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The Ubyssey Mar 7, 1989

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 the Ubyssey
LIFE OR
in the Amazon
By Catherine Lu
Jeff Gibbs is hardly a dead ringer for Sting. But the
second year arts student was often mistaken for the
British rock musician when the two went to Brazil in late
February to support the Kayapo Indians in their protest
against the continual destruction of their homeland—the
Amazon rainforest.
"I spoke English, I was white and had whiskers—that was all it
took," says Gibbs. "As soon as I started signing 'Sting" they just all
started coming up. Sting actually left the next day, but this went on for
four days."
Gibbs was one of 34 Canadians who attended an international
conference of Indian leaders and ecologists late February in Altamira,
Brazil to protest a massive hydro-electric dam project.
The first two proposed dams, the Kararao and the Babaquara, are
expected to flood about 5600 square kilometres of rainforest. According
to Gibbs, the 22 dams planned for the Xingu river would displace 85
percent ofthe Kayapo Indians who live in the region.
"The Kayapo know it's a life or death situation," he says. "History
has shown that it's not just that they'll lose their culture, but that they
will go extinct as a people."
Gibbs cites a past dam project that in ten years flooded 2400 square
kilometres of rainforest and decimated a large Indian tribe. The Balbina
dam, which began construction in 1975 near Manaus in northern
Brazil, cost approximately $1 billion, funded by the World Bank.
"In 1975, before this dam was built, there were 1,000 Waimiri
Indians living in the area. Now, there are only 300 Waimiri Indians
alive," says Gibbs. "And the dam has not produced one kilowatt of
energy. It was built wrong."
As well as hurting the Indians and the forest, the dam destroyed the
livelihood of fishermen and farmers living downstream, according to
Peggy Hallward, a researcher for a watchdog on international aid
agencies and multinational corporations.
And due to faulty engineering "the transmitting lines are set up,
but they're not transmitting any energy," says Hallward, who is director
of forestry research for Probe International.
The jobs created by the industrial sector only employ skilled labour,
which does not include the 70 percent of the Brazilian population,
mostly displaced peasants, who are living below the poverty line, says
Hallward.
"It's questionable how much the grand capital-intensive development schemes in the rainforest are benefiting the landless peasants
who are living in the slums in southern Brazil."
Face to face with Sting in the Amazon
UBC student Jeff Gibbs alive in the forest
VOLUME 71, Number 42
Hallward and Gibbs agree
that no amount of foreign investment can solve Brazil's economic
problems when 80 percent of the
arable land is owned by four percent of the landlords. The Brazilian government has attempted to
generate wealth by encouraging
the displaced peasants to settle in
frontier areas, like Rondonia.
"The government promised
farmers that if they moved to
Rondonia, they would be provided
with land for farming, medical
services and schools," says Gibbs.
"Thousands of people went and
found nothing. They discovered
the soil of the rainforest isn't
suited for farming, because it has a
very thin topsoil with very few
nutrients."
In order to subsist, peasants
contribute to the overall deforestation ofthe Amazon basin by slashing and burning new chunks of
rainforest every couple of years
after they have exhausted the poor
soil of one area.
Hallward says that far from
generating any wealth, the transmigration scheme actually enlarged Brazil's already massive
foreign debt.
"Most ofthe people there now
have severe medical and health
problems, and the government has
had to borrow more money to take
care of these people who are worse
off than they were before," she
says.
"Every year, the gap between
rich and poor is getting bigger, not
smaller," she adds.
Rather than addressing these
problems, says Gibbs, the proposed dams will serve mostly the
energy needs of the industrial
sector, which includes many
multinational companies.
The Brazilian government is
justifying the need for the proposed dams by overestimating the
projected increase in energy demand, according to Gibbs. For
1988, the government projected a
6.5 percent increase in power consumption, but "there was a zero
de-
percent increase in energy
mand in Brazil in 1988."
The Brazilian government
subsidizes the price of electricity to
attract foreign investment, which
has not stimulated Brazil's economy. Because of government subsidies and energy production in ex-
cess of demand, energy is very
cheap in Brazil. As a result, companies find it more profitable to
squander large amounts of energy
with inefficient equipment than to
upgrade their plants' energy efficiency.
According to a World Bank
Energy Department study last
October, improvements in the energy efficiency of Brazil's industrial sector would cost only $10
billion and save half the projected
energy consumption in Brazil by
the year 2000. The estimated cost
of the 100 proposed dams is $44
billion.
Hallward says the Brazilian
government campaign to build
support for the dams is built on the
idea that "anyone against dams is
against progress."
"The government is setting up
a false logic—an either-or argument—to set public opinion
against environmentalists," says
Hallward. She    notes    a
strong industrial elite exists in the
Brazilian government, which
stands to benefitbybuildinglarge-
scale dams.
But large-scale dam construction is not the only alternative,
says Gibbs. "Spices, rubbers, dyes,
extracts, oils, bamboo, nuts and
fruit" can be harvested by peasants and with a minimal impact on
the environment, he says.
And while large dam projects
produce short-term gains for a few
industrialists, "an industry in a
standing forest can go on forever,"
says Gibbs.
Gibbs also argues that
smaller dams built at smaller
tributaries close to where the
power is needed are also a better
means of harvesting hydro-electric power than large dams that
have to supply power to far-flung
areas of Brazil.
Gibbs is urging Canadians to
write to Michael Wilson, Canada's
representative on the Worl d Bank,
to voice their opposition to a $500
million loan to Brazil's power company, Electronorte, intended for
the Kararao dam.
Six Canadian banks are also
planning to loan money to Brazil.
The Bank of Montreal, CIBC,
Toronto Dominion, the Bank of
Nova Scotia, the National, and
Royal Bank are expected to contribute seven percent of a $750
million loan by Chartered Banks
to Brazil.
"People should write their
bank presidents, and say they
don't want their money used to
fund projects that would destroy
Indians and the rainforest," says
Gibbs.
Gibbs will be presenting a
multi-projector slide show of his
Amazon trip at noon next Tuesday
in the SUB Auditorium. An admission cost of two dollars will help
Gibbs repay the debt he incurred
on the trip.
The slide show will feature
recorded sounds from the Amazon
rainforest, music by the Kayapo,
and songs by Bruce Cockburn and
the real Sting.
Vancouver, B.C. Monday, March 7,1989 Between
Note: "Noon" =12:30 p.m.
TUESDAY
Jewish   Students'   Association/
Hillel
Famous Hot Lunch,  12:30 pm,
Hillel House.
Lutheran Student Movement
Co-op Supper, 6:00 pm, Lutheran
Campus Centre.
Institute of Asian Research (IAR)
Film: Bonker Margayya (in Kun-
nada with English subtitles). 7
pm, Asian Centre - AUDITORIUM.
WEDNESDAY
Environmental Interest Group -
Recycling committee
Recycling promotion, 9 am - 5 pm,
SUB concourse.
AMS Women's Committee
Workshop: The myth of happiness
- women and depression. 12:30 -
1:30, SUB 130.
Jewish Students' Association/
Hillel
Torah Study with Rabbi M. Fever-
stein. 12:30 pm, Hillel House.
Graduate Student Society
Film - No Longer Silent: The
struggle against injustice toward
Women in India. 12:30 pm, Garden Room, Graduate Student
Centre.
Lutheran Student Movement
Lenten   Service   "Lighting   the
Easter Fire", 12:40 pm, Lutheran
Campus Centre.
Graduate Student Society
Live Jazz with Alan Matheson
Trio. 6:30 - 9 pm, Fireside Lounge,
Graduate Student Centre.
Institute of Asian Research (IAR)
Film: Mukha Mukhom (in Malay-
alam with English subtitles), 7
pm, Asian Centre Auditorium.
Foreign film: "Bicycle Thief (Vit-
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Meeting, 12:30 pm, Angus 321.
University Christian Ministries
12:30, SUB 119, Is the Bible credible   and   authoritative   today?
Peter Dunn gives an answer.
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Career   panel   -   Discussion:
"Trends and Opportunities in Biotechnology and Medical Careers",
noon-2:20 pm, IRC #3.
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Unlimited
Meeting, 12:30 - 1:30, Women's
Centre, Room 130 SUB.
Nutrition Week, UBC, presents
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Track": a nutrition teaching system workshop. Speaker: Gillian
Ackhurst, 12:30 - 2:30, Wood, IRC
#1. Free, (kits avail, for $15.00)
(All welcome. Sponsored by School
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Film Night: 1) The Dead (John
Huston).- US, 6:30; 2) Treasure of
the Sierra - US, 8:30. Fireside
Lounge, Graduate Student
Centre.
Jewish   Students'   Association/
Hillel
Israeli Dancing, 7:00 pm, SUB
207/209.
SUBfilms
Film showing: "Married to the
Mob", no Saturday showing, 7 pm,
SUB Theatre.
UBC Pacific Rim Club
3rd Annual Gala Event. The Asia-
Pacific Foundation President will
be speaking. Tix: 228-6041. 7 - 9
pm, UBC Asian Centre Auditorium.
UBC Scottish Country Dance Club
Dance class (new members welcome), 7:30 pm - 9 pm, SUB party
room.
Dept. of Hispanic and Italian
Studies
Spanish play (dialogue in Spanish) - *La heroica villa' by Carlos
Arniches, Thursday and Friday,
March 9 and 10,1989,8 pm, International House.
SUBfilms
Film showing: "Bull Durham", no
Saturday showing. 9:30 pm, SUB
Theatre.
Environmental Interest Group
Speaker Dr. T. Perry - UBC professor
topic: "Military and the Environment. The Innu Experience in
Labrador"
12:30 pm, Geography 229
FRIDAY
Grad Class Council .
Annual General Meeting for all
graduating students (will b^ voting on grad class gifts, etc.) 11:30
am - 3 pm, SUB Ballroom.
AMS Women's Committee
Workshop: How Not to Get Raped
- Awareness and Avoidance
Strategies. 12:30 -1:30, SUB 130.
Institute of Asian Research (IAR)
Seminar: When do films transform people: Clips and discussion
ofthe role of Indian films in Indian
society. 3:30 - 5 pm, Asian Centre
- Auditorium.
Gays and Lesbians of UBC
Beer Garden - 3:30 - 7:00 pm, SUB
215.
Graduate Student Society
Beer Garden - 4:30 - 7:30 pm, Ballroom, Graduate Student Centre.
Institute of Asian Research (IAR)
Film: KHANDHAR (in Bengali
with English subtitles), 7 pm,
Asian Centre - Auditorium.
SUBfilms
Film Showing: "Married to the
Mob", no Saturday showing, 7 pm,
SUB Theatre.
Graduate Student Society
D.J. John Fossum, 7 pm -12 midnight, Fireside Lounge, Graduate
Student Centre.
Dept. of Hispanic and Italian
Studies
Spanish play (dialogue in Spanish) - *La heroica villa' by Carlos
Arniches, Thursday and Friday,
March 9 and 10,1989,8 pm, International House.
Chinese Collegiate Society and
Taiwanese Student Association
Gym  Night,  8:30  -   11:30  pm,
Osborne Gym A&B.
SUBfilms
Film showing: "Bull Durham", rio
Saturday showing, 9:30 pm, SUB
Theatre.
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2/THE UBYSSEY
March 7, 1989 NEWS
UBC tuition hike
not Socred's
fault says Hagen
By Deanne Fisher and
Katherine Monk
UBC students should
blame the University, not the
provincial government, for
the 10 percent tuition hike
this year, according to Advanced Education Minister
Stan Hagen.
"How can a university
raise its fees when they don't
even know how money
they're getting?" Hagen responded when asked for his
opinions on the increase in an
interview Friday.
Hagen said the increase
was not a fair one and compared tuition hikes at other
institutions to back up his
claim. "It doesn't happen at
the colleges and it didn't
happen at SFU and it didn't
happen at UVIC," he said.
But when asked if he
would consider increasing
funding to UBC to compensate for fee hikes, Hagen responded, "I don't think you
should expect that the minister should be blackmailed
into giving more money because of that irresponsibil-
ity."
Hagen said he respects
the independence ofthe universities adding, "At this
point, I'm not prepared to
interfere with the process at
UBC."
Claims that government
underfunding has caused the
increase are "very easy statements to make," said Hagen,
adding the ministry has increased funding but is up
against a huge increase in
demand because ofthe number of people wanting to attend a university or college.
NDP post-secondary
education critic Barry Jones
disagrees. "The solution (to
high tuition costs) very
clearly rests with the provincial government," he said in
an interview yesterday.
"It's very hypocritical for
the minister (Hagen) to suggest the University not increase fees, when it was his
doing that they didn't get
funding in the first place."
"If he felt fees should not
have gone up, he could have
arranged meetings with
Strangway," Jones said.
It was especially hypocritical for th e minister to say
it was UBC's fault that fees
went up, given the fact that
the two swing votes who
voted for the increase were
Socred appointees to the
Board of Governors, said
Jones.
Hagen indicated he has
been negotiating with UBC
president David Strangway
but would not reveal any details. "I am prepared to say
I've had many discussions
with the president. That's all
I'm prepared to say."
Funding of post-secondary education in the past
has had to compete with
health and it is difficult to
say that "*my demands are
greater than yours," said
Hagen. "It comes down to
comparing the number of
kids and the number of sick
people," he joked.
But Jones said if the government is serious about its
promise to bring education
funding up to the national
average, they will have to increase "their share in the
company."
"The federal government
contributes around $619 million to post-secondary education, providing that 31.2 percent—what the the feds recommend—of the gross transfer payments reach post-secondary education, leaving
the other odd seventy percent to health care."
On top of the $619 million, the province contributes
close to an additional 10 percent to the PSE budget, but
according to Jones, the national average is close to a 25
percent. Quebec and Alberta
lead the provinces providing
close to 50 percent ofthe PSE
contribution.
'This minister (Hagen)
has a habit of blaming the institution—the fact is that the
minister thinks students
should pay up to 17.5 percent
ofthe University's operating
budget, where it was more
along the lines of 10 percent,
15 years ago."
The missing money is
going into projects like Co-
quihalla and Northeast Coal,
instead of education, Jones
said. And the "rainy day" or
"budget stabilization fund,"
which has been piling up over
the last year, should be used
to supplement education
costs, he said.
Hagen, as a cabinet minister, has a good case to bring
to the treasury board, Jones
said, adding that maybe it
was time to increase the
years of free tuition to make
education open to everyone.
Hagen agreed there was
"no question" that tuition
fees affect the level of accessibility to post-secondary education adding, "It's not fair or
proper that a person should
come out with a degree with a
massive debt and go into a
career with a large debt. I
don't think that's the way to
start out your life," he said.
His advice to students
combatting the increase was
to "look at the (provincial)
budget (when it comes
down)...look at the share
given to the universities and
work up a case based on that
information. Then go to the
Board of Governors."
ill
NOV
j{0 > '
f Us
HOPMAN SETO PHOTO
Pro-choicers march to support International Women's Day and Vancouver's abortion clinic on Saturday.
Levy blasts local media
"I'm no critic" says Socred candidate
By Rick Hiebert
Point Grey Socred candidate
Michael Levy says he supports Bill
Vander Zalm "unreservedly" and
is now attacking those in the
media who say and write differently.
"I'm not a critic of Bill Vander
Zalm. I think he's a party leader,
he's my leader and anyone running as a Socred has to support the
leader," said Levy.
"(The media was) wrong when
they called me a critic of Bill Vander Zalm. They assumed I was a
critic by themselves. They didn't
bother in person to ask me," Levy
said.
"It doesn't make good copy to
say 'Levy supports education or
housing", but it does make good
copy to say 'Levy is against Vander
Zalm'," Levy said, adding he
hadn't bothered to share his concerns with the media outlets
themselves because "people don't
do that in the real world."
But three Vancouver reporters say that Levy has made it
obvious he is a critic ofthe Premier
and that the media is merely reporting what is true.
"We've been accurate and factual in any story we've written
about (Levy), whether it was me,
Vaughn Palmer or Gary Mason,"
said Vancouver Sun reporter
Keith Baldrey.
"The reason he's been portrayed as a critic of Bill Vander
Zalm is because he has been a
critic of Bill Vander Zalm. There's
no doubt about that. If he wishes
now to change his mind on Bill
Vander Zalm, that's perfectly
within his right. But certainly in
the past, in the days and weeks
leading up to the by-election call,
he was critical of Bill Vander
Zalm's leadership," he said.
Levy's reputation as a critic of
the Premier dates from when he
was a media commentator on
CKVU and CJOR, said Baldrey.
Levy has also attacked the Premier in conversations with reporters, particularly at last year's
Socred party convention in Penticton, he said.
"Levy used to be a member of
the (Victoria) Press Gallery, as we
are. We got to know him in a way
that perhaps other people didn't
know him, because we are all
members of the same reporting
group where conversations are
had, points of view are exchanged.
There's no doubt in any reporter's
mind here that he was a critic,"
said Baldrey.
Sun reporter Gary Mason
agreed. He said that at the Point
Grey nomination meeting Levy
didn't mention Vander Zalm and
had identified himself with the
Socreds in the riding opposed to
the Premier's leadership style
when he told them he would take
their message to Victoria.
Levy, however, recently said
his speech was designed to address the concerns of his constituents. He said he's "an independent
thinker" and was taking the message of those he'd talked to to Victoria. "I've carried the message,
I've done it, it's over with," he said.
"In that speech, to my mind,
he was putting himself in this
camp," Mason said. "It was in
stark contrast to the conciliatory
speech by the other main candidate John Gray."
"I can figure out what Michael
Levy is up to. He doesn't want to be
seen as a Vanderslammer, but I
think that his comments speak for
themselves," said Mason.
Andy Orr, CBC TV reporter,
said it was Levy who introduced
the issue by mentioning that 80
per cent ofthe Point Grey Socreds
had problems with the Premier's
leadership style.
"In the scrums and in things
with him, he has made it clear that
he is a supporter of the Social
Credit party. He has never said,
for the public record, when I've
talked to him, that he is a supporter of Bill Vander Zalm."
He added that Levy's problems raising funds for his campaign may have something to do
with his potentially newfound
admiration of the Premier. "Perhaps he's thinking that he should
straighten out some of the things
he said earlier."
"I don't know, and I don't
think the public knows what his
position is on the leadership issue
and I think Levy has only himself
to blame for that," Orr said.
March 7,1989
THE UBYSSEY/3 ATTENTION!
ALL GRADUATING STUDENTS
The Annual General Meeting Of The Grad Class Is:
Friday, March 10th, 1989
11:30 a.m. - 3:00 p.m.
SUB BALLROOM
THE
FOLLOWING
SUBMISSIONS
FOR
GRADUATION
CLASS GIFTS
WILL BE
VOTED ON:
THREE WILL BE SELECTED
(MAXIMUM REQUEST
PER GIFT IS $3,000)
Title: Handicapped
Person Pool Lift
Group: UBC Aquatic
Centre
Amount: $3,000
Total Budget:   $6,500
The UBC Aquatic Centre would like to
purchase an Aquanaids, DS Mark II
pool lift. This device is specifically designed for an aquatic environment to
enable one person to lift a handicapped
person from the wheelchair to the water
and back again with little effort. This
would make it more convenient for both
users and the staff. Inserts for the lift
would be located in both the indoor and
outdoor pools which would allow the
handicapped better access to the facilities. The cost ofthe lift plus installation
would be $6,500, the Aquatic Centre
would be willing to contribute $3,500
:j towards this proiect.
Title: Main Library
Foyer Benches
Group: Information and
Orientation Division, Main Library
Amount: $3,000
Total Budget:   $3,000
Six wood and wrought iron benches to
be located inside the Main Library entrance hall. Brass plaques would be
attached to the benches acknowledging
them as gifts of the 1989 Grad Class.
Students, faculty, and staff who use or
visit the Main Library would benefit
from this gift. The benches would provide durable, comfortable and attractive seating in the principle traffic area
ofthe library. They would be important
and very visible elements in a refur-
bashing project to improve the utility
and appearance ofthe Main Library.
Title:
Group:
Amount:
Total Budget:
Salmon Incubators for Elementary Schools
Save the
Salmon Society
(Forestry Undergrad)
$3,000
$3,000
The Save the Salmon Society in the past years
supplied B.C. schools with 147 salmon incubators.
It is hoped that with this proposal we can stock ten
local elementary schools with classroom incubators.
The cost to furnish each school with an incubator is
$300. These incubators have been valuable instruments in instructing young students of the life
cyclesofpacificsalmon, their habitat requirements,
and in general the environmental conditions in
nature that are necessary to maintain healthy Ash
stocks (salmon fry will be released into streams
streams in the UEL)
The children who work on these projects are our
politicians, fishermen, construction workers, teachers, and managers ofthe future. They, more than
anything else, are the future of our fish.
Title:
Group:
Amount:
Thunderbird
Stadium Flag
Pole
UBC Athletics
Department
$3,000
Total Budget:   $5,000
A highly visible masthead-type flag pole, to be
situated at the south end of Thunder_ird Stadium
field. This type of flag pole would allow the opportunity of paying appropriate respect to visiting
teams and dignitaries attending stadium athletic
events. We would envision this masthead pole being
illuminated for the benefit of night games. This illumination would allow for a suitable notice of the
base of the assembly indicating the donor class,
which would be clearly visible to all spectators
attending stadium events. Anticipated cost of this
project would be $5,000. Your contribution will
make this project feasible. You may be aware that
the scoreboard at Thunderbird Stadium was donated by the graduating class of 1967. This masthead pole would be a suitable counterpart at the
other end of the stadium.
Title:
Group:
Amount:
Total Budget:
SUB Plaza
Benches
Alma Mater
Society
$3,000
$4,200
Proposed is the construction of 7
concrete and wood benches similar
to those already in place on the SUB
exterior plaza. The present number
of benches is inadequate, and this is
evident especially on sunny days
when students have to resort to
stairs or the ground for seating. This
project will benefit all students at
UBC who venture over to the SUB
and who like to sit outside.
Title: Disabled Sudents
Communications
Group: Student Counselling
and Resources
Amount: $3,000
Total Budget: $3,000
The monies requested will be directed to
the purchase of 14 4-track cassette player/
recorders at a per unit price of $212.00. It
is light weight and portable in addition
to having a variable speech control capacity which allows for a compression of
speech on slow recordings to be sped
through faster without a loss in the
quality of sound resulting from distortion. Access to a recorder such as described would allow for the future independence ofthe disabled student in need
to have an accurate account of his/her
lecture notes than would have otherwise
been possible.
Title:
Group:
Amount:
Electrical Handicapped Door for
SUB
Student Administrative Commission
$3,000
Total Budget:   $4,435
Proposed is the installation of an
electric door at the south main entrance of SUB to allow for easier
access for handicapped students. The
doors to the SUB are manually
opened, and this presents an obstacle for disabled persons trying to
enter the building. The electrical
door will be set on a time delay so
that the student has plenty of time
to pass through.
Take Note
• It is Imperative That You Attend, As We Require A Quorum Of 400 Graduating
Students To Vote On The Gift Proposals.
• Without Quorum, NO GRAD GIFT WILL BE FUNDED BY THE 1989 CLASS.
(The Grad Fees YOU Paid In September Will Be Turned Over To Next Year's Grad Class.)
• BRING YOUR STUDENT CARD •
AGM Agenda
1. Graduation Ceremony Info
2. Grad Tree Planting Info
3. Cheap BEvERages
For Further Information
Call Niki Patel
222-4185
Or Leave A Message In SUB 238
4/THE UBYSSEY
March 7,1989 SPORTS
Vikings eliminate T-Birds
By Joe Altwasser
The Basketbirds playoff road
show came to a grinding halt on
the "rock" this weekend with the
grind-it-out Thunderbirds
stretching the Victoria Vikings to
the limit in the best out of three
Canada West championship series.
Friday night's match was a
see-saw battle until the final ten
minutes of the second half when
the Vikings opened up an insurmountable lead after UBC coach
Bruce Enns took a technical. Enns
■thought a three-second violation
that occurred was not called.
The Vikings  finished  the
match with a 101-89 victory.
Game two also belonged to the
Thunderbirds and this time they
managed to convert it into a victory.  The 'Birds, led by Perrie
Scarlett and Al Lalonde heroics,
combined with a solid bench effort,
deflated a 16 point U-Vic lead to
win 95-91 in overtime.
The Sunday rubber match
was also close throughout the first
half with the 'Birds up at the half
40-38. The second half was another game. "In the second half we
hit the wall and completely ran
out of gas," said Enns.
But the Vikings played the
best ball he had seen all year and
dominated the "Birds thoroughly,
winning 79-60.
Despite the loss, Enns was
pleased with the play of the 'Birds
notingit was a considerably different club than the early season
team.
Rocked by strife and change,
the early season team lost one of
their 1987-88 stars, J.D. Jackson
Al Lalonde stuffs home two points
STEVE CHAN PHOTO
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due to academic ineligibility, and
Aaron Point because of friction
with Coach Enns and lack of commitment to the team.
Enns agreed the York Christmas tournament victory was a
turning point of sorts for the team.
"When we beat the Americans
(Slippery Rock) at York it showed
us something. We realized we
could do it but only with a team
effort."
The second half of the season
the T-Birds played better each
weekend and as Enns said, "only
had one poor match since Christmas." The 'Birds had won 11 of
their past 12 matches before facing Victoria in the finals.
This week Bruce Enns begins
work on the 1989-90 version ofthe
Thunderbirds as he begins a serious recruiting/scouting drive of
the B.C. highschools searching for
new players.
The 'Birds should have a
strong club for next year as only
three players are not returning.
Perrie Scarlett and Reg Wiebe are
finished their CIAU eligibility,
and Eric Kristiansen won't be
back because of a neck difficulty.
UBC will also be bolstered by
the addition of J.D. Jackson who
Enns said should be returning for
the 1989-90 season.
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STEVE CHAN PHOTO
Perrie Scarlett takes flight in his last weekend as a Thunderbird
Axemen grind-out
playoff spot
By Joe Altwasser
The Acadia Axemen basketball team have received the final
wild-card play-off berth over UBC,
and will be travelling to Halifax
for the CIAU final tournament.
The selection was made yesterday by the same committee of
sports sages who rank* the CIAU
teams each week. The last ranking
had the Axemen ranked seventh
with UBC eighth.
UBC coach Bruce Enns, while
disappointed in the decision, is not
bitter and said, "Whoever wins the
league gets the berth, a wildcard
spot is just gravy."
Because the difference in the
quality of the two teams is minute,
geography was probably the mitigating factor in the decision, as
Acadia is much closer to Halifax
than UBC, said Enns.
"If the tournament were being
held in Calgary the decision may
have been different," said Enns.
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March 7,1989
THE UBYSSEY/5 TOM IS
HERE!
TOM is • Former Defensive Captain of the
U.S.C. Trojans Football Team
• Presently Chaplin for U.S.C. Trojans
DANA is • 1982 Miss California
• Now a frequent speaker with women's groups
• Director of Miss California Beauty Pagent
Tom and Dana Sirotnak travel worldwide
addressing students and athletes on the
Power ofthe Gospel
SPEAKING NIGHTLY
7:00pm Buchanan A 100
Tues., Wed., Thurs., March 7,8,9
Also performing nightly
Singer/Songwriter C.J. Peifer
sponsored by Maranatha Christian Club
*■        .   «    _■>■■. ">s--5-"
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'■■*■ 1,..1--.-.-_-h_.>3-m.'-i.-._-.---.--.--.
NEWS
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-■*■ -»---
Iff ^J I Environmental Interest Group
FLASHES Wednesday, March 8
Recycling promotion - campus and city wide
Education -how, where, when, why!!
9 am - 5 pm SUB concourse.
a;_'_
_iTgm_*rea
Spend Your Summer
Working On Our Dock
Bridges is hiring
hosts, hostesses, bussers,
experienced waiters/waitresses
and experienced bartenders.
Apply in person at our Office
No. 5-1551, Johnston St.,
Granville Island
between 2 and 4:30 p.m.
March 7 thru 10.
Challenge '89 targets
drop-outs in B.C.
By Deanne Fisher
B.C. will follow the federal
government's lead and divert
Challenge 89 funds from post-secondary to high school students in
an effort to curb the nation's 30
percent drop- out rate.
Jean Charest, Minister of
State for Youth and B.C. Advanced Education Minister Stan
Hagen signed an agreement Friday that will see B.C. receive
$22.65 million in federal funds for
the summer employment program, the same amount the province received last year.
But the deal includes a 60
percent increase in programs directed at early leavers and potential drop-outs, which has come
under fire from the Canadian
Federation of Students.
Charest said statistics show,
that of those unable to find employment last summer, 80 percent
were high school students. Yet
they comprised only 40 percent of
those who benefitted from the
program.
"The choice we've made is to
put more resources towards high
school drop-outs and potential
drop-outs at the expense of post-
secondary students," said
Charest.
But the federal government
should be funding the program
adequately to provide for both
high school and post-secondary
students, according to Pacific
Region CFS chair Pam Frache.
"I think it's unfortunate that
the federal government has chosen to pit students against students," said Frache. "It's like robbing Peter to pay Paul."
"Even if high school students
had the same expenses, a university student also has to pay tuition," said Frache, adding that
with increases in tuition, post-
secondary students will face even
more difficulties keeping up.
Charest said he was not "hiding from the fact there's a choice
involved here," and said post-secondary students "have their own
special problems, but they are also
the ones who will have the best
paying jobs in society."
Although B.C.'s returning
student unemployment rate
dropped by 1.8 percent, "you have
approximately the same amount
of funding," said Charest, adding
"we have to make choices with
limited resources."
But Frache points out that
with inflation and rising tuition,
"what we're experiencing is a real
dollar decrease."
Frache is looking to the provincial government to top up the
Challenge funding for post-secondary students. "They could easily
make up a significant portion for
post-secondary students. They
have a billion dollar rainy day
fund."
But Hagen said he could not
speculate on any supplements
"until the budget comes down."
The Challenge 89 program is
expected to create 12,364 jobs in
total in 1989, including some year
round Work Orientation Workshop pilot projects geared at high
school students.
B.C.'s 1988 unemployment
rate for post-secondary students
was 21.1 percent compared to 78.9
within secondary students.
Charest and Hagen sign Challenge pact.
DEANNE FISHER PHOTO
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6/THE UBYSSEY
March 7,1989 Canadian national championship
HEATHER GREENING PHOTO
Ponting sets world record
at CIAU championship
By Rick Hiebert
UBC's swim teams battled to finish
in the top 10 as Calgary's Tom Ponting set
a world record during the CIAU swim
championships at UBC over the weekend.
Ponting, a member of the Canadian
Olympic team who attends the University of Calgary, set the new mark in the
200m individual medley Friday with a
time of 52.62 seconds. He also set a Canadian record of 1:55.82 in the 200m men's
butterfly Saturday.
Ponting, Mark Tewksbury, Randy
Fedderson and Steven Vandermullen set
a new CIAU record in the men's 400m
relay with a time of 3:43.39. Katie Dug-
gan, the meet's best female swimmer, led
the University of Alberta women's team
to a new CIAU record of 4:15.01 in the
400m medley relay.
The University of Toronto topped the
women's team standings while the Calgary team won the men's events.
UBC's swim teams placed 7th out of
22 teams in the women's events and the
men placed 9th out of 20, which was a
good showing, according to UBC swim
coach Jack Kelso.
"Considering we had only six people
and no relay team, we did really well,"
said Kelso.
"Without the relay team, we lost a
lot of points. All six kids placed in the
finals. We have a small team but they're
all good swimmers. We have quality, but
not quantity," he said.
Kevin Draxinger beamed for UBC
by gaining CIAU gold, silver and bronze
medals. He won the 200m backstroke,
placed second in the 100m backstroke
and third in the 400m freestyle.
Kelso added he had "expected"
Ponting to set the new record as he had
been swimming well in the World Cup
events in Europe. "The UBC pool is a fast
pool, so it's no surprise. However, it's the
first world's best time for the UBC
aquatic center, which is really nice,"
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BACK ALLEY THEATRE
751 THURLOW • 688-7013
Vancouver TheatreSports League
«•*
You're
paying too
much for
tuition"
New Democrat Dr. Tom Perry
"As a member of the
Faculty of Medicine, I talk
with students everyday.
You're being short-changed
by the Vander Zalm
government. As your New
Democrat MLA. I'll fight
for lower fees and better
student aid. Education
must be financially
accessible. Our future
depends on it."
Help elect Tom Perry
To help elect Dr. Tom Perry as our MLA for Point
Grey, visit our campaign office at 3417 West
Broadway, or telephone 732-5711.
VANCOUVER POINTGREYNEWDEMOCRAT
March 7,1989
THE UBYSSEY/7 Why battle
your way through Europe.
Travel Contiki.
Fighting your way through
crowded European stations from
Waterloo to the Gare du Nord,
fruitless reconnaissance for a vacant
hotel room or route marching with
a backpack can make your vacation
seem like an uphill battle. But not
with Contiki.
18-35 year olds have been experiencing Europe with us for
the last 28 years because we sort
out the time-wasting and costly
hassles while getting you right to
the heart of Europe's finest cities.
You then have more time to soak
up the atmosphere, meet the
locals and discover the real soul
of Europe, by yourself or with fellow
Contiki travellers from around the
world.
On our tours you can live like
a European in a 13th Century French
Chateau, a Palace in Italy and cruise
the Greek Islands on our three
masted Schooner.
If you're thinking of going to
Europe this summer, get Contiki's
new brochure and video from
your local Travel Cuts office. It's half
the battle.
Contiki gets you to the heart of Europe
with time to discover its soul.
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THEN YOU'LL LOVE THE ROXY
VANCOUVER'S HOTTEST PARTY SPOT
LIVE QASSIC ROCK MUSIC BY
DAWN PATROL
WEDNESDAY NIGHT IS UBC NIGHT
FREE ADMISSION WITH YOUR AMS CARD
ROXY
932 GRANVILLE
684-7699
Make money and have fun. Ifyou want to
raise money for your dub, charity or team,
the Roxy has a great idea.
CaU Blaine at 684-7699
THE OFFICE FOR WOMEN STUDENTS
with the assistance of the Koernor Foundation
prosonts
CAREER PANEL-DISCUSSION
IRC#3
12:30-2:20 P.M.
n
BIOMEDICAL CAREERS
Trends and Opportunities in Biotechnology and Medical
Careers
Thursady, March 9
Dr. Virginia Diewert
Dr. Diane Herbst
Professor of Clinical Dental Science. UBC
Laboratory Manager, Department of
Pathology. B.C. Childrens Hospital
Senior Scientist. NSERC Industrial
Research Fellow, Quadra Logic
Technologies Inc.
y Dr. Patricia Logan
I
'/ Next: WHO SETS HIRED NEXT?    MARCH 16   ENQUIRES: 228-241S
"One ofthe special responsibilities
of a Point Grey MLA is being an
aggressive advocate for the
University of British Columbia and
its students: to fight for enhanced
funding, new initiatives, and a
greater recognition of the value of
university graduates to our
economy and society. Your
decision is who will do the better
job; someone who will take the
message inside or someone
throwing rocks at the window."
MICHAEL LEVY
CAMPAIGN HEADQUARTERS
738-LEVY (5389)
2568 ARBUTUS ST. VANCOUVER, B.C.   V6J 3Y2
If you would like more information or want to
become involved, drop by or call us today!!
8/THE UBYSSEY
March 7,1989 NEWS
Administration asked to
budge in T.A. strike
TORONTO (CUP)—More than a week into a strike
by University of Toronto teaching assistants, top
academic officials are pressuring the university to
budge on some ofthe
union's demands.
Both sides had
been at the bargaining table since last
June. Talks broke off January 20, and the TAs went
on strike February 23.
The administration has refused to discuss the
TAs' main concerns, which include class size, the
number of TAs and job security.
"We implicitly said (to the TAs) ifyou want to go
on strike over those issues, then that's fine,*' said vice
provost David Cook.
At a meeting late last week, the university's
department heads and faculty deans decided to ask
the administration to at least go back to the table.
Union officials say they are more than ready for
a long strike. The union, local two of the Canadian
Union of Educational Workers, has a $400,000
strike fund—enough money to hold out at least until
the end of the term.
Union official Stephen Guy-Bray hopes the
strike will end long before the fund runs dry.
Most students seem to support the strike, but
won't go as far as missing classes or stayingout ofthe
libraries to show their support.
"I don't agree with picketing in front of libraries.
Some students need to study," said Brenda Young, a
CAMPUS BRIEFS
third-year physical and health education student. "I
feel bad when I try to cross lines to go to the library."
Jila Ghomeshi, a linguistics TA and picket captain, said most students are honouring picket lines.
"A lot of students are stopping to talk because
they want to know the issues. Alot of them assume it's
about money. But when they realize that it's affecting
them, they respond
differently," she
said.
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED
9htrose?cualfemale votunteers, 22 years and older, are needed
forastudy measuringemotional and physiological reactions to
briefvisual stimuli, some of which may include erotic content.
$20T>OLLfil%$zinU6epaidforparticipationin this study. Jen-
further information, please contact:
'Eileen Tatace, 'Department of Psychology at 228-3800, Between 4:00 and6:00 T9d, {Monday through Thursday.
Jeans burned by students
to protest gay rights
SASKATOON (CUP)—A handful of anonymous students burned their bluejeans to protest a gay and
lesbian awareness week at the University of Saskatchewan.
Organizers of Gay and Lesbian Week asked students to wear their bluejeans February 10 to show
their support for gay rights.
But a few students doused two pairs of jeans and
burned them in the middle ofthe school's main square.
"I wasn't that concerned. It's hard to take seriously people who don't take responsibility for their actions," said Gays and Lesbians of University of Saskatchewan president Garnet Pocock.
Pocock said the group would probably have the
same event next year. "I don't see any reason not to,"
he added.
"I don't think that's how the majority of students
feel. The atmosphere on campus is pretty good. All of
my friends know I'm gay and they don't care."
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SUB OFFICE
SPACE
All AMS Clubs and Service
Organizations may apply for offices in
the Student Union Building.
Application forms and information
available at SUB 238.
Deadline: Tuesday, March 14, 1989
Due to limited space,
late applications will
not be accepted.
PDA-March IB -SUB Ballroom
Tickets Available at Fogg U Campus • Kitsilano • Broadway • English Bay •
APPLICATIONS
NOW
AVAILABLE
for the position of
JOBLINK
COORDINATORS
Resumes required with application
Deadline for Resumes
& Applications:
FRIDAY, MARCH 10, 4:00p.m.
Applications
Available
SUB 238
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THE
UBC QUARTZ
Occasionally, a watch goes beyond just
telling time...
The UBC Quartz Classic is designed exclusively
for UBC and represents the University's long
tradition of academic excellence and commitment.
BOOKSTORE
6200 University Boulevard • 228-4741
We're Here To
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And we've got the tubes, strips, sheets, glues, plastics
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228-1179.
March 7,1989
THE UBYSSEY/9 Student Peons
Someone is using us.
The provincial government says their hands are
clean, and Dr. Strangway says he is just a poor victim of
the sour Socred government.
If they are the ones lying to each other, how come
students are making up the difference in the University
budget? It appears as though we are caught in the middle
of a public relations war.
Strangway needs to show the media that universities
are facing a crisis. If the Board of Governors had lessened
the fee increase to a level in line with the other universities, then the case would not have been as strong in the
eyes ofthe public. But continued protests, and the high
profile which students have been giving the increase can
only add up to more public pressure to increase provincial
support for post-secondary education. Strangway can't
lose—he balances the budget, and he's raising such a
hullaballoo that he'll probably get more money on top of
that. He may even get enough money to bring UBC inline
with other Canadian univerities, or give faculty a long
awaited raise.
The Socred government is trying hard to make up for
the decisions made in the days of restraint—but they keep
messin' the whole thing up, buildin' stuff like Expo and
Highways, and making ads about families. They keep
getting away with it too. And in a mad panic, when i t looks
like the public is getting wise, they do things like promote
the environment—a cause which was once associated wi th
the radical left, but is now quite correct regardless ofthe
milieu.
Now the Socreds are getting scared, because slim
Strangway has called Hagen's bluff: "Pahdner, you say
you are going to fund Post-Secondary Educashen, well put
yure money where yure big maoweth is—'cause I am
blowing the issue back in yure face. I ain't gonna shut up
on the promise of increased fundin'... I want buckaroos,
not promises as worthless as a Albertan's pickup."
So we have two poles: a panic striken government
trying to find a way of hiding the wreckage of corruption
of close to fifteen years in office, and the mad as hell
martini-swilling Strangway—getting money and putting
up with the heat. It's no wonder neither of them want to
tell us the real story.
But students are still getting burned, little peons that
we are. We are the cats in trees and baby Jessicas of the
world—perfect human interest stories, but with no real
power. We have no legal course of action—we have no
union—all we have is our somewhat pathetic public image. Well we ain't dead yet, and we aren't as stupid as they
would like us to believe. Watch out boys, we've caught on
to your tricks.
A dedicated minority of students in B.C. refuse to
become "rallied-out" and succumb to the powers that be.
The demands are itemized: freeze tuition fees, add more
post-secondary seats in B.C., and, of course, increase
funding to post-secondary education. Even a Socred can
understand those.
The rewards of sustained lobbying are not limited to
those who put in the effort. But a failure to make our
demands known means every student will suffer. Please
support better education in British Columbia. Join other
concerned students Thursday, March 9, 1:00 at the Vancouver Art Gallery.
theUbyssey
March 7,1989
The Ubyssey is published Tuesdays and Fridays
throughout the academic year by the Alma Mater Society
ofthe University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions
are those ofthe staff and not necessarily those of the
university administration, or of the sponsor. The Ubyssey is published with the proud support of the Alumni
Association. The Ubyssey is a member of Canadian
University Press. The editorial office is Rm. 241k of the
Student Union Building. Editorial Department, phone
228-2301;  advertising, 228-3977;   FAX# 228-6093
*M in a magic place. A land far iwncwed tromtheomin which iheuiualry bund ho* wit
It wa-a world wbareHh wee eeiy, cere-free, fun. It waa a world wit hou I Hubert debar man. In herdraemer*. eyeeehe
•aw Joe Akwara- and Michael Booth. THey www fitting fn a room drinking taa from delicate cup« mad* of fine gold and
jam*. Bee ide them waa Carthy Lu draeeed in • wadding gown made of copper wire. She wai trying to catch a butterfly
inatinyiibwrnat. The butterfly •uddenly Ireiwbrrned ii\to K^heriiM Monk (.Vienna toeeed and turned e few tin-iae at
thial OragDawiaana-rgadfroinaewtfKngmiet. He we»ee««» Hontamer end heheU elor^toaehtowhkJi weifMtenad
RkkHiefaartCdreaaad<_■■ amouee). Am_l_tanoftlwconfttMonOanni>SeldarBndErnie_ltel_ariloodatanngateachoth-r.
They ww* utterly amaaed by tha aimilarity of their nama. Laura May iat In a la/fa fed »hue and cloned her gteiaee
with ofieofthe___M which AlsJobnaon hed knittarduiiiig two ri^ Chung Wong
and Steiw Chan owe emerging from a large pink and brown peanut eheped loafofbennana bi-ud. Their moul hi were
quite full and they chewed quietly ae a contemplative Ted Auaewn looted on from hie vantage point on lop of Olivia
Zango'i manve hair pin, Ted wa* taking down notei with what Deanne thought tnuat wisely be a limple ball point pen.
Soon, howM.ehereahaad that it wea no ample bell point pan at alt, but a vary fancy red and bkic bk tipped pen Carle
Meftathukwei itowh/chmbing up Ted'i Ivory Tower. She waadrsaeed ai a ninja from wmnhere in Japan. Thia was
odd aa aha wee actually from Queenel (though ihe would not admit it inaroomwith more than five people in it). At the
top ihe (bund Jon Treichel dancing a alow walti with Heather Greening. Hai be, drweaed a* a monlu-y, watched them
from behind a _mau grey doud,<WM»nenycoi*ri_^
drinking with about a doaao or bd redneck Agricukural KudenUonaiaturday night in June at a bar in Chicago'* kiwer
eaat aide (•aeuming Chicago ha* a loww ea_t aide)... and getting violently ill after it all, but waking up without a hang
over. Deenna wola up •creaming endreelised that aha had merely been remembering the Uel Ubyaeey production night.
Air»n__y nttingonhercouoh hitherwith aitaledonut... he burped. JennibrLyellaboburpedCbuLihe waa much rnure
potee about it).
sports:
Joe Altwasser
news:
Deanne Fisher
entertainment:
Robert Groberman
city desk:
Katherine Monk
Letters
Meech Lake
slammed
I was happy to see some
commentary about Meech
Lake on your editorial page
(One for all etc., Feb. 24). It's
an important issue and deserves scrutiny.
For my part, I agree
that Quebec does have a
bona-fide cultural crisis
that must be resolved, not
only in their interests, but in
the interests of the whole
country. And like you, I find
the antics of the English
preservationists disturbing
and insulting. I'm proud of
the bilingual, multicultural
nature of Canada. On the
other hand, I really must
take exception to your defence of the Meech lake Accord. Quebec's problems are
very complex indeed, and
they won't be solved by that
cynical little piece of parochialism. Even if they could,
the price is too high. Something a little more imaginative is called for, I think.
Firstly, I won't debate
your apology of democratic
relativism, but I would like
to point out that the 'distinct
society" clause is not defined
anywhere in the entire
document. Fair implementation of the clause will
depend on the generosity
and good sense of our politicians. That's what you call a
pipe dream. Can you say
litigation as nauseam? Still,
my reservations notwithstanding, with a few sensible modifications to the
clause, I could probably reconcile myself to its inevitability.
Much more difficult to
swallow is the widening of
provincial powers in general, and the unanimity
requirement for constitutional amendment. The opting out of national programs
provision is especially offensive. Remember, a big part
of the reason post-secondary education in BC is in
such a sorry state is the
federal government's lack of
control over the disbursement of educational transfer payments. Instead of an
education, we get garish,
populist extravaganzas or
expensive   roads  into  the
The Ubyssey welcomes letters on any Issue. Letters must be typed and are not to exceed 300 words in length. Content
which Is judged to be libelous, homophobic, sexist, racist or factually Incorrect will not be published. Please be concise.
Letters may be edited for brevity, but it is standard Ubyssey policy not to edit letters for spelling or grammatical mistakes.
Please bring them, with identification, to SUB 241k. Letters must Include name, faculty, and signature.	
Socred hinterland. Of
course, that's an education
in itself, but would you like
to see a national child care
plan suffer the same fate?
Women and aboriginals,
gays and anyone else not
firmly ensconced in the
mainstream (read white,
read male, read moneyed)
are effectively shut out of
the constitutional process
by Meech. These guys can
barely settle on lunch; do
you really think they're
going to unanimously consent to divest themselves of
one whit of legislative latitude in favor of some subversive minority?
Lastly, I must say that I
was intrigued by your brazen invocation ofthe Name
ofthe Magister in defence of
the Accord. Meech Lake is
as hemlock to M. Trudeau,
and he made that quite clear
in testimony before the
committee. Repeatedly he
has said that Meech Lake
will do nothing to unify us.
In fact, under the Accord,
instead of two solitudes well
have ten. Personally, I'd like
to see just one. But that
would require the kind of
political nerve and will
that's in awful short supply
these days.
Iain Hiscoe
Artsl
Participate and
be heard
One ofthe biggest problems with our system of
democracy is the lack of
participation by people. The
exceptions are the short,
promise filled weeks of an
election and the moment of
voting. Essentially we live
under what can be described
as a governmental "dictatorship" for the four-odd
years in between elections.
During those four years the
people most rely on the opposition, which by nature is
a minority and is virtually
powerless to stop governmental legislation from becoming law. People can
show satisfaction or discontent with the government
only through the voicing of
opinions as we are excluded
from the decision making
process.
The voicing of opinion is
an essential right that lets
the government know what
the people are thinking.
Voicing an opinion is not
necessarily radical or militant. We begin the expression of our discontent at the
bus stop with friends, signing petitions, writing letters, phoning our MLA's and
MP's, and often we are unheard or passed off with a
polite smile.
Should this attitude of
the government stop the
voicing of our opinions?—
Not if you believe in what
you are saying. If the government doesn't listen we
should speak with a
stronger and united voice.
We can rally and march for
education at the Vancouver
Art Gallery on Thursday.
Students from all over the
Lower Mainland will express our deep concern with
funding of Post-secondary
education in a legitimate,
effective way.
Free buses to the rally
will leave from the Bus Loop
at 12:30 and 1:15. See you
there.
Vanessa Geary
AMS Coordinator of External Affairs
Criticism well
taken
Re: Op-ed article in Feb.
28th issue
I am writing to draw
your attention to your use of
the word "schizophrenic" in
the headline and "schizophrenia" in the body of the
above article. Schizophrenia is a severe mental illness
which is devastating to the
afflicted individual and to
his/her family. It is very
important that all members
ofthe public understand the
nature of the disease because it affects such a large
fraction of the population.
It's symptoms are not those
implied by the article and it
behoves authors and editors
to ensure that the word is
not used incorrectly.
I am writing this letter
in the hopes that it will alert
The Ubyssey to the fact that
it should only use the words
"schizophrenia" and
"schizophrenic" in the correct medical context as the
Ubyssey's contribution to a
correct understanding of
schizophrenia by the students and by the public at
large.
Michael Smith
Biotechnology
Pro-choice
losing steam?
Is the feminist-pro
choice movement losing
steam?
In your feature article
of Feb. 28 (No middle
ground found on abortion
issue), Charles Lugosi reports that leading feminist
Nancy Morrison would solve
the abortion debate by giving "rights to the fetus,
which she says is not human
until birth." There is no
middle ground according to
her.
Morrison bases her position on pure pragamatism.
She says that the question of
when a fetus becomes a
human being is a theological—religious—philosophical one, and she wishes to
avoid all three. When it is
suggested to her that some
atheists, on purely biological evidence, conclude that
life begins at conception, she
ingnores the evidence. She
opts instead for a pragmatic
position that despite evidence to the contrary, a fetus becomes a human being
at birth because...well, because that works better in
today's society.
I get the impression
that Ms. Morrison has made
up her mind in advance that
she will never allow herself
to be convinced that a fetus
becomes a human being at
some point prior to birth.
That would not be pragmatic.
This has got to be the
most superficial resoning I
have ever heard coming out
of the feminist-pro choice
camp. IfMorrisonisaleader
in this camp, they're losing
steam, very quickly!
Tako J. Van Popta
Law in
10/THE UBYSSEY
March 7,1989 PBRSKCTIVE
I'm getting my
shit together
I recently tried to organize my life.
I checked out several books on
Time Management. Then I bought
a Daytimer, string, fluorescent
labels, and file folders.
With indescribable pleasure I
made my first entry: "Tuesday -
4PM to 6:30PM - read Time Management texts."
From page ix, where the author thanked her mother and Aunt
Dot from Saskatchewan for teaching her the importance of being
organized, I was hooked. Being
organized, it seemed, was almost
as good as having a butler.
Soon I would have time for
washing socks and underwear,
time for baking wholesome zucchini bread to pack in my homemade lunch, the ingredients of
which were all purchased at the
cheapest possible price because I
would have time to shop.
I looked forward to high-powered organizing tools gracing my
scholarly pursuits. I would turn in
essays perfectly typed a week before they fell due, and then slyly
watch as the professor put the
paper on his desk hardly able to
restrain himself from scribbling a
great big red "A" right across the
front.
I would enter a lecture like a
King, having scoured the library
for the most recent data concerning the lecture topic, which I would
of course know. And when it came
time for "Student Contribution," I
would be able to enlighten fellow
classmates and garner their undying appreciation.
What about an organized love
life? I caught my breath at the
thought. No longer would I be late
for dates or miss the previews at
movies. I'd have extra money to
spend on my lover too, because I'd
remember to pay all my bills on
time.
Soon I vowed I would join a
religious organization that lived
and breathed these transforming
principles. We would talk "checklists" and "how to do three things
at once calmly," or "how to hide
your organizational superiority so
you don't alarm friends and relations."
Unfortunately, I didn't find
Converting as pleasant as I had
anticipated. In fact, it turned out
to be pure hell. The first night
when I went to bed at eight I kept
seeing re-runs of David Letter-
man, especially where he dresses
in velcro and jumps against a velcro wall.
It was dark when I got up and
I thought I was going crazy. I had
that groggy feeling you get when
you haven't over or underslept.
On the second day I started to
criticize myself when I forgot my
daytimer, sometimes in front of
friends.
People were telling me I was
rigid, but not in a good way.
My love-life quickly deteriorated. I kept turning the light on so
I could see what to do next and how
long it should take.
By the third day, I realized
that the time management books
were late and I now owed sixty
cents! Something seemed terribly
wrong but I couldn't put my finger
on it. When I checked my schedule,
I realized I wouldn't have time to
return the books for two days, and
even then it would cut into my new
weight-lifting regimen—something I wasn't about to let happen.
All my dreams seemed to be disintegrating.
On the fourth day at about
five thirty in the morning, I lost
the pencil I used to write in my
Daytimer. I searched for twenty
minutes before I gave up. It put my
whole day off. At twelve fifteen I
gave the bus driver my cinnamon
zucchini bread and went down to
eat a wonderfully disgusting chili
burger in the Pit.
Since then I've learned to be
content with "Macro-Planning," a
topic not covered in either of the
Time Management books I read. It
goes like this: I wait for my stress
level to build and then I work.
Stress level goes down and I screw
around. Stress level goes up and I
work. It's all very organized. In
fact, it's so organized I never think
of it anymore.
Dennis Selder is a window
washer turned sage, and frequent visitor to the office with
the dirtiest windows
UBC
MUSIC
THE FACULTY
CONCERT
SERIES 1988/89
WITH
INTERNATIONAL
GUEST ARTISTS
presents
Benedetto Lupo,
piano
b:::;:;::::;:^^^
rpCEXCE • L-L-E-N-T.-y,
IHE    EATER I
—. r_t rm —. GOURMET BURGER
■_■ mJ _^a_ Bui                     (_iai ec Tetuj
I   fft __________           OR ENTREE
The good deal is, your least expensive meal is FREE when two or more of the
above items are ordered. Not valid with any other coupons. Dining in only,
please. Valid only when this ad is presented prior to placement of order.
3431 WEST BROADWAY 738-5298
Saturday, March 11
UBC Recital Hall
8:00 p.m.
Tickets $10/$5
Call the School of Music
at 228-3113
UBC
The School ol Music
The University of British Columbia
DISPLAY YOUR
CHARACTER.
Kinko's self-service typewriters and copy creation centers
give your reports and presentations the clean impressive
professional look they deserve.
kinko's
the copy centre
Mooday to Friday 8 a.m -Midnight
Saturday 10-6
Sunday 11-6
5706 University Blvd.
Telephone: (604) 222-1688
FAX: (604) 222-0025
rise and t&varbeiute
ttoirsdaY. Yaacomr/rt Gatlen
APPLICATIONS NOW AVAILABLE
for
THREE STUDENT-AT-LARGE
REPRESENTATIVES TO
UNIVERSITY ATHLETICS COUNCIL
1989-1990
and
ONE POSITION OF EDITOR
OF INSIDE U.B.C.
APPLICATIONS DEADLINE
4 p.m. MONDAY
MARCH 13, 1989
FORMS AVAILABLE
SUB 238
"As a public institution,U.B.C. has
the legal obligation to ensure
access on the basis of an
individual's merit and potential, not
his or her income. That criteria
should never be lost in the
minutiae of any one year's budget.
In setting tutition fees, book
prices, and housing charges,
U.B.C. must keep its eye on the
horizon, not just the bottom line.
The Province, in deciding on
global funding, can be no less
responsible"
SPONSORED BY THE TEAM TO ELECT
MICHAEL LEVY
Social Credit candidate
March 7,1989
THE UBYSSEY/11 The QraduateStudent Society Presents	
"NO LONGER SILENT"
The Struggle Against Injustice Toward Women in India
(For International Women's Day)
Produced by Clne-Slta in association with the national Film Board of Canada
Wednesday. March 8. at 12:30 pm in the Qarden Room
Discrimination wears many faces, often supported by religion, custom and tradition. In
modern India, where ageold traditions collide with twentletlKentuy values and technology.
Rbwomen who bear the heaviest bucden. rlo LongerSUentlsareveallng look at someaspects
of this discrknlnatlon, and at the determined efforts of some Indian women to bring about
change.	
Hong Kong
Chinese Foods
5732 University Blvd.
Lunch Specials (combination)
$3.45
MSG FREE
Licensed • Self Service
224-1313
The University of British Columbia
THE Mf.RRIf.GE OF BETTE fiND BOO
by Christopher Durang
(a wonderfully delicate black comedy)
MARCH 7-11 8 PM
DORTHY SOMERSET STUDIO
Res. 228-2678
Elections
British Columbia
Provincial ByElection:
Vkicouver-Point Grey Electoral District
16 vote in the
\kncouver-Ib_nt
Grey By-Election on
March 15 you must
be a registered voter.
•You can't vote unless you're
registered
•You must be registered before
election day to vote
No matter how you say it, to vote in the
Vancouver-Point Grey by-election you must
be registered as a voter before election day
Ifyou are not already
registered, you must have a
Certificate to
Vote.
You may register and obtain your
Certificate to Vote at any of the
following locations from March 6 to
March 11. Only those NOT registered
anywhere in the Province may apply
for a Certificate to Vote.
Registration
Centres.
Registrar of Voter's Office
475 East Broadway
8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.; Mon.-Sat.
Dunbar Community Centre
4747 Dunbar Street
11:00 a.m.-9:00 p.m.; Mon.-Fri.
9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.; Sat.
Student Union Building
University of British Columbia
2:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m.; Mon.-Thurs.
11:00 a.m.-9:00 p.m.; Fri., Sat.
Safeway Store
2733 West Broadway
2:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m.; Mon.-Thurs.
11:00 a.m.-9:00 p.m.; Fri., Sat.
Safeway Store
4575 West 10 Avenue
2:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m.; Mon.-Thurs.
11:00 a.m.-9 p.m.; Fri., Sat.
Eor further
information.
Contact: Registrar of Voters
475 East Broadway,
Vancouver,
660-6848
Remember: You can no longer register on Election Day*
Chief Electoral Office
Province of
British Columbia
12/THE UBYSSEY
March 7,1989

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