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The Ubyssey Nov 21, 1967

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Array RALLY TO KICK OFF EDUCATION CAMPAIGN
By MIKE FINLAY
A series of student explosions to jar the B.C.
government into education action will be set off
at a mass rally Wednesday.
The noon rally, to be held in front of the library
or in Brock if it rains, is sponsored by the education
action committee of the B.C. Assembly of Students.
"We are facing a real crisis," said Don Munton,
committee chairman and Alma Mater Society first
vice-president.
"It is predicted that university enrolment in
Canada will double in the next 10 years. Instead of
meeting this challenge, UBC has announced enrolment may be cut next year."
Similar rallies are scheduled for Simon Fraser
University, the University of Victoria, and possibly
for the B.C. Institute of Technology.
"The rallies are just to kick everything off," said
Munton.   "First  we  will  gain  the  support   of  the
students, then we will convince the public."
Spiking at the rally will be AMS president
ShamrSullivan, Munton, and three MLA's.
Liberal Dr. Pat McGeer, Socred Herb Capozzi
and NDP MLA Dave Barrett are coming.
"Capozzi would come only if we guaranteed he
could speak last," Munton said.
The rallies are the first step in the implementation of a 10-point education action program proposed
by Munton and adopted by the AMS last week.
The program calls for students to meet with their
MLA's, to petition for support for education, and
to write letters to their MLA's.
It also called for a meeting with education minister Leslie Peterson, but Peterson declined the offer,
saying he didn't see the need to meet.
Also on the program is a call for students to
pledge to vote only for those political parties which
adequately support higher education.
"We are not anti-government, but we must make
people realize the importance of higher education,"
said action committee member Val Thorn.
The committee hopes public awareness of the
problem will cause more money to go to higher
education when the provincial budget is brought
down in January, she said.
"If we don't get more money all the stops will
be pulled," Munton said. "We don't want to do
anything stupid like a strike but it might be necessary to have something similar to the Back Mac
campaign."
Munton was referring to a 1963 march involving
4,000 students supporting former UBC president
John Macdonald's call for more support for higher
education in B.C.
"There is a crisis in higher education. We must
work now to get the provincial government to act
now."
Shaun's
Vol. XLIX, No. 26
THE UBYSSEY
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1967 ,/'   ^ *,^^»«
got a
secret
t$ ft
t
224-3916
■^v
—goorge hollo photo
SATU OSTRING, far left, first runner-up in the Miss Universe
contest, joins fellow world-renouned Finnish Gymnasts on
the UBC campus for the gymnaestrada display Wednesday
at 8:30 p.m.. War Memorial Gym. Tickets for the demonstration are available at the gym athletic office.
Sprinkler, sprinkler go away,
is bookstores mopping tune
It was raining inside the bookstore Monday.
About 20 persons working in the basement storeroom got
a free shower at 11 a.m. when a safety sprinkling valve burst.
Water coursed along the floor for 15 miputes under gushing
pressures before a plumber was found to turn it off.
Bookstore employees estimated damage to books at several
hundred dollars.
"Like most UBC buildings, the bookstore was built cheaply,"
said one clerk who asked not to be named. "There are no floor
drains, so it took some time to mop up the inch of water."
Three officials of Grinnell Sales Ltd., which supplied the
fire protection system, later visited the scene.
A spokesman said the accident was probably due to a mechanical break in the valve.
"Since the valve has been taken away, we can't get an
accurate answer to why it broke," he said.
'Abandon %|£ii§cr
Sullivan tells C
OTTAWA (CUP) — The Canadian Union of
Students will abandon its policy of writing confidential field secretary reports.
The CUS executive came under sharp attack
over the reports from UBC president Shaun
Sullivan and other board members at the CUS
board of directors meeting Saturday.
CUS president Hugh Armstrong said field
work reports prepared by the associate secretaries in the field were to be circulated within
the secretariat only.
Sullivan termed confidential reports crap,
and said CUS attacks confidentiality in university government, and should not practice it itself.
CUS vice-president Don Mitchell explained
the reports were for the use of other field
workers returning to a campus, and they were
confidential because they discussed personalities
on campus in frank terms-
Christ Westdal, University of Manitoba
student president, said if field workers find
deficiencies in the work being done by the local
elected students the field worker should let
them know.
"I want to be told," said Westdal.
Sullivan said field workers are paid by the
members. They have no right to write secret
reports.
"It's a bit much," he said. "I can't believe this.
Who is the CUS secretariat working for?"
Barry McPeake, Ontario representative on
the board, objected, saying that was not the
point.
"That is the point," said Sullivan.
McPeake and the executive, including several
CUS Staff who had done field work, later agreed
confidential reports were not desirable in CUS.
Peter Simmie, finance commissioner, objected to reports in print about personalities on campuses.
"I won't tolerate any confidential information
put into a file about a person," he said.
Sullivan admitted later he was really miffed
because a field worker has spent a week on the
UBC campus and did not give any kind of feedback to the elected student government.
Sullivan also wanted CUS resources applied
to a particular project. This did not happen at
UBC, he said.
"Field workers should work for the campus,"
he said. "They are working for the campus, not
for themselves."
Past president Doug Ward also objected to
secret field reports. He said it is common in the
international student field, but confidential personal reports have no place in the national union,
because it breeds the concept of an on-going
secretariat.
The discussion turned to the role of the field
worker, and whether he should work through
a council that may be hostile to CUS programs
or that is lazy.
McPeake said it may be necessary from time
to time to bypass student government to get
real work done.
Sullivan said if a field worker came on campus without his knowledge and began subverting
the work of his council he would work to pull
his campus out of CUS.
At the urging of CUS associate secretary
Brian Hutchinson the board approved a resolution calling for full reports to the campus by
the field worker, and an end to the practice of
confidential reports for the use of the secretariat.
Principal firm;
won't free Daily
MONTREAL (CUP) —McGill Principal
H. Rocke Robertson announced Thursday   ;-
the administration will not comply  with   |s
student   demands   that   it   drop   charges
against the three members of the McGill
Daily staff.
In a letter to student union president
Peter Smith, Robertson said: "The senate
committee   on   student   discipline   cannot
withdraw charges The senate will give
no instruction to the committee in whose
fairness to judge the problems involved
it was confidence."
The letter cited university statutes
which gave the senate "general disciplinary authority" over the student body, and
concluded "let fair men, duly appointed,
do their difficult duty. Afterwards we will
speak of change."
President Peter Smith had no comment
on the letter.
Subject: Vancouver
Vancouver's future as a city will be examined
Wednesday by a U.S. expert..
Dr. Edward Higbee, a visiting professor of
geography from the University of Rhode Island,
will speak at a noon lecture in room 100 in
the geography building.
His topic will be Vancouver's potential in
the national system of cities. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 21,  1967
EOI TOR,THE   UBYSSCV-
WITH REGARD TO Of A* Of ARTS DEMMIS HEALV'S
STATEMENT ••...VOU CAN'T FEED
LETTERS INTO A COMPUTER" 1NOV 16 UBVSSEVI.I
MOULD RECCOMENO THAT DEAN HtALV
TAKE AN INTROOUCTORV COURSE IN COMPUTERS.AND
LEARN HOW EASY IT IS TO FEEO
LETTERS INTO A COMPUTER.
IAN EASSON.
PRESIDENT.
U»C COMPUTER CLUB.
DEAN DENNIS HEALY'S statement Wednesday about computerized marks brought a computerized reply from computerman Ian Easson. Picture is a one-fifth size reproduction of the
original electronic letter.
SAY PLACE VANIER  CO-EDS
'Late leaves are OK'
By STEPHEN JACKSON
Ubyssey Housing Reporter
Place Vanier women residents don't mind
being locked out at night.
A chedk Monday showed doors to their residence blocks are locked at 11 p.m. weekdays and
at midnight on weekends.
To get in, girls have to get the porter from the
common block, who walks with them to the
house door.
"Sometimes he waits a few minutes until
a group forms," said Jane Wannop, ed. 1, who
lives in Margaret MacKenzie house.
A porter is on duty at all times.
Freshette residents are permitted two 4 a.m.
and four 3 a.m. leaves a year.
Second year students receive five 4 a.m.
leaves a year, plus two 3 a.m. deadlines a month.
Third and fourth year students have unlimited
4 a.m. leaves, as do all residents over 21 years
old.
"The restrictions we have are just for our
benefit," said Holly Lougheed, home ec. 3. "I've
never found them very limiting. It depends how
outgoing you are. The rules are a fairly generous
guide."
There is no grave punishment for an infraction such as not signing out, she said.
"The worst that can happen is to have your
leave cancelled for a week."
Open house, said the girls, is great.
That is the time on weekends when men may
visit women's rooms, provided they leave the
door open.
MacKenzie house residents chose to permit
visits both Saturdays and Sundays. Hours are 1
p.m. to 5 p.m.
"It's an inconvenience in a way, but the girls
look forward to it," Miss Lougheed said.
It was a novelty at first, she said, but now it's
just a convenience to girls who want visitors.
"I felt the restrictions funny at first because
I'd never had any at home, but things turned out
all right," said Joan Avent, home ec. 3. "I never
think twice about it now."
EXPERIMENTAL
COLLEGE
Meeting - Thursday, Nov. 23rd
12:30 - 2:30-Bu 226
For Mr. Stockholders course on Imperialism and Literature readings.
T. S. Eliot: The Wasteland
Barrington Moore Jr.:
The Social Origins of
Dictatorship and Democracy
chapter on Britain.
WEDNESDAY NITE!
THE 3rd KNIGHT
featuring by popular demand
The Shockers'
if FULL FACILITIES
1275 SEYMOUR STREET
PHONE AND RESERVE YOUR TABLE NOW-MU 1-4010
THE HOYSTER
Active...Slim...Sporty
WHAT A DIFFERENCE
A DAY'S MAKES <t^
CORD  HOYSTER'S $9.95
9tL  ihsL   JxrtsLdJL   Shad&A
FINNS
Clothing   Stores   Ltd.
3031 W . Broadway
2159 W. 41st Ave.
6495   Fraser   Street
1) Theological Colleges - Parking Lot - 9:00 p.m. 2) Fort Camp Women's Residence
-9:10 p.m. 3) Fort Camp Huts - Corner Marine Dr. & Fort Rd. - 9:25 p.m. 4) International - Panhellenic House - Parking Lot - 9:35 p.m. 5) Totem Park Common Block - 9:50 p.m. 6) Lower Mall
Common Block - 10:15 p.m. 7) Library - 10:30 p.m. 8) Brock Hall - 10:40 p.m. 9)Fraternity Houses
11:00 p.m.    10) Acadia Camp - Corner Acadia Rd. & Agronomy Rd. • 11:30 p.m. Tuesday, November 21,  1967
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
Relations under study
— lawrence woodd photo
AMERICAN  POET John  Beecher  read  his  poetry Monday
noon in Bu. 106. Beecher's constant theme is the lot of the
underdog — particularly that of Negro laborers.
AMS in anti-mood
By NORMAN  GIDNEY
Ubyssey  Council Fink
Alma Mater Society council Monday night voted not to
support freedom of the press in high schools.
It was voting on B.C. Assembly of Students' resolutions
passed at the assembly's  conference two months ago.
Council also voted against "condemning authoritarian suppression" of high school student councils.
It also disapproved of six other students, rights resolutions,
including ones concerning a BCAS sponsored board of appeal
on grading, overcrowded classrooms, high school principals
opening mail addressed to student councils and curriculum
planning.
A final resolution urging students "never to support any
government that refuses adequate support for higher education"
was also strongly condemned by council.
"We approve of BCAS in principle but not what they're
doing," said engineering president  Lynn Spraggs.
"For an organization like the BCAS to push for freedom
of speech and freedom of the press in high schools is drastically
wrong," he said.
Education representative Bob Gilchrist said: "As a future
high school principal I don't feel high school kids should have
the final say."
On resolution 14 which condemned the arbitrary withdrawal
of the business license of Vancouver newspaper Georgia Straight,
AMS co-ordinator Jim Lightfoot said, "It's none of their goddamned business."
Only 15 out of 26 council members were present when
BCAS resolutions were debated. Fourteen councillors constitute
a quorum.
Council didn't vote on the proposed BCAS 10 cents per student fee levy
It was tabled until next week when a full council would be
present.
Constitutional revisions and council dinners were also
debated.
AMS first vice-president Don Munton wore an orange hard
hat.
OTTAWA (CUP) — A commission jointly
sponsored by student, faculty, and administrative
national organizations will report on relationships between universities and governments in a
year.
Doug Ward, Canadian Union of Students past-
president, made the announcement to the CUS
board Sunday.
The Ford Foundation has given the group
$150,000 to finance the study.
Ward said the commission is a breakthrough
for students marking the first time students have
a veto over any suggestions for commissioners.
This is the first time the voice of students has
been recognized in decisions of co-operating
national organizations.
The other groups in the study are Canadian
Association of University Teachers (CAUT) the
Association of Universities and Colleges in Canada (AUCC), and L'union Generale des Etudiants
du Quebec (UGEQ).
Montreal riot
hits U.S. rep
MONTREAL (CUP) — Forty-eight students were arrested Friday as 1,800 demonstrators paraded in front of the U.S. consulate-general here, in protest to U.S. involvement in the Vietnam war..
Both regular and mounted police moved
in to break up the demonstration after red
paint had been splashed on the consulate
and two windows were broken.
Repeated violence broke out as police
charged demonstrators on horseback, forcing them onto lawns across the street from
the consulate.
In retaliation, students lighted torches,
which caused police horses to bolt and shie
away. Several students were injured in
the crush, either by the horses or by flying sticks and rocks.
Several police car windows were
shattered.
Forty-six of the arrested demonstrators
were charged with unlawful assembly Saturday, and two were sent to juvenile court.
All were released Saturday, on bail
paid by individuals and a few organizations.
The case is due to come up in court
later in the week.
Students came from Sir George^ Williams, McGill, U of Montreal, and local
classical colleges.
The march, part of a world-wide protest week against the war co-ordinated
by the International Union of Students,
was organized in Quebec by UGEQ, an
IUS associate member.
Boeing protest?
An arts general meeting will be held today
to discuss a proposed demonstration against the
Boeing Co. of Seattle.
"Boeing is without a doubt the most objectionable of the companies visiting this university," arts president Stan Persky said Monday. "It plays an important part in American
aggression in Vietnam."
Boeing representatives begin interviewing
Wednesday at the student placement office.
The three commissioners, to be appointed
within   a month, will:
• Define the distinctive role of the university
in a changing Canadian society.
• Study the competing necessities of academic freedom and public control.
• Define the instruments needed for university-government relations.
Ward has suggested Gunnar Myrdal as the
senior commissioner. Mrydal is a noted economist, sociologist, and statesman. His recent book,
beyond the Welfare State, has received wide academic acclaim.
The two other commissioners will come from
academic life and government.
Ward is the CUS representative on the commission steering committee. The UGEQ representative is Robert Tessier, a past vice-president
of UGEQ.
Daily hearing closed,
senate changes policy
MONTREAL (CUP) — Contrary to a previous
senate announcement, the McGill senate committee on student discipline will conduct its hearing
of the Daily case in closed session.
The hearing concerns the reprinting of an
article from the Realist entitled "The parts that
were left out of the Kennedy book." The three
Daily staffers involved, editor Peter Allnutt, supplement editor Pierre Fournier and columnist
John Fekete were told to appear before the discipline committee on charges of "obscene libel".
The charges were later altered to breaking the
standard of decency at McGill.
Originally, the McGill senate issued a statement "to ask the committee on student discipline
to consider conducting the present case in public", but this has now been reversed, and the
meeting will be private.
Two of the three Daily staffers, (excluding
Kekete) will, however, be allowed to bring two
observers each to future meetings in the case.
This was decided by the committee to ensure a
fair hearing of the case. Fekete was separated
from the other two, for it was felt that the three
should not be heard as one.
Liberals organize
Grit your teeth, anti-Grits.
The British Columbia University Liberal
Federation was founded last weekend in Brock
hall.
A provincial organ of the Canadian University Liberal Federation, the new group is composed of Liberal clubs of UBC, Simon Fraser
University, the University of Victoria, and Notre
Dame University.
Elected officers include president Mike Coleman, UBC clubs committee chairman; vice-
president Brian Fogarty, comm. 2, and secretary
Lynda Mitchell, a UVic student.
BCULF intends to prepare a series of policy
papers concerning French-English relations,
American economic domination, housing, higher
education, Indian affairs, and northern development.
These papers will be presented at he first
annual meeting of BCULF next March at SFU.
THE M£Za7W/(m*Lm
WELL .SCRUTINEER. ARE ALL THE
BALLOTS ^wflvEs^ENERAlT
LITTLE SffAT/X^BRALiTHEVRE ALL). B > i <X£,
THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions art
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services
of Pacific Student Press, of which it is founding member, and Underground
Press Syndicate. Authorized second class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 224-3916. Other
calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo, Page Friday, loc. 24; sports, loc.
23; advertising, loc. 26. Telex  04-5224.
"Why spend $32,500 on a hare when you
can get rabbit for $2.50?"
— Jimmy Pollock, printer, Nov.  16,  1967
NOVEMBER 21, 1967
Hey, teach!
"The best research," says UBC president Kenneth
Hare, "is done by people who have students."
Perhaps. But we're not sure that the reverse is true
— that the best teaching is done by people who are
deeply involved in research.
In fact, we suspect, research sometimes has a detrimental effect on teaching — particularly teaching at the
undergraduate level.
We wonder whether a professor, attracted by prestigious research contracts, doesn't tend to redirect energies that might otherwise have gone toward innovation
in his courses. And we wonder which suffers first when
there are competing calls on a professor's time—teaching
or research?
What spurs our suspicion is the promotions policy
of this and other universities in which classroom performance  and  contacts  with   students  count  for  little.
One reason for this promotions policy is the difficulty of assessing teaching performance. Only students
are well situated to make such judgment — and students
have no say in promotions.
Promotions decisions are made by a professor's colleagues who find a man's research record easier to judge
than his teaching abilities. We doubt that many teachers
are unconscious of this when they allot their time between research projects and students.
Such professors are likely to find that too much time
spent with students means decreasing chances at promotions, higher salaries, and tenure.
The problem of compatibility of teaching and research is particularly relevant at the undergraduate level.
Undergraduates need concerned teachers who can direct
them in their attempt to get a general education and
develop their critical faculties. Such teachers need not be
in the advance guard of research.
If there is serious concern with improving the quality of undergrad education at UBC, deans and department heads should investigate the compatibility of research and teaching. The aim of such investigation would
be a more rational promotions policy.
ANTI-BOEINQ DEMONSTRATION THIS WEEK
Imagine
We congratulate arts president Stan Persky on his
new program of imaginary sports which was revealed in
Friday's Ubyssey.
Persky's proposal appears to be a serious attempt at
making UBC's sports program more relevant to more
students.
In addition, the program is economical—neither loss
of. energy nor of sweat will be required, according to
Persky. Also unnecessary in the arts imaginary sports
program will be expensive equipment.
First step in the program, promises Persky, will be
an imaginary hockey team which will skate about an
imaginary John Stuart Mill lounge hockey rink.
We believe the arts idea could be the imaginary beginning of a whole imaginary new trend.
There are many parts of campus life which would be
improved by becoming imaginary. We would be pleased
to enjoy:
An imaginary student union building costing each
of us an imaginary $15 a year.
Imaginary exams.
Imaginary Brock hamburgers.
Imaginary 8:30 classes.
Imaginary miles between c-lot and the library.
Imaginary bookstore mark-ups.
Imaginary student councils.
Imaginary summer-camp-style residence rules.
Imaginary Ubyssey editorials.
Persky has requested a $10,000 grant to finance his
imaginary sports program. If he can set up the program
aoid make a start on some of these other imaginary projects, $10,000 is cheap.
'God, not another demonstration! Don't tell me they're really serious about this!'
■LiTiMs:^^Mi^^ifOiil
Natural  death
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Copies of a textbook required for a law course were ordered by the professor from the
bookstore in the middle of
September and arrived two
months later. I ordered the
same book direct from the
publisher and received it ten
days later, in one-sixth the
time. The difference in price?
Thirty cents, including postage
and exchange on my cheque.
To me it's worth the thirty
cents to have the book when
needed. Indeed, a limited number of copies of this book were
on sale at the bookstore early
in September and would have
cost me $1.15 more than I
eventually paid.
If other students did the
same, I cannot help but predict that the bookstore would
improve its service or else
succumb to a natural and welcome death.
DOUG ROBSON
law 3
napalm. Should the allies have
stopped Hitler in World War
Two, or let him rampage on?
No, I think if the big ship with
the big red flag sails into Vancouver harbor one of these
days, you'll fight.
HICK CORBETT
arts 1
'Appalled'
Lyndon  nice
Editor, The Ubyssey:
It would be easy for the
U.S. to withdraw from southeast Asia altogether. I'm sure
that Lyndon Johnson does not
enjoy seeing thousands of his
countrymen — people our
ages — being killed and buried
in a war that, by rights, he
shouldn't give half a damn
about. Do you think that Johnson enjoys seeing his country
fall into a tremendous debt
over a war on the other side
of the world? Do you think
that Johnson likes seeing his
name spat upon? Is Lyndon
Johnson that inhuman?
Johnson keeps his men in
Vietnam because he has a
reason. He doesn't support the
war because he is sympathetic
to industry. Dow became
wealthy making saran wrap,
not napalm. The U.S. is in
Vietnam to fight for what she
believes is right, and no other
country in this world is willing to help her. She stands
alone, but at least she stands.
To everyone who thinks this
war is such a terrible thing,
no war is a teaparty. No, this
doesn't make it right, but we
kill one helluva lot more people with cigarettes than with
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I am appalled that the administration of the university
could allow a part of its establishment to deteriorate in the
manner in which the lounge in
the Buchanan building has
under the control of the PUS
(psychedelic undergraduate society).
For anyone who is not aware
of the condition of John S.
Mill lounge (so labelled by the
arts council), the hippies have
apparently come to the conclusion that the finish of the
walls was not suitable for their
fine taste and have taken it
upon themselves to paper the
walls with posters spouting
such clever slogans as "Marijuana Control Board H.Q."
and "Merry ol' Mill hill, home
of Transcendental Politics,"
and notices of meetings which
took place weeks ago.
Strewn about the floor
amongst various papers is seen
one or two of the gentle folk
lounging on a sleeping bag.
There are times when students need a place to relax and
certainly something should be
done to raise the level of the
lounge to a place suitable for
a university student.
BOB FORST
arts 1
Dow  good
In my opinion the protest
against Dow Chemical is all
wrong. It doesn't appear to
have been started by student
opinion, but because a Canadian company wanted to interview UBC students. Someone
got the idea that Dow was bad,
and set out to make everyone
else believe it. The result —
everyone is up in arms over
the fact that Dow, a company
which manufacturers plastics,
glass, and beer, is making a
tenth of one per cent of its
gross, not net, profit from sell
ing the U.S. Army a type of
gelatin.
DAVID HOBBS
sc. 2
Chelsea  fan
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I would like to congratulate
the special events committee
for their initiative in bringing
in Andy Warhol's Chelsea
Girls.
I was, however, a little dismayed at the ignorance of
some of the people I have
spoken to about it.
They obviously missed the
point but I am convinced that
these people are definitely in
the minority.
If there were more producers around of this calibre, and
with such insight into war, the
movie industry would most
definitely be better than it is
now.
I again would like to congratulate Gerry Cannon and
the special events committee
for their great effort.
GERRY CANNON
arts 3
EDITOR: Danny Stoffman
City  Stuart Gray
News   Susan Gransby
Managing   Murray McMillan
Photo   Kurt Hilger
Associate .... Al Birnie, Kirsten Emmott
Senior   Pat Hrushowy
Sports   Mike Jessen
Wire   Charlotte Hair*
Page Friday  Judy Bing
Ass't. City   Boni Lee
Ordinarily, no one would bat an
eye at an attack of bats. But this
time was a bit much. Their squeaks
even drowned out the noise ot Ann
Arky's yogurt mixing machine. So
she took her glass eye, raised a
baseball bat, and batted it. Later,
reading Othello, Bae Moster began
shaking a spear. It flew out of her
hand and hit Irving Fetish, who was
reclining on a sheepskin rug. He
almost dyed in the wool.
Steve Jackson and Mike Finlay,
feeling noisy, went into the tennis
business and made quite a racket.
The late Mark DeCoursey turned
into a frog and croaked. "Warter
way to go," said Paul Knox. Irene
Wasilewski, caught in a web of Intrigue, escaped a three-inch spider.
Alexandra Volkoff and Judy Young,
however, condemned insect categorically. Richard Baer was stepped
on by the Phyfatalphynx's left foot
and felt like a heel. Glenn Bullard
typed all night and got an inkling.
Norman Gidney machine-gunned
Bonnie in the Clyde, while Arnold
Saba confirmed his real name is
Hank Snow. Luanne Armstrong
strong-armed Leo Tolstoy with
Laurie  Dunbar.
Orman Rower, Chris Blake, Lawrence Woodd, and Mr. and Mrs.
George Hollo baked 187 clams in the
darkroom by using lots of mussel.
Mike Fitzgerald, Bob Banno, and
Brian Rattray toiled in the jock
shop, as did Pio Uran, who was
quite  flushed. Tuesday, November 21,  1967
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
LETTERS TO   THE EDITOR
Adoption dispute flares
COLLEGE
SHOP
BROCK EXTENSION
AMS Charter Flight
DEADLINE
Thursday, Nov. 23
See Page 10
Editor, The Ubyssey:
In your Nov. 14 story, "Adop-
t i o n procedures criticized"
Children's Aid Society officials
"deny these conditions exist,
saying almost anyone who applies^ can adopt."
CAS spells it out with the
word "applies". Because 90 per
cent who "seek" are not allowed to "apply".
Only 10 per cent of the
total who reek white middle
class are allowed to "apply".
Only three per cent of these
are denied — therefore the
CAS says, "We accept 97 per
cent."
The social worker determines
by reading an applicant's application, or in borderline
cases, in the first five minutes
of meeting a couple, if an adoption will proceed. Those couples
who will not be allowed to
adopt will be kept waiting for
up to two years, and will never
be told. If they call in more
than once, they are asked, "Is
this adoption an obsession with
you?"
And for whom is the social
worker a flunky? Your local
fuzz! How does he enter the
picture? Freedom for adoptive
children will point out that a
prerequisite in adopting a
baby is a police report.
Even if you do not have a
record, but are on the cops'
ahit list, (because you wear
beads and bells and have long
hair) you've had it. Our sin
was dmonstrating for the Free
Speech Movement and in civil
rights marches.
Our baby was taken from
us in Berkeley because he was
baptized a Catholic and my
wife is a Jew. State law!! But
to make sure he would be
taken, the phony Berkeley
fuzz's report read "Tony hangs
around the house" and is unemployed.
TONY and
LELA CALAMAN
Freedom for Adoptive
Children
1S43 Robson
ft     ft     ft
Editor, The Ubyssey:
The twelve social workers
(letters, Nov. 17) would have
us believe that the ability to
give a child love and emotional security is all that is required to adopt a child. They
claim that people are given a
child regardless of their nonconformity, their religion or
non-religion, their social attitudes, etc.
Why then, may I ask, are
these the questions asked on
the adoption application? Why
are almost all the questions thp
case worker asks the couple
centered around these facets
of their life? Why do all the
required    records,    (including
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police), verifications, probing
and recommendations have to
do with these areas?
Why are prospective adoptive parents asked what they
will do if the child masturbates? How will he be toilet
trained? What will he be told
about God?
If, as the 12 social workers
say, these things are irrelevant, I propose that they be
deleted from the application
form and all official questions.
If they do, in fact, play a part
in selecting prospective adoptive parents, then thousands of
homeless children are being
denied good homes for asinine
reasons.
LELA CALAMAN
Freedom for Adoptive
Children
1843 Robson
ft   ft   ft
Editor, The Ubyssey:
In reference to the article
(Nov. 14) on adoption procedures, I would like to voice
my objections to your irresponsible reporting as a former employee of the Children's Aid Society and a
present student in the school of
social work.
The image of the CAS presented by Mr. Gidney will
certainly not enhance the
general public's feelings regarding adoption. In fact, the
author must be prepared to
share responsibility for discouraging possible applicants
and therefore preventing some
innocent children from finding
suitable homes — a somewhat
weighty burden on his shoulders! Nobody will deny that
errors have been made in
screening adoption applicants
and also in child placement.
Humans do err although they
try to learn from their mistakes. When the author sites
individual cases in a light
which makes the individuals
appear to have been unjustifiably treated, he places the
agency hi a defenseless position. To explain its point of
view it would be liable for
slander if it were to reveal
confidential and possibly unflattering information.
The author pointed out the
present requirements for
adopting parents which are indeed lenient, asking only that
the family have the financial
resources required and a stable
marriage which can offer the
child love and security.
Dave Barrett is an outspoken, publicity hungry politician, a critic of everything and
everybody. His quotation is
surely out of context as nobody
could say the CAS no longer
has a valid reason to exist —
unless one is to close one's
eyes to neglected and abused
children, an area of service
which is also the responsibility
of the two children's aid societies in Vancouver.
One cannot help feeling the
author is incredibly naive regarding the seriousness of this
article and the possible ramifications of it.
ANONYMOUS
social work 2
PRESIDENT, QUEBEC LIBERALS
Eric
K ierans
"Can we win without Levesque?"
TODAY NOON
BROCK
27
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE1
SHAKESPEARE'S
xs
a dark comedy of innocence and corruption
with
Derek Ralston Peter Brockington
Barney O'Sullivan Shirley Broderick
Directed by John Brockington
Designed by Richard Kent Wilcox
November 17-25
STUDENT TICKETS $1.00
(available for most performances)
- SPECIAL STUDENT PERFORMANCES -
L
Monday, Nov. 20th, 7:30 p.m. — Thursday, Nov. 23rd, 12:30 p.m.
Tickets: Frederic Wood Theatre, Room 207 or 228-2678
Don't Miss This Opportunity To See One Ot Shakespeare's
Rarely-Performed Masterpieces
SUPPORT YOUR CAMPUS THEATRE
.FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE.
4?
The Repertory of the Soloists is made up principally of works from the baroque period
period and from the 20th century.
Condudoh - EDUARD FISCHER
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 21 - NOON - AUDITORIUM - 35 CENTS
SPECIAL EVENTS and JEUNESSE MUSICALE
PRESENTATION Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 21,  1967
Dow protest shows new radical style
By STAN PERSKY
The best thing about the
Dow demonstrations, from my
point of view, was the series
of conversations we had Tuesday noon with about a hundred engineering students.
Those of us that talked treat
ed each other with the respect
due to human beings — wearing a red jacket or carrying
a sign didn't automatically
make you a part of some impersonal block. The guys I
talked to were serious, and
had intelligent, practical things
to say. I didn't have any sense
of hostility in the scene.
We had come out to demonstrate our concern about the
continuing, brutal war in Vietnam and to indicate that we
personally care about fellow
students in the professional
faculties and what they do
with their (and our) lives.
In a very traditional university way we engaged each
other in an activity of persuasive reasoning. Dialogue
and discourse. I don't know if
this was the best way, but it
was a course of action we had
decided on in an open way,
and it succeeded in cutting
down antagonism.
OPEN CAMPUS
There was a disagreement
on what to do that took place
between about 35 protestors
and the rest of us. We maintained the principle of "open-
campus" — that Dow had the
right to come here and students had the right to be interviewed and that we weren't
interested in blocking roads
or doorways.
Although I was sort of uptight about the group who insisted on the vague obstructions of sitting-in (after we had
negotiated an agreement about
being inside the placement
office with the student services
director), looking back on it
I didn't have any feeling of
condemnation toward them. A
couple of engineering students
who  noticed  them,   and  who
know me and must have known
that some of the sitters-in were
my personal friends, said to
me, "You don't have anything
to do with that sit-in, do you."
There was no question-mark
at the end of their statement.
Also, I would observe that
the arts council idea of reaching decisions by telepathic
consensus and acting collectively doesn't mean that we
hide our own differences of
opinion or the existence of opposing viewpoints among ourselves. Anyone who thinks that
is wrong.
NEW STYLE
More important to note is
a difference of style between
the radical political groups on
campus and the new local student government in arts.
The radical political groups
were small and not successful.
We were able to elect only one
person into student government, Charlie Boylan. While
almost everyone agreed that
he was the best student counsellor on campus, I don't think
he was very successful because
he didn't change students' lives
or conditions. He tries hard
and had good ideas, but he
didn't have a daily situation
that reached people in all aspects of their lives.
LIVE FOR PROTEST
The character of the radical
political group was like this:
the 35 or so members of the
group planned demonstrations;
after the demonstrations we
held post-mortems on why
they were't so successful; we
then spent a lot of time raising money to pay for the leaflets of the last protest; then
we held meetings about politics because we had to keep
up; then we held the next protest. You were supposed to
live your life from demonstration to demonstration.
There was a lot of praise of
the common man, but an
astounding personal contempt
for the actual people we were
supposed to be reaching. There
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an International Firm of Public Accountants, will
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Contact your Placement Office
for an appointment.
was a lot of talk about political consciousness and a lot of
technical jargon. The issues we
raised were of international
scope and local campus matters only came up when they
could be used. Also, the leaders go far ahead of the mass
of the people in regard to
theory and experience, and
thus separated themselves
from those whom they sought
to be with.
Mao was quoted, but I didn't
see that we were really serving the people (which is the
business of government).
What I'm saying is not bitter or vindictive or a laying of
blame. These are the facts,
baby, and the fragments of
those groups can testify to
same.
NO COMMUNITY
In the local arts government
that has grown in the last six
months something else has
happened.
We don't have a community
yet (in overusing that word I
sometimes give the erroneous
impression that it exists), but
many of us are engaged in
community-making.
This means that you don't
show that the central student
government is meaningless
simply by complaining, but by
actually going out and doing
something that makes student
conditions better. We've created  some  kind  of constructive
alternative, so that if people
go to central student government with a problem and nothing happens, they now come
to us and something gets done.
FOOD AND SEX
We present, in our half-assed
way, not merely serious politics, but psychiatric help, birth
control information, food, offers of sex, drug information,
course evaluations, free rock
dances, poetry, theatre, a realistic program of academic reform, *and a place where intellectual conversation goes on
as a daily matter of course.
We make friends. We make it
with a little help from our
friends.
Sometimes we're called activists (mainly by the mass-
media that needs words for us
in their headlines), but as my
friend Russ Precious points
out, what most people mean
when they say activist is what
the Greeks meant when they
said, citizen.
GOODMAN
The most illuminating statement I've seen this week on
the relationship between the
munitions-makers and the universities is a passage in Paul
Goodman's angry speech made
before the National Security
Industrial Association on Oct.
19 in Washington.
Goodman said: "Dramatically intervening in education you
have again disrupted the normal structure. Great universities have come to be financed
largely for your programs.
Faculties have become unbalanced; your kind of people
do not fit into the community
of scholars. The wandering
dialogue of science with the
unknown is strait jacketed for
petty military projects.
"There has been secrecy,
which is intolerable to true
academics and scientists. The
political, and morally dubious
co-opting of science, engineering and social science has disgusted and alienated many of
the best students.
EDUCATION WARPED
"Further, you have warped
the method of education, beginning with the primary
grades. Your need for narrowly expert personnel has led to
processing the young to be
test-passers, with a gross exaggeration of credits and grading. You have used the wealth
of public and parents to train
apprentices for  yourselves.
"But the educational requirements of our society in the
foreseeable future demand a
very different spirit and method. Rather than processing
the young, the problem is how
to help the young grow up
free and inventive in a highly
scientific and socially complicated world."
Don Perrie oflondon Life'srA&tutirlat D
"There are alv
new areas to ei
to study for.
actuarial wbrk|
take a dull jobi
i new work sit&Kj&l
ifore, new exams,'*?,
St's what makes _*.$
[teresting
9t wouldn'i
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London Life's actuarial d
I put my university educa
Also, London I
pays bonuses i
of Actuarial Se
Besides that,
all-Canadian, l
Jiving in Londf
encourdi
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tiety exams.'
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ipany and I
Don graduate*
Western Or\U
Already he ha\
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om the Un
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Company
f, Canada esday,  November 21,   1967
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 7
' *-V- !»* *«
Free, critical university
forms basis for class war
"i :*■■■»" "'
IOW, LET'S  SEE  HERE.  ,  don't  like   making ^17 wnen
rn stoned   but I'm feeling particularly rocky today   chum
hat „   there's alway's room for improvement, especial
*en lm stuck like this, surrounded by photographer.
BERLIN (UNS) — West Berlin's radical left-
wing students have set up their own "critical
university" here.
The school is designed to analyze and possibly change existing political structure in the
west.
About 2,000 students debated on the new
school's organization, aims and political purposes. At the end of a lively but disorderly session they accepted the project and voted to urge
adoption by the city's entire student body.
On Nov. 1, 1948, the Free University in
Berlin, founded with American aid, opened
its doors to students who had been expelled or
had broken away from the Communist-run university in East Berlin.
The new "critical university" is to operate
as an organization of its own on the campus and
within the context of the Free University, according to the wishes of its founding members.
There is widespread opposition to the experiment and a number of professors have called
for an outright ban on the new school.
Yet a minority of left wing professors supports the venture. Professor Wilfred Gottschalch
of Berlin's teachers' college told the assembly
that capitalism in the west has taken on fascist
or imperialist traits.
Gottschalch also declared that parliamentary
democracy had failed in West Germany where
he said, "workers are being repressed by masters" and where a "demi-authoritarian regime"
has been established.
Those who side with Gottschalch are seeking to turn the school into a cadre school for
social revolutionaries.
A workshop has already started to prepare
a campaign against Axel Springer, West Germany's leading newspaper magnate. The students intend to stage a public tribunal later this
winter to "indict" Springer, whose concern controls about 30 per cent of the country's news
media.
The program for the first term of the "critical university" ranges from such issues as the
"repression of sexuality" in the western world
to studies of American involvement in Vietnam,
"Cuba and the future of Latin America"  and
"social  structures  and  the  economic   crisis   in
West Berlin."
Those at the founding meeting constituted
less than ten per cent of Berlin's university
population of about 29,000 students. The critical
university is to be open not only to members of
the Free University, but also to students from
the technical university, the teachers' college,
the Protestant seminary and the city art school.
• ■   &
Treasure banned
OTTAWA (CUP) — Treasure Van was
scrapped   by  Carleton  University  student   ,
!   council last week.
Treasurer   Barry    McPeake   said   the
World University Service of Canada, spon-
•'    sors  of the  travelling boutique  of exotic
items, has become an unwarranted cost.
"Treasure Van is no longer worthwhile   ;'
(because   most of  the  items  can  now  be
bought downtown," he said.
"Anyway,  most of the  profit  from  it
go into the administrative costs of WUSC."
WUSC   has come under fire over the
,   past   three   months   from   the   Canadian
';   Union of Students and student leaders.
The September CUS congress accepted
:  a  report which condemned   WUSC as an
establishment with remarkable inertia.
Housing stalled
TORONTO (CUP) — The Ontario government is stalling on allocating money for university residences.
The charge was made Saturday by J. A.
Corry, chairman of the Committee of Presidents of Ontario Universities as he released the
CPOU annual report.
Corry said the CPOU had sent a letter to
Ontario university affairs minister William
Davis 13 months ago, urging the Student Housing Corporation be allowed to provide grants
to enable construction of much-needed residences.
He said the minister has failed to answer
the letter, and as a result universities are holding back on final decisions on residences.
c
ELDORADO
9
ELDORADO   MINING   AND   REFINING   LIMITED
ELDORADO REPRESENTATIVES WILL BE AVAILABLE
FOR INTERVIEWS ON CAMPUS
NOVEMBER 23rd.
Opportunities exist in the following fields:
PERMANENT EMPLOYMENT:   Gedo*s,s
Mining Engineers
Mechanical Engineers
Electrical Engineers
SUMMER EMPL0YENT:
Geologists (Post Grads,
Undergrads)
Mining Engineers
Chemical Engineers
Metallurgical Engineers
Mechanical Engineers
Electrical Engineers
Contact the Student Placement Officer for interview times and further information. Page 8
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 21,   19
CUSO RECOMMENDS:
*<<>!< .ssSN^jSiSms
>U -»!jX("i ,v   **■-■?..
'Channel student protest'
Student protests should be channelled towards something positive, a Canadian University Student  Overseas  officer said Thursday.
"Students demonstrating against Dow Chemical is a negative action," CUS recruiter Les
Johnson told a small noon hour audience in
Brock 100.
"If you are really concerned about Vietnam
you should do something about it, like joining
CUSO."
CUSO does not save the world, he said. It
Freeways rally
A giant meeting to rally opposition to the
city's proposed downtown freeway plan will be
held in city hall council chambers Thursday.
Beginning at 7:30 p.m., city hall officials
will present their plans for open debate to
several opposition groups. Students and faculty
members of UBC and Simon Fraser University
will be included.
City council voted last month to approve
an elevated freeway link which would cut a
120-foot swath in Chinatown and join the new
inlet crossing.
tries to supply skilled manpower on the doing
level.
"A CUSO volunteer has a job to do. He
should keep his ears open and his mouth shut."
CUSO has a tough selection process, but it
is only to keep out those who won't succeed.
"You have to know how to work in a system
and yet accomplish something. The selection
process is to make you decide if you really want
to go overseas for two years.
"You don't send developing people to developing countries."
CUSO sends people to countries only when
they are requested, Johnson said.
The country's politics are considered taboo
to the volunteer. He is asked in a memorandum
of agreement not to become involved in their
politics and not to write for any publications
not cleared by CUSO.
CUSO volunteers receive six weeks of basic
training in language, teaching and area studies.
Salaries are paid by host governments on
local scale. Travel to and from the country is
born by CUSO, which also gives the volunteer
$500 on his return.
"There are currently about 1,000 volunteers
placed overseas. Any skill or profession is
welcome," Johnson said.
EFFECTIVE
RAPID
READING
can help YOU
There's a long year ahead—a lot of reading must be accomplished, understood
and remembered. The Reading Dynamics method GUARANTEES to at least
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You will enjoy our modern up-to-date class rooms
You will meet our top rated teaching staff
You will be impressed by our detail and personal
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No classes have more than 26 people
During your classes you will meet and get to know
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LEARN THE MOST RECENT STUDY PROCEDURES
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Contact one of our
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PERRY SEIDELMAN
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MIKE MENARD
Phone 266-5574
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Phone 266-0403
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Cut rate  Euro-flight
At least one Alma Mater Society official is getting
flighty.
He is Ken Glasner, director of a chartered flight from
Vancouver to London non-stop this summer.
The flight will be available to students, faculty and
their children, wives, and parents if they are living with
them, Glasner said Monday. The cost is $295.
Those wanting to go should send a letter to Glasner
at the AMS office by Thursday.
The round trip will be from June 7 to Sept. 4, 1968.
If there are less than 170 persons, two groups will be
formed.
One will be from May 13 to Sept. 4, the other from
June 4 to Sept. 4. These will cost $400.
COLLEGE
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See Page 10
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TEXAS
INSTRUMENTS
INTERVIEWING
ON CAMPUS
NOV. 27
|   GRADUATING   4
STUDENTS
Thank You For Your Co-Operation
FOR THOSE WHO DID NOT HAVE
THEIR GRAD PHOTOGRAPH TAKEN
IN THE MOBILE UNIT ON CAMPUS
OUR STUDIO FACILITIES WILL BE
AVAILABLE AT 2580 BURRARD AT
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PHONE 736-0261 - HOURS FOR
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This Service is Covered by Your Grad Fee
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10rh & BURRARD
736-0261 Tuesday, November 21,  1967
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 9
Playboy typifies perversion'
The  Ubyssey's
as  a  symbol
Gabor
of  a
Mate  examines
wealth-oriented
Playboy
society
In its Christmas edition Playboy has published
a feature much more obscene and perverse than last
month's pathetic photos of two decrepid people performing the sexual act.
In this issue Playboy has decided to play funny
games with the female body — in various positions
girls' bodies are painted up to resemble political
leaders like De Gaulle, Castro, Hitler, and Mao.
Accompanying each picture is a little limmerick.
The magazine has played this sort of cute game
before; a year ago female bodies were dressed and
painted to look like animals: for example, one girl,
bent over, had a horse's tail stuck to her arse.
This is obscene and perverse not in the sexual
sense, but in the human sense, for the purpose is to
reduce a fellow human being to the status of a mere
object to be used in any fashion whatever to satisfy
one's pleasure.
Such objectification is of course the very basis
of the Playboy philosophy — when Hugh Hefner
talks about sexual freedom what he really means is
the unfettered freedom of the male to use and
exploit the totally submissive female. The Playboy
ethic reduces all women to the position of commodi
ties, bought and sold on the market as any other
commodity.
But Playboy is not the problem, merely one
manifestation of it. For the objectification of the
female is a prevalent aspect of our entire social life.
Often a girl is not an individual human being,
out a mere package containing a desired product:
;hat precious hole between her legs. And the packaging has to conform to the demands of the market:
the right hairdo, the right clothes, and the right
Dpinions.
Not that the girl is only a piece of arse, far
:rom it. She, depending on the situation, may func-
;ion in a variety of roles.
Like a toy, she can be played with to provide
mtertainment. Like a car, she can be a status sym-
>ol — if she conforms to the current definition of
vhat status is.
Like Mount Everest, she can be conquered in
the supreme proof of one's manhood. Or, like a
soothing drug she can be an escape from the troubles
of the real world — the world only men are concerned with.
What unifies these various functions of the
female is that she must be prepared to play the role
  whatever role   is demanded of her. And these
roles do not follow from her own personality, her
own humanity as an individual,
but from the socially defined needs
of the male.
Thus when many girls come
into a new relationship they quickly learn what hairdo the boy likes
to see them wear, what clothes,
and what kind of a smile. And
they learn to wipe their minds
as a fresh blackboard on which
the boy's opinions will be inscribed
MATE for  the   duration  of  the   relation
ship. A new relationship, a new set of opinions.
Thus it happens that most serious discussions of
politics and society are carried on by males, while
the females are relegated to the role of the audience.
The occasional girl who challenges this state of
affairs is considered a masculine bitch whose opinions are not to be taken seriously.
On many levels of their existence girls have to
prostitute themselves, to sell themselves and their
human beingness for a price. The price is the
security of being accepted by the male on the male's
terms.
The unfortunate hags on East Hastings who must
peddle their cunt nightly for a few meager dollars
are only the most blatant example of the prostitution of the female in our society.
For after all, they too are looking for security
— and money is the only security they know. They
are the ones who couldn't sell themselves to any one
particular male.
Although some rebel, many girls accept this role
of the object, for through numerous doctrines, rewards, and punishments society prepares them for
this very role.
They are told, for example, that man's sexual
role is aggressive while woman's is submissive, and
that from this fact — which is presented as being
an inherent characteristic of human nature—follows
woman's inferior position in all other fields. Or
that woman's natural concern is the home and perhaps the arts, but that the important issues of society
are the exclusive preserve of men.
Good looks are rewarded with attention from the
males; being ignored is the punishment of being
judged ugly. An ugly girl friend, you see, is much
more embarrassing than any other ugly object one
may possess.
But it must not be thought that girls are the
only victims of this object-mentality. The males pay
the price in the many hang-ups, sexual and otherwise, which result from this reduction of women
to objects.
In a society which measures success by one's
ability to acquire objects, men begin to doubt their
own manhood, their own worth as human beings
if they have somehow failed to acquire all the necessary objects of success — and woman is the prize
object. Thus the ideal man is a James Bond whose
capability to acquire women is1 infinite.
Thus if Playboy plays gross games with the female
body, it is no more obscene and perverse than the
society which reduces women to the status of objects and roles. What Playboy does with its women
is only what many humanly perverted individuals
in this society would like to do themselves.
And a society which regards as its very basis
the acquiring of more and more objects to the point
where this amassment of object-wealth becomes
more important than human life and human dignity,
such a society cannot help but produce humanly
perverted and hung-up individuals.
exhilarating
elegance
for MEN
Jf>QH
EA5T
COLOGNE
4oz.
$4.75
Discerning men find luxurious
pleasure in the subtle masculine scent of Jade East...worlds
apart from the ordinary.
A Career
in
Iron Ore!
IRON ORE COMPANY OF CANADA
AND
QUEBEC NORTH SHORE AND LABRADOR RAILWAY
SEPT-ILES, P.Q. - SCHEFFERVILLE, P.Q. - LABRADOR CITY, NFLD.
Career opportunities are offered in
fcV GEOLOGY
»V MINING ENGINEERING
»V GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING
fcV CIVIL ENGINEERING
^ MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
»V ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
► METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING
PERSONNEL. DEPARTMENT,
IRON  ORE COMPANY OF CANADA,
SEPT-ILES, P. a.
Our representatives will be pleased to meet with you when they visit your campus on
December 4 and 5 Page  10
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 21,  196
FILM SOCIETY PRESENTS
HOW THE WEST
WAS WON
with
GEORGE PEPPARD, GREGORY PECK,
DEBBIE REYNOLDS
Color & Widescreen
THURS., NOV. 23 - AUDITORIUM
12:30, 3:15, 6:00, 8:30 - 50c
LABATT BREWERIES
OF CANADA LTD.
offers
Challenging Career Opportunities
for
Science Graduates
Mr. J. Compton, Technical Director of Labatt Breweries
of Canada will be on campus to interview interested
Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Food Science
graduates.
Date: NOVEMBER 24, 1967
Time: 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
For appointments please contact
The Placement Office
Announcement
to
UNIVERSITY STUDENTS
The Northern Miner, the foremost authority
on Canada's mining industry, now extends to
students a special yearly subscription rate.
This weekly mining newspaper published continuously since 1915 has the largest mining
circulation in the world. It is a valuable
source of information for those engaged in,
investing in or selling to the mining industry
of Canada.
Start reading The Northern Miner each week
— become acquainted with what's happening, as it happens, in Canada's fast changing,
ever expanding mining industry.
Take advantage of this special student offer.
Complete the coupon below and mail it today.
♦ftbelftottbem (Miner*
Canada's National Mining Newspaper
77 RIVER STREET      —      TORONTO 2, ONTARIO
Please send me one year's subscription to The
Northern Miner at the student subscription rate of
$5.00.    Remittance enclosed.
Name	
Address	
City--
School  Attending .
_ Zone..
Province-
Faculty   Year of Graduation..
IN ICE HOCKEY
Birds end prairie drought
SASKATOON (UNS) — One win and one loss
marked the UBC hockey Thunderbirds' visit to
Saskatoon this weekend.
They won 7-5 on Friday and lost 5-4 in overtime on Saturday.
Four years is a long time between wins, but
that's how long it had been since the hockey
Birds had won in Saskatoon.
The last win came while the Birds were under the direction of Father David Bauer, the year
the Birds took the Western Intercollegiate Hockey League championship.
Mickey McDowell, current Bird captain and
the only holdover from Bauer's days considered
Friday night's win over the Huskies a good omen
for a good season both for himself and the rest
of the team.
Friday's game was the league opener for both
teams.
The Huskies opened the scoring early in the
first period, but Bird rookie Jackie James evened
the score less than a minute later, on a pass from
Blaine Pollock.
James scored again with only a minute left
in the period and put the Birds ahead to stay.
In the second period UBC outscored the University of Saskatchewan three to one, despite
being outshot 13 to 7.
At the 1:49 minute mark of the third period,
Miles Desharnais scored to put the Birds four
goals ahead.
Later, with only eight minutes left to play,
the Huskies poured home three unanswered goals
within 70 seconds.
The goals narrowed the score to 6-5.
UBC's defence managed to contain the Huskies for the final minutes, and forward Don Fiddler scored the clinching goal at the 17:30 mark.
It was a different story on Saturday.
The Thunderbirds were outshot 21 to 4, and
outscored 3 to 0 in the first period.
Early in  the second  period Desharnais  put
UBC on the scoreboard, firing in a relay sh(
from Wayne Hunter.
Later the Birds and Huskies exchange
singles to end the period with U of S leading 4-
The third period belonged to UBC as M
Dowell and Desharnais scored one each to ser
the game into overtime tied at 4-4.
Saskatchewan forward Karl Kozinski score
the winning goal at the 8:40 mark of the t£
minute overtime session.
The Birds are now practicing for this wee!
end's series  against the  University of Calgai
Dinosaurs.
ICE CHIPS
• Coach Bob Hindmarch said he was impre
sed by Rick Bardal's steady and oft-times fa;
tastic' goaltending.
• UBC's Mick McDowell picked up fh
points, with three goals and two assists in Sask
toon, to give him a good start in the scoring rae
AMS, alumni greedy
says Jayvee coach
Junior varsity basketball coach Norm Wa
has come out with some harsh words about tr
present AMS setup which gives out the mone
his team needs.
"The whole structure needs a real good loo'
If they want to emphasize two sports, then let
do it," said Watt.
He echoed the words of varsity coac
Peter Mullins when he said they weren't goir
to be able to compete with SFU in a few year
He added that the AMS is responsible for tr
welfare of this team, but are a little greedy wil
the money.
"And the alumni aren't helping either," co:
eluded Watt.
Further Announcement Concerning
AMS CHARTER FLIGHT
Three Months
in Europe
$295 or $400
To: Faculty and Students:
If the response to date continues to the deadline of Thursday, Nov. 23,
1967, the Charter Flight to Europe will be at the low price of $295 per person.
The question remains as to whether the response will be sufficient to fill all
180 seats.
Further, in answer to your questions:
1. Assuming the charter flight materializes there will be NO Group flights.
2. If the charter flight does not materialize the group flights will be available
and will cost $400 per adult person. The first flight would leave May 13, 1968,
and the second on June 4, 1968.    Both return from London, September 4, 1968.
Therefore, let me remind you, that if you intend to take the Charter,
and are able to meet the financial obligations of the $295 then send your
letter of commitment no later than Thursday November 23, 1967.
MORE FACTS ABOUT THE CHARTER FLIGHT:
Time: June 7, 1968—September 4, 1968
Place: Vancouver to London, return
Cost: $295 per person
Plane: Boeing 707—jet
Flying Time: Approximately (nine) 9 hours
FINANCIAL ARRANGEMENTS: $100 at date of application
$100 by January 5, 1968
Balance of $95 by February 1, 1968
DEADLINE FOR APPLICATION: Thursday November 23, 1967
For further information please contact me by phoning the A.M.S. office
or writing to:
KEN GLASNER
Charter Flight Director
A.M.S. Office, Brock Hall
University of British Columbia
Vancouver 8, B.C. jesday, November 21, 1967
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 11
Grocers7 Price too high    SPORTS SHORTS
Vancouver IGA Grocers invaded War Memorial Gym
wer the weekend and left in
heir wake a battered and
aeaten but newly confident
JBC Thunderbird basketball
earn.
Grocers walloped Birds 81-61
Triday night but were hard-
pressed to salvage a 77-72 derision in the Saturday re-
natch.
Though Birds held the
ough Grocers to a mere four-
>oint advantage at the half in
he first encounter, Grocers'
uperior height gradually wore
3irds down.
Former New Mexico State
tar Billy-Joe Price took advantage of his 6' 9" frame to
core 12 of his 16 points in the
econd half.
Price, 6' 7" Al Birtles and
I' 4" Dave Way combined to
ntimidate the vaunted shoot-
ng of Birds' Ian Dixon and
'hil Langley with their shot-
locking tactics.
Grocers forced the Birds to
ake numerous shots from
ray-out range and dominated
10th backboards.
Dixon and Derek Sankey led
tirds Friday with 13 points
ach.
Ian Hunter and Way follow-
d Price in Grocer scoring
irith 16 and 15 points respec-
Lvely.
Birds' zone-press, not too
ffective Friday, was more
macious in the second en-
agement.
The press clicking, Birds nar-
owed a ten-point half-time
eficit Saturday to just three
ioints with less than a minute
smaining.
But Grocers' Hunter dashed
ayvees take two
The UBC basketball Jay-
ees won their second and
bird games of the season as
hey bombed Newton 82-65
"riday night and clobbered
forth Shore Teachers 75-34
tie following night.
Ron Thoreson, with 31
oints, led the Jayvees against
Tewton.
Gary Best scored 17 points
l leading UBC to victory over
le Teachers.
all UBC hopes by making good
on two foul shots with 15 seconds on the clock.
Once again, the story for
Grocers was Price.
The willowy center was virtually unstoppable under the
hoop, connecting on 11 of 18
field goal attempts and four
of five foul shots for 26 points.
Guard Ed Suderman and
Hunter added 13 and 12 points
respectively for Grocers.
Dixon poured through 17
points to lead Birds and Neil
Murray and Ken Shields added 16 and 13 points respectively.
Though Birds lost, UBC basketball fans left the gym in a
hopeful mood.
So did coach Peter Mullins.
"We would have beaten
them if it weren't for Price,"
he said.
ii*- A' ■.■&.''■'    ft"
— derreck wabb photo
UBC'S KEN SHIELDS (21) stretches to snatch the basketball
away from IGA's 6'9" Billy-Joe Price (13). The tall Grocer
led his team to two victories over the Thunderbirds on the
weekend. Bob Molinski (43) looks on as the two fight it out.
VOLLEYBALL
The UBC volleyball team, defending Canadian champion,
began its new season victoriously in the British Columbia Invitational Tournament on Saturday at the Richmond Forum.
The Birds, injury-ridden and in the midst of conversion to
a highly complicated offensive system learned on their recent
Japan tour, played faulty and inconsistent volleyball but were
able to play well enough to win the tournament championship.
Relying primarily on the skills of Mike Rockwell and Robert
Boyle and the enthusiasm of rookies, the Birds were able to
show their awesome power just often enough to beat Simon
Fraser 3 games to 2, British Columbia Institute of Technology
3-1 and Royal Roads 3-0 to take the championship.
CROSS COUNTRY
Ho, hum, yawned the UBC cross country team as they
departed the confines of Royal Roads Military College in Victoria.
They had just captured Admiral Nelles' prized trophy by
having their first four runners finish one, two, three, four.
"It's been a long time since I've seen the least number of
points (10) scored by the winner in a meet," said track and field
coach Lionel Pugh.
Bob Tapping, running for the first time this year, won
easily as his time of 19:54.8 was just seven seconds off John
Valiant's record.
Ken French ambled in second while Jack Burnett and Tom
Howard fought it out for third and fourth.
Gerry Glyde finished seventh.
UBC's B team did not fare as well and ended up in fifth
place in their division.
The team was so ecstatic about winning this important meet
that they forgot to bring Admiral Nelles' prized trophy home
with them.
SOCCER
The "roarrr" that the UBC football Thunderbirds couldn't
find all season has been discovered.
While all eyes have been on the affairs of one Frank Gnup
and his brood, Joe Johnson has quietly led his soccer Birds to
the first place berth in the Pacific Coast Soccer League.
Their latest endeavor was a come-from-behind 3-1 win over
Victoria on Saturday.
The half time score was 1-1 after Harvey Thom kicked in
the tying goal. In the second half Victoria tried to get a different
kind of attack going for them but apparently hadn't done their
homework.
Gary Thompson and Dave Kotula kept themselves to one
goal each before the game ended.
JUDO
On Nov. 4 the UBC judo club held an invitational tournament and some of the best judokas in the Pacific Northwest
showed up.
After Yoshi Okita won in his middleweight class, he went
into the open class, overall champion fights. When the thumps
and grunts had died away, Okita was declared the winner and
grand champion of black belts.
UBC came out of the skirmish with four firsts and one third.
Besides Okita's two consecutive wins, Charles Maignon and Art
Adams won the lightweight black belt and lightweight junior
colored divisions respectively. John Osaki supplied the third
place from the lightweight senior colored division.
WOMEN'S SPORT
The UBC field hockey Thunderettes travelled to Portland,
Oregon last weekend and placed second in the Pacific Northwest
Tournament.
The University of Victoria was the overall winner with a
record of six wins and no losses. UBC had five wins and one
loss to Victoria on the last day of the tourney..
Let's Go Skiing!
SAMUEL ANDERSON
•   Erbacher, Gresvig and A & T skis
mi
-— "American Revolutionary"
• E.C.L, Tyrol and La Dolomite Boors
• E.C.L, Tyrolia and Allais Harness
ltf.
— "S.N.C.C. International Affairs Dept. Member"
•  Junior Ski Sets
—
— U.S. Editor of "New African" Magazine
•  After Ski Boots and Slippers
C1
Committee Member of Black Student Congress
•  Toques, Parkas, Hoods, and Hats
Complete Ski Sets
at $33.95 and up
c.
Previously-Black Youth Task Force Advisor in
Newark, N.J.-Black Power Conference
— Former Organizational Director of Harlem
Black Panther Party
(Not $39.95 as shown in Friday's Ubyssey)
,Other Complete Sets at $45.95 -$99.95
North Western
Political Essayist and Reviewer, Poet & Writer,
Math Teacher for the State University of New
York in Harlem
Sporting Goods Ltd.
10th at Alma                                                                 224-5040
SPECIAL EVENTS-THURS. NOON - NOV. 23
BROCK LOUNGE - 35 CENTS Page  12
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  November 21,   196
'TWEEN CLASSES
Kierans queries Levesque
LIBERAL CLUB
Eric   Kierans,   president    of
Quebec Liberal Party,  speaks
today, noon, on Can We Win
Without  Levesque,  Brock.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Jeunesse  Musicales  presents
the  Prague   Chamber   Orchestra   Soloist   in   concert,   noon
today, auditorium.
AMS
Education confrontation rally, today noon, in front of
library if sunny, in Brock if it
rains. Come!
GEOGRAPHY CLUB
Dr. Edward Higbee, visiting
professor of geography from
University of Rhode Island,
speaks on Vancouver's potential in the National System of
Cities, noon today, Geog. 100.
ARTS COUNCIL
Where do demonstrations go
from here — or boing, boirig,
Boeing? Meeting today, noon,
JSM lounge.
VISITING LECTURER
Dr. Baldo Conticello, Italian archaeologist, will lecture
on The Grotto of Tiberius, at
Sperlonga, and Roman Nym-
phaet, today noon,    Lass. 102.
ECONOMICS SOCIETY
Robert    Bonner    speaks    on
Economic   Continentalism,   today, 8 p.m., Ang. 213.
VISITING LECTURER
Dr. Yi-Fu Tuan, of the University of Toronto, speaks on
European and Chinese environmental attitudes — an informal comparison. Thursday,
noon, G.G. 100.
INUVIK CENTENNIAL
SUMMER EXCHANGE
Slides and discussion of the
people and problems encountered during the CAMSI summer school in Frontier Medicine, held in the Northwest
Territories last August. Wednesday, Lecture hall B, 8 p.m.
DEBATING UNION
Debate   of   the   year   with
British      National      Debating
Team   vs   UBC,   noon   Friday,
Brock.
CIASP
Education action meeting in
first vice-president's office —
south Brock. All interested or
involved people please attend.
ARCHEOLOGY CLUB
Meeting and film on Australian archeology, noon today,
Bu. 205.
HISTORY 206
International relations film—
From Kaiser to Fuehrer, today
noon, Bu. 106.
GERMAN CLUB
Kommen sie und sprechen
sie Deutsch. Heute mittag. IH
402.
IL CAFFE
Slides on Bologna, Wednesday
noon, IH 409.
CHORAL SOCIETY
Practice Wednesday in Bu.
104.
PRE LAW SOC
Meeting today, noon, Ang.
410.
FILM SOC
How the West was Won,
Thursday, auditorium, colour
and widescreen.
PRE MED SOC
Dr. T. L. Perry, department
pharmacology, speaks on co-
relation of mental illness and
biochemical defects, Wednesday, noon, Wes. 201.
PRE LIBRARIANSHIP
No meeting this week. Next
week, a children's librarian
will speak.
DANCE CLUB
Tuesday, waltz; Tuesday
night, pin classes; Wednesday,
samba; Thursday, pin classes;
Friday,  open dancing.
FULL GOSPEL STUDENTS
Work continues on a Christmas Wayfarer, this week, noon,
Ang. 406. Help!
ONTOLOGY
Welcoming Pressure — guest
speaker, Bill Porter, Wednesday  noon,   Bu.   223.
NDP
General meeting, Wednesday noon, Bu. 202.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Meeting of Mr. Stockholder's course on Imperialism and
Literature, Thursday noon,
Bu.  226.
ANGLICANS
General meeting and election and reports on chaplain
hunting. Plan activities. Thursday noon, Henn. 302.
PRELAW SOC
Meeting for all members in
Ang. 410, today noon.
3 Months in Europe
$295 by JET
See Page 70
COLLEGE
LIFE
Thursday, 7:17 p.m.
DENE HOUSE LOUNGE
Totem Park
Birney Fandrich speaking
Bruce Anderson singing
SEE YOU THERE!
Everyone Welcome
Sponsored by
Campus Crusade For Christ
FILM SOCIETY PRESENTS
HOW THE WEST
WAS WON
Thursday, November 23 — Auditorium 50c
12:30, 3:15, 6:00, 8:30
AUS
For all interested students,
a discussion of the compulsory
language labs, with the French
monitors, today noon, Bu. 202.
MARKETING CLUB
Bill Climie of Imperial Oil
will speak on Locational Strategy in Imperial Oil. This is
of special interest to comm.
363 and comm. 463 students.
Ang. 207, today noon.
^If I   with the
YOUTH HOSTELS
Six weeks professional ski instruction at Whistler.
COST:
$30.00—Lessons and Transportation
$20.00—Transportation Only
REGISTER NOW AT:
Canadian Youth Hostels Association
1406 West Broadway 738-9838
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75*, 3 days 12.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Rates for larger ads on request.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone.
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in advance.
Publications Office, BROCK HALL, UNIV. OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
 11
TIRED OP STUDYING? THEN WHY
no come to theC.V.C.-N.V.C. Dance
at Brock Hall this Saturday, November 25. Featured will be Jason
Hoover and the Epics. Time 8:30-
12.    Members    $1.00.    Non-members
_$1.50	
JASON HOOVER AND THE EPICS!
Dance to the soul sound of Jason
Hoover and the Epics! Sat., Nov.
25th,   8:30-12:30,   Brock.     	
RELAX—LET YOURSELF GO UN-
der the spell of our strobe at
Retinal Circus, 1024 Davie. Two
bands.   Fun  from   9   till   2.
Greetings
 12
"MERCI" ANGUS STEPS LAST
Friday. 3:00 p.m. Love to meet you
again.    Jean-Luc     988-4564.	
Automotive & Marine (Cont.)
I960 VALIANT. GOOD RUNNING
condition. Radio. New Tires. $250.
Best offer.  682-3279  after 6 p.m.   _
'63 AUSTIN 850, MINI, 40,000 MILES
Red, Snow tires, Chains, $550.00
738-6624 after_6 p.m.	
BE SURE TO GET THERE WITH
this happy car, 1960 Envoy. Mon-
Fri.   After   6.   733-7235.   $450.   or?
'59 PORSCHE, GOOD CONDITION,
must sell, best offer, 224-9662. 2250
Wesbrook    Cres.
'66 ALPINE, EXCELLENT CON-
dition, overdrive, radio, country
mileage. Must sell immediately.
Only     $1550.    Phone    224-4001.
Lost & Found 13
LOST IN FRED WOOD TH. GEO-
logy 105 notebook. Contact Sher-
rin Beruschi at 224-9757. Totem
Park.
Rides & Car Pools
14
STUDENT WISHES TRANSPORTA-
tion to Winnipeg or Minneapolis at
Xmas,   share  driving  expenses,   etc.
__946-6013.	
RIDE WANTED TO NEW YORK,
Ontario, points along way X-mas
holidays._Call   228-3204__or   228-8480.
ONTARIO STUDENT REQUIRES
ride to Toronto at Xmas. Share
driving, expenses. Rick. 733-8607,
Leave   number.
Special Notices
15
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20 and
have a good driving history you
qualify for our good driving rates.
Phone   Ted   Elliott,   321-6442.	
HOW THE WEST WAS WON —
Nov. 23, 12:30, 3:15, 6:00, 8:30. Aud.
50e.   Cinemascope   color.  	
MAKE 'EM LAUGH WITH AN UN-
usual gift this Christmas. Humer-
ous gifts, jokes, cards, bar supplies, toys, lamps, (check our
prices on picture framing). The
Grin Bin, 3209 W. Broadway, 738-
2311, opposite liquor store and Super  Valu  —   Post-office.
TICKETS FOR COUNTRY JOE ARE
on sale now at the Record Gallery
Tartini's & the Psychedelic Shop.
Country Joe, Papa Bears & the
Loyalists. Dec. 8-9 Now $2.50. At
door  $3.50.
U.B.C. BARBER SHOP IN THE
Village. 3 barbers. Open weekdays 8:30-6 p.m. Saturdays 'till
5:30.  _ 	
HOW WAS THE WEST WON?
Find out Nov. 23. Aud. 60c. 12:30;
3:15;  6:00:  8:30 Come!	
"PAINTING IN CANADA—A History — R. J. Harper. The Book-
finder—4444   W.   10th   Ave.,   Vane,
_B.C.           ._
RETINAL CIRCUS IS GREAT FUN
for everybody. Comeand see the
for everybody. Come and see the
lightshow. Dance with the Seeds
of Time and Mother Tucker's Yellow
Duck. Starts at 9. Lasts until 2
a.m.   See   you  there.           	
Travel Opportunities
"jet
16
CALIFORNIA: JET FLIGHT TO'
San Francisco. Lowest Christmas
fare $83.00. Avoid rush. 261-3831 or
224-4958.
COMMERCE AND ECONOMICS
Students ! World - Wide Summer
job       opportunities.       watch       for
 AIESEC Recruitment    Meeting.	
Wanted—Miscellaneous 18
WANTED — FOR NEW-YEAR'S
eve party — Three piece band,
phone    876-9360.
AUTOMOTIVE & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1956 PLYMOUTH. GOOD RUNNING
condition. $125.00. Phone after 6:30
p.m.,   738-5003.
'60    VOLVO,    $695    OR   OFFERS
After   6   p.m.,   733-3841.
'57 MORRIS MINOR, GOOD RUN-
ning condition $200. or offer. Phone
evenings   922-5284.
'63 AUSTIN COOPER, NEW MOTOR
tach, rally light, radio, good tires,
excellent condition. MU 3-7211
evenings.
Automobile Parts
23
Motorcycles
26
HONDA-FIAT
Motorcycles -  Cars
Generators - Utility Units
New and  Used
SPORT  CARS
N T
O     Motors     S
R E
T      W
145 Robson H 688-1284
Typing (Cont.)
SHORT   NOTICE   TYPING;   CAMP!
pick-up    and    delivery;    $25c    pf
 page;   phone JZE   8-4410_after   6:(
ESSAYS AND~ THESIS TYFING-
electric.    Campus    pick-up   434-955
' 'STUDENT'S WIFE~~EXPER.~~ ES
say and thesis typist — electric -
Please   phone   731-2278"
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
S
OPENING      FOR       TWO      CO-
part-time    selling.    Exclusive
cosmetics.   Training   and   top
mission.     Phone    224-6314    or
9804.
ed;
Hi
con
73:
Help Wanted—Male
a
Male or Female
9
Work Wanted
5
Music
6
INSTRUCTION
Special Classes
f
ANGEL MONZON, SPANISH FLi
minco dancing lessons for studen
and others interested, contact Dui
bar   Community   Centre,   224-1374.
Tutoring
Copying & Duplicating
31
Miscellaneous
32
Orchestras
33
BUSINESS SERVICES
Scandals
 37
FILM SOC. PRESENTS "HOW THE
West Was Won", Nov. 23, 12:30,
3:15, 6:00, 8:30, Cinemascope, Aud.
50c.
BOOKS — BOOKS — BOOKS —
Now open—a NEW bookstore on
campus, in the Tudor Bldg., 5732
University Blvd. Featuring all
books and study notes. The
VILLAGE BOOKSHOP. Open 10
a.m.   to  9  p.m.	
HAIR TREATMENT AND BODY
perm at reasonable prices U.B.C.
Beauty   Salon   In   the   village   228-
_8942.	
HOW THE WEST WAS WON "!
Nov. 23., Thurs. 12:30; 3:15; 6:00
8:30 Aud. 50c. Color and widescreen
GUESS WHAT? BRITISH NATION -
al Debating team vs. U.B.C. Friday, Nov. 24. Brock Hall. 12:30 all
welcome.
ENGLISH, FRENCH, HISTOR
Russian. Individual, no contract
$3.00 hr. by B.A., M.A., B.L.S. 73
6923.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
1
MOTHER TUCKER'S YELLOW
Duck is not obscene. It's just one
of two great bands at Retinal
Circus   this   weekend.
Typewriter Repairs
39
Typing
40
EXPERIENCED   TYPIST   —   ELBC-
tric.   Phone   228-8384   or  224-612*.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING, ARDALE
Griffith Limited, 8584 Granville
Street   (70th  & Granville).   263-4530.
AT LAST! An exclusive typing service for students. 24-hour service,
elec. typewriters, 1 block from campus. All this for only 30 cents a
pafre! University Typing Services —
Around the corner from World Wide
Travel — next to R.C.M.P. 2109 Al-
lisf n Rd. at University Blvd. Mon. to
Fri.   9  to  5.   Phone:   228-8414.
EXPERT ELECTRIC TYPIST
Experienced eassay and thesis typist
Reasonable  Rates. TR. 4-9253.
GOOD EXPERIENCED TYPIST
available for home typing, please
phone  277-5640.	
COMPOSITIONS, ESSAYS, THESES
typed. Quick service. Reasonable
rates.   Phone   681-4634.
UBC TEXTS BOUGHT AND SOL:
Busy B Books, 146 W. Hasting
681-4931.	
GOYA GUITAR FOR SALE. NEA
new, good condition. For ste
strings — large sounding box. P
733-7963.	
KOFLACH GOLD STAR BUCKLE
$50.   Phone   224-9956.	
FURNITURE?  BED-CHESTERFIEI
chairs,   dining   room   set,   etc.   R
finished    and    upholstered.    Gas:
and   good   value.   738-6624   after
p.m.	
1 BOGEN CHALLENGER-^ ~AK
2 Trayner columns, each contal
4 12" sneakers, mike and cabl
inclu.   985-5775.	
VOX SUPER LYNX GUITAR WIT
case, Fuzz-tone, 12 string electi
guit., copy of Rickenbacker: 22
6460;  	
THE SEEDS OF TIME PLAY
hot sound with that lighshow
Retinal   Circus.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
t
FOR   MEN — DBLE.   ROOM  FOR
sgle.   for   1;   bathrm.,   small   kit
Avail,   immed.   3455  Trafalgar aft
6:00 p.m.
FURNISHED LOUNGE, TEA, CO]
fee, every Thursday afternoon fro
3.00 p.m. at International Hous
upper  lounge.
Room & Board
ROOM AND BOARD ON CAMPT.
for spring term. Applications tak>
now. Z.B.T. Fraternity, 5760 To
onto Road. Phone 224-9660. Aft
six.
BED-SITTING ROOM WITH KI'
chen priv. for female. 3044 W. 10
please   phone   738-8266.
1
Furn. Houses 8c Apts.
2 ROOM SUITE, NEWLY DECOl
ated. Suitable 2 girls, near Unive
sity. Transportation available. $
month.   224-4256   after   7.
Unfurn. Houses & Apts.   t
WANT ONE BEDROOM APT. C
one large room; kits.-U.B.C.; $7
$115.   Available   Dec.   ph.   224-478(

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