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The Ubyssey Oct 29, 1964

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Array THE UBYSSEY
VOL XLVII, No. 18
VANCOUVER, l.C, THURSDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1964
CA 4-3916
SHE CAUGHT IT I
Nursing bench-warmers scream in
Women footballers
New theft
Shapeless nurses I hikes total
battle Home Ec
By BRIAN STAPLES
Misfit nurses plan to scalpel the Home Ec girls this year
at their annual Tea Cup tangle.
The yearly game between
Nursing and Home Economics
students takes place at noon
today in the stadium.
The nurses, who haven't won
for years say they are hoping
for a win this year.
The reason for their failures
was given by Art Stevenson,
Engineering IV: "The nurses
are only on campus in their
first and fourth years and cannot keep their team in shape
like the Home Ec girls."
MOLD MINDS
OF CHILDREN
See Page 2
At half time, Engineers and
Sciencemen will try to outdo
each other in Ben Hur buggies.
A cross-country race is open to
all except the track team.
Half time will see the glorious Pubsters take On other
thirsty teams in a boat race.
"The pubsters are having a
hard time picking a team because everyone insists on
chewing the glass and swallowing the bottles," said Mike
Horsey, Ubyssey editor.
"We'll get a team though,"
he said.
Admission to the game is a
donation of 25 cents, and gate
proceeds go to the Crippled
Children's Hospital. Tom Lar-
sheid of CKNW will describe
the action.
By JOHN DILDAY
Theft of a $120 wrist
watch has brought the
campus theft total to
more than $425 for the
last two weeks.
Police said the theft
occurred in War Memorial dressing room between 5:05 and 5:35 Monday.
"The lock had been
torn off the locker containing the watch," said
AMS second vice-president Byron Hender.
Earlier in the day, $50
was taken from clothes in
the Education gym.
Police said no arrests
have been made.
Spread of on-campus
thefts prompted announcement of an AMS
crack down last week.
Brief asks
living aid
for students
By MIKE HORSEY
Ubyssey Editor-in-chief
The Alma Mater Society has asked the provincial government for grants to defray out-of-town UBC students' room,
board and travel costs.
Presented to the government
Wednesday, the request is in
the form of a brief containing the first results of the
AMS   student  means survey.
The survey was conducted
last year for the AMS by a
downtown firm.
The brief shows the out-of-
town student is really a poor-
country cousin when compared
to his city counterpart.
It asks the government to
consider instituting travel
grants equal to return fare
costs from the student's home
to an institution of higher
learning.
It also suggests each out-of-
town student receive a grant,
such as one equal to two
months' room and board in university residences.
It also asks the provincial
government to "use its influence at the national level to
change the Income Tax Act so
that:
Room and board costs to
students not living with their
parents be income tax deductible.
Parents be allowed to claim
a student as a dependent unless he has earned the amount
listed in the Act as a basic
exemption.
Text books be tax deductible.
AMS president Roger McAfee and other student council executives discussed the
brief with a cabinet committee
headed 'by Attorney-General
Robert Bonner.
Expenditures
The brief showed 94 per cent
of men from outside Vancouver spend a total of $1,000 to
$3,000 annually, the bulk of
them falling in the $1,600 to
$2,200 bracket.
A UBC counselling service
brochure lists $1,400 as a minimum expenditure.
Sixty-nine per cent of women from outside Vancouver
spend between $1,000 and
$2,000 while only 31 per cent
of in-town women spend the
same amount.
Summer Earnings
The survey shows 53 per
cent of in-town men and 41
per cent of out-of-town men
earn less than $1,000 during
the summer.
Seventy-five per cent of all
women earn less than $1,000
during the summer and 38 per
(Continued on Page 3)
.    SEE. LOCAL
LESTER PEARSON
... for the qualified
Pearson
likes free
education
OTTAWA (CUP) — Prime
Minister Pearson told an audience of Canadian educators
Monday night he advocates-—
in principle—free education
for qualified students.
Pearson told the National
Conference of Canadian Universities and Colleges' annual
dinner this feeling was his own
personal belief, and could not
be implemented overnight.
He did not mention the
10,000 $1,000 scholarship program promised by the Liberals
prior to the last election.
"Although there will always
be impediments of one kind or
another," Pearson said, "the
financial barriers to education
which now exist cannot be tolerated indefinitely."
He added, however, at the
moment there may be other
and greater priorities in the
field of education and that it
is possible there may never be
perfect equality of opportunity.
"But," Pearson said, "if existing talent is to be appreciated, then no young man or
woman ought to be shut off
from university by the gap between what he or she cac tarn
in the summer and what it
costs to live and study for a
year."
Commenting on the student
loan   program,   Pearson   said
(Continued  en  Page 3)
SEE:   EDUCATION Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 29, 1964
Waste ot time
McAfee
blasts
meetings
By AL BIRNIE
Ubyssey Council Reporter
Controversial meetings of
undergraduate society presidents before regular student
council meetings has come under fire again from AMS president Roger McAfee.
McAfee charged during
Monday's council meeting the
presidents' meetings are a
waste of time, not only because
matters they dealt with could
be brought up at regular meetings, but also because the executive have to sit around and
do nothing while the undergraduate society presidents
meet.
"Councillors sometimes complain about the length of the
meetings, but the half-hour
spent at the presidents' meeting means we get out half an
hour later," said McAfee, during the debate which lasted 28
minutes.
Engineering president Steve
Whitelaw replied: "You should
be studying instead of sitting
and doing nothing. Or you
could be holding meetings of
your own."
However the presidents did
agree to change the time of
their meeting to before supper.
Presidents will now meet
from 5:30 to 6 p.m. then go for
supper which the executive
will have started at  5:30 p.m.
"Council meetings will start
sharp at 6:15," said McAfee.
—carol maceluch photo
Joe Washerman eyes Fort food returning on used plates
Fort Camp fishy food
brings Chinese eat-in
By  JOHN DILDAY
Fort Camp's Hut 17 ordered
$17 worth of Chinese food and
ate it in Fort's cafeteria to protest cafeteria food.
They hung a sign overhead
saying: "There's nothing fishy
about this food."
The other side of the sign
said: "We gave up and you'll
throw up."
•    •    •
Food Service head, Ruth
Blair, said she had heard nothing about the matter.
Fort Camp dieticians said no
formal complaint was register
ed before the incident Friday
night.
"We have to serve fish on
Friday," explained Fort's Head
Dietician,   Shirley  Venables.
Assistant   Elizabeth   Staratt
Son like father,
advises Bailey
By MIKE BOLTON
Children should be brought up to think the same way as
their parents, according to Chuck Bailey, public relations
officer for the Vancouver School board.
Bailey, speaking in a debate
added   they   always    offer   a
choice of meat, even on Friday.
Hut 17 boys said the action
was more in joke than protest,
but they did have some
grumbles.
"One salad was made of cabbage, mashmallows, figs, walnuts, pineapples, raisins and
carrots," he explained.
The dieticians claimed the
students are eating this salad.
Another student complained
about "a clove soup or something" served last week.
"Oh yes, that one," laughed
the dietician. "It was really a
disaster, although I found it
was all right."
•   •   •
Most student complaints
were that the food was "monotonous", or "generally tasteless".
One student said the food
wasn't too bad.
"There have only been three
meals 1 refused to eat so far."
Another resident said, "I've
had better mass-produced
food."
The dieticians were puzzled
by student complaints.
"I wish they would tell us
about it," said one.
"We'll try and do anything
we can to improve, if students
tell us what they don't like.
here Wednesday with provincial Liberal leader Ray Perrault, said:
• •    •
"It is wrong to convert
young people to a way of
thinking different from their
parents.
"It is the duty of parents
to influence children to a certain extent," he said.
"You cannot trust the luck
of a high school political
club's work,"  he said.
Perrault had a different
view.
• •    •
He said political clubs would
be useful  in B.C. schools.
"We are not sophisticated
enough in our attitude toward
our political system," he said.
"Newspaper letters to the
editor indicate a lack of political education in' the general
public.
AUTO INSURANCE AT
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GENERAL
MEETING
FRIDAY NOV. 6
AT 4  P.M
"The only comments we've
received have been favorable."
"The only way we have to
judge now is by how much of
what comes back on the
plates," she said.
who's
in, ,
control
•9
Human events are controlled by
thought — the basic premises that
shape the life of each individual.
Underlying all progress is the
growing vision of man's spiritual
nature and destiny. Hear this lecture titled "Who's in Control?" by
WILLIAM MILFORD CORRELL, a
member of the Board of Lecture- <
ship of The First Church of Christ,
Scientist, in Boston, Mass.
CiriaiM Sflenee leetire
12:30 p.m. Thurs., Oct. 29
in BU 106, presented by the
Christian Science
Organization on Campus
ALL GRADUATE
STUDENTS ELIGIBLE
Careers
grow
on
trees.
at MacMillan, Bloedel and Powell River Limited
... the largest integrated forest products company in Canada. And right now our company is
developing long term expansions that offer exciting
career opportunities for graduates in many fields.
We have attractive openings for graduates in
ENGINEERING, FORESTRY, SCIENCE, ARTS AND COMMERCE
The positions offer careers with a good future. Pay
well from the start. Offer a challenge to your
talents. Provide the scope and training for rapid
advancement. . . and the chance to live in one of
the finest recreational areas in the world - beautiful British Columbia.
Interested? Let's get together and talk about your
future and ours.
Call at your Student Placement Office, pick up
more information about the positions that will be
available, make an appointment for an interview
with our representative on the Campus.
Interviewing dates:
engineering November 2, 3, 4, 5, 6
forestry     November 9, 10, 12, 13
science        November 9, 10, 12, 13
arts November 16, 17, 18, 19, 20
commerce    November 16, 17, 18, 19, 20
Make your appointment early!
MACMILLAN, BLOEDEL and POWELL RIVER LIMITED Thursday, October 29,1964
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
FROSH ARE looking for a crest to wear on grubby sweat
shirts and other things. Frosh president Kim Campbell
models one idea and suggests anyone keen drop their
ideas off at the Frosh office. There will be prizes, she says.
Predicts former minister
Medicare for a
within 10 years
Local student has
financial advantage
(Continued from  Page   1)
cent of these are earning less
tfian $500.
/These earnings figures, the
brief states, are before income
taxes living or other deductions.
Parents' Income
The brief indicates income
of parents of in-town students
was higher than that of parents outside Vancouver.
On the average, 38 per cent
of all students listed their
combined parents' income as
less than $6,000 a year and an
additional 21.6 per cent said
their parents' earnings were
between $6,000 and  $8,000.
Twelve per cent of in-town
women listed their parent's
income as over $16,000.
Loons
Almost 37 per cent of men
outside Vancouver have had to
borrow money, 30.7 per cent
borrowing up to $1,000.
Twenty-six per cent of out-of-
town women have had to borrow money, 19 per cent up to
$1,000.
Only 18 per cent of Vancouver male students indicated they had to borrow money.
The same number of Vancouver women said they had to
borrow but 13.4 per cent of the
total said they borrowed $500
or less.
Part-Time Work
"Since the out-of-town student has to spend substantially more money during the academic year than his Greater
Vancouver counterpart," the
brief   said,    "And   since   his
earnings during the summer,
the combined income of his
parents, and the number of
scholarships and bursaries he
has won are no greater than
the Vancouver student, one
would expect that a higher
percentage of out-of-town students would have part-time
jobs."
Studies
The brief also indicated that
12.4 per cent of men from outside Greater Vancouver have
had to interrupt their studies
for at least one year.
Only 4.1 per cent of men
living in Vancouver, however,
interrupted their studies for
financial reasons.
AMS president Roger McAfee said the brief was well
received by the government
representatives.
"They told us the material
would be seriously considered,
and that they were impressed
with the survey information,"
he said.
McAfee said more results
from the means survey will be
released before Christmas, as
soon as they are tabulated.
KEEP FIT CLASS
For Girls and Women
King Edward High
School Gymnasium
Every Thursday 8:15 p.m.
Male Instructor — Danish
With 15 years experience.
For Information Call
733-0378 EVENINGS
only cost an extra $456 million," he claimed.
He said the revenue would
come from corporation tax, income tax and sales tax.
"Doctors are educated in
public-supported schools, and
use hospitals and expensive
equipment purchased with
public funds," Nicholson said.
"The public deserves medical security for all it has spent
on its doctors," he said.
SPECIAL EVENTS
By JOHN DILDAY
Saskatchewan's former minister of welfare
Tuesday every Canadian province will have a
plan within 10 years.
A. M. Nicholson pointed to
the Saskatchewan plan's success and the Hall Commission
Report to support his prediction.
"There are more doctors,"
more specialists, and more
rural area physicians in Saskatchewan than elver before,
now Medicare is in effect
there," said Nicholson.
"And the average Saskatchewan doctor's income is higher
than the average Canadian
doctor," he added.
Nicholson explained that
Saskatchewan doctors may
practice either under the plan
or without it, because Medicare is not compulsory.
He said after a patient visits
a doctor working under Medicare, the doctor reports his
diagnosis and what he did.
"He then receives a provincial cheque for 85 per cent of
the scheduled fees," Nicholson
said.
"Medicare doctors pass up
the remaining 15 per cent for
the assurance that they will be
paid, and promptly."
Nicholson continued, "The
government also pays the 85
per cent to doctors not working under the plan, but their
patients have to pay the extra
15 per cent.
"It is legal not to accept any
government money and force
the patient to pay all, but this
is rare," he said.
Nicholson said the federal
government would only have
to pay 50 per cent to initiate a
nation-wide program.
"Canadians spend $756 million a year on tobacco, and
$973 million a year on alcohol,
but the proposed  plan  would
Creatures like us
PASADKNA, Calif. <UNS)—
Creatures as intelligent as man
may inhabit thousands of
planets in our own Milky Way
predicted
Medicare
EDUCATION
(Continued from  Page  1)
while it has enabled more students to attend university it
does not completely meet existing needs.
"One of the main causes of
unequal educational opportun-
ities_remains the great difference between what it costs to
go to university in your home
town and what it costs, say,
for a Pembroke boy to come
to Ottawa," he said.
Pearson also warned universities against stretching their
staffs too thin in a vain attempt to establish more comprehensive universities than
can be effectively developed.
The 'Prime Minister called
for more co-operation between
universities to allow increased
mobility among students who
attend universities far from
their home.
PRESENTS
Raphael  Green's
Uncensored and Non-Political Colour Film
"RUSSIA and ITS PEOPLE"
NOON November 2 AUDITORIUM
Lost Chance to See
LARRY   KENT'S
SWEET SUBSTITUTE
A story of the driving sexual
urges of an adolescent
TWO DAYS ONLY
Thurs., Oct. 29 and Sat., Oct. 31
Evenings - 8:00 p.m.
No Performance Friday, Oct. 30
UBC  AUDITORIUM
WITT'S  HOSIERY  tic LINGERIE  SHOP
CLOSE-OUT SALE
You'll Save On KAYSER
Seamless and Full-F»»hloned Hosiery — Glove* — and Lovely
Lingerie — at Reduced Prices.
You'll Save On  FORMFIT
Brassieres and Girdles — Famous for their Fit, Comfort and
Styling — all Sale Priced.
You'll Save On SABRE SLIMS
Slims — also Skirts by Canada's Leading Sportswear Makers—
at Close-out  Sale  Prices.
You'll Save On  HOLLYWOOD
Cardigans and Pullovers of Hi-Bulk Orion — Terrifically Styled
— Fantastically Priced.
You'll Save On  NOTIONS
Sewing needs and Notions of all kinds — also a host of GIFT
ITEMS — at Give-a-way Prices.
You'll Save On CHILDREN'S WEAR
Socks  —   Underwear  —   Outerwear   for   Babies,   Toddler   and
early school years — at Deep Cut Prices.
YOU'LL  SAVE ON EVERYTHING!
There Is No Reserve — Entire Stock If On Sale
Witt's Say Good-Bye
With Bargains
Yes, in a very short time the
owner of this fine, popular
ladieswear store will retire
from business. All the present
stock must be sold out—Fast!
Here is an exciting stock from
Canada's most trusted makers
— Styleful — of Finest Quality—in Quantities and Variety
that make it a pleasure to
shop — and the Prices have
been CUT DEEP for real Fast
Action!
It's Bargain Time! Be Sure
You Make The Most Ot It!
SALE STARTS FRIDAY 9:00 A.M.
WITT'S — 5732 University Boulevard
OPEN FRIDAY EVENING TIL 9:00 P.M. THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B. C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3242,
Loc. 26. Member Canadian University Press, Founding member, Pacific
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1964
Stop, thief!
The only reasonable way to stop thefts on campus
is to abolish crime.
Consider it hereby abolished by Supreme Order.
Conservative estimates place total value of property
stolen this term at $500.
This includes cash, briefcases, books, and, yes, even
the odd umbrella.
Earlier this month student council announced it
was going to crack down on campus criminals.
Various council members suggested planting briefcases about the campus and then watching for light-
fingered souls to come tripping by.
The faults of such a plan are obvious.
The real solution is to remind Joe and Jill Student
that theft takes place here as well as outside our ivory
:.. tower.
,       Students who (gasp) have large amounts of money,
: and are prone to carry it on their persons, will have
; few excuses if it is stolen while they're  out working
up a sweat in Hula-hoop 307.
But if a lock is wrenched off a locker, there's not
much that can be done—except the obvious step of increasing supervision in areas where this might happen
i (i.e. gym).
S       This discussion, however, is rather irrelevant.
We've abolished crime, remember?
Adol-obsolete
Those who think the U.S. has a problem with  a
j presidential candidate who propounds obsolete thinking
in an adolescent manner should take a look around UBC.
Why, the Archaic Arizonian hardly compares with
a university in the throes of a coming-of-age forced by
the post-war baby boom.
Adolescent? That's how the provincial government
i treats us—just as if UBC were an unstable adolescent
unworthy of anything more than the minimal amount
of pocket money.
The result is the obsolescence problem here.
Obsolete army huts, obsolete access (three over-
: burdened by-ways), outdated and insufficient facilities,
insufficient . . . oh, you know the story.
It's a story as silly as the word adol-obsolete.
Which about describes our provincial government's
attitude towards UBC.
--'/'
NEWS   ITEM:   Councillors  accuse   AMS   president   Roger
McAfee of railroading policies through council.
*/*! ■%,&<&.
Letter from the editor
Mr. John Drainie:
This Week Has Seven Days,
c/o The CBC, Montreal, P.Q.,
(Canada).
Dear John:
Well, John, old boy, looks
like you and that immoral
bunch at the CBC have done
ii again.
You know, raising all that
hell with George Lincoln
Rockwell and those nasty
Nazis.
How could you? Everybody
knows the best way to get rid
of  something  is to  ignore  it
and wait for it to go away.
And you knew darn well
that those forward thinking
guardians of our tender sensibilities in Ottawa were so tired of trying to raise a flag
that they'd raise a fuss about
you folks.
But don't worry John, we'll
keep watching when they
water you down so that
you're just like everybody
else. And we'll read the Obituaries.
Fossil laws
By Wulfing von Schleinitz
Time to clean up the criminal code
As I see it punishment for
a crime is to serve a two-fold
purpose — to deter others and
to reform (more probably, re-
indoctrinate) the so-called
criminal.
There are always those who
would have us go back (or
even retain) a criminal code
based on the idea that punishment should consist of
some sort of retribution. Essentially the "an eye for an
eye" doctrine.
Let me state flatly that
persons who advocate such an
approach are sadistically inclined. This is one reason
why we should reject Christianity.
An ethical system based on
the belief that your enemies
shall (and should) suffer eternal and ever-lasting torment
in some afterlife for not toe
ing the line seems at the best
a vicious teaching. (1 am indebted to Bertrand Russell
for this particular point.)
What ever happened to
Christian love and charity?
Perhaps there was, at one
time, some sense in hanging
the person who stole a sheep
or a horse but a punishment
which demands more than
the proverbial eye for an eye
seems always of rather dubious ethical value.
I am quite sure that a good
case can be made out for
tougher punishments to
drunken drivers. I refer to
such individuals capable of
solving the Christmas shopping problem for several
people by pinning them and
their car against the bridge
abutment.
This points out that I, for
one, will be willing to sit
down and discuss the matter
of suitable and necessary
punishment to achieve the
goals of deterence and reformation.
We should be reasonable
about such things and the
first reasonable thing would
be to rid our criminal code
of fossil laws and those laws
which serve no useful function but to cut down on
people's pleasure.
A fossil law, for instance,
is one forbidding that cheques
shall carry a Sunday date or
that abortions are illegal.
Laws forbidding pleasure
are much too numerous to
mention. Besides, everyone
knows at least half a dozen
from personal experience.
After having accomplished
this spring cleaning of the
criminal code there remain
the hard-core laws designed
to keep society running.
These should be examined
and tailored to meet the goals
of deterence and reformation
of the so-called criminal.
There is no reason to think
that the criminal cannot serve
his sentence usefully in pleasant surroundings and even
have his wife (if he is married) stay with him overnight
(or vice-versa) once a week
or once a month.
Repeaters can always be
separated by placing them
into different institutions
while at the same time they
would receive longer sentences but hardly more cruel
treatment.
LETTERS
Eggs and judges
Editor. The Ubyssey:
Mr. Dennis Browne, Law
III, suggests that the four
judges of Student Court, being Greek, disqualify themselves from hearings of the
screech day egg-throwing incident.
As Mr. Browne may be
aware, the AMS constitution
requires that three of the four
judges be lawyers. Hopefully
the AMS in making appointments, considered the appointees to be persons of integrity and merit. That they
also happen to be males, Canadians, under 30, physically
normal, participants in extra-
curricular activities, and
Greeks, are general characteristics  of the applicants.
Taken to its logical conclusion, Mr. Browne's argument would have our legal
system select judges for each
particular case only on the
basis of an exhaustive metaphysical review of their sex,
religion, ethnic origin, personal philosophy, political beliefs,   and   habits.
Mr. Browne's argument
rests on the thesis that the
egg throwing is only explainable as a protest against the
Greek community. Might not
it also be somebody's idea of
fun? Or mere hooliganism?
Or the result of an emotional
disturbance? Or a protest
against women? Or an organized prank?
Mr.  Browne   would surely,
agree   that   in   an   adversary
system such as ours, the first
function   of  the   Court   is  to
hear both sides.
Mr. Browne's complaint
would seem to lie •with man's
fibre: he would suggest that
colored by the activities of
his life, a man cannot therefore sit as a fair arbiter in a
dispute. His complaint, then,
surely lies with our whole
judicial system.
But machines, as a sterile
alternative, would surely provide a nunsatisfactory jurisprudence. And not even these
would condone all activity in
the name of "protest".
PETER   S.   HYNDMAN
Law II
V     *r     V
Minority of one
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Available in our bookstore
is a magazine called The
Minority of One. It is sponsored by Linus Pauling, Bertrand Russell, Albert Schweitzer, Sir Robert Watson-Watt,
and others.
In spite of the sponsorship
of these respected people, the
magazine has only 25,000 subscribers after five years of
publication.
I'm sure these sponsors feel
that what the magazine has
to say is important. I recommend it to you.
KEN HEIBERT
v.-'-. x>«™- ,-r- 'i*»*mmx!mi&im
EDITOR:   Mike   Horsey
Managing   Janet  Matheson
News    Tim Padmore
City     Tom Wayman
Art  Don Hume
Sports  George Reamsbottom
Asst. Managing  Norm Betts
Asst. City      Lorraine Shore
Asst. News Carole Munree
Associate   Mike Hunter
Associate   Ron Riter
Magazine   Dave Ablett
Blessings on frosty paws of Corol
Smith, AI Birnie, Janet Currie, Ed
Clarke, Jack McQuarrie, Carol Anne
Baker, Mike Bolton, Brent Cromie,
Massino Verdicchio, Paul Wood, John
Kelsey — who wants to switch to
cityside (a convert!), John Dilday,
Rrian Staples, Lome Mallin, Tim
Roberts, Bob Weiser. Big surprise
(or everybody tomorrow. Thursday, October 29, 1964
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
DR.   MARGARET   ORMSBY,
acting head of the UBC history department, received
an honorary doctor of laws
degree at the University of
Manitoba Saturday.
Contempt
depresses
Freshmen
By BRENT   CROMIE
Ubyssey Green Angle
What is the essence of that
heart warming friendliness
that all established students accord the lowly frosh?
Raw contempt.
I first realized upperclass-
men's feelings toward me at a
party several days before start
of the year.
Hearing a third year type
ramble on about his accomplishments, I quietly questioned their authenticity. He
screamed: "What right has a
goddam little frosh to speak to
me like that!"
Only a glib tongue saved my
neck.
Then at the library pool I
watched a red-jacketed mob
dunking several of my contemporaries.
Finally at Homecoming Saturday my date and I approached the door of a frat and were
told: "It's 12 and the party is
CLOSED."
By this time I didn't argue.
However, the freshette is a
different matter. I overheard
two upperclassmen at Brock
considering their lawful prey,
namely one very voluptuous
freshette.
There was a marked absence
of the hostility I met.
Totem women
WEST  POINT  GREY
BAPTIST CHURCH
Eleventh   Ave.   at   Sasamat
Rev. A. J. Hadley
9:45 A.M.     ELECTIVE   STUDY
COURSES
11:00 A.M.     "THE  BREATHLESS
LIFE"
7:30 P.M.     "BY APPOINTMENT"
8:45 P.M.    YOUNG   PEOPLE'S
FELLOWSHIP
ALL MALE
STUDENTS
Assigned To Totem Park
Residences
East Wing (Haida  House)
MAY MOVE INTO THEIR
ACCOMMODATION
OCTOBER 31st
Over - protected
and cut off too
By JOAN GODSELL
Ubyssey Women's Angle
We're being persecuted—again.   Cut off, too.
Someone's developed a security system at Totem dorms
to keep women in—and men
out.
Either one.
With eight-foot walls, high
barred gates and blinding spotlights, it works for everybody
but Engineers.
But that's not all Totem has.
As you've heard a Buzzerbox
has been added.
A Buzzerbox may be defined
as a machine which transmits
requests to unlock the dormitory door to a Porter. It then
allows four seconds for one to
open the door, get in and shut
shut the door.
That is; you say to Buzzerbox, "I'd sort of like to come
in now."
. Without   a   word Buzzerbox
opens the door.
Great Stuff.
But if you're half a second
slow, a burglar alarm goes off.
Guaranteed to wake everybody
in the building.
How do you feel.
Four hundred eyes at 4 a.m.
Sunday—and they're all looking at you.
That's not all.
Buzzerbox has an added feature.   It  picks  up  your  good-
nights or whatever you say at
4 a.m., and relays every word
for the benefit of anyone within a few feet of the Porter's
desk.
You're returning home from
a black wavy hair, Paul Newman eyes, dreamy build, 1964
white Parissiene convertible-
type date.
He   says,  "Mumble   diddle?"
You say, "Ratsifrani."
And you're just about to say
"Fortistran", when the door
slams. Cut off.
Frustrating, but you recover
enough to turn around and see
the entire faculty and staff of
Totem Dorm standing "within
a few feet of the desk."
Pretty funny, all right.
Funny enough to start a Ban
the Buzzerbox campaign.
NOTICE
Satirist's exhibition
at Gallery next week
UBC Fine Arts Gallery will display a bicentenary exhibition of works by the satirist William Hogarth next
week.
This exhibition will commemorate the 200th anniversary of Hogarth's death.
The gallery will show books and relics relating to
Hogarth as well as Wedgwood china and furniture from
Hogarth's era.
Nov. 4-11 is Hogarth Week at UBC.
A program of noon-hour speakers in La. 104 will discuss aspects of his life and times.
Anyone having information concerning the egg-
throwing incident in the
Auditorium Cafeteria on
Oct. 5, please contact Disciplinary Committee Members Richard Scardine, Law
III, or Greg Morely, Law II,
at the law building.
FROSH SYMPOSIUM Oct. 31
11.30 a.m. Hycroft Towers
On "Race, Religion and Nationality"
Apply at AMS Office
This Symposium provides  an excellent  opportunity for
Freshmen to get introduced to intellectual gabfest. It will
be a shame, if the program fails due to non-participation
of Frosh.
Frosh please apply!
We assure you Kim won't be there!?!
SECOND ANNUAL FALL SYMPOSIUM
Rosario Beach, Nov. 6 - 8
The Fall Symposium is a weekend consisting of:
—academic papers presented by various members of
the faculty.
—very informal discussion between faculty and the
students.
Its purpose is to:
—expose both faculty and students of varied disciplines to a topic of particular importance.
—provide an opportunity to open dialogue between
faculties, students and faculty members.
It is open to:
—any U.B.C. student or faculty member.
—we would especially like to encourage participation by faculties of science, engineering, education,
commerce, and nursing.
The topic this year is: BETWEEN MAN AND MAN
—It is a study of Communication and Myth.
This means we will be looking at some of the basic
assumptions and thought patterns of communication and exploring their breakdown in the modern
situation.
Cost:  $6.00—covers   transportation,   food   and   accommodation.
Apply A.M.S. Before November 1st
UBC Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre
For   SKATING,   CURLING,   HOCKEY
Pleasure Skating Hours:
12.45 p.m. to 2.45 p.m. Tues., Thurs. and Sunday
3.00 p.m. to 5.00 p.m., Friday and Saturday
7.30 p.m. to 9.30 p.m., Tues., Fri., Sat. and Sunday
THURSDAY STUDENT SPECIAL 15c
Skating Parties each Wednesday, 7:30 p.m.- 9:30 p.m.
SKATE RENTAL AVAILABLE, ALL SIZES
Book Now for Your Club
Skating Tickets at Reduced Rates Available
For Information Phone Local 365 or 224-3205
1.   Clients'   Committee -
Student  Union   Building
Applications for a Clients' Committee for the Student
Union Building are now being accepted. This
Committee will be in operation during construction of the Building, working closely with the
architect, and will be involved from the time of
production of working drawings to the final
acceptance of the Building from the contractors,-
up to three years.
This is the Committee which will decide the detailed
planning of the areas within the Building and is
therefore most important.
Since this Committee will be operating over a con-
sidable length of time, consideration will be
given to younger students, who might be prepared to spend more than one year on it.
Applications should be directed to Marilyn McMeans,
Secretary, Box 55, Brock Hall.
2.   Nome   for  S.U.B.
The proposed new Student Union Building now needs
a name. Please forward suggestions in writing,
along with your name and phone number, to the
A.M.S. Secretary, Box 55, Brock Hall.
3. Guideposts to Innovation
A committee will be formed to discuss the President's
Committee Report on Academic Goals. Would any
interested persons please leave their names, telephone numbers and reasons for wanting to work
on such a committee with either Jim Slater,
President of Graduate Studies or Marilyn McMeans, Secretary, Box 55, Brock Hall.
4. Charter Flight to Europe
Applications are now being sought for a Travel Director to organize and run a charter flight to
Europe. Interested persons please leave name,
phone number, address and a list of their past
experience in this field with the Secretary, Box
55, Brock Hall. Applications close November 9,
1964.
5. World University Service Committee
Students are invited to join the UBC World University Service Committee. Weekly meetings are
held in the Council Chamber, Brock Hall, at 12:30
p.m. Tuesdays. The WUS Office is Brock Extension 257, and more information may be obtained
there.
An informal WUS Workshop, outlining the activities
and philosophy of WUS, followed by discussion,
will be held on Saturday, October 31, from 2:00
p.m. to 5:00 p.m. in International House (Upper
Lounge). All students interested in international
academic endeavours, or WUS in particular, are
cordially invited. Page 6
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 29, 1964
Council briefs
Means survey planned;
ambulance lack probed
BYRON HENDER
. . . high quality
UBC FM
station
proposed
UBC Radio wants to be a
full blown FM station.
Byron Hender, Alma Mater
. Society second vice-president,
. said the station, if it comes,
will be non-commercial.
"It would > provide a high
quality, educational broadcast
outlet for the Greater Vancouver area," Hender said.
He said financing involved is
"very, very hazy right now."
"There may be money forthcoming from downtown advertisers,"  Hender said.
• •    •
"It is foreseen that capital
funds for the establishment of
the station would come from
the AMS," Hender said.
These capital expenditures
would be much greater since
the administration has torn
down the radio aerials that
were a part of the UBC wireless station behind Brock Hall.
This was done even though
UBC Radio and the AMS asked
that they be spared.
All equipment, including
new aerials for the proposed
station will cost the AMS from
$10,000 to $15,000, Hender
said.
In a letter to Hender, President John Macdonald expressed interest in the idea of a
UBC FM station.
• •    •
The station would possibly
be controlled in the same
method as the Winter Sports
Centre, Hender said.
The Winter Sports Centre is
run by a committee on which
students have more votes than
administration   representatives.
Programming for the FM
station would provide informa
tion on sports, meetings and
noon hour events.
High quality music would be
used and there is even the possibility of French language
programming.
A broadcasting licence from
the Broadcast Board of Governors has not yet been applied for.
By AL BIRNIE
Ubyssey Council Reporter
Canadian Union of Students
is planning a nation-wide student means survey.
"The CUS' executive is presently meeting with officials of
the Dominion Bureau of Statistics, and DBS says it is interested in the project," AMS
president Roger McAfee said
Monday.
"CUS has asked them for an
$8,000 donation for the survey,
and there seems to be a good
hope of getting it."
McAfee gained his informa
tion from CUS vice-president
Malcolm Scott via a telephone
call to Ottawa.
Scott was UBC AMS presi
dent last year.
The national survey will be
based to a large degree on the
UBC survey, conducted by the
AMS last spring.
• •   •
Nursing    president    Wendy
Woodland is a one-woman
committee looking into the
possibility of getting an ambulance for our fair campus.
"City ambulances get lost
and spend half an hour getting
out here," says President McAfee. "For injured students
that's quite inconvenient."
Miss Woodland says her only
progress so far has been to find
out university officials consider the problem non-existent.
• •   •
Joining Frosh president Kim
Campbell as new members of
student council are Sandy
Gray (Forestry), Don York
(Science), and Sally Sargent
(Librarianship), who have been
Workshop probes
WUS history
History and aims of the World University Service will
be discussed at an open workshop Saturday at Intemar
tional House.
elected since the summer.
Social Work president is yet
to be seen or heard.
• • •
Undergraduate Clubs Committee, which co-ordinates
inter-club affairs and disputes
for the nearly 90 clubs on campus, has elected this year's executive:
Lome Hudson, president;
Glen Witter, vice-president;
Ken Paterson, treasurer; Rick
Vulliamy, treasurer; and Orma
Jones, secretary.
• •    •
The AMS is on the lookout
for someone to co-ordinate
their travel department. Last
year two charter flights were
booked to Europe and one to
the West Indies, but President
McAfee hopes for a large expansion of the department this
year.
Inducement is a free seat on
the plane of his choice for the
department director.
Dr. John ConWay of the UBC
History department and Wendy Moir, 1963-1964 WUS
chairman will address the as-
chairman, will address the assembly. The film, Window on
WUS, a sketch of world-wide
WUS activities, will be shown.
The UBC delegation to the
WUS National Assembly in
London, Ont. earlier this
month will attend.
UBC WUS committee conducts the largest exchange
scholarship system; it was the
first to establish scholarships
with USSR and Chile; it
collected and made the largest
shipment of books to underdeveloped universities overseas, said Terry Creighton, stu^
dent delegate to the National
Assembly.
The workshop, set for 2 - 5
p.m. is sponsored by the UBC
WUS committee.
University Students
Earn Extra Money
Representing the
HARVARD CLASSICS
Top Remuneration
Car Necessary
For Appt. Phone 435-9348
ECONO-CAR
Rental System
New - Low
Winter Rates
1041  Alberni 682-7567
If your pizza is perfect
it's from
We are installing the
WORLD'S LARGEST
Pizza Oven to give you the
World's Fastest Service.
Weekend waiting will be
eliminated
2676 W. Bdwy. - RE 6-9019
Creighton urged interested
students to attend the workshop.
Text deadline
this Friday
Friday is the deadline for
returning unwanted textbooks.
Only books in good shape
and accompanied by sale slips
will be accepted at the bookstore.
Exceptions may be made for
students who have lost their
sale slips, said bookstore manager John Hunter Wednesday.
Term break
not official
for
Don't make   any   plans
your mid term break yet.
It's not official.
The proposal has passed the
Registrar and the Senate but
the final decision rests with
the individual faculty heads.
So far no Dean has made an
official ruling on the midterm break, which is scheduled
for March 4 to 7.
Students have been lobbying
for a break in the long, holi-
dayless second term for several
years.
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The Administration Building:
MERLE C. KIRBY, Manager Thursday, October 29,1964
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 7
IH house
World
committee
formed
By CAROL ANNE BAKER
A committee to make UBC
students more aware of international affairs has been
formed.
International House chairman Mike Geddes is forming
a n International Activities
Committee.
• •    •
The committee will be made
up of both overseas and Can-
- adian students.
"The Alma Mater Society
bureaucracy is too Canadian,"
Geddes said. "One of every 11
students on this campus is
foreign.
"Students should become
more aware of current international affairs.
"We hope to get persons important in international affairs to come and speak at
UBC," he said.
• •   •
This week is International
Affairs Week on campus, with
the theme The American Presidential Election.
Anyone interested in joining the committee should contact Mike Geddes at International House or through AMS
Box 146.
57 varieties
There are World University
Service Committees in 57
countries.
Translation difficulty
brings change of name
RAPHAEL GREEN
. . . Russia visit
Green probes
Russians
on Monday
Special Events is presenting Russia and its People, a
Raphael Green film on life behind he Iron Curtain, in the
Auditorium at noon Monday.
Green has travelled throughout the Soviet Union making
the film and has covered a
great segment of Soviet life.
The film touches on the
questions of religion in the
Soviet Union, the social state
and the nature of the privileged classes.
Green, the director-cameraman, has worked on the White
House staff and travelled
through North Korea on the
U.S. Reparations Commission.
Like a summer in Europe?
get together with AISEC
The International Association for Students of Economics and Commerce, known as AIESEC, is looking for
new members.
AIESEC's purpose is to further international understanding through student exchanges of summer jobs.
It was formed in Europe, hence the French-language
initials.
Last summer, five UBC students worked in Holland,
Switzerland, Germany and Italy. Seven students from England, Wales, Holland, France, Japan and the U.S.A. worked
in B.C.
Anyone interested can drop into the AIESEC office,
Brock extension 361.
G.S. A. News
A committee is being formed to consider the Report
of the University President's Committee on Academic
Goals. If interested in working on this committee, please
leave name with Secretary in the office.
G.S.A. General Meeting has been set for Friday,
November 6, 4 p.m. All Graduate students welcome to
attend.
Some progress has already been made in our efforts
to soBve the parking problems of Graduate students — 50
more spaces in 'B' lot, and free evening parking in the
Biological Sciences Lot. Be sure to fill out questionnaire
at the Centre.
Remember to have your pictures taken for Totem —
the Campbell mobile studio at the Stadium.
Canadian Universiy Students Overseas is about to become the Canadian Volunteers.
CUSO is the Canadian version of the Peace Corps except
that it is a private rather than
a government organization.
Tony Best, UBC chairman of
CUSO, said the organization
decided to change its name at
the annual meeting in Ottawa
because the present name was
difficult to translate in some
foreign dialects and because it
didn't indicate the purpose of
the organization.
OUSO sends graduates in
any field to one of 16 emerging
nations in Asia, South East
Asia, Africa, the Caribbean
and South America for two
years.
The volunteers are paid by
the host country and live and
work at the local level.
Since the organization was
established in 1961 it has sent
over 200 volunteers.
Only four of these have terminated their service before
the allotted two years.
Colin Johnston, a UBC
theology student and return
volunteer from Sarawak in
Malaysia, was elected to the
national executive at the meeting in Ottawa.
'No is the best
contraceptive'
EDMONTON (CUP) — A
University of Alberta professor told a facts of life seminar
that the best contraceptive is
a firm no.
However he added that girls
should learn about other types.
GRAD STUDENTS
Photos Now Being Token for Totem
MOBILE STUDIO AT STADIUM
9 a.m.-3.30.p.m. - Limited Time Only - Don't Delay
This service covered by your Grad Fee
CAMPBELL STUDIO
10th & Burrard
RE 1-6012
* SALE *
OCTOBER 27th to 30th
LONG LAB COATS
Regular 4.95.   Now 4.50
SHORT LAB COATS
Regular 3.95.   Now — 3.50
The College Shop
HOURS: 11:30 - 2:30
BROCK EXTENSION
REGULAR
and
KING SIZE
du MAURIER
a product of Peter Jocfctoa Tobacco Halted — Maker* ef flee cigarettes Page 8
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 29, 1964
Different drivel
at 650 on radio
If you're a residence resident and you're tired of the
same downtown drivil pouring through your radio, you
can tune to 650 kc for a
change.
U B Cs Radio Society
transmits programs over the
power lines into Acadia,
Fort and Lower Mall residence areas using 10 watt
transmitters.
Their night broadcasting
is aimed primarily at Students housed on Campus and
runs until 10:30 p.m. week-
nights.
Attempts to include Totem
Park Residence have failed
so far, as wires are not yet
available.
Fall sees
interludes
musical
Care for a musical interlude?
The department of music at
UBC is offering a series of
concerts and recitals this  fall.
Every Friday at 12:30 and 8
p.m. concerts ranging from
English Chamber Music in the
Time of Hogarth to the music
of Mozart, Brahms and Bach
will be presented.
Sunday Nov. 8 an orchestral concert of Weber, Mozart and Schumann will be pre-
::'-r.tocl by the University Symphony Orchestra at 2:30 p.m.
in Brock.
"Music of Johannes Brahms"
is the theme of the Harry Ad-
askin Noon Hour Series every
Wednesday noon in Bu. 106.
20 universities
RCAF
OPPORTUNITIES
>UI
The RCAF is Canada's biggest
aviation business and offers a
wide variety of opportunities
Train with No. 109 UBC
Squadron under the
Regular Officer Training
Plan (ROTP)
For information without
obligation contact
F/L Ben Robinson,
The Armoury, UBC
CA 4-1910
Mean fee boost
$60 in Canada
Tuition fees have risen an average of $60 over last year
at at least 20 of Canada's degree-granting universities, a
survey conducted recently by the Canadian Union of Students indicated. 	
'Ombudsman
unnecessary'
The average, fee hike at UBC
last year was $50.
Fees at Victoria College also
went up $50 last year and further hikes have been predicted
for this year at both institutes.
At some universities the
hike was announced after the
end of the academic term without the prior consultation of
the students, and without explanation.
CUS president Jean Bazin
said about the survey: "The
time has come for students in
general and student governments in particular to start discussing these matters with
their  provincial governments
Gordon Gaibraith, local CUS
chairman, said UBC students
should watch the increase situation with interest because it
might effect their later university life.
The 28th Congress of CUS
held in September approved in
principle a fee freeze, pending
the outcome of the CUS means
survey and Bladen Commission
on the financing of higher education.
Cryptic ad tantalizes
cupless Fraternities
An Ombudsman is unnecessary at UBC, says a report
presented to student council
last week.
The report on the necessity
qf improving communication
of student problems to the
proper authorities was compiled by AMS first vice-president Bob Cruise and Education president Dave Lynn.
Cruise said the best communication is the present one,
in which students can work
through their undergraduate
societies or through AMS councillors.
"At present The Ubyssey is
the best ombudsman on campus," Cruise said.
How to study
MONTREAL (CUP) — A
seminar for first year students
on how to study is being held
at McGill university.
lid JIllIllitMflL
CALGARY, ALBERTA
offaJunq jooamM  in
Petroleum Exploration
will conduct campus interviews on
November 4, 5, and 6
Post  Graduates — Graduates
Undergraduates
HONORS GEOLOGY — Permanent and summer employment in Geology.
GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING (Options 1, 2, 3) —
Permanent and summer employment in Geology
and/or Geophysics.
PHYSIC and GEOLOGY — Permanent and summer
employment in Geology and/or Geophysics.
MATHEMATICS and PHYSICS—Permanent and summer employment in Geophysics.
HONORS PHYSICS—Permanent and summer employment in Geophysics.
ENGINEERING PHYSICS—Permanent and summer
employment in Geophysics.
ARRANGEMENTS FOR PERSONAL INTERVIEWS
MAY BE MADE THROUGH
THE UNIVERSITY PLACEMENT OFFICE
Wannahousercup?
The Inter-Fraternity Council does. Badly.
The silver loving cup was
stolen from the Beta house
about a week ago.
The cup is awarded annually
to the fraternity that accumulates the most points for participation and success in athletics, campus activities, scholarship and philanthropy.
IFC had no idea of the cup's
whereabouts until the appearance of a classified ad, simply
stating "Wannahousercup", in
The Ubyssey.
Neither The Ubyssey nor the
Publications Office knows who
placed the ad.
"Possibly   it   started   as   a
prank," said a Council spokesman. "But it's being carried to
a ridiculous point. IFC paid
more than $100 for the cup.
"We want it back or we'll
turn the matter over to the
police."
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THE     UBYSSEY
Page 9
Bongos,
dancing
at Fair
Would you like an economical sample of the world's culture?
For a nominal fee you can
learn to play the bongo drums,
dance the hora, or take a judo
lesson at the seventh International Fall Fair.
The fair, being put on by International House, opens Nov.
7 in the Armory.
The 2 p.m. - 6 p.m. program
will include formal opening by
Lieutenant-Governor George
Pearkes, a stage show, a fashion show, and national displays of 12 countries.
The 6:30 p.m. -1 a.m. show
has more national displays, a
stage show and dancing to the
Caribbean Steel Band.
Local coffee house impres-
sario, Howie Bateman, will be
master of ceremonies for the
show.
Price for the afternoon show
is $1.00; for the evening show
$1.50 for adults, $1.00 for students. Tickets are available at
the Hudson's Bay Company,
International House or Alma
Mater Society office.
Drive aims
at $40,000
The B.C. Educational Research Council is trying to
raise $40,000 to study the effectiveness of the provincial
education system.
UBC associate professor Dr.
Walter Hartrick, executive director of the council, said the
council plans research into curriculum, foreign languages,
new courses and kindergarten
programs.
The money, to be raised by
January, will be sought from
school boards, teacher associations, parent-teacher associations and the department of education.
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On student paper
7 editors resign
over frat story
LONDON (CUP)—Seven editorial staff members of The
Gazette, University of Western Ontario student newspaper,
have resigned following refusal by the paper's editor-in-chief
to print a satire of fraternities.
No   longer   with  the   paper
SCOn MclNTYRE
. . . prize winner
Yearbook
among best
on continent
Totem, the university year
book, has placed among the
first 10 per cent in the Associated Collegiate Press' All American Year Book contest.
"This year's book will be
even better," said last year's
and this year's editor Scott Mclntyre.
"We've cut back the only
sections that lost us points last
year and improved the others,"
he said.
This year Totem will include
a special color section in the
campus life section.
(Totem is published in two
parts—a campus life section of
general interest, and a special
volume for graduates.)
Sponsored by the University of Minnesota, the contest
included entries from more
than 100 Canadian and American  universities.
Totem received bonus points
for Photo essay and presentation of campus life sections.
Judged on editorial and pictorial content, originality and
imagination, Totem's campus
life coverage was the "best
seen anywhere".
Totem is on sale now at AMS
office.
Ye Olde Charles
O'Hegarty
from Ye Olde  London Towne
"The Tang of Ale and the
Savor of fine Old Cheese"
—Raymond Hull
plllA
Ellen Boskett
UBC's finest folksongslress
Direct from "The Mews"
in Phoenix; Arizona
t^EEE^L
t
.
3607 West Broadway
(One Block East of Alma)
Doors 8:30; 1st Show 9:30
Reservations: RE 6-6011
are The Gazette's managing
editor, assistant editor, news
editor, features editor, two reporters and a columnist. Sports
and photography editors stayed with the paper.
Gazette editor-in-chief Rob
Johnson refused to print a
story satirizing fraternities
during Silence Week.
Silence Week is a week traditionally set aside to allow
students to decide the fraternity question for themselves.
Rushing activities are prohibited. "
Johnson, a fraternity member, said the story probably
would have been published
during any other week .
He said there has been general disagreement during the
past two months about what
the paper should print.
The former seven staffers,
none members of fraternities,
said: "A campus newspaper
should provide provocative
reading on subjects ranging
from   the   traditional   to    the
slightly irrelevant. It should
focus attention on contemporary problems and criticize
strongly where criticism is justified."
Johnson said he agreed with
the philosophy but felt that
the seven did not in practice it.
Western's students' council
has supported Johnson's stand.
The council said Thursday:
"The USC, is confident The
Gazette will continue to reflect
independent student opinion
and to produce a high-quality
newspaper."
Yeah, yeah Virgil
say Latin buffs
BOSTON, Mass. (UNS)—
The Beatles' haircuts are
traceable to the Latin poet
Virgil, reports the American
Classical  League.
In an announcement at
Virgil's 2034th birthday
party the ACL pointed out
that the Latin poet is a dead-
ringer for Ringo.
McGill honors
funny alumnus
MONTREAL (CUP) — Mc-
Gill's new humanities and
social sciences building has
been named after Stephen
Leacock.
Lecturer-humorist Leacock
was chairman of the economics
and political science department for 28 of his 35 years at
McGill.
OK   BRAKES
1st Ave. & Main St. Phone: 879-3014
* For all popular makes:—
Brake Shoes (4 wheels) $16.50
Wheel Kits (4 wheels) $10.00
Both Shoes and ——
Wheel Kits $25.00
* Special 5% Discount Before Xmas, for UBC Students
EATON'S
More than meets his eye...
our laced-front fisherman's knit
A flair for fashion uncommon to bulky knits will be found in this wool,
hand-knitted sweater from Italy. Sporting a deep laced front, needled
in nubbly pattern, ribbed at waist and sleeves. Soft pastel colours
include pink, light turquoise, light green and natural (beige). Sizes
S, M, L. See what it does for you! <• ^   OK
EATON Price  1 O ^^
EATON'S Sportswear—Downtown Page JO
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 29, 1964
Bains'
remarks
ire IH
By BOB  WIESER
International House has
fought back.
Feeling at International
House was one of anger at
Hardial Bains after he criticized it last week.
Bains said: "International
House treats foreign students
as if they were delinquents and
needed special help." He said
IH promoted small ethnic
cliques.
"There are no cliques," a
West Indian student said flatly.
Essop Mia, a South African,
said: "Hardial might be active
on campus but he is seldom in
attendance here."
Mike Geddes, English, added: "Foreign students are offered help when they need it,
but they are not treated like
delinquents."
Joan Bennet, a Canadian,
said Canadian students feel
unable to help foreign students
and so avoid International
House.
Another Canadian, Bill Bier,
said: "The organization is open
to everyone to promote friendship and understanding for foreign students. The motto of International House, That Brotherhood May Prevail, is practised."
Students want to learn
to think like guerillas
K. j. HOLSTI
... on radicals
Presidential
race probed
in lectures
Be in the know about American presidential elections. Go
to the International Week lectures this  week.
The International Activities
Committee is focusing on The
Making of a President 1964.
Two noon hour lectures
have already been presented
and two more are scheduled
for Thursday and Friday in
Wesbrook 100 at noon.
Dr. K. J. Holsti, of the political science department,
speaks on The Radical Right
on Thursday and W. E. Wright,
also from political science,
speaks on The South on Friday.
By  GRAEME  MATHESON
With a planned series on
guerilla warfare the Academic
Activities Committee has gone
into the seminar business.
Students participating will
meet once a week to talk about
why guerillas win, and how.
The dozen students, including an anthropologist, an engineer and a biochemist, say
they read books by guerillas
about guerillas.
Then they propose to think
like guerillas in order to see
how a guerilla's mind works.
Books to be read include
those by authors like Che
Guevera, Yank Levy and Mao
Tse Tung.
It is expected that a letter
to Washington will bring guerilla and "counterinsurgency"
material from Sargent Shriver.
To  join  this or  other sem-
►"w*""m "Ml
STRIKES*
*by
Available  at these Canaday  Dealers:
FINNS
Clothing   Stores
Limited
3031 W. Broadway
2159 W. 41st Ave.
6495 Fraser Street
4000 East Hastings
inars named below, apply by
leaving your name at the Academic Activities office at 260
Brock Extension, the Student
Christian Movement hut, or
contact Hardial Baines at
224-4044.
The AAC is also sponsoring
an evening discussion group
on Logic and Communications
and another called The Revolt
of the Masses.
The Student Christian Movement and the AAC are jointly
sponsoring a seminar on Man
and Biology.
The Fun of Riding Horses
over miles of pastures or over romantic trails through
wilderness into the Garibaldi foothills to hidden lakes
and Campfire-Mieals. The finest Western horses, quiet or
spirited, are yours from one hour <$2-$2.50 Sat., Sun.)
rides to daytrips or overnight packtrips.
And how about the old-fashioned Hayrides for groups (16
persons minimum) for a Wiener Roast (Dayrides, $2;
Nightrides $3).
For ihe joy of Western Horsemanship come to
PARADISE VALLEY HORSE RANCH
SQUAMISH, B.C.
42 mi. scenic drive from Vancouver
PHONE: 112-892-5044 (Tex Rodgers) or MU 4-1949
*•** Cabins and Restaurant nearby **••
ON ITS WAY...
AND MORE TO COME
While Vancouver slept, one of the biggest moving jobs in the city's
history took place. A huge "pressure cooker" started on its way from the
fabricator to the Columbia Cellulose mill at Prince Rupert.
This stainless steel clad digester is 62 feet long and weighs 87 tons. It was
worth a quarter of a million dollars before installation.
Equipment of this size arid complexity is typical of the advanced technology
in use at Columbia Cellulose. In the ever-changing pulp and paper
industry, "new" is a temporary description. The aim is constant improvement.
Columbia Cellulose operates both kraft and dissolving pulp mills in
British Columbia, employing about 2100 people. A continuing programme
of expansion ensures room for advancement.
FOR INTERVIEWS: Graduating students wishing to discuss employment
will be interviewed on campus by senior company personnel
&
COLUMBIA CELLULOSE
COMPANY, LIMITED
VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA ~w
Thursday, October 29, 1964
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 11
AROUND
THE
CAMPUS
By ED CLARK
While most campus types
were celebrating Thanksgiving at various spots around
town, a former UBC student was celebrating his debut as an established pro at
Empire Stadium.
Even though the Igloo men
from Edmonton were severely mauled by the mighty
Lions, the gigantic middle
guard filling jersey number
60 put up a game battle, until the final gun told the Eskimos that they just weren't
hot enough for Skrein's gladiators. Except one named
Peter Lewis.
• •   •
A graduate and football
star of West Van High, Peter
attended the University of
Oregon, where in his freshman year he became first
string defensive tackle.
He ran into leg trouble so
the following year he returned home and attended UBC.
His was 1961, the year that
the North Shore Cougars of
the Junior Big Four had one
of its better teams.
Lewis was part of it, such
a big part that he became an
all-star defensive and offensive tackle.
• •    •
When    Pete   joined    the
Thunderbirds in 1962 he tipped the scales at 230 pounds
and stood six-feet two-inches.
He became a vital link in the
Thunderbird defensive chain
and won all-star recognition
in the W.C.I.A.A. Conference
for two years.
Lewis impressed everybody.
An impression that reached
as . far as Montreal where
Jungle Jim Trimble decided
he could use Mr. Lewis for
some added beef to his skinny
Alouette   herd  of   linesmen.
Jungle Jim claimed the
Thunderbird All-Star as one
of his top draft choices.
Along with Lewis went
Norm Thomas, tenth draft
choice, and Barry Carkner,
present Thunderbird Assist-
and Coach.
The latter two didn't stay
too long but Pete managed to
avoid Trimble's axe. Unfortunately, the Alouettes seem
to always part with good
players so away went Pete
into the igloos of Edmonton.
• •    •
And in Edmonton he is sure
to stay. The Green and Gold
is on a rebuilding plan and
Lewis is their number one
middle guard. A position Pete
won't mind keeping; and with
his 248 pounds he will be
hard to move.
Lou Holland found that
out when on first down and
goal to go from the three
yard line he tried to sneak
past number 60. He ended up
with eight yards on that particular play.
To top the night off lumbering Pete scooped a Joe
Kapp fumble and carried it
eighteen yards to the Lion
38. But this is the year for
Edmonton to finish where
they ended up last year, out
of the picture, so they lost
the ball a play later.
In PCSL Soccer
Birds to mop-up
mad Firefighters
UBC's thundering Thunderbirds, riding the precarious
crest of a one game winning streak, hope to perform a
mop-up operation this Saturday at Varsity stadium.
Their opponents for the sec-
\
T'BIRD GRID LINEMEN Don MacRitchie (standing), and
George Brajick work on blocking in preparation for
game at Ft. Lewis Saturday. The Ft. Lewis defensive line
averages 240 pounds per man.
In track
UBC favoured
in WCIAA meet
UBC's cross country track
team is winging its way to Saskatoon this weekend to take
part in the Western intercollegiate championships.
In last year's meet UBC finished a strong second and with
a greatly improved team are
favoured to win the championship this year.
If they win the championships the team has been guaranteed its expenses will be paid
to the National Championships
which will be held in Quelph,
Ontario, this year.
Head track coach Lionel
Pugh, who has just returned
from Tokyo where he was a
television commentator on the
Olympics,   is   planning   to  re-
Sports cars
have rallies
UBC's Sports Car Club is
looking for cars with drivers
for their Brail Rally this
Saturday. The Rally which
starts at 1:00 p.m. from the
Armory is navigated by
blind students from Jericho
Hill School.
UBC's Sports Car Club
Totem Rally will be held
Sunday, November 8. The
driver meeting is at 8:30 a.m.
and the rally will start at
9:00 a.m. from Simpson-
Sears in Burnaby. Application and entry blank are
available at the Sports Car
Club Office behind Brock
Hall.
organize  the  track   and   field
program at UBC.
Pugh feels that the meet is
inadequate with more competition needed to attract student
participation. One solution he
hopes to implement is the intro-
SPOBTS
duction of indoor meets during
the winter months.
The students travelling to
Saskatoon this weekend are:
Rod Constable, Dick Beardsley,
Shawn Duffey, Tom Fell, Peter
Horn, Bob Tapping, and Vic
Reeve the star miler from the
University of Oregon who is
taking post-graduate studies at
UBC.
A meeting will be held in
room 211 of the Memorial Gym
this Monday noon.
-CLING-
Stick on Plastic
for use on
Bathrooms - Showers
Kitchen Shelves
Cabinets, etc.
"TRY A YARD"
CARPAY BLDG.
SUPPLIES
4415 West 10th Ave.
224-4545
ond week in a row are the
Vancouver Firefighters, whom
the Birds downed 1-0 last
Saturday.
It was the first loss for the
Firemen in Coast League or
Cup play since last April and
the revenge seeking downtowners have stated they intend to hose UBC right out of
the stadium.
DANGEROUS
And with seven PCSL All-
Stars on their team the Firemen who like to play the
same fast-breaking wide-open
style of soccer as UBC will be
treated with due respect by
the Birds defensive unit.
The Firefighters top stars
are goalie Ken Pears and centre Art Hughes, who are rated
two of the best soccer players in Canada.
But UBC fullbacks Jim
Berry and Tom Cryer intend
to give their new goalie Eike
Scheffler the insulation treatment.
The Birds are currently
four points out of first place
and one behind the third place
firemen.
JIM BERRY
. . insulation
UBC golf 'ship
Gary Smith won the UBC
golf championship with a score
of 294 over 72 holes medal
play. Other finishers were:
Jim Nolan (295), Gord Robinson (300), Jim Seed (300), Ian
Muter (307), Rusty Goepel
(311), Ron Fratkin (311), Jim
Stephens (311), John Kavalac
(313) and Len Dodson (313).
UNION  CARBIDE
CANADA LIMITED
Interviewing for 1965 Graduates
NOVEMBER 9,  10,  12 &  13
Complete Description of Positions at the
Placement Office
•
Our Representative: Gordon Hatfield
Welfare, General Administration, Public Relations,  Economics
t
o
Z
9
C
'R
o
.e
u
b
9
u
«
E
E
2
2
s
a.
E
o
u
CAREER  OPPORTUNITIES
with the
GOVERNMENT OF CANADA
for university graduates of ALL faculties including
Arts, Economics, Commerce, Science, Law
as
JUNIOR EXECUTIVE OFFICERS
and
FOREIGN SERVICE OFFICERS
STARTING SALARIES
$405 TO $505 A MONTH
Depending Upon Qualifications
EXAMINATION PROGRAMME
Oct. 21, 7 p.m.—ALL CANDIDATES—Objective Test
Oct. 22, 7 p.m. — FOREIGN SERVICE CANDIDATES — Essay paper and, for those with a
knowledge  of  French,  a  written  language  test.
FOR COMPLETE DETAILS SEE YOUR
UNIVERSITY PLACEMENT OFFICER
o
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3
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o
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3.
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Editorial, Legislation, Personnel, Indian Affairs, Labor Relations Page  12
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 29, 1964
.,-»
Starving Jim's
thousands sent
For those who wondered
what happened to the Pilikwe fund:   It was sent.
Only $4,032.82 of the target $7,000 was collected for
the pet project of Jim Ward,
last year's AMS first vice-
president. Ward went on a
hunger strike to publicize
the drive.
The money was sent this
summer to the National secretary of the Canadian
branch of UNESCO in Ottawa. From there it was sent
to Pilikwe, Bechuanaland,
South Africa.
Camps
not beat,
says IRC
Inter-Residence Association
president Derril Thomas disagrees with the president's
committee's assessment of Fort
and Acadia Camp life as bo-
hemian.
Thomas said he hardly considered life in Fort Camp beatnik or bohemian.
It said: "the Bohemian cas-
ualness of social contact in the
Camps is one foundation for
an active student community."
He said he didn't know what
the report classified as bohemian.
Thomas did however agree
with the report about accommodations. The report called
them "spartan — almost substandard."
Thomas added the Camps
did have a spirit but said he
didn't  think it was  definable.
When is a
Young Man Ready
for Marriage?
Is a girl making a mistake
when she marries a "man" of
19? Is he still half a child as
far as character development
goes? What does he know
about money—about himself?
In November Reader's Digest
you'll find a searching, but
not unsympathetic, letter
written by a thoughtful godfather to his 19-year-old godson. This month's Reader's
Digest is now on sale.
"THE" PLACE
to meet
your friends
is at tile
Do-Nut Diner
4556 W. 10th Ave.
Try Our Delicious T-Bone
Steak $1.35
It's really Good!
Full course Meals
within your income
Students Meal Tickets
Available
'tween classes
Substitute' run
ends this week
Tonight and Saturday are your last chances to see Larry
Kent's Sweet Substitute. Shows are at 8 p.m. in the Auditorium; admission is $1. There will be no performance
Friday
• •   •
PSYCH CLUB
Dr. Gibson lectures on the
History of the Development of
the Nervous System at noon
today in Room 19 at the Psych
Hut.
• •    •
NEWMAN  CENTRE
General meeting noon today
in the Newman Lounge, St.
Mark's College.
• *    •
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
Who's in Control? A lecure
by William Correll at noon today in Bu. 106.
¥    ¥    *
UBC PEP BAND
Short practice in Education
Gym at noon today.
• ¥   *
SUS
Vandals Retreat, a costume
dance Saturday, 8:30 - 1:00 in
Traders'   Hall.  Tickets   at the
AMS. All welcome.
• •    •
EAST ASIA SOC
Is . militant nationalism reappearing in Japan? What are
Sokka Gakai's aims? An informal discussion by Wayne
Lytton at 8 p.m. Oct. 30 at
4663 West 12th Ave.
• •    •
UCC
International bowlers wanted for Wednesday and Friday
afternoons, 2:30 - 4:30; details
at the UBC bowling lanes.
UBC SOCREDS
Two free historical films on
Howe and Baldwin at noon in
Bu. 104.
•   •   •
DAWSON CLUB
Tom Elliott, B.C. Dept. of
Mines, speaks on Mining in
B.C. in F & G 102 at noon today.
Student, 10,
at Mich. U.
MICHIGAN (UNS)—Perhaps
the youngest university student
ever has registered at Michigan
State University.
Ten-year-old Michael Grost
enrolled as a regular freshman
after scoring high grades in college classes taken unofficially
at the university.
Psychologists say Mike is
normal. He asked for 10 comic
books if he got an A in a history course. He got five for
a B-plus.
Michael scored in the top one
per cent in a math ability class.
Treatment for half
TORONTO (CUP) — More
than half of the student population of the University of Toronto at some time in their
university career need psychological counsel according to a
survey taken last year.
So soft, so comfortable, this medium weight cardigan
is a must for every Fall wardrobe! In long sleeves
with cardigan facing and roll collar. Sizes 34-42,
$14.98. Kitten superbly tailored fully-lined
Botany wool worsted skirt, matches perfectly
exciting new, Fall sweater shades. Sizes 8-20,
$15.98. At better shops everywhere.
Without this label   /$&£$*,    it is'not a genuine KITTEN
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, 75c—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
FOUND ADS Inserted free. Publications office, Brock Hall., Local 26,
224-3242.
LOST—Black wallet in Booster Club
office. Please return by dropping
in Brock Extension, Room 165.
Papers  urgently  needed,   please.
LOST  — Green  ski  jacket,   Sunday
p.m. Gym field.  Brian. CA 4-9073.
LOST—Pair of brown men's glasses
vicinity of Fraternity House, Saturday night. Call Ross, 266-7567.
LOST—Would the person who took
black briefcase from Brock, 9:30
a.m. Monday, call Bob, CA 8-8767.
$20 reward for returning contents
of briefcase.
LOST—Ronson butane lighter Sat.
night at Armouries or Kapa Sigma. Inscribed W.T.Y. Telephone
224-9880, Bill Young, small reward.
LOST—Green ski jacket last Thursday, Forestry Geology Bldg. Phone
946-2493.
LOST — Gold lady's Birks wrist
watch with expansion bracelet.
Turn in to Publications office. Lost
Bu. Bldg. Monday.	
MIX-UP in white trenchcoats at
Kappa Sig. House last Sat. night.
Looking for someone who has the
non reversibl one, Agu label. Ask
for Gary, 224-9028.   Leave message.
FOUND Monday night, frisky black
puppy, outside Faculty Club. Collar and plain disc. No identifica-
tlon.  Apply Rosenberg,  Local  504.
FOUND at Homecoming dances, a
bracelet and three pairs of gloves.
Owners contact D. Paver, Forest
Club Office, F & G.
FOUND — car  key,   license   236-421.
Publications  Office,  AMS.	
FOUND vicinity of 41st & Granville,
4 UBC keys. Collect at Publications
Office.
LOST—4 keys in brown case, with
verse printed thereon, between
Stadium and Beta House, Saturday. Call Mrs. Turner, Local 65'8,
or CA 4-9200.
Transportation
14
RIDERS WANTED, 9:30 lectures—
Mon. to Sat., 4th Ave. between
Yew and Alma.   Call Jim, 783-9388.
RIDERS wanted Mon.-Fri., 8:30's.~
Route, 49th - Oak to Granville
across Granville to 33rd, down
33rd to Dunbar and out Thunder
Rd. and vie. AM 1-5880'.
RIDE WANTED from: 3878 West
Broadway for 9:30 lectures. Phone
224-9473.
RIDK WANTED from West End
MWF.   Phone  evenings,   685-6616.
RIDERS wanted vicinity of 4th and
Dunbar, Mon.-Sat.. Graduate parking facilities.  Call Janet,  733-2687.
Transportation, Cont'd.
14
RIDERS wanted from Central West
Van. for daily lectures. Telephone
WA 2-1076 evenings .       	
RIDE wanted 20th & Dunbar for
8:30 lectures, Mon.-Fri. Please
phone  Karin,   987-6843.	
DRIVER for 8:30 carpool. Alternate
weeks or Fri. 41st and Granville.
Phone Norm, AM 6-4675.
RIDER wanted from area west of
Lonsdale in North Van. Telephone
Arlene,  YU 5-5254.
Wanted
15
CHEM 205 lecture and/or Lab notes
wanted.  Call 224-6707 after 6 p.m.
AUTOMOTIVE   &   MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1959 ALFA Romeo coupe. Engine rebuilt recently. New silver gray
paint. New tires, $2000. MU 3-1891.
AUSTIN A40,   1950,  $50.  In running
condition.  Call 731-3902 after 6:30.
'58    METEOR.    Excellent    condition.
Phone  Sharon, AM 1-8247 after 6.
'57   DODGE   H.T.   V-8.   Full   power
equip.  Must be seen. Asking $895.
1375 Renfrew. Phone 255-2272.
'57   MORRIS   convert.    New   paint.
Sprite   engine.   Dual   carbs.   Good
top.   Radio   Trans.,   $595,   or   offer.
WA 2-5901.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
2 LITTLE BOYS need baby sitter
Mon. - Wed. - Thurs. Mother at
Univ. Deliver at your home 8 a.m.
on or near campus. Phone 921-7160.
WANTED—Student help by hour for
typing and misc. jobs. UBC Alumni
Assoc.   Room 252, Brock Hall.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS—the most useful book
on the campus. Student telephone
directory available now. Limited
number.    Get yours  now.
TOTEM   PRE   SALES   now   at   the
AMS office.
RENTALS   &  REAL  ESTATE
Rooms
81
SHARING room for male student.
Private entrance,, bathroom and
phone. Near UBC gates, reasonable. CA 4-3648 after 5.
Room & Board
82
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
SENIOR FEMALE STUDENT desired to share suite with same
English Bay view; transportation
included. Phone after 6 p.m., 684-
9687 for Mildred.
IMPORTANT
NOTICE
FOR ALL STUDENTS
Friday, October 30
IS THE
DEADLI NE
For Returning Textbooks
Due to Course Changes
BOOKS WILL NOT BE ACCEPTED
AFTER THIS DATE
UBC BOOKSTORE

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