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The Ubyssey Mar 29, 1968

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Array STORM   BREWS   OVER   FACULTY   FIRING
A minor rebellion is brewing in UBC's English
department to keep English lecturer Murray Morton
from being fired.
Refusal of the English department's promotions
committee to renew Morton's contract was confirmed
Thursday by department and committee head Dr.
Geoffrey Durrant.
The Ubyssey understands that Morton, who is
noted for experimental teaching methods, is being
fired because he does not fit the mold as shaped
by senior department members.
A strong movement in support of Morton has
started in the department. A petition is expected
to be circulated urging the promotions committee
to reconsider its decision.
Morton, a lecturer at the university for nine
years, is rated by many   students as an excellent
teacher. Students — some of whom visited The
Ubyssey office to express their distress with the
firing — say he has strayed from conventional teaching methods, thus drawing criticism from senior
English professors. <*?■ -' \   i
/.c v****
In an interview with The Ubyssey Jan. \% Atun-.w*h
urged abolition of English 200. He said h*? inferred
a new system in which teachers would api as guides,
"This would require secure people who know who"-*
they are, and might disqualify many academics who
at the moment are hiding behind neat formulae and
other lecturers have been promoted without doctorates.
He has been a lecturer for nine years — much
usual.
,pst  important,  Morton's  publications
ave beM JIFeatWe rather than critical.  He is editor
of the local literary magazine Limbo and rarely aims
for- RuUlication   ijh   specialized   English   professors'
rigid sets of categories,'' he said in the intef*v6$f, y C.coilfeagu<
2*$urtfaTs. £p
The Ubysse^ understands Morton's case has been
taken through normal grievance channels but that
ress  was  made.   As  a  result,  sympathetic
Morton refused comment Thursday. However,
The Ubyssey understands there are several reasons
for his release aside from the unconventional ideas
on teaching.
Morton does not have a Ph.D — but in the past
ues tried to have the case reconsidered.
given no reasons
It is known Morton has been
for his dismissal.
But at the core of the problem is his divergence
from the departmental teaching and publication
status quo.
And so
the ear
comes to
an end
Vol. XLIX, No. 62
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, MARCH 29,  1968
224-3916
PROF. MURRAY MORTON  discusses  literary criticism with his English 300 class, while meeting on the lawn in the Nitobe gardens. (See story above.)
Nostalgia fills musty air
as Ubyssey leaves Brock
By RICHARD BLAIR
Home to The Ubyssey is a rather unobtrusive
pit in the basement of north Brock.
The majority of students have never seen it
and most would not know what to make of it
even if they did.
It reeks of stale cigaret and pipe smoke and
putrid coffee.
Old newspapers, copy paper, used and unused
pictures litter the desks and clog the floors.
Poster and slogans   -
Hack and Fascists Unite
walls.
Go Southam Young
- are plastered to the
But out of these somewhat seedy surroundings spewed some of Canada's top newspapermen.
For The  Ubyssey,  despite  its  detractors  —
All good things
come to an end\
Today, alas, is a last.
;*g
This priceless issue of The Ubyssey is the j|
final regular edition of 1967-8 vintage. j
Staffers now will hit books until exams, 1
after which they will hit the bottle. ~
and they are legion—has been Canada's greatest
newspaper for many years.
And it has occupied this rather seedy, obscure
office in Brock since the building was opened
in January, 1940.
But in September the scene changes with the
opening of the new Student Union Building
which will replace Brock as the centre of student bureaucracy.
The Ubyssey staff, under editor Stuart Gray,
will find themselves turning grey from the heady
heights of their new third-floor office.
As soon as the antiseptic atmosphere of the
new office wears off, it will probably resemble
— at least in its disarray and aroma — the
Brock office.
But things  won't  be  completely the   same.
There is a certain indefinable part of the old
office which cannot be transferred along with
the files, vintage typewriters and other -apparatus
necessary for newspaper production.
This is the atmosphere which has been produced during the past 28 years.
The Brock office reeks of nostalgia — in
addition to the putrid coffee, of course.
But the memories will undoubtedly survive,
just as they did in The Ubyssey's previous moves*.
The memories are passed along personally
or through the tattered volumes of 50 years of
Ubysseys.
The first Ubyssey — and what some people
fo page 6
see: MORE NOSTALGIA
f
Passing Jock
referendum
usurps power
Passing of Wednesday's athletic referendum would place
complete control of student athletic fees in the hands of the
board of governors, Alma Mater Society vice-president Carey
Linde said Thursday.
"All the talk in the ballot is confusing. It makes one think
that we have control," Linde said. "While it is true that the
board cannot alter the $5 figure without student consent, it is
also true that the students cannot change it without the consent
of the board."
The referendum asks students to transfer the $5 of the $29
AMS fee directed to athletics to the control of the administration.
The AMS fee would then become $24 and the athletic fee would
be collected separately by the administration to be used by the
men's and women's athletic committees.
Supporters of the transfer argue that having the athletic
budget approved by student council takes too much time.
Should the referendum pass, the council would no longer
have to approve the budget. Use of money within the $5 fee
would be controlled by the athletic committees.
However, control over the amount of the fee would remain
in the hands of the board.
"If you really believe in student control of student money,
you have no choice but to vote no," Linde said.
AMS president Dave Zirnhelt said Thursday he was in favor
of the fee transfer.
"I think the board would just be a rubber stamp. I would
have grave reservations if the board would not abide by student
Wishes. If they did not we might withhold our fees in protest."
Zirnhelt conceded that theoretically, the board has the
power to refuse a student request to change fees.
(Immediately following his election as AMS president March
13, Zirnhelt said he was opposed to the transfer.)
Andy McConkey, men's athletic association vice-president
and athletic committee member, said Thursday talk about losing
control to the board is pointless.
"Under the Universities Act they have control anyway," he
said. "Saying they would deny the students' request for the
money back is also pointless with the present student attitude
and publicity that would ensue."
"The board has never refused a student request on student
fees. There must be some form of good faith between the board
and students."
Advocates of the transfer also argue that control would not
be lost because a majority of the members of the athletic committees would be students. Also sitting would be faculty members
and an alumnus.
Acting UBC president Walter Gage said he thought passing
the referendum might solve several problems.
"The proposal is a much neater idea," he said Thursday.
"I don't want to influence anyone's voting, but my personal
opinion is that the athletic committees should know how much
they have to spend before they start spending it."
Supporters of the transfer have said student council takes
so much time passing the budget that the athletic committees
are spending money months before the budget is approved.
Gage said he believed the "board of governors could maintain
the same athletic fee against student wishes simply by making
up the difference resulting from the fee change in tuition fees. Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, March 29,  1968
Seminar trip up for grabs
A ten-day, expense-paid holiday in Winnipeg this spring awaits seven UBC students interested in higher education.
The students to be chosen at large from
the student body, will attend the annual Canadian Union of Students seminar to be held this
year at the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg.
Subject of the seminar is education in society:
rhetoric vs. reality.
Alma Mater Society external affairs vice-
president Tobin Robbins said Wednesday applications from students interested in higher education.
Dressy protest set
Protests against the arrest of 17 people for
loitering in front of the courthouse March 9 are
continuing.
UBC staff members and a local magazine
writer are organizing what they call a dress-in
Saturday from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. by the courthouse fountain.
"People should wear suits and  ties— their
Sunday best," an organizer told The Ubyssey.
"There will probably be a lot of policemen
there, but if there are enough of us, we can't all
be arrested," he said.
should be sent to Box 52, Alma Mater Society,
Brock Hall.
Resource people at the seminar will include
John Porter, author of The Vertical Mosaic,
former UBC student vice-president Charlie Boylan and CUS president Hugh Armstrong and
president-elect Peter Warrian.
The seminar will attempt to determine the
social effects of the educational system and examine the educational status quo. It will study
the forces which shape the Canadian education
system, formulate a set of educational goals and
consider strategy and tactics for attaining these
goals.
A synopsis of the seminar's organization is
available from AMS offices. Working papers,
being written now, will be distributed to delegates before the seminar.
Hare   lecturing
Incoming UBC president Dr. Kenneth
Hare, will give the final lecture of the
1967-68 Vancouver Institute lecture series
Saturday.
He will speak on Universities Unlimited
in Hebb theatre at 8 p.m.
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THE     UBYSSEY
Pag* 3
SUB  MANAGEMENT   COMMITTEE
Ex-AMS pres to be chairman
600 PENCIL-POCKED, wicked, wobbly, wooden work tables
and chairs await you in the armory, open for studying
weekdays from 8:45 a.m. to 5 p.m. to April 11. Dean
Walter Gage authorized study space upon suggestion of
Alma Mater Society internal  affairs officer  Ruth  Dworkin.
Sir Ouv gallops off,
Rohringer stays put
Sir Ouv's  going.
Sir Ouvry Roberts, former British general, and colorful
UBC director of ceremonies and director of traffic, will retire
from UBC on June 30.
His resignation was one of four accepted Thursday at a
board of governors meeting.
Also resigning are Prof. Joyce Hallamore, German department head; Prof. J. Lewis Robinson, geography head, and Prof.
Jacob Biely, head of poultry science.
Replacing Sir Ouv as director of ceremonies will be Prof.
Malcolm McGregor, head of classics, who returns this summer
from a year of absence in Greece.
Acting UBC president Walter Gage said Thursday Les
Rohringer, acting housing director, will become permanent housing head July 1. He replaces McGregor, who has resigned from
the post.
Rohringer was born in Hungary where he received a bachelor
of architecture degree. In 1945 he went to Venezuela, where he
designed school buildings for the ministry of public works. He
joined the UBC staff as housing administrator in 1962.
Prof. Hallamore will be replaced as German head by Prof.
Michael Batts, 39, who was educated at the University of London.
The retiring dean has been a faculty member for 38 years,
including 20 as head. She studied at UBC while it was still housed
in the Fairview Shacks, old wooden buildings near the Vancouver
General Hospital.
During the 20 years she headed the German department,
enrolment in it rose from 500 to more than 1,100 students.
Prof. Robinson, first and only head of geography^ said he
was resigning because he felt less and less satisfied with administrative tasks and wished to devote more time to students.
He has been a member of the UBC faculty for 22 years.
"The geography department is now the best in Canada," he
said. "I feel able to resign with complete confidence that the
future direction of the department is in good hands."
Dr. Robinson, currently hospitalized as the result of a minor
heart attack, has published more books, chapters, articles and
maps than any other Canadian geographer.
Prof. Biely joined the agriculture faculty as an instructor
in 1935 and was named head of poultry science in 1952. He says
he will continue to teach and do research fulltime.
His research has earned him an international reputation in
such fields as poultry diseases, vitamin utilization, the action
of antibiotics and improvement of the nutritional value of grains.
He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Agriculture Institute of Canada.
Alma Mater Society president for 1966-67
Peter Braund was elected chairman of the student union building management committee
Thursday.
The vote by nine attending members of the
11 man committee was unanimous but for one
abstention.
Braun, law 2, is law president for 1968-69.
In previous years, the AMS co-ordinator has
been chairman of the Brock management committee. With the change to SUB no provision
was made for the co-ordinator to hold a similar
position in SUB.
Observers say an attempt at Monday's council
meeting to make co-ordinator Jill Cameron chairman of the SUB committee failed due to Miss
Cameron's confusion and ignorance of council
procedure.
Miss Cameron voted in favor of a weighted
vote that gave representatives opposing her appointment as committee chairman enough votes
to defeat her. The motion for a weighted vote
carried nine votes to eight.
The weighted vote gave engineering and education three votes each. Both voted against the
motion to make the co-ordinator the chairman of
SUB. The motion, which needed a two-thirds
majority as an ammendment to the AMS code,
failed  16 to nine.
Had Miss Cameron voted against having a
weighted vote, engineering and education would
have cast only one vote apiece and council might
have appointed her committee chairman.
After the Monday meeting Miss Cameron said
she was confused in the voting.
"It was not clear to everyone. There were
two motions on the floor, one to withdraw the
old clause from the code that said the chairman
was to be elected by the committee members,
the other to have a weighted vote.
"I thought I was voting on the original motion, and not the second one."
However, AMS vice president Carey Linde
said Miss Cameron simply appeared to be unfamiliar with the weighted vote system and did
not know how to vote.
Questionnaires
get few  replies
Hundreds of arts anticalendar questionnaires
are going unanswered, says arts acting president
Ralph Stanton.
Many students neglect to complete evaluation
forms for their classes, said Stanton. Most
classes are giving a 40 per cent return or better
but some classes are returning only one or two
forms.
Help is badly needed for German, senior
English, and Slavonic Studies courses.
This year's arts anticalendar will be more
comprehensive than ever before, Stanton said.
There will be a special economics and arts I
sections. In addition, all students are invited to
submit articles on their experiences in arts
courses.
Every arts student receives an anticalendar
free.
Volunteers will be required to summarize
and assess evaluation results, Stanton  said.
Arts students who haven't received a questionnaire for all their courses should come to
the arts office and pick up the necessary forms,
he said.
Education
A student subcommittee of a faculty group
studying the future of the faculty of education
is  receiving   membership   applications.
The committee, to consist of the education
undergraduate president, ombudsman and five
students selected from the faculty, will present
the student viewpoint to the faculty committee.
Applications are being received at the education undergraduate office until April 3.
Students should include their telephone number in their application, said Ed US ex-president
Gary Gumley, who is chairing the subcommittee.
The committee will study the effectiveness of
present methods of teacher training, the general
organization of the faculty and its relation to
other faculties.
After the council meeting Miss Cameron said
many qualified people were not appointed to the
SUB committee because there were too many
applications.
Other members appointed to the committee
at Monday's council meeting are: 1966-67 AMS
president and for next year law president Peter
Braund, law 2; AMS returning officer Chuck
Campbell, eng. 1; (Lawrence Stuart; Dave Gibson, arts 4; Dave Grahame, arts 3; Hanson Lau,
arts 2; Manuel Neira, grad studies, and John
Davies, arts 3.
University clubs committee chairman Harry
Clare and treasurer Donn Aven, eng. 3, automatically sit on the committee.
Winter sports centre management committee
members are former AMS president Shaun Sullivan and Al Wait, eng. 3.
Committee chairmanships include: Michael
Lange, arts 2, performing arts; John Mate, arts
2, speakers; Blaine Kennedy, comm. 3, symposia;
Brian Burke, arts 3, World University Service;
Gerry Cannon, arts 3, Canadian University Students Overseas; JudTth Sigurdson, ed 3, high
school conference; Winnifred Lowe, ed 1, frosh
orientation.
The student disciplinary committee will
include John Norton, law 2, Bob McQuarrie,
law 2, Jim Ramsay, law 1, and Rob Hodge,
eng. 1.
GRAY ... no yellow journalist
Ifs a Gray day
for  The  Ubyssey
By STUART GRAY
Ubyssey Appointments Editor
An arts student who once slipped in the tub
and lived to tell about it has been named editor-
in-chief of The Ubyssey for 1968-9.
When asked to put in a plug for himself
before being ratified by council this week, Stuart
Gray said  he  has  dubious  experience on tap.
Gray, 21, worked on The Ubyssey for two
years, as reporter in 1965-6, and as city editor
this year.
While enjoying a sojourn away from university, he worked for 18 months as a fulltime
reporter at the Province, considered by some
Vancouver's best mourning newspaper. He has
been weekend police reporter on the Province
for six months.
"The first goal of The Ubyssey next year will
be to record a British meteorologist saying 'no
comet'," Gray said. "That done, the paper will
present news with as much accuracy, fairness
and diversity as is possible in bedlam."
Basic to the paper's philosophy will be the
belief that change on campus is not normally
effected by emotion or spontaneity, he said.
"It's effected by reason and persistence. A
prime criterion in our selection of news will be
a desire to examine what is happening to UBC
as lucidly as possible."
Gray is also the western regional president
of Canadian University Press. His proudest
achievement this year is putting up with a
fourth-year engineer as a roommate. M UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. Proprietor, Ubyssey News Services (UNS). The
Ubyssey subscribes to the press services of Pacific Student Press, of which
it is founding member, and Underground Press Syndicate. Authorized second
class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of postage
in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and
review. City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo.
Page   Friday,   loc.   24;   sports,   loc.   23;   advertising,   loc.   26.  Telex  04-5224.
Final winner Southam Trophy, awarded by Canadian
University Press for general excellence. Co-winner Bracken
Trophy for editorial writing.
MARCH 29, 1968
A last gasp
This, friends and enemies, is it. With this sixty-
second issue of the term, The Ubyssey closes its large
mouth until next September. It was a good year, a year
of lasts and firsts.
For The Ubyssey's staff and its visitors, friendly and
angry, it was the last year in the musty basement of
North Brock. The office is old: its walls are covered
with the foolishness of 28 years. It has been UBC's
hotbed of intellectual ferment, bad jokes, radical politics,
and sex. It has been the mine from which Canadian
journalism has extracted its best practitioners—among
them, Pierre Berton, Eric Nicol, Lister Sinclair, Alexander
Ross, Morley Safer. But we're not going to get sentimental merely because The Ubyssey is moving from a basement with tradition to new Student Union Building
quarters with a balcony and a view of the mountains.
Next year's office will be new but it will contain the
same kind of people doing the same kind of things.
It was the last year in which The Ubyssey competed for the Southam Trophy. We won it this year for
the seventh straight time—then we persuaded the rest
of Canadian University Press that university journalism
can measure its achievement in more meaningful ways
than by trophy competitions.
Some things, however, won't change next year: as
The Ubyssey's punning new editor, Stuart Gray, will
find out, the paper by its very nature must be the leader
of some kind of movement, be it bowel, symphonic, or
radical. This year we continued the fight to bring education and human fulfillment back to the university—a
university which a corporate elite still controls for its
own ends. We continued to insist that students must
organize—both locally and nationally—for radical change
in the university and in the society of which it is part.
Thus armed with reasons for producing a paper, the
rest was simple: we fought for what we thought was right
and necessary. The Ubyssey this year, along with other
university papers across the country, continued the long
process of dumping the myth of objectivity. Achievement
of objectivity is impossible; news cannot be written in
mathematical symbols. Pursuit of objectivity, we believed,
was an effort both sterile and pointless. So we operated
from our own point of view—but we strived, as The
Ubyssey always has, to tell both sides of every story.
We kept our pages open to debate and dialogue. And we
tried to report as accurately as possible the day to day
doings of students and teachers.
For the first time in recent years The Ubyssey found
itself often in tune with the thinking of a large mass of
students. We strongly supported UBC membership in the
Canadian Union of Students which is struggling to develop among Canadian students a potent movement for
social change; the students, by a 75 per cent majority,
agreed with us. We saw a need for outspoken student
senators capable of presenting their constituents' case
forcefully; so did a majority of students. The new senators
helped us produce immediate reports of the academic
body's meetings—another first. We urged a change in
student government—the Alma Mater Society elections
showed that students agreed.
Despite this clear evidence of student support, we
encountered opposition—we would have sweated blood
if we hadn't. We knew that a paper which doesn't make
enemies is being ignored. We considered the source of the
attacks and often were moved to remember William
Blake's dictum: "Listen to the fool's reproach, it is a
kingly title." And we remembered that The Ubyssey's
opinions ultimately can only be those of the people who
make up its staff. Never, in its 50-year history, has the
paper claimed to reflect the views of all the students.
We tried to keep up The Ubyssey's hoariest and best
tradition: irreverence. We laughed—at others and at
ourselves.
That said, the inky reins of Ubyssey power pass into
the hands of Stuart Gray. A 1967-68-vintage editor,
eyeing this callow youth, offers these words of sage
advice: Producing, in a short six months, 1,000 pages of
newspaper containing two million words isn't easy. Everyone will think he knows much more about how to edit
The Ubyssey than you do. Don't believe it. And keep
laughing.
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LETTERS TO THE  EDITOR
Growl
Editor, The Ubyssey:
A recent letter complained
about "growlie ladies" in the
Brock cafeteria. May I add
more fuel to the fire? It seems
there is an abundance of bad-
tempered food service women.
Today in the bus stop I gave
the cashier a $10 bill as payment for a 25 cent bill — it
was all I had.
The growlie lady snarled:
"Oh no, not another goddam
ten. Shit!" If this is the kind of
woman that works for food
services, a change should be
made. Maybe the lady is somebody's mother. I'm glad she's
not mine.
DOUGLAS STARK
music 2
Reply?
Editor, The Ubyssey:
It has been brought to my
attention that The Ubyssey on
Friday, March 22 contained
some rather bitter letters. Upon investigating further I became reassured that The Ubyssey was continuing its policy of
devoting considerable space to
publicizing the distorted views
of a rather unstable and no
less insecure group of individuals. May I point out to Mr.
Divad Zusuki (sic) that poor
over-violated Mabor Gate pulled a gross violation of individual's rights by his Dow Chemical protest. Further, the "chanting red-coated engineers at the
SFU-UBC football game" were
congratulated by the city police
for preventing what could have
been a bloody riot when SFA
stood in front of our stands
calling to anyone, especially
engineers, to come down and
fight. Mr. Zusuki (sic), I suggest that perhaps you would be
more at home at SFA where
you could study the behavior
of the human animal in a more
secure( ?) environment! As for
master Garry Bill (sic) I will
say that if there is such a large
group of staunch supporters in
favor of opposing Vic Hardy
when are they going to make
themselves known within the
faculty. Even better why didn't
they? Mr. Bill, how many of
your friends did you publical-
ly embarrass? As for Mr.
Steven Black (sic), arts 4, I
have the following comments
to make. First, as president of
the faculty which boasts a fair
share of boorish Neanderthals
I was rather alarmed to find
that your letter was written in
such crude language. In fact
I had to read it twice, I thought
a logger had written it until
I saw the epigram following
your name . . . arts 4. Secondly Mr. Block if you think you
can stop the flow of tears long
enough, you might be able to
do something about the abhor-
rid (sic) condition of this campus . . . but I doubt it. So once
again congratulations to the
Ubichssey, at least it keeps the
students reading some of your
rag (sic).
F. D. HODGE
president, EUS
Red Sheep
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Reaction upon witnessing the
ceremony of the ducking tank,
21 March, 1968: What is a university? I would suggest that
it is an environment in which
a young man on the verge of
adulthood can learn to express
himself, in which he can develop his mind, in which he
can learn to discipline himself. In other *<vords, it should
be a haven for the maturation
of the individual, so that upon
graduation he has a strong
sense of human values to equip
him for life in our depersonalized society.
And yet this university
clutches a drove of sheep to
its bosom, sheep with red coats,
EDITOR:   Danny   Stoffman
City       Stuart Grey
News          Susan Cransby
Managing         Murray   McMillan
Photo       Kurt Hilger
Senior       Pat Hrushowy
Sports       Mike   Jessen
Wire       Norman Gidney
Page Friday      Judy Bing
Ass't. City       Boni  Lee
Slowly, inexorably, relentlessly. It
ground to a halt. But before it did,
several earthquakes occurred. Potent and brilliant journalist minds
matured. Prose erupted in a continuous fusion of unbelievable mental
orgasms. And, by crum, they had
fun. They sweated and shouted,
swore and wailed, laughed and fornicated, boiled and sang.
It was a year of step by step
building, a year of incredible patience and frustration, and utter insanity. It was filled with jolly quivers
and folly shivers. It was. most important, a year fraught with solid
lumps of satisfaction in journalistic
stomach pits. Belly laughs were
shared by, among others, Steve
Jackson, Mike Finlay, Paul Knox,
Irene Wasilewski, Fred Cawsey, Alexandra Volkoff, Jade Eden, Hew
Gwynne, Mark DeCoursey, Elgin Lee,
Dave   Salmon,   Mike   Fitzgerald,
sharp hooves and an overdeveloped herd instinct. These
sheep seek out those individuals least resembling themselves and attempt to wash
away their individuality. Totalitarianism has its origins in
such faceless masses of envious, grieving men. What difference is there between the
swastika and the red jacket,
the club and the slide rule?
What place is there for such
as these within the university
community? I am unable to
find an answer. Perhaps these
zeta babies of our brave little
world are taught to utter just
the single phrase, adapted from
a well known children's book
"I am a boor of very little
brain."
TONY WARREN
assistant professor
dept. of microbiology
Apology
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I sincerely wish to apologize
for the nonsense I tried to pull
this month in regard to Ubyssey distribution. It is true this
nonsense was done mainly out
of spite: I don't — quite sincerely — feel The Ubyssey
gave me too fair a shake this
year in its editorials. Nevertheless I now know how wrong
I was in saying AMS had any
say over Ubyssey distribution
and press run. I was wrong and
you were right.
SHAUN SULLIVAN
AMS president, 1967-68
Ted Syperek, Judy Young, Fran
McGrath, Irving Fetish, Ann Arky,
Leo Tolstoy, Alfred Hitchcock, John
Davies, Hugh Tayler, Wendy Carter,
Luanne Armstrong, Nigel Thursfield,
Richard Baer, Bill Storey, Olga Stech,
Godfrey Golashes, Alice Dee, Linda
Gransby, Richard Blair, Dennis Hut-
ton, Wensley Mole, Bill Rayner,
Wally Gage, Dick Needham, Joachim
Foikis, Gabor Mate, Charlotte Haire,
Al Birnie, Kris Emmott, Rae Moster,
Glenn   Bullard,
Karl Burau, Stanislaus Persky,
Mike Bolton, Tony, Lela and Morde-
cai Calaman, Scoop Stoffman, Godfrey Glower, Mike Coleman, Bishop
Homer Tomlinson, Al Vince and
John Kelsey.
Sparking in the revered jock shop,
creaking with age and wisdom; were
John Twigg, Bob Banno, Jim Maddin, Bjorn Simonson, Mike Fitzgerald
(again), Rick Mansell, Brian Rattray,
Pio Uran, Joyce Forrest, Hilda Hoop-
ster, Gary Goalscore, and Jock Strap,
the   all-Canadian   ball   carrier.
Flashing wit in the darkroom with
the occasional bulb were Lawrence
Woodd, Robert Brown, George Hollo,
Chris Blake, Derreck Webb, Denis
Gans, Bill Loiselle, Sam Shutter, Ian
Cameron, and Aiken Drum.
A last official blorg meeting will
be held at noon today in the third
socrched wastepaper basket. Banquet
for all Sat. night.
So the end.  Again,  we   did it. Friday, March 29,  1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
MORE LETTERS
Lots of cops
Editor, The Ubyssey:
UBC has lots of cops. The
RCMP set up radar traps on
campus roads. The brownshirts
ticket people for mis-parking
and for driving past the library
before 2:30 p.m. Narcs have infiltrated the classrooms to trap
students who use drugs not
sold by the government.
But what happens when
$1,000 worth of papers are
destroyed or when people are
assulted, kidnapped, and forcibly tanked? Nothing. Like
their downtown counterparts
who are busy hunting for
"obscene" literature and capturing loiterers, the police out
here have better things to do.
DENNIS GANS
arts 2
Fire  trap
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Everybody has or is getting
a new building — forestry,
music, dentistry, medicine, biology — the list seems endless.
I think it's criminal that the
geology department, which is
the largest school of its kind
in North America, represents
B.C.'s largest industry, and is
highly accredited scholastical-
ly, should get stuck in the
shittiest building on campus.
This fire trap might have
been fine 45 years ago when
it was built, but right now the
drab dull barn is just too darn
small.
CHARLES MAIN
science 4
Inflation
Editor, The Ubyssey:
In these days of inflation, the
rising costs of higher education, and the financial indifference of "our" provincial goverment to the university, it Is
indeed stimulating to see Sir
Ouvry Roberts' university traffic department doing its bit to
cut needless spending. While
walking from the graduate student center we discovered that
the traffic department maintains only one Oldsmobile "98"
chauffer driven limousine for
the purpose of transporting
"dignitaries"  about  our   cam
pus. To some this may seem an
excessive frivolity, considering
the great number of centrally
located parking plazas, however we consider the maintenance of such a vehicle necessary to project the feeling of
prosperity and relaxation which
enables  the  administration   tb
best study the problems of the
student body. The problem: Is
one   limousine   enough?   Perhaps a fleet of sedan chairs . . .
B. McLELLAN
E. WISMER
D. JOHANNSON
MAY-JUNE
Reading and Study Skills Program
for University Students and Faculty
The program will be held at the Reading and Study Skills
Centre, Room 119, East Mall Annex (next to Brock Hall).
Classes will meet for 1 Vi hours twice weekly for five weeks.
UNIVERSITY STUDENTS: Tuesdays & Thursdays,
beginning May 7, 7:30 to 9 p.m.
FACULTY & ADULTS: Mondays & Wednesdays,
beginning May 6, 7:30 to 9 p.m.
STUDENT FEE: $35.00-FACULTY FEE: $55.00-Class limit 21
Further information and aplication forms are available from
the  UBC   Extension   Department,   228-2181.
Wctice tc I96S
WC graduated
The management and staff of Campbell Studios wish each and everyone
of the 1968 Grads the very best of
luck in their future careers. All negatives will be kept on file for 4 years
if additional portraits are required.
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736-0261
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In printing the results, the Queen's
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thousands of titles printed during
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Incjuire today from the
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Telephone 68i-729i. Page 6
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday,  March  29,  1968
— lawrence woodd photo
More Ubyssey nostalgia
from page 1
probably hoped would be the last — appeared
on Oct. 16, 1918.
At first the paper was produced on the old
Fairview campus prior to the move to Point
Grey in 1925.
But even the years at Fairview saw a few
persons pass through The Ubyssey who later
made their influence felt in B.C.
For instance H. L. Keenleyside — now co-
chairman of B.C. Hydro — was associate editor
in 1919-1920.
Two years later saw a chap by the name of
J. V. Clyne as sports editor.
He apparently learned his copy - chopping
chores well because he later transferred these
cutting techniques to the business world as top
man with MacMillan and Bloedel.
As one executive said of Clyne: "He fires
executives like they were office boys. He's only
H. R. MaoMillan's hatchet-man."
The Ubyssey moved into its new Point Grey
ofice — room 206 of the auditorium — in September,   1925.
And there it stayed, producing two papers
a week, until 1940 when it moved into Brock's
north basement.
During   these   15   years   in   the  auditorium
Historian Blair is a former Ubyssey reporter,
city editor and managing editor.
office — room 206 of the auditorium — in Sep-
the list of Ubyssey editors reads like a partial
B.C. Who's Who.
Professors Earle Birney and Malcom McGregor, OBC man Norman DePoe, Sun publisher
Stu Keate, Province columnist Himie Koshevoy,
and B.C. Appeal Court Judge Nathan Nemetz
are included.
The dirty thirties ended with a war for the
world and the new Brock office for The Ubyssey.
Although the previous decades had brought
some conflicts to The Ubyssey, they were nothing
compared to those which occurred in the 1950s.
In 1951 the board of governors damned The
Ubyssey for its "irresponsible writing" in charging the administration with concealing facts
about UBC's budget.
The paper actually apologized and admitted
its words had "not been carefully chosen."
A special general student meeting in 1954
censured the paper for naming three fraternities
which practised discrimination.
The next year a professor at Assumption
College, Windsor, held up The Ubyssey as a
reason for censorship.
"The Ubyssey is the vilest rag you can
imagine, and is the best argument for censorship that could be produced," said Rev. E. C.
Pappert.
Amen.
In February,   1959, editor David Robertson
and city editor Kerry Feltham were suspended
after the disappearance of a' $450 painting from
Brock.
The pair — who later resigned —argued that
the picture had been taken as a prank.
Unfortunately, student council thought there
was more to it than a simple prank. After all,
the picture had been missing for a couple of
months.
The Ubyssey continued its irreverence with
a 1959 goon edition lampooning Easter.
Faculty council chairman Geoffrey Davies
called it "offensive, blasphemous and sac-
religious."
And UBC president Norman Mackenzie said
it was in "extremely bad taste."
Editor Al Forrest and associate editor Rupert
Buchanan were forced to apologize before resuming classes.
UBC president John B. Macdonald charged
The Ubyssey in 1966 with printing distortions,
lies and suppressing facts.
"Throughout this year The Ubyssey has constantly distorted the position of the university
and the administration and has refused to publish the correct facts."
The Ubyssey won the Southam award for
general excellence in university newspapers for
the fifth time that year.
But the 28 years in Brock brought more than
conflict and awards. It also brought forth another generation of newspapermen.
Prominent among them was Pierre Berton,
golden boy of Canada's television and popular
literary world.
Ron Haggart, now of the Toronto Star, and
Alexander Ross, managing editor of Maclean's
magazine, are also Ubyssey graduates.
And the years have also seen the former
denizens of the Brock occupants form a cadre in
Vancouver's two newspapers.
Onetime Sun columnist and now local radio
hot-line type Jack Wasserman, Province -funnyman Eric Nicol, Sun business writer Pat Carney,
and Leisure editor Alex MaoGillivray are included in this class. Would-be-member of the
local establishment, Al Fotheringham, is another
former Ubyssey type turned Sun man.
The Ubyssey premises came close to disappearing in the $175,000 fire which engulfed
Brock in October, 1954. Fortunately, the damage to the $250,000 building was confined to the
centre and south parts leaving the North Brock.
basement relatively unscathed.
Production was not interrupted as the" staff
continued to work during the building's reconstruction.
These are the memories that will go to the
new SUB.
These are the memories that have made The
Ubyssey the institution it is today —-revered
and despised, loved and hated.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Invites your
participation in a
RECEPTION
PROGRAMME
For 400
Foreign Students
Arriving at U.B.C.
This Fall
CONTACT US AT
International   House
WEST MALL
224-4535
BEFORE THIS MAY
our lapinary compatriot
reacts unpredictably
\o jrosfress, "We've
found*?
like, how she uses
my "hef im.w True
/fapphess is/fop^     &^Uhx& AcCOUtfr.
pasl-fiaste ioa   ^
posi-fox io mail       ^-h-*3 tends out checjues
Money to a frie>ib.     fa &&> cei& %q far
fi-iends.
so, naturally, all he?
■£tiends i\2tre to write
her b&ck, \o Wiank, her
_tbr Iner unexpected
^enerosiVy.
and t/ien9 o£ course,
we send back, all itap
cancelled, cheques.
■£or every letter -that
l&pinette sends out",
she receives iwo "back,.
il seems -to ie a very
—         down-key way to
There are altentaiive     ^XvsjA  StfteivtioiL.
Tneifierts of keeping m
bvc/eofipm-moxey     -ft is also a darned Sfcod
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past-happiness is
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cj.f .peirson, manager
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$tti® CAPITAL pf   2 WO I
MARCH 29,  1968
ON THE COVER: A new release
on the Das Capital label the
mind bending sound of Page
Friday, reviewed below. Grouped around editor Mother Judy
Bing is the motely crew which
has perpetuated this rag every
week for the past year. Starting
from the top right clockwise
they were Gordon Fidler, Reilly
Burke, Andrew Horvat, Kurt
Hilger, Arnold Saba, Bert Hill,
and even Stephen Scobie. Now
you can see what we all look
like.   Lucky you!
Although this group has had a
tremendous underground reputation for some time now, this
record marks the public's first
exposure to their influence. The
eight members' proficiency and
versatility is inobvious right
from the leadoff song, "Dr. Orgasm's Electric Blitzkreig".
Stephen Scobie socks a mean
typewriter, and together with
Bert Hill's revolutionary style,
forms a solid base of Scotch on
the Rock. The soulful wail of
the legendary Mother Bing herself in "Uh — well, I don't
know", and Gordon Fidler's
profound silence gives one an
idea of the capabilities of this
group.
The forty-nine minute "Aken
Drum Song" is undoubtedly the
best cut on the album, fusing
various influences in a metaphysical goulash of unbeatable
bathos. The title song, lent a
picturesque mood by Kurt Hil-
ger's shutter snapping, and the
funky "Granny's Pot-Pot Chew-
ies" are obviously derived from
the ethnic songs of Hungary,
which Andrew Horvat skillfully
blends with Japanese tap dancing on the incredible "Magical
Hysterical Tour". The only real
flaw in the album is when
Arnold Saba's hair gets stuck
in the microphone on "I am the
Walnut", which causes Reilly
Burke (electric ladel) to have a
psychedelic contusion, breaking up the recording somewhat.
Other cuts include "18 em
right indent", a hard driving
song of confusion, featuring
Mother Bing on the electric wet
blanket; "Scobie - doobie - doo!"
(sprocket to me, Stephen!);
"White Hare", "Strange Daze",
"Out and Down", "Friday's
Child", and the group's hit
single, "Flower Pot", which has
been banned from here to Des
Moines  and halfway back.
Unfortunately, the group is
splitting up and heading their
separate ways, although Horvat
is going to try to assemble several new players and continue
next September. But don't miss
this one, the one, only, unbeatable, Page Friday sound!
FOOLS RUSH IN
The following is a conversation between Vancouver's
Town Fool, Joachim Foikis, and Page Friday's Arnold Saba.
fool: We are all looking for a medium in which to
communicate. People are finding it worthwhile to communicate something that they believe in. And the question
is, what do you want to communicate, in what form, in
what manner? You can teach, or write, or paint, or you
can live your words. In a way, that is what I am doing. I
go out in the streets. I am relating my vision in images
which may even be perceptible to those who are illiterate.
Not those that can't write or read, but those that can't see,
they are also illiterate.
pf: Do you claim to have a vision?
fool: I say you live in a world of unreality, and I believe that whether you call it a vision or what, I've stepped
into reality, and I'm presenting reality in the disguise of
a mask, the fool, which is assumed, and I am an actor on
the stage.
pf: Do you feel you are getting through now?
fool: Well, even while I am getting through there is
the danger of becoming entertainment, rather than communicating subliminally. Entertainment helps to sustain
people in the cave in which they find themselves, the
grey world of everyday existence. Plato says only a fool
wants to remain in the cave when the light is to be found
outside. But the cave is secure, while outside is dangerous.
It's a matter of not having faith, and not having a clear
enough vision.
pf: Is it ever possible to get through to the majority
of people?
fool: Well, I don't worry about that. I don't believe in
elitism, which says the kingdom is for the few, not for
the many. Who is the devil? The man of expediency. The
man who is essentially blind. I represent through the
medium of the stage man's vice, his folly, his inability to see
clearly. Harlequin is one of the seven devils. He belongs
to underground religion. The overground religion, the Billy
Graham  type of religion,  the nice  clean boys,   proclaim
— lowrence woodd photo
happiness as a result of negation. Religion has done a complete switch. The underground religion thinks highly of
myth, not law or literacy. The best way of passing on a
vision is mythology. This is where the churches are breaking down.
pf: Don't you thing man's situation has always been
negative? Because the same religion has always arisen.
fool: But the religion has always lost its vision or
something. The more sensitive people in the last few
hundred years have become dissatisfied with the completely
puritanical unenlightened vision. The orthodox and the
money-makers go hand in hand, you know. Two toad visions.
Two bad trips, both.
There is a complete topsy-turvyness of appearance
and reality. Here is this idea I use of the fall of the world.
It's Humpty-Dumpty. The cosmic egg becomes fragmented,
the Hump is the heaven, the Dump is the earth, the egg
yolk is the sun, and all the other parts are the cosmos.
pf: Now,  about the  king's horses	
fool: The king's horses and king's men can't put the
world back together again because the king of the world,
you know, the prince of the world is obviously teaching
us a very strong wrong .... urn	
pf: Can it be put back together?
Fool: Well: obviously, but this depends on what you
believe in.
pf: Would you class yourself as wiser or more foolish
than the establishment?
fool: I would consider myself a bit of a lesser fool.
Maybe this is arrogance, but I've got the license to be
arrogant, because I personify the cock.
The cock just crowed
To let you know
If you are wise
'Tis time to rise.
I feel I am happier and more controlled in what I am
doing.
You've got to listen to the person whose message
reflects his experience, not his reading, not somebody else's
authority. He whose message and life are identical will
carry a little more power than those whose life and message are  completely at odds.  Like Billy  Graham.
pf: Would you say that what's happening now is different from three thousand years ago?
fool: We stand at an end point. Something is going to
blow, either satori or the bomb. And I don't believe that
those things are identical. Oh, I put myself in a position
there! I made a decision, and we've got to do something
like poets do, and you do, and writers do and people of
good will do, to just change the trend because it doesn't
matter whether we push that button or ... . the difference is whether we close or open the door, turn right or
left.
It's a different matter with an activist viewpoint. We.
need to recreate the world according to our own vision.
I don't say like the very meek-minded, just let things go
and they will change. We must take up our job, because
it's in creation and work that you have fulfillment. By
which I mean that work isn't the same as toil, you know?
pf: What about the straight people? You can't dislike
them.
fool: You want to turn them on. You want other people
to participate in the dance of life. The most effective way
is like a pyramid — you want to be at the top of all the
dead bodies. But when you invert the pyramid, like the
Canadian pavilion at Expo, at the bottom is the fool, and
the other people dance just as high as they can. This is
the vision of non-competitiveness in a social structure. You
want the other person to dance higher, because he will
carry you along. But if you don't pull the others up first,
you will just be supporting their weight all the time, all
the dead bodies, and who can live among the dead?
Kids today want to get out of their home situation,
because they can see clearer the essential hell.
pf: You seem to feel we're heading towards some
sort of apocalypse.
fool: Well, we are still playing the game, but under
very absurd and laughable conditions.
pf: Do you think the totality has been split unnaturally?
fool: Well, it has fallen, Humpty Dumpty, it has been
fragmented, this is the fall. We are fragmented until we
find the other. I believe in the marriage of heaven and
hell. This is why my costume is red and blue, for hell and
heaven, you know? Or the dialectic of the holy and the
profane. Integrated in the x. Not the cross, but the x, the
fool's letter. Turn the cross sideways, it becomes the x,
the symbol of life, not death.
pfj Is man holy and profane?
fool: Yes, surely they belong together, the spirit and
the body.
pf: So you don't believe in the devil as in Milton.
fool: No, I believe in the devil as in Shakespeare. In
Twelfth Night the devil is Malvolio, the man of ill-will,
the Puritan, the man of expediency.
pf: But even if we do return, through technology, to
our original empathetic condition, why is man going to
be happier?
fool: Because he would have no fear.
pf: But there's something still to be faced, which I
have always understood in my interpretation of apocalypse
and millenium.
fool: Well, death. This is where the imagination explodes. We put down flowers into this bloody wasteland,
and regain once more the vision of the world as a garden,
not a wasteland. That's why I'm not a naturalist, our destiny
is with civilization. Art, religion, and philosophy won't be
necessary where art is carried into life.
pf: But supposing that when this comes about	
fool: Oh, you want to find out the ultimate thing too
much, instead of finding complete satisfaction from what
you are doing right now. Today is your heaven on earth;
you should not be concerned about entering that city but
about the process of going toward it.
pf: It seems to me that the devil is what stands in your
way of becoming	
fool: Of seeing the light?
pf: I've seen the light, of what I'd like, but ....
fool: Who is that devil, ultimately? I am one of the
devils. To get my release I have to do my job, but I don't
worry about it, trying to get rid of the devil. I see myself
as part of every bullet that is shot in Vietnam. If you are
a part of being, you are a part of negation as much as
Continued on pf9
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, March  29,   1968 pf   3hree
Dilemma of the Hare apparent
ON   UNIVERSITY   FREEDOM   IN   THE
CANADIAN  CONTEXT  by   Dr.  Kenneth
Hare, University of Toronto Press, $2.50.
By DR. ROGER SEAMON
Department of English
The central concern of these lectures
by our new President is the relationship
between universities and the provincial
governments which are now the main
source of their revenue. Although the lectures refer mainly to the problems of
Ontario, Dr. Hare's suggestion about how
universities can retain the degree of autonomy necessary for their intellectual health,
and at the same time fulfill their responsibility to the community which supports them, seems reasonable to me.
Dr. Hare's solution is simple. He would
create a provincial advisory committee
which would function in the following
way. First, it would be composed of three
elements, "prominent lay members, with
sympathy for university objectives; heads
of universities . . .; and senior professors."
He prefers "an academic majority, but
(does) not  feel that this matters if you
DR. HARE
pick a good team."
Secondly, he would "advocate a statutory role for such committees, with well-
articulated terms of reference built into
the legislation. These should include the
right, the exclusive right, to present annual operating budgets for the system to
the appropriate Ministers."
Thirdly, the committees must have a
secretariat, complete with technical staff.
Fourthly, the operating budgets of the
universities simply must be guaranteed
several years ahead.
Because these are very specific goals
we will be able to evaluate Dr. Hare's
success in achieving them easily. In fact,
one would hope that his coming to UBC is
in some way connected with the goals he
has set in these lectures. If not, we will
have gotten one more president who is
acceptable to students and faculty, and
acts as a temporary buffer between them
and the provincial government. I wish
him a better fate.
IDr. Hare's lectures contain those qualities which are to be expected of a man
in his position: intelligence, good manners,
wide reading in administrative matters, a
fundamental seriousness combined with a
capacity for light humour, in other words,
as Zorba says of his wife and family, "the
full catastrophe". As an American I miss
the note of zeal, the touch of the crusader,
which, I imagine, an aspiring American
university administrator would try to include in his baggage. (That is cynical, he
would believe it was part of his soul). I
confess I like Dr. Hare's style better. It
sounds more plausible, and is less likely
to lead to cries of betrayal.
On the philosophical level I agree with
Dr. Hare's unequivocal commitment to
mass education and his opposition to arrangements which would try to preserve
the elitist atmosphere which has in the
past been connected with the university.
Suggestions along this line usually involve
a division between advanced universities
and liberal arts colleges. "My own conviction," Dr. Hare writes, "is that all 'two-
tier' arrangements are unsound." Another
idea, that of restricting entrance, is more
interesting and more tempting to Dr. Hare,
and, I am sure, many others. But he seems
to have some taste for the Whitmanian
pleasures of masses, and he supports the
"open door" policy, at the same time recognizing that it is a source of many problems.
I would guess that Dr. Hare's relationship with his faculty will be excellent, and
that he will do his best to work out the
problems that exist in the area of provin
cial-university relations. It is only in his
occasional comments about students that
one finds cause for worry. Let me quote
a few:
"At present thick smoke is swirling
up over one campus bush-fire. This is
the question of staff-student relations,
of Berkleyism, of student activism. In
many places, perhaps most, the English-
speaking universities have apparently
failed to convince their own students
that their affairs are being run properly.
Veritable sieges have been staged on
both sides of the Atlantic, and the lives
of senior campus administrators have
become increasingly dominated by the
demands of vocal, angry, and importunate student leaders. Historically there
is nothing new about student unrest.
What is new is that it is news, and that
it shows signs of effective strategic
planning. There are rumours of agents
provacaleurs flitting from campus to
campus, and there is a strong suspicion
that the radical left is behind it all.
I confess that I am at a loss to account for the present pattern of unrest,
and I have been too close to events to
be able as yet to see them in perspective.
Published comment so far is minimal,
cautious, and often tendentious ... I
am suspicious of instant diagnoses of
academic ailments. Yet I must comment, because I am certain that the
autonomy of the universities will not
survive an open conflict between students   and 'university authorities'.
The fires (of student unrest) burn in
many countries. But it only takes a
few to make a lot of smoke."
Although Dr. Hare later goes on to
say that he welcomes student activism
as a correction to the conservatism of academic institutions, this all sounds awful.
Why not simply begin by saying, yes there
are things wrong, and student complaints
must be considered exactly like those of
any other members of the academic community. Why so much defensivesness, and
all the ominous phrases? I, for perhaps
mad reasons, have never felt the least
threatened by student unrest, as it is
called. I am frankly puzzled by the incredible resistance, the scare phrases, and
the nervousness of many teachers and
administrators. Unfortunately Dr. Hare
seems like he must be enlisted in this
band. I hope this is a mistaken impression, that in the heat of the lecture moment images of student conflagration burned into his mind, and that he will temper
his images of burning students in the
cooling rains of Vancouver.
On a slow boat  to China
THE ESSENCE OF CHINESE
CIVILIZATION, edited by
Dun J. Li. Princeton, Van
Nestrand.
By  CLIVE ANSLEY
Professor Li's book is one of
a series on Asian civilizations
published by Van Nestrand. As
the title implies, his approach
is basically cultural. He has
translated excerpts from the
ancient Chinese classics, official histories, court memorials, decrees of emperors, and
important works of Chinese
literature, up to and including
the modern period. The translations are divided into the four
main categories of religion and
philosophy, government, economics, and family and society.
Li then introduces each section
with a short explanatory essay
of his own.
In recent years a controversy
has arisen among -western students of Asia, concerning the
relative merits of a "civilization" or "cultural" approach,
as opposed to an approach based
on one or more of the modern
social science disciplines. Western scholars studying far eastern civilizations confront a culture so fundamentally distinct
from their own that they often
find the application of social
science concepts based on occidental models to be totally
irrelevant. It is interesting to
note that although Professor
Li has been trained in the
methodology of western political science, he chooses to employ a cultural approach, even
in the section of the book
which concerns the theory and
practice of Chinese government. By so doing, he avoids
the shallow superficiality characteristic of too many contemporary studies of various
parts of the Chinese cultural
area, including Vietnam.
As   a   general   statement,   it
can be said that Professor Li
has done a competent job.
While the book contains nothing which cannot be found
elsewhere, the editing has
given a needed emphasis to
peculiarly Chinese attitudes
towards religion, government,
and physical labor. Chinese
society at no time developed
that peculiar proselytizing, exclusive, intolerant brand of religion so typical in the west.
The essentially eclectic attitude of the Chinese is accurately represented here. Also, the
manner in which the official
state doctrine of Confucianism
functioned as an ideological
justification for a system based
on the gross exploitation of a
nation of peasants by an effete
leisure class is amply demonstrated.
Nevertheless there are sufficient instances of error or
ambiguity that some criticism
cannot be avoided, for example.
one translation makes the
claim that Buddhism was introduced to China by the
Hsiungnu, a Turkish-speaking
tribe which plagued the Chinese militarily for many years.
This is simply not true. Buddhism was transmitted directly
from India and Professor Li
surely owes it to his readers to
explain this error in the original text. In another instance,
Professor Li tells us he has rewritten a story, making whatever additions and subtractions
he deems necessary, because
"The original is dull, repetitious, and uninspiring." I do not
question that linterest is increased by the revisions. However, the efforts of the creative journalists who now write
about contemporary China predispose me to doubt that changing the source material to suit
the interest of the reader really serves the cause of education.
Mr. Lawrence says:
SPRING COLOURS GO
SHORT'N'CURLY
The result is a look as fresh as spring itself.
Beauty in colour, accented by beauty of style.
A great combination.
.   MAISOHAWREIE
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Friday, March 29,   1968
THE     UBYSSEY ipf   4ouri
Cocksure and Cubans
COCKSURE, by Mordecai  Richler, McClelland  and  Stewart.
By BERT HILL
Mordecai Richler's latest book is an all-purpose take-off,
and an insubstantial piece of fluff that will disappear with this
season and its set of "ins" and "outs".
The book also fails through Richler's indecision on whether
the book should have a plot or be a series of obscurely connected
anecdotes. A book of this non-substance must make up its mind
which path it will follow. The story is of one white, Anglo-
Saxon Protestant who has the misfortune to also have a job
and some degree of success to his life. In this day and age of
minorities supremacy, our hero is obviously a very big loser.
He is editor of Oriole Press, London, England and in line
for the big job there. The company is taken over by the Star
Maker: an immortal individual who controls his employees and
his stars in a most bizarre fashion: he maintains his immortality
by transplanting organs from his employees. Our hero is obviously
in line because he has a marvy lymph system.
In the midst of this circus our hero, because of his aforementioned frailties, suffers hell at the hands of his 'friends'
who have the good fortune to be non-members of any of these
categories.
There are a lot of good laughs and some hilarious scenes
but Richler fails to keep them close together. Perhaps his failure
stems from the comparisons with the book's predecessors. Thomas
Pynchon disposed of plots entirely in his opening novel V and
constructed some richly memorable and incredibly researched
vignettes. Other authors like Ken Kesey and Joseph Heller have
continued the tradition of the surrealistic novel matching the
barbarity of reality since World War II.
Richler should leave the flogging of the middle classes and
the' snotty-nosed minorities to others and continue with the
works where he showed his abilities in The Apprenticeship of
Duddy Kravitz.
By ROY STARRS
Perhaps now we can be more optimistic about the local word
scene. Two new books have been put out in Vancouver that will
deserve reading. One is called Three Cuban Poets, translated by
Roger Prentis. The other is a novel called Billy Barker, written
by the well known local poet, Greydon Moore.
The translations by Mr. Prentis are of three poets writing
at the present time in Cuba, and thus the book is subtitled, approximately, In the Turmoil of the People. All three poets are
zealous supporters of the Cuban revolution and the Castro re-
giirie. Consequently, their poetry tends to be too explicitly political ;and verges sometimes on an almost hysterical polemic. This
is riot to say that poetry that has communist designs cannot be
successful. Read for instance, the colloquial ballads of Bertolt
Brecht, or, more recently, the fatal anti-bourgeois poetry of Hans
Magnus Enzensberger.
But both these German poets have something that the Cubans lack — that is, a transcendent imagery. There are exceptions — for instance, a lovely, rambling poem telling the war history of an old village bell.
But by and large, these Cuban poems tell us much more
than they actually show us. Nevertheless, because they do tell
us so much of how Cuba thinks (and in Cuba poetry has a much
stronger popular base than it has here), they are important and
should be read. By the way, Mr. Prentis renders them into immaculate English.
In a totally different vein is Greydon Moore's new novel,
his first to date. Set in the erstwhile boom-town of Barkerville,
it is concerned with the mental and physical disintegration in
the face of daily routine of an individual who has suddenly become aesthetically sensitized. The allegorical significance of this
theme may remind some of Kafka. The author's language is at
once visual and abstract, calculated to transport the unwary
reader into high-altitiude mind-flow. Again, this is a local product
which deserves your consumption.
♦
♦
♦
♦
♦
In the Bachtubb
t
♦
♦
♦
t
♦
♦
By CLAIRE WEINTRAUB
The UBC Radsoc missed a good chance to provide
something real for the UBC audience unable to make the
Brock Lounge on Thursday noon. The University of Oregon
Symphonic band, conducted by Robert Vagner of the U
of O and Paul Douglas, UBC, gave an extraordinary concert, beginning with Bach and ending with Tubb.
Although one might have rejoiced to see them backed
by a concert shell in the rose garden, it was little enough
to treat them with enough applause for a single encore;
"The gates of Kiev", from "Pictures at an Exhibition" by
Mussorgorsky.
The concert, sponsored by the U of O Dept. of Music,
concluded a nine day tour. Over half the band are studying
for the field of music education, meaning to teach in either
elementary or high school. Of the handful of composition
students, Jack Andrew of Vancouver, B.C. mentioned the
fact there were few musicians studying conducting, although
there are still those preparing to teach university music.
It was no surprise to find that we are still fleecing
ourselves of nearly every cultural opportunity which arises.
Friday, March 29,  1968
ra^stiv
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THE     UBYSSEY Rabbi doesn't
fiddle on roof
John Mate interviews Reform Rabbi John Sherwood
director of UBC's Hillel House.
pf: What is Reform Judaism and how does it
differ from Orthodox Judaism?
rabbi: First of all, Orthodox Judaism is set up
as a system the essence of which is obedience to
authority, that is, the authority of a deity, who is
self conscious and has a will, and who has the capacity to communicate that will to man and did so at
a moment in time. That moment in time was the
revelation at Sinai and the content of that revelation
was the Torah.
Now, Reform Jews do not accept the concept of a verbal revelation, and therefore the
Torah and other religious writings are not authoritative. They are merely historical or sometimes
quasi-historical, or sometimes even mythological
documents.
Thus within Reform there is no absolute or binding authority, only contingent authority. Therefore
the essence of Reform is the radical freedom of the
individual to make his own decisions for himself
with regards to the great issues of religion, be they
philosophical, theological, or ritual.
pf: Does Reform Judaism believe in the existence
of God?
rabbi: The Reform Jew is free to develop his own
theology, and we cannot dictate to a Reform Jew
what he must believe.
pf: Nevertheless, does Reform Judaism have its
roots in Orthodox Judaism?
rabbi: In the sense that we share a common symbol system, that is, Jewish literature, Bible, Talmud,
Midrash, medieval Jewish philosophy, medieval Rabbinic commentary on the Bible, the Yiddish short
story writers of the nineteenth century. We also
share the life cycle round: baby naming, bar-mitz-
vah, weddings and funerals, as well as the calendar
cycle:  the  Sabbath,  the  High  Holidays,  the  three
Slvei
pilgrimage festivals, and the minor holidays. But we
treat these as symbols, and we very often reinterpret them totally in the light of twentieth century
epistemology and the twentieth century approach
to man. Therefore, philosophically speaking, in essence, Orthodox Judaism is a specific religion, and
Reform Judaism is another specific religion.
pf: Deriving from your definition of Reform
Judaism, what, in your opinion, are the major moral
problems facing humanity and North American
society?
rabbi: Let's take a look at political issues first,
for I see political issues as moral issues. To me,
the major moral issue of today is a political one
and that is specifically the American involvement
in Vietnam.
pf: You are American, aren't you?
rabbi: I am an American citizen, I am a veteran
of two years active duty in the Armed Forces and
four years in the Reserve with an honorable discharge. I am not a draft evader, or a draft resistor,
in point of fact I'm not even a pacifist, because I
believe there can be just wars. I believe that the
American involvement in Vietnam is aggression, and
that the United States is involving itself in a civil
conflict. If America withdrew from Vietnam, you
would probably have a unified country under the
leadership of Ho Chi Minh and I am convinced that
this is what the Vietnamese people want. Ho Chi
Minh stands in relation to the Vietnamese people
as George Washington does to the American people,
at least in their mentality. As a Reform Jew, I am
committed to the principle in politics as well as in
religion.
It can often be to me Jewishly more meaningful for a Jew to be participating in a peace or a
civil rights demonstration even though he might
have a ham sandwich in his lunch bag, than going
to a synagogue and participating in a service
which he neither understands nor is actually sympathetic to, but is attending because of social
pressure.
■pf: What are some of the other moral problems
in North American society?
rabbi: Another great moral issue of the day is
I
the generation gap — Our young people no Ic
trust the parent generation and frankly I don't b;
the  young  people   at   all.   The   parents'   gener.
speaks  about ideals  to  which  it  is not comm;
they talk about peace and yet they support a J
son administration; they talk about liberty and
they oppose civil rights legislation;  they talk a!
concern for welfare  of human beings and yet 1
oppose foreign  aid.  The parents  talk  about sex ml
abstinence  while  marital  infidelity,  wife  swapping,
and this kind of activity is happening in the American suburbs to a greater and greater degree.
pf: What is your view on sex?
rabbi: As far as I am concerned, in terms of
sexual relationships the most important thing is a
feeling of responsibility on the part of the people
involved. I don't believe in people using, or abusing
other people. This is a decision that has to be arrived at by two individuals and I don't think that
society has the right to speak or comment. We do
have the problem of illegitimacy and this is something that will probably be not worked out until
we develop a male oral contraceptive.
pf: How about abortion?
rabbi: Abortion is a medical decision, a decision just like any other operation, be it the ex-
tracton of a tooth, the removal of an ingrown toe
nail, or an appendectomy.
It is a medical decision to be arrived at by the
desire of the patient for the operation and the willingness of the doctor on the basis of his sound medical and psychiatric judgement to perform it.
pf: How do you feel about marijuana?
rabbi: I feel laws against marijuana are bad. I
don't think that it is an addictive drug, it does no
permament damage as far as I know, and I feel there
is no reason to have it made illegal. However, I
could not use it myself because I like to live in the
real world — I do not separate myself from reality.
pf: Let's return to Judaism. Are there any traces
of anti-semitism in North America?
rabbi: Yes, of course, there are. There are cer-
tion economic and social liabilities, clubs that a Jew
can't join etc. I wouldn't take the problem quite as
seriously as some do. There are anti-semites, but they
are in the minority and I don't see the situation
where we'll have another Germany.
WE'RE  NOT  PREJUDICED!
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or Volvo or Mercedes-Benz . . .
We would like to take this opportunity to formally thank the
U.B.C. students who have patronized us during the year. The staff
at Auto-Henneken, Hans, Werner, Joe and Jack, appreciate your
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Friday, March 29,   1968
THE      UBYSSEY ■"      D,,ec,edby ALAIN RESNAIS
"ACTION AND SUSPENSE AND DEPTH IN WHICH .THE HUMAN SPWIT CAN FIND ETEHNAL HOPE." *..*■. iosi
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pf   6ixi
Beckett suffers
from bad Brecht
By ROY STARR
Monday night's production of
Waitng for Godoi was one of
the -fullest realizations of a
play yet staged at Freddy
Wood.
This is true only relatively
speaking, keeping in mind recent debacles such as occurred,
for instance, when a tribe of
barbarian students attempted
the high civilization of a Restoration comedy.
Undoubtedly there is a message here for overambitious
directors: modern plays are
more accessible to us moderns
—after all, they were written
for us, and consequently share
our concerns, our sense of humor, our manner of speech,
our gestures and movements
etc. As a result, modern plays
are not only more accessible to
modern audiences but also to
modern actors.
By extension, Canadian plays
are more accessible to Canadians, and, forgive the heresy,
Vancouver plays are more accessible to Vancouverites.
If the man next door doesn't
share your destiny, then who
does?
So the company of this production was fortunate from the
start, in the right choice of a
play. In fact the choice was so
right and so unusual for Freddy
Wood that it makes the critic
reluctant to attack the production itself. He must, however,
return to his proper function
and point out a few of the more
elementary errors.
The most glaring of these was
the deplorable use of stage
space. It seems to be a practice
of Freddy Wood to amuse their
audience, if with nothing else,
with gaudy sets — in this case
a backdrop of screaming orange
and lavender. (Sock it to 'em
baby!) Nothing could have been
more inappropriate for Beckett.
The scene of Waiting For Godot
is a vast, empty plain — in
other words, a landscape of
nothingness and absurdity. To
capture the sense of this void
on stage, it is self defeating to
constrict the stage-space with a
backdrop that is not even col
ored for depth but, rather,
jumps out at the audience like
an enormous carnival poster.
If there was to be a backdrop
at all, it would have best been
black, and should have been
situated much further back on
the stage. A few objects scattered around this much larger
stage-space would have given
the necessary depth-perspective.
In judging the production of
a Beckett play, it is necessary
to keep in mind that Beckett
gives few stage directions and
consequently, the weight of the
judgment falls very heavily on
the director. In this case director Weese employs certain techniques which very obviously
betray his conception of the
play. The visability of the lights
and backdrop to the audience
(at one point, a character even
collides with the backdrop), the
off-hand, ironic manner of the
actors (as if they were merely
reciting a script), and even that
silly, gimicky moon which
plunged up every so often—all
these serve to disengage the
audience, to remind them that
they are merely watching a
play.
I suspect, from all this, that
Mr. Weese is a faithful disciple
of Bertolt Brecht. But to apply these techniques to Beckett
is completely incongruous. They
are   necessary with  Brecht  be
cause his stagings are elaborate, his plot-structure intricate
and his dialogue is rich and
even verges on sentimentality.
Thus the temptation is for the
audience to become immediately'
involved and carried away. But
with Beckett the situation is reversed: his stagings are sparse,
his dialogue trivial, and his plot
structures virtually non-existent. Thus the temptation is for
the audience not to get involved
at all, and the challenge for
the director is to get them involved.
This disparity of technique
proceeds of course, from a disparity of purpose. Brecht's purpose was social and political;
he intended a detachment of
the audience so that they might
objectively consider the questions and statements of his play.
Beckett, however, has no politics, or even metaphysics, he
wants the audience to consider
—if he has a point, this is it.
But he does present a human-
situation (on doubt symbolic of
The Human Situation) with
which he tries to engage his
audience. In other words, his
plays are more of an emotional
than an intellectual experience.
To present them in any other
way deprives them of their
force and desperation.
Help fatten skinny applause
By KEITH FRASER
There's nothing more embarrassing for a
small audience than trying to heighten its applause in a theatre which should echo with
approval. I remember clapping for Eugene
O'Neill's A Touch Of The Poet a year ago in a
local 700 seat building, wondering with some
justification at the 675 empty seats. Maybe
O'Neill isn't popular anymore. He certainly
wasn't last January when John Stark presented
two one-act plays at the Metro Theatre, one
of them by O'Neill and the other by George
Ryga. Audience applause was downright skinny;
28 patrons can thunder only so loudly.
Of course anything which is presented on
campus is generally an audience success. This is
only as it should be; the snob stigma still attached unfortunately to theatre-going elsewhere
in the city is not significant at this enlightened
institution. Yet how many college couples ever
spend a date at the Stage 2 Theatre compared,
say, to those who do so at the Odeon?
The Stage 2 Theatre is an exciting supplement to the Playhouse Company whose aim is to
produce new and experimental plays. So far the
response for this theatre-in-the-round has been
adequate but below expectation.
Perhaps Stage 2 isn't "in" enough, not camp.
THE      UBYSSEY
Maybe what students need is an old fashioned
underground theatre to support, something for
young actors, directors, and writers to experiment in away from established groups. Intermedia proved such a catacomb when it recently
ran two publicly announced one-act plays. Those
who squeezed in to sit around on the floor were
obviously impressed with the imaginatively
decorated surroundings. Possibly the free admission had something to do with Intermedia's success; probably, though, its underground aurora
should be credited. Hopefully we may hear from
this group again, on a regular basis.
What might prove just as attractive for students is some sort of local college festival between UBC, SFU, and Vancouver City College.
Competitive theatre is inevitably greeted wih
enthusiasm: eg. the just - completed Dominion
Drama Festival for this region's amateur groups,
and the annual drama competition for local high
schools. A College Festival would be tantamount
to a thundering success; but it needs an organizer.
I nominate John Brockington.
Finally, permit me to suggest for your vacation pleasure the return (after a two year absence) of UBC summer theatre. Three plays, Viet
Rock, The Sport of My Mad Mother, and The
Importance Of Being Earnest, will be presented
during July and August. See you in the fall.
Friday, March 29, 1968 Ipf 7even
Ragas & Muffins & stoned prunes
By STEPHEN SCOBIE
FILM CLIPPINGS: "In" movie of the year could
be Franklin Schaffner's Plane! of the Apes, due
shortly from Odeon. The new art-films policy at the
Dunbar seems to have got off to a successful start:
manager Ron Keillor reports "above average" business on King of Hearts. After a brief re-run of
Maral/Sade, the Dunbar will premiere The Whisperers, an excellent British film starring Dame Edith
Evans, who won an Academy Award Nomination
for her performance. Rumour hath it that the controversial film of Ulysses has been submitted to the
BC Censor prior to possible Vancouver showing.
TOWN PLANNING: I was sorry to see that
they've torn down the Funeral Home which used to
stand so reassuringly alongside the Fairmont Medical Building . . . Has anyone ever worked out why,
between 10th and 16th on Alma/Dunbar, there are
four bus stops on one side of the street and only
two on the other? Do more people come out of
downtown Vancouver than go into it? Is thai the
secret cause of suburban sprawl?
RECIPE: This week's recipe is for Prune-stones
a la Gordon MacTavish, an ancient Scottish delicacy.
It can only be made in bulk: I suggest you save it
for your next big party. Take fifty prunes, and stone
them. (Send discarded flesh to Frank Zappa.) Immerse totally in a vat containing three and a quarter
bottles of fine Scotch whisky. (The quarter bottle
makes very little difference, but it's a grand excuse
for drinking the other three quarters while you're
cooking.) Add half a teaspoonful of unexpanded
'brown rice. Boil very gently for 36 hours, if possible
bottling the aroma for sale to tourists. Strain off the
whisky into stone bottles kept cool in peat-moss. It
will be drinkable again in about fifteen years. Serve
THl-S,FOLKS, K -oSE
QoM>ottM*Ito£H
Tucking im tt> hi$
DAILY   &i£M(.FM>T oF FINEST ONES  on TOiVST- i
-•   &OR0OM   1*5   JHC    (*>■••-LV   &i«UiM-«4
CONWftn  OF Nil 0W*J i;      I
^°'%lkftb*!!«L.
the prune-stones on hot buttered toast, with marme-
lade.
LOGUEISTICS:   Critics   writing   about   a   new
British film called Poor Cow, which will probably
be shown at Don Barnes' Varsity Festival in July,
have gone all lyrical about the songs by Donovan
on the soundtrack, especially "Be Not Too Hard".
Actually, the fey minstrel from Glasgow wrote only
the music for that song: the words are by Christopher Logue, who also wrote the rather fine folksong in A High Wind in Jamaica.
Speaking of the Varsity Festival, among the
films coming up there will be Luchino Visconti's
film of Albert Camus's The Stranger, and Luis
Bunuel's last film, Belle du Jour. The Varsity is uncertain about the commercial viability of Jean-Luc
Godard's films: all the faithful are hereby exhorted
to deluge Don Barnes with letters requesting
Masculin-Feminin.
VALEDICTORY: The nicest thing to happen to
me this month was a student coming to interview
me about my own poetry, on which she was writing
an essay. It is an immeasurably satisfying thing to
see one of your own books looking as battered from
use as Billy Graham's Bible. The second yeccchest
thing to happen to me this month was seeing George
Hamilton perform an Otis Redding song on Ed
Sullivan. The yeccchest thing is realising that this
is the last Page Friday of the year.
So it's one final raga for Judy and Arnold and
all the other gnomes and misplaced dwarfs you see
on this week's cover (that's me —■ the one with the
shrunken head dangling from my belt); and muffins
to all the printers, especially Ted, who cut my
stories so beautifully.
Amen and hairy greetings.
^9VK^*-*j? >^°
>   poem
BEFORE THE SPHINX
Toward an end,
even a perpetual-motion  machine
breaks down,
wings clipped  by water or
just tired of water.
We find
our ghost, tactile
at the water's edge,
risen like a globefish
and hollow inside.
Stupid eyes bloat into bright.
Old,
worn-out and we're young.
Take me home, she says
(for a kind,
any kind of touch
desired. A kind touch.)
As for me,
I say As for me,
I only want to watch.
Take me home,
home to a padlocked silence,
hinges on the inside.
I want to watch.
I want
to see.
My husband finds a  star, twinkling
and the star's already clinker.
I feel so young again.
But
Keep this a secret:
That no dust
Collects in the scrotum
But may as well.
Hurry  behind you open  blinds.
Hurry behind your blindfold.
Don't mind shadows beneath the door;
I am the shadow (bird that never flies).
His hand in her housecoat,
a hand that slides across
white bellies of herring:
his job and avocation.
They smile they see me.
My eye, my ear dance
with embodied ghost.   My friend,
were you programmed for this?
He repeats your name
and animals down your body.
Fasten seat belts hurry please
Please  there   is   no  second   chance
No second coming. My husband . . .
You give, always:
Emblem for the one
whose hate grows quickest.
Now, the shadow falls
toward a candle;
still I see you.
Silent,
your teeth in waterglass.
I am shadow and door,
and become the keyhole
you promised.
You remember another formula:
now you pronounce its syllables,
awkward.    Another name
but your wrist forbids
that which is not flesh.
And you, my friend, you
speed-reader,
is there time to
wet your thumb to
turn dry pages?
Even now I hear her.
Son? Son?
Twice she cries she knows you
after all. From the glass
her smiling  teeth, smiling
almost motherly,
but these are silent:
the murderer has no name.
-by DERK WYNAND
Pass a little,
flunk a little
By REILLY BURKE
What are you going to do
next year?
A lot of us are facing this
question again and it doesn't
make much difference whether
you intend to pass a little or
flunk a little. Some sort of
decision has to be made.
For instance, there are great
quantities of students in the
Arts I program who are suddenly going to find themselves
abandoned and adrift after a
marvellous affair with the
learning process.
And there are the rebellious
ones who are becoming more
vocal in their demands for curriculum reform that never
seems to come. There are also
small knots of rejected student
politicians, Marxists, civil insurrectionists, and Uni-cop dls-
likers who would all like to be
free of the binding frustrations
of next year at UBC.
It seems like the choice is
discouragingly simple, you
either submit to the no-balls
university bag or you hassle
with the "outside world."
Either way it's a plain bummer.
The only logical alternative
is to start a separate learning
situation. It need not be a fixed
place because that only leads
to all sorts of image problems.
There are relatively few
things necessary to create
learning, and these may be
easily discovered by eliminating the jazz that we see around
us. For instance, football stadiums, faculty clubs, paved parking lots, SUB complexes, lecture theatres, teak doors, and
the entire AMS are all irrelevant. The bare essentials are
access to information and washrooms, and not much more.
With all this in mind, it
shouldn't be too difficult to set
up a new university. It might
perhaps have some roots in
darkest Vancouver, because
that's where a lot of tomorrow's problems are festering.
It wouldn't be too far to go for
a beer, either.
And what could be a more
appropriate name than "The
University of Vancouver"? An
open-ended institution where
the degrees are handed out on
the first day of registration.
This is the only sure way to
eliminate all the brown-nosing
and b.s. that arise out of the
traditional educational struggle.
If classrooms were replaced
with large trailers, the new
university could be trundled
to any location on the continent within days for in depth
studies of languages, history,
politics, geography, architecture, and so on.
"But will it work?" somebody asks.
I don't know, I hare no idea.
It was only a notion that came
to me in the middle of the
night while starting to study
for something or other. That's
how things get about this time
of year. You know. Sort of
desperate.
Friday, March 29,   1968
THE     UBYSSEY Education
for
Leadership
Are you the young man who can accept a challenge? rf you want a University
degree, and if you have the desire and determination to excel in studies, sports, and
personal development you will find that challenge at one of the Canadian Military
Colleges.
The Regular Officer Training Plan (ROTP) is your opportunity to achieve your
education goal, with all expenses paid, and to become a career Officer.
Go with us. The Canadian Armed Forces. p£  9ine
More fools
Continued from pf2
affirmation. We may tend toward  light because we ourselves tend more toward light than darkness. It that true?
pf: That's what I'm wondering.
fool: Well, I believe in life rather than death.
pf: But what does life entail? I'm trying to get rid of
the devil, and maybe I'm wrong.
fool: The Puritan fights his  own devil and becomes
" completely obsessed,  and  separates  from  God  that  way,
from the light.
pf: Can't you eliminate the devil and get towards God?
fool: Wow . . . this is really fantastic .... there was
once a completely democratic method of making a choice,
.and the people yelled Barabbas instead of Christ. Can
you make any decision between them?
pf: Can you choose one or the other?
fool: Well, isn't that the ultimate question? You've got
to see that you must never be asked that question. How
can you make a choice between two people, to hang one
and not the other, or to hang one at all. You should never
-, listen to the guy that asks you this question. I don't believe
in the law book. Justice is to forgive and forget, not to
judge.
What is the devil you are trying to separate? Eros,
and God is Logos. Body and Spirit. Heaven on earth, the
apocalypse, comes when you have stepped into reality. Do
the thing now, and get tremendous joy out of it, and the
means and the end are the same.
pf: So the devil is not evil?
fool: The devil is not an immoral devil, but a blind
devil. The devil is folly. The moral trip is an irrelevant trip.
Oh, I should not be doing so much analysing. I should
"just spout nursery rhymes. I have a more effective medium
than analysing. I believe in myth, and myth is a representation of psychic reality, in its purer forms. It doesn't demand intellectual affirmation, but presents the same reality
in a simpler form. I don't want to pass on information. I
want to create images or maybe that's another way of
passing on information.
I only wish that other kids would find their medium,
which I've been looking for for such a bloody long time,
so they could join in the fool's comedy.
Good times ahead
Awake all sleepers and rise from the dead
There are good times ahead.
The world is governed by folly. Well-being is it.
Just contribute your own little brick. Every fool according to his own talents dum dum dum that's
all you are requested to do. You don't have to do any toil.
It's a Divine Comedy. Maybe you're still waiting for Godot,
the little Prince. But you know he is coming. You don't
have to ask if he exists.
Four looters out of five
pick Schlock over all others
In the disturbances last summer in America's
cities, looters picked up our toasters, vacuum
cleaners, stereos, television sets, and other
quality electric products four times out of five.
Surveys conducted by our advertising agency
show that nearly a year later over 80% of our
products are still providing efficient service and
enjoyment to their new owners. The urgent
and hazardous action of removing the products
from the retail outlets was a real test. We found
that our products survived being thrown through
windows and dropped on pavement three times
as often as comparable priced lines. Take for
instance this testimonial . . .
"When we and the brothers broke into the
Man's store we knew what to grab. Every evening on TV we saw ihe Schlock commercial telling
us their products were belter than brands X and
Y and Z. And they were right! Some of our
brothers said commercials were just honkey
mind-bending and they only wanted to burn
down the store. They grabbed anything and now
they are sorry . . ."
Schlock Electric is  for everyone!
niccolini
suits, coats, car coats, rainwear,
at fashion stores everywhere.
Friday, March 29,  1968
THE      UBYSSEY Meet Kendra Law - Student
A few months ago Kendra Law
saw an advertisement for a Reading Dynamics Demonstration
which GUARANTEED that her
reading speed would be at least
tripled, with good comprehension, in the short span of eight
weeks; and told about people
like herself who had increased
their reading speed by seven or
eight times.
Kendra attended the demonstration. At the demonstration
Kendra saw a motion picture
with impressive testimonials
from men in high public office
who had taken the Reading Dynamics course. After an illustrated lecture, she joined the audience in asking candid questions
about the techniques and rewards of Reading Dynamics.
She now reads over
2300 words per
minute.
It all started at the
Evelyn Wood
Reading Dynamics
Institute
To Kendra's surprise she discovered
that the Reading Dynamics Institute
has taught over a quarter of a million
students and that it was the largest and
fastest growing school of its kind. She
learned that the Evelyn Wood Reading
Dynamics course is the definitive rapid-
reading course in the world today.
Kendra enrolled in the
course. "Eight weeks later,"
Kendra says, "my reading speed
increased from 360 to over 2300
words per minute. Today, I can
read an average novel in less
time than it takes me to watch
the Ed Sullivan television show
on Sunday night."
She now reads faster and better than she ever dreamed possible.
MONEY-BACK
GUARANTEE
We guarantee to increase the reading
efficiency of each student AT LEAST 3
times with good comprehension. We will
refund the entire tuition to any student
who, atter completing minimum class
and study requirements, does not at least
triple his reading efficiency as measured
by our beginning and ending tests.
Attend a Free Demonstration
Tonight, March 30th-8:00
Grosvener   Hotel    —    Douglas Room
Special  Demonstration Monday, April   1
BUCHANAN 202 - 12:30 - 1:30 P.M.
special £tu4ent Rate A
If students register for any classes beginning in APRIL,
MAY, JUNE, JULY, and AUGUST by the 31st of May,
they will obtain a SPECIAL STUDENT DISCOUNT OF
10%. Remember, to obtain a special rate, you MUST
HAVE YOUR REGISTRATION IN BY MAY 31st.
REGISTER  BY  MAIL
Mail this application now to reserve the class of your choice, to:
Evelyn   Wood Reading Dynamics Institute
602-1075 Melville  St., Vancouver  5,   B.C.
Please accept my application for admission to the Evelyn Wood Reading
Dynamics Institute. Enclosed is my deposit (minimum $10) to reserve
space in the class indicated below. (Refundable if class of my choice
is not available). Please forward to me the standard registration form
so  I  may complete my enrollment by  mail.
NAME -	
ADDRESS -	
TELEPHONE  BUSINESS PHONE	
CHECK THE CLASS OF YOUR CHOICE:
n MON.
□  THUR.
n SAT.
□ MON.
D TUES.
□ WED.
□ THURS.
D SAT.
APRIL
APRIL 15—7:00 p.m.
APRIL 18—7:00 p.m.
APRIL 20—9:30 a.m.
JUNE
JUNE
JUNE
JUNE
JUNE
JUNE
17—7:00
18—7:00
19—7:00
20—7:00
22—9:30
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
a.m.
□ MON.
□ TUES.
□ WED.
□ THURS.
□ SAT.
□ MON.
□ TUES.
□ WED.
Q THUR.
□ SAT
MAY
MAY 13-
MAY 14-
MAY 15-
MAY 16-
MAY 18-
JULY
JULY 15-
JULY 16-
JULY 17-
JULY 18-
JULY 20-
-7:00 p.m.
-7:00 p.m.
-7:00 p.m.
-7:00 p.m.
-9:30 a.m.
-7:00 p.m.
-7:00 p.m.
-7:00 p.m.
-7:00 p.m.
-9:30 a.m.
□
□
□
□
□
MON.
TUES.
WED.
THUR.
SAT.
AUGUST
AUG. 12—7:00
AUG.
AUG.
AUG.
AUG.
13—7:00
14—7:00
15—7:00
17—9:30
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
a.m.
All Classes Are Held At 1075 Melville Street
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,  March  29,   1968 FAMOUS ARTISTS LTD
QUEEN ELIZABETH THEATRE
APRIL 2 TO 6 AT 8:30 P.M.
SAT. MATINEE AT 2:30 P.M.
;':W
■*\
THE SOVIET NAVY
ENSEMBLE
singers   • dancers*   musicians
PRICES: EVES.: 6.00, 5.50,4.50,3.50,2.50
MAT.: 5.00, 4.00, 3.00, 2.00
Tickets available in the Bay Box Office,
Main Floor at the Bay — Daily 10 a.m. to
5 p.m. Phone 681-3351.
SUZUKI
MOTORCYCLE
CENTRE
SERVICE  -   PARTS   ■   ACCESSORIES
3627 W.  Broadway 731-7S1*
BOOKS
* Hardcover   books
* Textbooks
* Paperbacks
* Review     Notes
* Study   Guides
If   you   are   looking   for   a    required
text   or   for   casual   reacting   try:
Village Book Shop
5732  UNIVERSITY   BLVD.
228-8410
Open 10 a.m.  to 9 p.m.
NOW IN
THE UBC
AREA
TAKE-OUT and
HOME DELIVERY  !
Chicken  * Shrimp *  Ribs
*   Fish   *   Pizza
I 736-97t"- I
chic-ken i
delight:
3605 W.   Fourth  Ave.        ]
■»<>*-e*-----»(>-«*---»0-*M-»-0-^^)<«»-0<^-»(><^_»0«_»«).^»4)^W.(>^
MM4MS & MUSI LTD.
802 Granville St.,
786 Granville St.,
Vancouver, B.C.
March 29, 1968
To the men of the 1968 ^^ ^
We, at Richards & Fari-^ , • •_
°"uck in aB youMJ^W*h y°" ^ fe*
Remember, that you will ftw,i
when you are well dressed   Tl ""**"*
are experts in a   *   ~esSedr~IUA>^s & Parish
seW ng y°Ung ^^tes fa
selecting co-ordinated fashions  ...
of re^r:drOPinand-^ our selection
ready-to-wear suits, or brow<«-> ih„      u
■» •*«*. for „ w ,;rastrM.
Come in now, or after vour fin-i
- •» -id. *__, Md aJZIZT" md
Hope to see you soon.
/a/)M-
Tim Sheedy, President
RICHARDS & FARISH LTD. and
COLLEGE SHOP LTD.
pf   11 even I
Rooftop battle
A widely acclaimed new French film, Les Vierges Toits,
was recently pre-screened in Vancouver. Film societies and
festivals have put in competing bids to show it, probably in
October. Page Friday critics Kirk Tougas and Stephen Scobie
were at the showing. We are sure that their sharply differing
views, as printed below, foreshadow many a controversy over
the movie, which is the first feature directed by Jean-Luis de
Compostelle. The American title is The Frenchman's Bed.
By KIRK TOUGAS
As a result of the private screening of Les Vierges Toils which
Mr. Scobie and myself had the honor of attending, it is necessary
to proclaim the unmistakable genius of M. Jean-Luis de Compostelle, instigator of a resurgence in the French and European
cinema. Very simply, de Compostelle has directed a vast symbolic
Chappaqua—the autobiography of the folded, spindled, stapled,
and mutilated cineaste.
Although the viewer must suffer the heartless American
translation of the poetic, imagist title for the sake of capital
commercialization, the ecstatic fluid strength hardens as of the
very first frame to an instantaneous projection of despairing
hope and hopeless despair reflected within Jean-Luis' gaze
searching through coffee grinds in his cup.—the locus of cataclasm
as a ceiling of pure white light effuses from the screen. Concomitantly, the tale unwinds as the erring poet finds an exordium
to his dialogue with celluloid;. Jean-Luis seduces Jeanne Moreau
in the symbolic and expressionistic magnificence of the wide,
yawning stage of the Grand Opera; the b&w Cscepe revealing
the empty seats manifesting a cryptic (dare I say occult) vacsaicy
of many thousand visions.
Moving to color, de Compostelle answers a Delphic oracle as
he presents his further step into the film orbit, what virtually,
may be called the seduction of Francois Truffaut. . . . Within
a theatre, during the projection of the sensational erotic doca-'
mentary Azimuth by Malahat P. Grishna, an amazing cosmic,,
interchange of fugitive virtuosity occurs. (In fact an actual upheaval and redefining of the static balance of montage, and
indeed the Cinema, is required to convey the magnanimous
Truth revealed; an almost tactile conflict of sensibilities!!)
As a tribute to the American musical, inspiration of both
life and death, de Compostelle closes his film with a sentimental
collage of flash-editing (in both C-scope and normal ratio)—76
shots of ever-new angles and distances depicting and discovering
Beauty.
To speak of Les Vierges Toits as a whole, it does not suffice.
to simply say that it is "magnificent", and even a "it is incon-
testably the greatest film made in the past 500 years" is Still
insufficient. Rather, with due admiration let us sum up this
oeuvre: the director with minute circumspection has peripicuously
elucidated the latitude of meaningful interpretation so essential
in the existing correlation between the graphic and non-matrixed
performance. He has incontestably structured the film alogically
completely grasping its inherent dynamic biomechanics—rendering total diffusion of its in-built plastic balance!
By .STEPHEN SCOBIE
Were it not for the incredible adulation which certain so-
called critics have heaped upon this gross exhibition of tasteless
egotism, one would be tempted to consign this inanity of a film
directly to the compost-heap of oblivion.
Monsieur de Compostelle's travestj-* is egregious in every
department. At least the absurdly pretentious title (literally
"The Virgin Roofs") has been changed by the American t&stri-
butor to "The Frenchman's. Bed", which more or less indicates
the film's true level.
I    The plat is said to be autobiographical: if so, I can only pity
Madame de Compostelle.
A, young jinan, of peculiarly insipid unattractiveness, arrives
in Paris from the $uimrbs». hoping to become a film director. He
meets, and seduces, a wealthy actress, played by Jeanne Moreau;
later, he seduces a "ttouvelle vague" director, played by Francois
Truffaut. "■.,,*■
XT-he latterscene taKes place in a ejaema, which is-showing
MsOahat P. G%hna's Azi&utk This typically facile "in" gesture
at least allows us some relksf from the general, tedium yaih its
glimpses of scenes from that surpassingly great doauroentatS'i",',
I see that my onCe-esttiemed colleague, Monsieur Toogas,
claims that the parts involving Moreau and Truffaut are in fact
autobiographically correct ahd that all the principals play ibein-
selves. If this is false, It is libellous; if it is true, it is Sheer moral
cowardice by all concerned to hide behind ihe deceitful web of
ficltious names.
In the latter part Of the film, the hero(?> takes refuse in the
sewers of Paris, where he makes underground movies. The
quality of these is unbelievably bad, and Monsieur Toogas* explanation, that they were shot with the revolutionary technique
of keeping the lens cap on, is no exoneration.
This blatantly superficial plot is decked out with an array
of technical gimmickry unequalled since the first spray of the
new wave.
Stop-motion, back-motion, upside-down-motion, black-and-
white-motion: all that is missing is the use of Smellovision or
Odorama: doubtless omitted only because of the sewer scenes.
Miss Moreau is understandably bored.
So was I.
But I noticed that Lome Parton walked out of the showing
with a smirk the size of Compost's ego.
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, March 29,  1968 jazz
Being as it is the last issue'
I will say everything now.
It's been a very good year.
Bobby Bland, Buddy Rich,
Nina Simone, the Gospel
Jazz Singers, Little Richard
and O. C. Smith were some
of the reasons. Especially
O.C. a personable young man
with ia real zen for life (that's
my own combination of
"zest" and "yen" not the
other stuff).
But don't look back. Coming    up    are    Earl    "Falha"
Hines,   Lou   Rawls,   and   Ella
Fitzgerald    and   some   other
howcum
you can't buy The New York
Review of  Books — one of
the most intellectually stimulating magazines published
on this continent—anywhere
in Vancouver? Where, for
that matter, can you find a
decent selection of current
English and French papers?
The UBC bookstore's magazine    section    which   should
surprises later on in the summer hour.
And from Vancouver herself some promising sounds
in the music scene. The Night
Train's single "Ain't Love
Wonderful" doing well on
the charts. The Collectors
promise something along the
Mothers of Invention blueprint in a new album. Word
from Spectres is they'll be
cutting a single with their
talented singer Billy Taylor.
And finally Bobby Taylor
and the Vancouvers' new Motown release "Does Your
Mama Know About Me"
looks  like it could put Van-
carry these things has an assortment of periodicals ranging from Time all the way to
Vogue.
Howcum the Queen E.
Playhouse thinks so little of
the playwrights whose works
they produce they rarely
bother to include their names
in advertisements of Playhouse productions? (If you
don't believe Backside check,
for instance, the current ad
for   Max   Frisch's   Firebugs..)
7M2m$MMMMM£M^mmg^M
art
From March 21 through
to April 6, the UBC Fine
Arts Gallery presents The
Transformation of Space, as
well as an exhibition of B.C.
prints.
On loan from the Smithsonian Institute, the space
exhibition is concerned with
symmetry; the prints feature
the work of Baxter, Binning,
Onley,  Shadbolt and others.
The work of six Los Angeles artists is on display at
the Vancouver Art Gallery
from Sunday. The name of
the exhibition is the Los Angeles Six.
Posters    full    of    Vietnam
etc.
Page Friday hereby presents to its readers an alternative to the utterly banal exam
timetable, which the administration, proving its complete
lack of originality and good
taste, has set up the same
time as in past years.
Complementing the black
comedy of examinations, are
The Firebugs, in the Playhouse from April 2 to the
20th. Presenting a threat to
U.S. imperialist hegemony, is
The Soviet Navy Ensemble,
complete with off stage fishing fleet, at the Queez Liz
Theatre April 3 to 6.
Outrageously priced season's tickets for the Vancouver Symphony's fall season
can be picked up for pennies
with the presentation of an
AMS   card,   but   don't   quote
poetry, 100 per cent con, are
available from Mrs. Thomas
in Buchanan 2277, at $1.50
for single copies.
The posters starkly executed by Bob Masse present the
works of Robin Blaser, Lionel
Kearns, Fred Stockholder,
Helene Rosenthal, and other
local poets.
In pf's Contemporary Poetry
issue a few weeks back, we
gave a good deal of space to
the phenomenon known as
Concrete Poetry. This movement is becoming increasingly important in modern poetry; in the last few months,
there has been a fantastic explosion of articles, analyses,
reviews, etc. devoted to it.
this newspaper. Featured
artists include Jean-Pierre
Rampal, Robert Casadesus,
Igor, Oisirakh, Philippe, En-
tremont.
The Food Services Newsletter mentions in its most
recent issue that change is
the order of the day. April
11 will be the last day for
sticky buns at the caf. Revolutionary ideas will have
to be exchanged over the
clatter of a "battery of vending machines."
The Barn, until recently a
music building, "a charming
relic of UBC's distant (sic)
past" will be taken over by
the food services. And the
SUB will feature a colossal
dining hall, only for the
truly gregarious. The newsletter makes no mention of
liquor licences.
Roger Schiffer, has announcer he will open the Re-
couver   on   the   rhythm   and
blues map.
For fall, students can look
forward to an active jazz
and blues society. All its
plans are not yet known but
two of its major objectives
will be the Introduction of
jazz into the music faculty
and the presence of a little
bit more of that good music
on CYVR radio.
So, till then may these
words from Bertohl "Blue"
Brecht's translation of American slang keep you "up in
close proximity, beyond the
visible spectrum and let it all
protrude."
— P.L.
Why aren't the comics
comic any more? Why do women's fashions "return" to
the 'feminine look" when no
designer has ever admitted
to deviating from it?
Where did Fourth Avenue
go?
Why do the daily papers
never tell you -what cops do
with all the pot accumulated
in raids? — Curiouser and
curiouser.
—J.B.
Now Vancouver has its first
chance to see a truly international sampling of what is
being done in this strange and
exciting medium. For two
weeks, starting Monday, April
1, there will be on view at
the Mandan Ghetto on Fourth
Avenue an international exhibition of concrete poetry.
Organizer David Harris, a
young poet from Toronto recently moved to Vancouver,
and himself one of Canada's
leading concretists, has assembled a n impressively
large collection of material
from America, South America and Europe. Many of
the poem-constructs in the
exhibition will be for sale.
tinal Circus on Thursdays
starting from Easter. Admission on Thursdays will be
$1.75, on Fridays and Saturdays $2.50.
This weekend the group
featured will be Siegel-
Schwall from Chicago.
Along with the Notes From
The Underground, a group
from Berkeley, and the Charlatans, who are to play for the
Easter Be-in, Schiffer will
feature, a local band with
each imported group. New
names, like The Pacfic Nation,
and the new improved Black
Snake, as well as My Indole
Ring, The United Empire
Loyalists and others will be
on at the circus every weekend during the summer.
Kaleidescope, the group
which recorded with poet
Cohen, is scheduled for the
summer.
— A.H.
VARSITY FOR DIAMONDS
You are buying for the future
as  well  as the  present  .   .   .
SEE US FOR YOUR DIAMOND TODAY
10% Discount to Students
Varsity Jewellers
4517 West 10th 224-4432
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, March 29, 1968 Friday, March 29,   1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 19
'TWEEN CLASSES
UBC Oregonians
help dump LBJ
Campaign for McCarthy,
first week in May. Contact 701
High Street, Eugene, Oregon.
Help dump LBJ.
OPERA
The Medium and the Telephone by Menotti, April 1 to 6
at 856 Seymour, 8 p.m. Student tickets $1.50 at the music
building. A gassy experience.
TEACHERS'  COMMITTEE
ON VIETNAM
Prof. David Donaldson discusses Canada's foreign policy
and Prof. Benson Brown will
discuss NATO and NORAD,
Wednesday, noon, Bu. 106.
CHRISTIAN  SCIENCE
Free Christian Science lecture on What Is Success by
Harry Smith, 7 p.m. Thursday
at fireside room, Lutheran campus center.
ARTS US
The anti-calendar helps you!
Why not help the anti-calendar?
Come   to   the   AUS   office   in
Buchanan basement anytime.
AQUA SOC
Members interested in a dive
to the San Juan islands May
18, 19 and 20 sign list in clubroom.
GERMAN CLUB
Elections and banquet details
Tuesday noon in IH 402.
SPORTS CAR CLUB
Last general meeting of the
year, noon Thursday in chem.
250. T-birds film will be shown.
GSA
Classical guitar concert by
Edwin Emslie will be held
Thursday in upper lounge of
grad center.
SPECIAL EVENTS
LMT Stage Two of the playhouse nightly, Dunsmuir and
Beatty.
EDUCATION US
Applications now being received for positions on students'
committee on the future of the
faculty of education. Deadline
is April 3, further information
in room 1 of education building.
GERMAN DEPARTMENT
Prof. Benno von Weise speaks
on Gestaltungen des Wahnsin-
ns in der modernen Literatur,
noon Wednesday, Bu. 218.
COLLEGE LIFE
CAT-GIF tonight at 9 p.m.,
7879 Osier. Special speaker is
Rob Kendell with folk singing.
MAA
Meeting to elect executive
Friday, April 5, gym bowling
alley. Applications being accepted by director of athletics.
Be prepared to speak at the
meeting. For further information call Andy McConkey, 738-
1741.
FROSH ORIENTATION
Those interested in working
on committees, meet Monday,
noon, Brock council chambers.
EDUCATION US
EdUS needs your help. See
room one.
KARATE CLUB
For information on summer
karate classes, contact gym
office.
ROBSON HOUSE
Changes in boat cruise: a)
boat leaves Bayshore Inn
waterfront, Saturday, 7:30 p.m.;
b) taped music on board, ample
room for dancing; c) boat
cruises around Vancouver harbor till 1:15 a.m. — does not
stop at Belcarra; d) all drinks
to be purchased on board at 40
cents per 1.5 oz. drink; e) free
food at midnight.
VCF
Today, Rev. Hadley of West
Point Grey Baptist church.
April 5, Dr. John Ross, today,
noon, Ang. 110.
VIETNAM COMMITTEE
Meeting to discuss international day of protest, Tuesday,
noon, Bu. 216.
PSYCHOLOGY DEPT.
Dr. Leo Levy, director of
planning and evaluation, Illinois department of mental
health, speaks on public health
theory and practice, Friday,
April 5, 3:30 p.m., Ang. 207.
STUDENTS' WIVES
Fashion  show April 3  at  8
p.m., Cecil Green park. Graduation spring tea April 20, 2:30
to 4:30 at Cecil Green.
Page 19 —
MOUSERS
Garry    Gumley    speaks    on
Why   I   Was'a  Failure   as   ed
prez, ed lounge, noon today.
NHL
Egg-throwing contest outside Angus, Tuesday noon.
Rally, Thursday noon, Ang.
110.
100%
HUMAN HAIR
WIGS
21.95, 31.95, 41.95 & 61.95
WIGLETS
$9.95
BEAUTIFUL  FALLS
$29.95
SALES
10%
Discount  to
U.B.C.   Students
& Personnel
SERVICE
"GONE WITH THE WIG"
49 W. HASTINGS ST.
Between Woodward's and A. & N.
TELEPHONE
688-1201
CLASSIFIED
Publications Office, BROCK HALL, UNIV. OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
THERE WILL BE DANCING AND
Partying every night in Mexico.
Leave May 3 for two weeks. For
young single people only. $428.00 includes EVERYTHING. Just bring
your body. Can be paid at only $15
month or as fast as you want without interest worries. 733-8690 or 681-
4616.
Lost & Found
IJ
FOUND: MEN'S WATCHES & SEV.
glasses and rings, identify & claim,
Pub.   Off..   Brock   Hall.
FOUND: PAIR OF GIRL'S GLASSES.
Left in car by hitch-hiker. Phone
922-6075.
FOUND SHEAFFER PEN OUTSIDE
Sedge lib. Sat. Phone 263-6057 after
6  p.m.
LOST: A CAMERA IN BROCK ON
Saturday night. Reward. Terry 731-
9974.
LOST ONE GREEN FLOWERED
'head' shirt around Toronto-Allison.
Show that you identify with other
students if you find it. Call 224-9660.
RAINCOAT SWITCHED IN BU. 205
Tuesday at 8:30 Economics. Black
wallet and keycase.   Phone  733-3009.
LOST IN THE MUSIC LIBRARY
about two weeks ago a blue binder.
If found please contact Jane 224-
9980 Nootka Rm.  287.
LOST: MY SHOE! BLACK LEA-
ther Slingback between Acadia and
Library. Please phone Blaize at 224-
9835.
REWARD: WOULD THE PERSON
who took my leather jacket and
sweater from the rack outside Chem.
370, Tues. afternoon, please return
the glasses from the pocket to the
Publications Office.
Rides & Car Pools
14
RIDE WANTED TO SAN FRAN-
cisco April 9 or 10. Share cost of
gas,  driving.  Phone Larry,  261-9717.
GIRL NEEDS RIDE TO MONTREAL
after May 3.  434-3948 after 5 p.m.
Special Notices
15
SOMETHING  DIFFERENT OR
MORE OF THE SAME
May 21 - 31
A human relations institute,
an opportunity for a different kind
of learning experience, compared to
the  traditional  seminar,  conference
and  workshop programs,
decision     making,     self-perception,
listening skills, utilization of human
resources.
participants from various disciplines
and cultural and  racial groups,
for  more   information   call   or  visit
INTERNATIONAL   HOUSE
OPEN DOOR DROP-IN CENTRE —
(Coffee house in Church cellar.)
Every Friday night, 9-12 midnight,
corner of llh and Fir.
POST EXAM FUN TOUR TO MEX-
ico. Singles only. Sponsored by the
"Fifth Day Club". Up to two years
to pay. Group rates, 733-8690 or
681-4616.
AQUA SOC MEMBERS INTERESTED
in a dive to San Juan Islands May
18,   19,   20.   Sign   list   in   club   room.
DON'T FORGET THE FOREIGN
student reception programme. Open
to all Canadian students. Please apply at International House office
by this May.	
FACULTY AND STUDENTS FOR
Trudeau: Funds are urgently needed
for Pierre Elliott Trudeau's campaign for the Liberal Leadership.
Send cheques to Trudeau Committee
for B.C. Suite 704, 535 Thurlow,
Vancouver.
CATCH ON . . . THE EYES HABIT.
Tomorrow's Eyes will be appearing
at the Village Bistro, 2081 West 4th
from April 1-14. The Eyes Habit . . .
Catch On!
Travel Opportunities
16
EASTER WEEK-END LAS VEGAS.
Join the Swinging Singles of the
Fifth Day Club in Las Vegas at the
Fabulous Riviera Hotel, departure
time Thursday, April 11th at 8:00
p.m. returning Sunday, April 14 at
7:00 p.m. INCLUDES Boeing 707 Jet
transportation, two persons per
room, Breakfast or Brunch each day
Funny Girl Review includes dinner,
Cocktail Parties etc. etc. All for
$160.00. For further information telephone 681-4616 or call in at the office 1390 Robson Street,  Suite 1A.
THE BEST TIME TO TRAVEL IS
when you're young and thats now.
Post exam university tour to Mexico.
Travel with your own age group.
Arranged to fit your budget. Only
$25 down. All inclusive tour. Excellent accommodation, food, booze
cruises, beach parties, tours, all
transportion, etc. May 3 for two
weeks. 733-8690 or 681-4616 for further  information.
CHEAP RIDE TO TORONTO SHARE
gas and driving. Leave May 5/6.
Arrive 10/11. Interested? Phone
Norm 224-9774. Leave message.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
GRADUATING? MOVING OUT? I'M
staying and I need 2 bedroom accommodation for the upcoming year.
If you know of any bargains I would
appreciate   a   call.   Keith   738-8627.
WANTED: "FERNS AND FERN-AL-
lies of B.C." by Taylor. Phone 224-**
1845.  Paul.
USED R/C EQUIPMENT FOR Model airplane. Reasonable. Write:
John T. Meszarosi. 3036 W. 7th Ave.
UBC TEXTS BOUGHT AND SOLD.
Best prices, Busy "B" Books, 146
West   Hastings,   681-4931.
AUTOMOTIVE & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
ai
JI.G.A. 1961 BLUE WITH WIRES,
radio, accessories. New paint, new
clutch, engine work. $9011 spent on
renewals in lasl _-/_ years. Has
American registration —* can only
be sold to a non-immigrant in Canada. Call or visit Peter Bill, Hut
0-4,   228-3411  or 733-8218.
1959 MORRIS 1000. GOOD CONDI-
tion. New Brakes and Clutch. Asking   $375.  AM  1-4600.
1959 VW. GOOD CONDITION. 67,000
miles. Asking $400. Phone Mike 224-
0227 after 6  p.m.
1963 VW RADIO, SKI-RACK, SNOW
tires, new clutch, and battery, well
looked after. $800. 261-6153 after 5:00
p.m.
'51 CHEVROLET. MOST DEPEND-
able transportation on campus. Dirl
cheap. Phone Bob after 5:30. 266-
8164.
BEAUTIFUL SLEEK WHITE JAG-
uar 3.4 model good condition. $975
or trade for car of equal value!
684-3832.
BEAUTIFUL SLEEK WHITE JAG-
uar 3.4 model. Good condition — $975
or trade for car of equal value.
684-3832  anytime.
1964    DATSUN    1500.     27,000    MILES.
Lots of extras. Phone 224-1559.
1956 FORD V8 AUT. LOTS OF
Power. City tested. '68 plates, $150.
58,000.   RE   3-3018.
1959 FORD V-8 STD. VERY GOOD
condition. Must sell before May 922-
7203.
1957 CHEV. 6 CYL. AUTOMATIC,
radio, 2 speakers, best offer over
$100. Phone 731-9663.
Automobiles Wanted
22
WANTED TO RENT A CAMPER OR
VW bus for May. Call Gael 738-815B,
5:30 - 6:30.
AUTOMATIC 6 CYL. '61-'64 station
wagon preferred for cash. Phone 299-
0932. Sun.  12-4.
Motorcycles
26
'67 CUSTOM BUILT HONDA 305
Scrambler, crome and candy paint.
Apply 738-7462 after 5:30 serious
offers only.	
'66 HONDA 50,  4,000 MILES—$125 OR
nearest  offer—Call   685-6795.
HONDA    50    EXCEL.    COND.    LESS
than   2,000   miles.   Phone   431-3887.
MOPED 45 cc, WITH HELMET, 6,000
miles, great for around town, only
$70,  phone 224-9974  (Ken).
BUSINESS SERVICES
Scandals
37
SELLING YOUR TEXTBOOKS? TRY
The Bookfinder. 4444 West 10th
Ave. 228-8933.
FOR   THE   BIGGEST   SCANDAL   OF
your life take in  the post-exam  tour
to Acapulco.   For singles  only.   This
will   be   a   once   in   a   lifetime   trip.
733-8640 or 681-4616.
$975 OR TRADE FOR CAR OF
euual value! Beautiful sleek white
Jaguar 3.4 model. Good condition,
684-3832.
MONDAY 12:30 — D. S. BREADNER-
Magor will be presented with the
Order of the Fag, and decorated for
contributions to the Croquet and
Bowls Club. Main library stairs.
Typing   40
EXPERT   ELECTRIC   TYPIST
Experienced   essay   and   thesis   typist
Reasonable Rates TR. 4-9253
TYPING  —   ELEC.   MACHINE
Phone   738-7881
EXPERT   TYPIST   —   ELECTRIC
224-6129  —   228-8384.
SHORT NOTICE TYPING DURING
the day; 25c page: phone Ruth,
RE   8-4410.
TYPING.  PHONE 731-7511 — 9:00 TO
5:00.   266-6662 after  6  o'clock.
ESSAYS AND THESIS TYPED. MRS.
Hall   434-9558.
'GOOD EXPERIENCED TYPIST
available for home typing. Please
phone 277-5640.
ESSAYS      AND     THESIS     TYPED.
Please call Dallas Simkins, 926-2741.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
SI
MODELS FOR HAIRSTYLING CON-
tests at 2 B.C. hairdressers convention. Vancouver Hotel May 4 to 6.
Must have hair in good condition
and be willing to have hair cut
styled and freshly coloured. Pay
based on number of contest appearances. Further particulars from
Hairdressers Association of B.C.,
No. 611, 198 West Hastings St.,
Vancouver 3,  B.C.  683-6691.
ROOM AND BOARD AVAILABLE
May first in exchange for household
duties.  Call 261-3241.
Help Wanted—Male
12
TRAIN NOW OR START NOW.
Largest return for smallest investment. Part or full time. Mr. Mc-
Lellan. 224-4642 daily after 5 p.m.
Wednesday, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Help W'ted—Male or Female    53
EARN $50.00 PER DAY WITH
YOUR NOSE!
Short-term summer employment on a
medical research project for person
with exceptionally keen sense of smell.
If you think you can identify individual persons easily by smell, please
phone 228-2575 for appointment for
odour testing. Successful applicant
must demonstrate superior ability to
identify trace amounts of pure chemicals by their odour.
CUSO IS STILL ACCEPTING APPLI-
cations  for overseas service  in August   1968.   35   countries   all   professions   and   skills.   Contact   International  Houst.
Help Wted. - Male or Female
Con'td. 53
INTERESTED IN SELLING NEXT
term? Then why not be an advertising sales rep. for the Ubyssey.
Several second or third year business-minded students who are willing to work hard for about 10 hours
a week can make up to $t,000. If
interested apply to the Publications
Oftjce.   Brock Hall.	
ITALIAN SCHOLAR TO RESEARCH
Zl'ST automobile. Possibility of free
triti to New York this summer. Mt:
4-7994.
Work Wanted
BRIGH
54
VERSATILE   YOUNG   MAN
wants full or part-time employment
for   month   of   April.   Anything   con
sidered.   Call   263-9679.
INSTRUCTION
Tutoring
EXPERIENCED TUTORING IN 1ST
A 2nd year English, History. Math,
Chemistry, French, and other languages. For appointment phone Mr.
Huberman—B.A.-LLB — Huberman
Educational Inst., 215S West 12th
Phone  732-5535  — 263-4808.
FIRST YEAR MATHEMATICS AND
sciences other undergraduate subjects to fourth year. Canadian Tutorial   Centre,    736-6923.
FRENCH CONVERSATION, GRAM*
mer, literature. My home, Marpole,
hours to suit 321-8489.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
NEW LINES AT THE DISCOUNT
House' of tape-players, tape recorders, all sizes in transistor and electric radio's, watches, luggage, binoculars, jewelry and gift items; 1500
latest style ladies bathingsuits to
choose from, wholesale prices on all
merchandise. 3235 West Broadway.
Phone   732-6811. 	
SKVKRAL HAND KNITTED DRESS-
es from $19.00, size 10-14, make to
order, knitted & crochet dresses &
dressmaking — 224-3672, 4689 West
12th  Ave.
—   OLD   TOTEMS   FOR   SALE   —
1963,   1965   &   1966   issues   50c.
Campus   Life's   25c.   Publicaions   Off.,
Brock Hall
WE'LL    BE    HERE    ALL    SUMMER.
Lessons,   Instruments &. Guaranteed
Repairs
MEDITERRANEAN GUITAR SHOP
228-8412
4347 West   10th Avenue
FOR SALE STUDENT BASS FIDDLE
call Ken, 987-5737.
ROYAL PORTA BLE TYPEWRITER.
Excellent condition. $25. Phone Judy,
738-6134.
ELECTRIC  GUITAR   EXCEL.   COND.
Must sell. Phone 431-3887.
PUREBRED WHITE SAMOYED
puppy: 7 weeks old. Tel. 856-2201.
Aldergrove.	
LONELY? LEO, OUR REFRIGERA-
tor will keep you company, sing
(rattle) to you, also keep your food
cold! Call Bob or Susan 224-1972.
$25  or  offer.
PACKING CARTONS USED ONCE IN
long distance moving. Wardrobe
with bars, mattress, asst. sizes. 224-
3043.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
61
UBC GRADUATE MAN REQUIRES
unfurnished suite or furnished small
suite or room with light cooking facilities. Separate entrance from May.
Prepared pay six months advance
rent.  Phono 7-"!-0767 or 254-1284.
LIVE ON CAMPUS THIS SUMMER.
Delta Upsilon Fraternity House. For
details  phone  228-8051.
ROOMS ON CAMPUS; NOW & KUM-
mer, 2250 Wesbrook 224-9662.	
GIRL—SENIOR STUDENT, NEEDS
reasonable room urgently. Call
Carolyn.   RE  6-7908  or  RE   3-6556.
Room & Board
62
MOVE ON CAMPUS FOR EXAMS.
Good meals, quiet study space.
Males  only   224-9665  after 6 p.m.
YOUNG LADY — ROOM & BOARD.
$80.00. Refund of $50.00 for evening
babysitting   May   to   Aug.   incl.   731-
5946.	
66
Furn. Houses & Apts.
FURN. APT ON CAMPUS IN HI-
rise avail. June, July, August. Come
view  and   chat,   228-8417.
WANTED TO RENT: CHEAP
house near water (Kits.) June-
August call  Jean 738-8156,  5:30-6:30.
APT. NEEDED CLOSE TO GATES
will share May 1—Ph. Marilyn 228-
8331,   6   p.m.   	
THREE BEDROOM FURNISHED
house near U.B.C. Gates. May 1st
to  September   1st.  Phone  224-0264.
MAY-AUGUST. TWO GIRLS TO
share with third furnished flat.
Fourth & Alma. $40/month. 738-9055.
WILL SOMEONE SUBLET ACADIA
apartment for summer school? Quiet
couple with one girl aged seven.
Total rent paid by June 20th. 731-
0231.
WANTED: FURN. STE. FOR 2-3RD
year girls on or near campus. Available Sept.   Phone 261-4813.
WANTED: TWO BEDROOM FURN.
suite in UBC area. Occupancy May
1st. Phone 224-9059. Rm. 390 Totem.
Leave message.	
TO SUBLET ONE BEDROOM APT.
May 1 to Aug. 31. On campus.
Phone  224-5046.
GIRL NEEDS 2 ROOM-MATES TO
share on-campus apartment May
through August. Separate double
room.   224-7266.
Unfurn. Houses fe Apts.
84
NEW     APARTMENT     FOR     RENT
May 1 on campus, 3 bedrooms, stove,
fridge. All draped. $145 month. Students or faculty only. 228-8166 evenings. Page 20
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday,  March  29,   1968
YOUR PRESCRIPTION . . .
. . . For Glasses
for that smart look in glasses .. .
look to
Hlesclibtion Optical
Student Discount Given
WE HAVE AN OFFICE NEAR YOU
GUARANTEED JOBS ABROAD! Get paid, travel, meet people.
Summer and year 'round jobs for young people 17 to 40. For
illustrated magazine with complete details and applications
send $1.00 to The International Student Information Service (ISIS),
133, rue Hotel des Monnaies, Brussels 6, Belgium.
The   "fioivw" and
"ClydsT  Look
FUN WORKING IN EUROPE
548 Granville, Vancouver 2
MU   2-1022
1967-1968
Mediocrity, but
By PAUL KNOX
Ubyssey Gloom Editor
This was the year that didn't quite make it.
After all the prating and screaming last term
about increased dialogue with the administration, improved housing, education action and
other grandiose schemes, a long look at the
accomplishments of UBC's students and administration doesn't reveal much in the way of concrete accomplishments.
HOUSING UNIMPROVED
Take housing, for instance. The year started
with student councillors lamenting a critical
housing shortage. Landlords and householders
with rooms to spare were urged to register
them with Don Mutton's AMS housing registry.
Mutton soon reported the situation was improving, but when he went before city council to
ask for a lifting of the moratorium on illegal
suites, he was shot down.
And then there was Acadia Park. Completion of the 275 suites for married students was
delayed several times before students finally
filled the last suite in mid-January. Between
September, when the suites should have been
finished, and January, married students found
temporary accommodation in motels, campus
army huts, and assorted other hovels.
Now the Acadia suites are finished, and next
on the housing agenda is the removal of Acadia
and Fort Camps. The camps are to be replaced
by new towers at Place Vanier and Totem
Park, and a building behind Brock Hall.
Most important renovation in the housing
administration this year has been its director.
Les Rohringer replaced the somewhat autocratic Malcolm McGregor when McGregor took
a year's leave of absence in Greece. Most residents hoped he wasn't coming back. He isn't,
at least not as housing director.
Since September, Rohringer has worked ceaselessly to improve communication with residents.
He's extended late-leave privileges and adopted
a philosophy of principles rather than rules.
Rohringer had one tiff with Acadia Camp presi
dent   Eric  Brynjolffson,   but   that   was   solved
after Brynjolffson  resigned.
SECRECY ISSUE  VANISHES
Then there was the senate. Four student
senators, including three radicals, were elected,
for the first time in the history of UBC. Their
platforms were terrific—a vote for us is a vote to
end senate secrecy, they said. "End tokenism:
these radical fired-up students want a true voice
in the decisions that affect them. Student Power!"
But  what happened?  In the  first  place,  it
and the war drags on." — Donovan
E for egregious
turned out the senate only meets about once
a month, and the voices of four students, although loud, had little effect on senate policy.
And where was the seething mass of discontented students? When a student-senator meeting was held in International House to discuss
the secrecy issue there were more senators than
students. And to top all of this off, senator Kris
Emmott resigned for personal reasons, to be
replaced by former AMS vice - president Don
Mutton.
The secrecy issue has petered out ignomin-
iously. At the IH meeting, congeniality reigned
supreme. But precious little was decided, although no-one seriously expected either students or senators to capitulate completely. The
open senate issue disappeared into committee
at the last senate meeting Feb. 14 and hasn't been
heard of since.
A great deal was accomplished at that meeting, nonetheless. The senate in effect abolished
the language requirement at the request of the
faculty of arts. Frosh with grade 12 standing
in language no longer have to pass through the
grist mills that are the present first year language courses. Instead, the profs that teach them
will be free to spend their time on students
who are seriously interested in the study of
language. The senate also established a department of computer science and approved institution of pass-fail courses in the faculty of arts.
The senate secrecy fizzle was symptomatic
of the troubles plaguing president Shaun Sullivan's AMS executive this year. Crisis after
crisis beset Sullivan, Mutton, treasurer Dave
Hoye, co-ordinator Jim Lightfoot, and second
vice-president Kim Campbell. From the housing situation through the education action program to the final colossal mass of red tape that
was the AMS election, Shaun rode a perilous
path down the middle of the road.
BITTER RIVALRY
The executive remained uncomfortably silent through the November protest marches
against Dow Chemical's campus recruitment
program. They failed to show up for a meeting
with new UBC president Dr. Kenneth Hare, the
man who will shape much of UBC's academic
and administrative future. The only time they
took a definite stand — by condemning Mardi
Gras' deep south theme — it remained an ineffectual voice of protest, uttered at no risk to
the executive and causing no harm to Mardi
Gras attendance.
Dave Hoye, who was ruled ineligible to hold
office by student court, started off the year by
giving no money to the arts council. A year of Friday, March 29,   1968
THE     U BYSSEY
Page 21
...ITCHES, STITCHES
alls not lost
rivalry, often bitter, between arts council and
technical faculties followed.
To start with, a band of sciencemen marched
from the Hennings building to Buchanan terrace
in mid-October, armed with barrels of foam
they wanted to spread in Buchanan lounge.
Angry artsmen repulsed them with fire hoses
and a cursing, shoving clash ensued. Robin Russell and Stan Persky called each other names.
But relations were patched up a couple of weeks
later when science vice-president John Taylor
presented Persky with a bouquet of chrysanthemums at an arts free dance in Brock lounge —
the cause of another AMS snafu. Commerce
prez Peter Uitdenbosch had reserved the lounge
for a commerce meeting but the arts types
maintained it was theirs. In the resulting battle
of words, Uitdenbosch called the arts council
"filthy animals".
THEY PISSED RED
Engineers succeeded in alienating almost
everyone. They ransacked The Ubyssey's office
after the science foam stunt. They fed phenolph-
thalein - spiked cookies to sciencemen, who in
the words of one engineer "pissed red for days".
During their annual splurge of self-glorification,
engineering week, they implanted a large E in
the main mall (it was later removed), strung
toilet paper across the campus <rain washed it
away), and paraded machinery on the main mall.
If it wasn't a good year for anything else, it
was a good year for newspapers. Tom Campbell tried to ban Georgia Straight but she
wouldn't give up easily. Tom even got into The
Ubyssey when he complimented the rag for
refusing to print a picture of a woman masturbating. And the Sun and Province went on
strike for a short time near Christmas, but
nobody noticed. The spectre of exams, then as
now, was overpowering.
STUDENT POWER FIZZLES
Academia progressed this year. Most notable
achievement was the institution of the new Arts
I program, under which all exams and most lectures were abolished. Students sat in seminars
and listened to records, heard speakers, painted
and even sculpted, all toward the cause of
higher education, discovering the ultimate reality, and getting credit for nine units. But there
won't be an Arts II next year.
There was more in '67-'68. Pre-registration
was abolished, but there's a chance that it
might come back. And that's the way it is with
most situations right now: the housing crisis,
the  AMS constitution,  the new student  union
building. There's a chance for all of them.
In the opinion of most campus observers,
the faculty and the world of academia have progressed this year more than any other element
of the university community. Arts I, abolition
of the language requirement and announcement
of a plan for a UBC cluster college represent
real milestones in the academic development of
the university.
The student government's record has been
less enviable. Student power has remained the
proverbial impossible dream. But students this
spring elected what is by any standard a radical
student council.
Next year, we may make it.
Ritual sorrow drowning
WIdMa pizza mokil
Dine In — Take Oul — Delivery
Across  the street from the
Fraser   Arms
1381   SW.  Marine Drive
263-4440
UNRULY HAIR?
Best Men's Hairstyling Service
at the
Upper Tenth Barber
4574 W. 10th Ave.
1 block from gate*
DATA-DATE
See our questionnaire
in the Sun, April 5
When summer comes
and your friends are
gone. Remember us!
P.O. Box 4102, Vancouver 9
ONLY $5.00
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
EXTRA SESSIONAL
EVENING CREDIT COURSES
MAY-JULY, 1968
May 1 - July 31, two evenings a week, 7 - 9:45 p.m.
Registration at the Office of the Registrar, specify registration is for May-July Extra Sessional course. Early
application is advised.
ENGLISH 200
ENGLISH 300
ENGLISH 303
ENGLISH 425
HISTORY 429
PSYCHOLOGY 409
SOCIOLOGY 301
SOCIOLOGY 425
Literature and Composition —
3 units Mondays and Wednesdays
Seminar for Majors —
3 units Mondays and Wednesdays
English Composition —
3 units Mondays and Wednesdays
British Drama, 1880 to the Present
3 units Mondays and Wednesdays
History of the American West —
3 units  Tuesdays  and  Thursdays
Cognitive Processes —
3 units Mondays and Wednesdays
Deviance —
3 units Mondays and Wednesdays
Urban Sociology —
3 units Mondays and Wednesdays
THE TOWER OF BABEL
by
MORRIS L. WEST
The Middle East on the
brink of the Six-Day War
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4560  W.  10th  Ave.
514  Hornby  Street
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HOURS: 9 A.M. to 6 P.M. daily incl. Sat.;  Mon. to 8 P.M.
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.J Page 22
THE     U BYSSEY
Friday, March 29, 1968
Vancouver soccer
Birds  take   on   Royals   in  Thunderbird   Stadium
By JOHN TWIGG
UBC soccer is growing in
leaps and bounds, but the same
can't be said lor the local pro
soccer team.
Witness Thursday's game in
Thunderbird Stadium against
the Simon Fraser University
club. The score was only 5-0
for the Birds but with any luck
it could have been more. However, the Birds were not exactly busting their asses to win.
Fans and players joked back
and forth, but in the second
half when winger Ash Valdai
was on the bench, he picked
up a camera and took pictures
of the cheerleaders.
The Birds looked classy
when they needed to, getting
good goals from Jim Berry (2),
while Valdai, Jim Briggs and
Kirby  Carter added singles.
While the Thunderbirds are
the class of local college soccer, they're also in first place
in the tough Pacific Coast league and have all but won the
title.
The Vancouver Royals, our
pro entry in the North American league, aren't winners
though, and are adding a blemish to local soccer.
The Royals' problems started
long ago when they could
have been corrected. But nothing was done and we still
have the Royals.
Originally, the Vancouver
franchise hired Bobby Robson,
a distinguished English soc-
cerman. Things looked good,
but the Vancouver franchise
merged with a California franchise and kept the team in
Vancouver.
But the first problem to
arise was the coach. Both
groups had hired coaches and
one had to go. Ferenc Puskas,
who doesn't speak English, was
DATA-DATE
See our questionnaire
in the Sun, April 5
When  summer  comes
and your friends are
gone. Remember us!
P.O. Box 4102, Vancouver 9
ONLY$5.00
FORMAL
AND
SEMI-FORMAL
rental and sales
Tuxedos, tails, white dinner   iackets,   morning
coats . . . complete slie
range.
We   also   make   made-to-
measure suits.
10%   U.B.C.   Discount.
McCUISH   fOUHMdHWM
Mon.-Sat. 9:00 to 5:39
2046 W. 41st 263-3610
YORK
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SPECIAL STUDENT  RATES
224-0034      4397 W. 10th
chosen over Robson for some
strange  reason.
Puskas, although a great international player, is so far a
poor coach.
At the moment, the biggest
problem is the player personnel. They lack goal scorers,
and to find them they've gone
looking everywhere.
Unfortunately, most of the
players are second class in their
own country and have to come
to North America because of
the low calibre and high wages.
But have the Royals really
exhausted every source of
player personnel? Not quite,
they missed the area under
their noses.
The Pacific Coast Soccer league is a veritable gold mine of
experienced, young players but
so far Puskas and company
have ignored the PCSL. Well,
not quite. The Royals have
played most of the weaker
teams in the league, but haven't
done any recruiting.
That is, not until the Victoria
Oaks embarrassed the Royals
by holding them to 1-1 tie. For
their effort, Oak goalie Barry
Sadler was offered a tryout
with the Royals. Methinks it
was only to placate the public.
The third blunder was the
location of the training camp,
Richmond. The Royals were
so far out in the sticks they
looked bush.
But it can be argued that
the Royals were hiding from
scouts of other teams, lord
knows there are enough of
them around, but the pro scouts
aren't the least interested in
the Royals.
Rather, they're interested in
the amateur players in Vancouver.
The Atlanta and Oakland
teams have been the most active locally, and have made
several offers to players in the
PCSL. As yet, only one of the
coast league players has gone
south for a tryout, but it's certain that others will.
Most pro teams plan to carry
a few locals until the calibre
of play improves to a point
where anybody can make a pro
team. The players who will
benefit most are the kids in
B.C.'s   junior program  now.
But the only thing now the
Royals will give the Birds is a
game, and they surprisingly
agreed to play the Birds this
Saturday in the Thunderbird
Stadium at 2 p.m.
"The game could be an awful
shock to some people, perhaps
even the talk of the town,"
said Johnson. "Some of the
Royals just don't have professional savvy."
The Royals will have to subdue a bearcat, and I don't think
they can. But come to the game
and find out.
LUNCHEON STEAKS  $1.19
Luncheon    Steak    Dinner,    anytime—5    oz.    Sirloin
Baked    Potato,   Tossed    Salad   and   Garlic   Bread*
NOW
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4489 West 10th Ave.
VOLKSWAGEN
SPECIALISTS
Large Stock of Parts on Hand
CERTIFIED MECHANICS
UNIVERSITY SHELL SERVICE
4314 W. 10th 224-0828
QlrtoDML & (Diamond
Special 10% Discount to ail UBC Students
Convenient Terms Available
on Diamond Engagement Rings
FIRBANK'S JEWELLERS
Downtown
Seymour at
Dunsmuir
Brentwood
Shopping
Centre
Park
Royal
ARMSTRONG & REA
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■BROADWAY at GRANVILLE
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SUNDAY. APR. 7,2 p.m. only
OIHEIIyi
Laurence  Oliviei
224-3730
4375 W. 10th
Tickets on Sale Sunday 1:30 p.m.
Students $1.25  ADULTS  $2.00
U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
SKATING SCHEDULE 1967-68
Effective September 29, 1967 to April 14, 1968
TUESDAYS —
WEDNESDAYS   —
12:45 to_2:45 p.m.
2:00 to 3:30 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
FRIDAYS  — 3:00 to 5:00 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.*
SATURDAYS —- 3:00 to 5:00 p.m.*
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
SUNDAYS   — 12:45 to 2:45 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
*Except when Hockey Games scheduled:
February 23, 24.
Admission: Afternoons—Students 35c. Adults 60o.
Evenings—Students 50c. Adults 75c.
Skate Rental - 35c a pair. — Skate Sharpening - 35c a pair
For further information call 228-3197 or 224-3205
BIG BLOCK
LUNCHEON
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
12:30 NOON, MONDAY, APRIL 1
All Big Block Members Welcome!
NEW BLOCK WINNERS WILL
BE MEASURED FOR SWEATERS
Alma  Mater  Society
OFFICIAL  NOTICES
CUS Seminar
Applications are being accepted until Friday, April 5 by
the External Vice-President, Tobin Robbins, for the CUS
Summer Seminar to be held in Winnipeg from May 19-28.
The topic to be discussed is "Education in Society: Rhetoric vs. Reality". Air travel and registration will be paid
by the Alma Mater Society. Please leave all applications
in Box 52, AMS Offices, Brock Hall.
Notice of Referendum
A referendum will be held on Wednesday, April 3, 1968,
concerning the Student Athletic Fee Plan.
Students are asked to acquaint themselves with the Plan
before this date, in order that it may be a meaningful
vote. Friday, March 29,  1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 23
SPORT  TALK
BY MIKE JESSEN
Lefs  put  UBC  athletics   in  the  black
-"*•* It has almost been traditional at this time of
year for a Ubyssey sports editor to offer his opinions
for the improvement of this university's policy toward athletics.
Not wishing to be called anti-traditionalist and
feeling that I have something relevant to say, I
hereby offer my opinons. The words may have been
spoken by many others on many other occasions, but
since few people have taken any notice, I feel obligated to repeat them.
The first thing necessary is to have a sports
program run by men and women who know something about athletics. A commerce professor who
reads the sports pages of a newspaper daily is not
sufficient although he may  do the best he can.
What is needed are men and women who are
intimately associated with athletics and the ones I
have in mind are the coaches. The excuse given
- as to why these people are not in control of athletic
finances now is that they might tend to be prejudiced
toward their  own sport.   I think it's untrue.
The next item to be changed in the athletic program is the number of sports in that program. This
past year UBC students helped support 26 extramural sports to the tune of $119,000.
But what did they get out of it? A football team
which spent $20,000 of that money ended the season
with one win and more critics than fans. A sum of
$450 was given to a cricket team which, because it
> plays during the summer, is never seen by the people
who help pay for it. Is supporting two situations like
this realistic?
When someone owns stock in a company and for
some reason the value of these shares begins to drop,
most people sell their stock. The same is so at UBC.
We are not getting full value for our money and so
it's no wonder that more and more students are
becoming dissatisfied with the present athletic policy.
But I'm not calling for a mass abandonment of
a sinking ship.   Far from it, for I feel this ship can
- be refloated.
First of all, the 26 extramural sports encouraged
by UBC should be whittled down to nine. These
should be basketball, football, ice hockey, field
hockey, soccer, rugby, track and field, gymnastics
and swimming, with the main emphasis on the first
three. UBC either presently has, or soon will have,
excellent facilities for these sports.
This move would have saved $20,000 out of last
year's men's athletic committee budget. Now this
is truly a small sum when compared to the whole
but savings can be made elsewhere.
Because we are isolated from most of the other
Canadian universities with which we compete on an
athletic basis, UBC should compete with only local
and American teams in all the above nine sports with
the exception of ice hockey, since it is still a mainly
Canadian sport.
The high cost of transporting players and equipment by air half-way across a continent, and sometimes all the way across, would thereby be eliminated.
To obtain the personnel needed to compete with
the highly talented locals and Americans, I suggest
letting certain businesses provide athletic scholarships to attract the B.C. talent to attend our university. Certain companies, namely breweries, have
shown that they are not adverse to spending some
tax deductible money to further a sport.
These companies would gain from the advertising
that they received for their generous donations and
increased sales would probably make up for them.
(Major league hockey-mad, beer-drinking Vancouver
fans would probably be glad to switch to the Labatt
brand if it managed to bring NHL hockey to this
city.)
To get back to the scholarships, they would be
given out as the Molson ice hockey scholarships are
presently distributed. The prerequisites are high
grades and an above normal proficiency in a sport.
If the players' grades fall or his ability wanes, then
no more scholarship.
And these scholarships would be offered only to
B.C. students. If they prevent even one future Harry
Jerome from heading south of the border they could
be considered worthwhile.
Till B.C. gets a government that realizes the
monetary needs of a university, we could certainly
not ask the university administration to kick in all
the money needed for the athletic program. The
students should contribute their $5 worth as they
do now and it should be collected and matched by
the administration till athletics get back on their
feet.
Because they have already paid, the policy of
free admissions to  students should continue.
But when campus sports begin to show profits,
then students should stop contributing via a direct
levy and they should start paying a small admission
price (not over a dollar).
A following outside the university could be built
up if arrangements were made whereby UBC athletes, if they wished to continue in sports, would be
given tryouts with the pro teams in Vancouver. A
local player would profit a pro team based in this
city and fans would become interested in the team
where this talent originated. Again everyone profits.
The profits reaped from the now annual UBC-
SFU football and basketball games could be put to
use to provide aid to athletes or could go back into
the budget as they are now. If the other suggested
way of procuring athletic scholarships did not materialize to its full extent, these profits could come
in handy in this way.
Sports can do something for UBC but only if
UBC is willing to do something for sports. Unless
some changes are made to our outdated athletic policy
we'll soon have no reason for having one.
The rich administrators may not mind seeing
good money follow bad, but not-so-wealthy students
are a little smarter. We can't support suicidal policies
much longer, although we don't want to give up.
If administration and student representatives
would really work together for a change then perhaps we could bring about some of the much needed
amendments and put athletics in the black where it
deserves to and should be.
Slacks Narrowed
Suits Altered and
Repaired
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DATA-DATE
See our questionnaire
in the Sun, April 5
When summer comes
and your friends are
gone. Remember us!
P.O. Box 4102, Vancouver 9
ONLY $5.00
Buy Now, for Summer at These Sale Prices
(A Small Deposit Will Hold These Specials Till Your First Summer Pay Cheque)
Save $100 Till June 15/68
UHER
4000L Kit
$100   Off   the   Reg.
Price of $476.00
$376.00
You have probably read in the U.S. magazines about the "Own the Best" Sale on the
UHER 4000-L. We have arranged to offer
the same tyoe of deal in Canada. Now until
June 15th, we will sell the complete UHER
4000-L kit at $100 off the regular price of
$476. The UHER 4000-L. is undoubtedly the
finest portable tape recorder made. 4-speed,
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genuine   leather   case.
CANON
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$279.88
'Fantastic" is not exaggerating! The Canon 814 Camera
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chest pod has established itself as the camera that put
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movie making. The long 8
to 1 zoom ratio, with extremely sharp optics have made
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Power or  manual zoom   (8:1  ratio)
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Still some left on the MIRANDA "GT" kits.
This kit includes the famous Miranda "GT"
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"thru-the-lens" metering, removable "T"
prism, interchangeable focussing screen, mirror lock up, extra large mirror, etc. & 3 year
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telephoto lens, camera case & fitted reflex
gadget bag. The total list price on these
items purchased separately would  be $320.70.
AGFACHROME
35mm
12   Exp.  Proc.   Inc.
$1.49
POLAROID FILM
Swingei
$1.99
Black & While
FILM
120
29c Film
TAPE  CASETTES
C 60'
$2.49
FLASH BULBS
Westinghouse      M 3  B
List 2.40
88c doz.
KODACOLOR
Develop   &   Jumbo   Prints
12 Exposure Roll
$2.99
Super 8
MOVIE FILM
Processing   Included
$3.79 pack
35 MM B&W Film
20 Exposure
Agfa-Gevaert
10 Rolls $5.90
f)
MISCELLANEOUS
Ttl Meters _    _   .    __  _ .
8mm Movie Splicers      	
Pentax Mount SLR Bodiet
German   made,   new
with  case   	
Movie Editor, 8 or Super 8
Casette Tape Players
Lens Hoods for most SLR'.
Recording   Tape,   3"   Reels
Braun F100 Electronic Flash
Binoculars  7 x 35   _. .     _  ..
Spot Meters. Sekonic
Battery  Operated  Slide
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Special Purchase, Screens, Vz Price
LENS SALE
7mm f5.6 Fisheye (all mnts.)  $74.88
12mm f8 Fisheye (all mnts.) ..     __  _    ..  $69.88
28mm f3 Tokina P.S. (all mnts.)          -      -..,     _ . _ ._ $49.88
28mm f2.8 Automatic for Pent., Nik., & Min, complete with case & hood $59.88
35mm f2.8 Tamron P.S. (all mnts.) _    .    ...... _    ..   .....  $39.88
35mm f2.8 Automatic for Pent., Nik., & Min., complete with case & hood $49.88
135mm f3.5 Soligor P.S. (all mnts.)    $34.88
135mm f2.8 Tamron P.S. (all mnts.)               .      ..    _ $39.88
135mm IS.8 Automatic for Pent., Nik., & Min., complete with case & hood $54.88
200mm f5.9 Tamron P.S. (all mnts.)             ..          ... $23.88
200mm f3.5 Automatic for Pent., Nik., & Min., complete with case & hood $69.88
400mm f7.5 Tamron P.S. {all mnts.)                   _.    _/_ $32.88
400mm f6.9 Tamron   Nestar P.S.  (all  mnts)  ..   .    ..     .    . .  $59.88
500mm f8  Sigma mirror  (all mnts.)   _.   _    __.__.   ._ .. _. $99.88
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NIKK0RMAT F.T.
$219.88
WEST VAN BRANCH
1550  Marine  Drive
9*212-4921 Page 24
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday, March 29,  1968
—dennis minaker photo
THE FAMED UBC oarsmen carefully lower their shell into the early morning waters of Kala-
malka Lake. They won two events last weekend   in Tacoma  and  hope  to  duplicate the feat
this weekend in Coal Harbor.
UBC team bound for Mexico
The UBC field hockey Thunderbirds have
been invited to come to Mexico for two weeks
in May by the Mexican Olympic Committee.
The Birds will play matches with the Mexican national team who asked that the UBC squad
come to give them some experience.
Coach Eric Broom said in an exclusive interview with The Ubyssey Thursday that he and
his team of 11 Thunderbirds and three Braves
will leave May 11 and return on May 25.
The UBC team members have been raising
money since September to finance the trip and
now they have the needed money. Their hosts
will pay their expenses while they are in Mexico.
The UBC team met the Mexicans first in
Spain two years ago and again at the 1967
Pan American Games in Winnipeg. Out of these
meetings a number of close friendships sprang
up and hence the invitation to help the Mexicans
train for the summer Olympics which will be
held in Mexico City in October.
The Canadian field hockey team lost its
enauce to represent North America at the Olympics in Mexico when they finished fourth in the
Pan-Am games behind Argentina, Trinidad and
the  United States.
Trinidad and Canada are the reserve teams
for the Olympics and Canada has an outside
chance of making the October tournament, if
certain countries, including Trinidad, make good
their threats to pull out of the Olympics because
South Africa has been invited.
There are four or five UBC players on the
Canadian team and more including reserves.
There will be 16 teams competing at the Mexican Olympics and if one or two drop out Canada
could be in.
In local field hockey, the Birds defeated
Hawks II 1-0 in first round knockout play last
weekend. Saturday the Birds meet Pitt (Meadows
I at 3 p.m. at UBC's Spencer Field in the knockout semi-finals.
The Braves, who were beaten 4^0 by Hawks
I last week, challenge Grasshoppers A at 1:30
p.m. Saturday at Spencer in the losers semifinal.
At 3 p.m. Saturday at Hillcrest Park the
Tomahawks meet 'North Shore A in another
losers semi - final and the Scalps play Pitt
Meadows C Saturday at 1:30 p.m. at Spencer in
the third division winner's semi-final.
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