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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Mar 3, 1967

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Array CAMPUS MAP-EVENTS PROGRAM
See Yellow Pages Inside
__________-_-__i
-»•«_-..*-^> .-t_MH.it. -..iVfl, .,.^-i^f^^.^m-^L^
*•*•'   r "^'   *  ■   ' * ■. UBC Open House
This is the view ot the main lounge on the first floor (looking east) after just entering
the Student Union Building.   SUB is due for completion in the fall of 1968.
STUDENTS BUILD
$5 MILLION SUB
Peter Braund, Alma Mater Society President, considers the Student Union Building to be the major project -
of the Alma Mater Society in its fifty year history. "Our
Student Union Building has been called the most dynamic
project ever undertaken by any student government in
Canada."
The building was initiated by the student body in
1960 and since that time an international architectural
competition was held, a professional planning consultant
acquired, and an extensive student needs survey taken
to  ascertain   building   facilities.
The architectural firm of Pratt, Lindgren, Snider,
Tomcej and Associate of Winnipeg won the design
competition and was awarded the contract to plan the
building. The associate architects are Toby, Russell and
Buckwell of Vancouver.
In 1964, the students of U.B.C. voted to pay $15
per student per year for a 15 to 18 year period for
their share of approximately $3.4 million of the $5
million building. The University also recognized the
need for student facilities and has co-operated by contributing about 21 percent of the total cost — which
is   being   earmarked   for  food   services   in   the   building.
A.M.S. President Braund said "S.U.B. is intended to
be the social and cultural heart of the campus, available
to student, faculty, alumni and the community. The
facilities include food services areas for about 1,200
people, a 6,000 square foot bank, 450 seat auditorium,
music and reading lounges, an art gallery, barber shop,
headquarters for outdoor clubs, facilities for specialty
groups (Radio Society, the Ubyssey, Chaplains, etc.),
social ballroom and party room facilities and student
government offices."
The Student Union Building Chairman, Mr. Lome
Hudson, has noted that "we expect an average of 4,000
students in one noon hour and up to 10,000 students
a day to be using the building facilities".
Since a lease agreement has been signed with the
University Administration in July of 1966, tenders were
opened for the building on February 24, 1967. The site
for the Student Union Building is the field adjacent to
the present football stadium; construction is anticipated
in thirty to sixty days with completion by late summer,
1968.
Throughout the immediately preceeding twenty
month design period, the student committee has worked
closely with the University. This co-operation on the $5.2
million Student Union Building will ensure that the
project is realistically planned and that the multi-purpose
facilities which are desperately needed will be utilized
to the greatest extent.
the
new
students'
union
building
TENDER OPENING
The opening of tenders ceremony took place at 5 p.m.,
February 24, 1967. Representatives of the University, the
A.M.S., architects, contracting
firms, and students met for
the long awaited tender opening. The various tenders were
opened by Mr. Peter Braund,
A.M.S. President and Dr.
Phyllis G. Ross, Chancellor
Emeritus of the University. A
low tender of $4,237,000.00
was submitted by Grimwood
Construction* Ltd., compared
to an estimate cost of $4.7
million.
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
Architects:
Pratt, Lindgren, Snider, Tomcej & Associate, Winnipeg
Associate Architects:
Toby, Russell & Buckwell, Vancouver
Structural Consultants:
Grosier, Greenberg & Partners, Winnipeg
Mechanical Consultants:
Scouter, Mitchell, Sigurdson & Associates, Winnipeg
Electrical Consultants:
K. A. Hand & Associates, Winnipeg
Food Facilities Equipment Consultants:
Keith Little & Associates Ltd., Vancouver
Interior Design & Furnishings Consultants:
Hopping Kovach Grinnell Design Consultants Ltd., Van.
SVBMt
Pictured is a cross-sectfon of the small auditorium of SUB showing
general seating, stage area with steps, foyer and projection booth.
(Adverstisement) OPEN HOUSE
Here's a
tour of
campus
You'll probably want to
see just about everything on
campus this weekend.
But unless you've got a lot
of stamina, or an excess of
organizational ability, you'd
be best to take a look through
the list of displays in the yellow pages inside this paper,
and select the displays which
interest you most.
But if you want some help
—be sure to ask one of the
guides, or failing that, get
out your map and follow us:
Open House is open until 10
p.m. Friday night and from
10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday.
The heart of the campus—
centred around the main
mall in front of the library
—will contain most of the
activity. From there, you
can easily reach the clubs
display in the armory; faculty displays in Buchanan,
Frederick Lasserre, Mathematics, Angus, Physics-Chemistry, the Library, Brock
Hall, and the Law buildings
— these buildings form a
circle around you as you
stand on the library lawn.
If you park in "C" lot, be
sure and look into the medical buildings on your right
as you walk in, or the engineering buildings on your
left. You can also tour biological sciences before you
move on to the physics building (see map).
Official    opening    ceremony
is at 7 p.m. Friday, at the
"Skyroscope"   on   the   main
mall. Senator Norman MacKenzie will light the flame.
If you're in the Fraser
River lot — that is, if you
drove in Chancellor Blvd.—
you should go straight to the
armory across the street,
then tour through Forestry-
Geology, engineering, physics, Brock and Buchanan.
Many of the best displays
for children are in the engineering buildings and physics - chemistry complex —
there are games to play and
machines to watch. The aggies have animals in the
Field House — that's always
popular with kids.
An excellent series of lectures is scheduled for Buchanan Room 104 for those
who'd like to sit and rest for
a while. Many clubs are also
showing films.
Take advantage of the Alumni's jitney service — they
will pull you around campus
on  wheels.
And don't be afraid to wander over to the more out-of-
the-way places, especially the
oceanography d e p a r tment,
located in the research park
along lower mall, and the
medical buildings, opposite
the Memorial Gym on University Blvd.
Remember, Open House is
for you. Ask questions, and
ask directions. Any students
will be glad to help.
1867 U1967
-WADA-CONFEDEIWIION
Fishnet fantasy around entrance to Lasserre  Building  is part  of  Fine  Arts-Architectural   display.
—Powell Hargrave photo
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. XLVIII, No. 54
Special Open House Edition, March 3-4, 1967
4.000 lend hand
f   WHATS
t    INSIDE
'i
r
^   MAP OF CAMPUS IS IN
;*
\4   CENTRE YELLOW PAGE
*.    (P.  12 13)
-j   Page    4—Editorials.
Page    5—A look at campus Bureaucrats.
Page    7—An   assessment
of retiring President
Dr. John Macdonald's
5 years al UBC.
P  Page    8—The Happening.
Page    9—Special Events.
|;   Page 10—Messages.
I*.   Page 11—Where to go,
eat, and what to see.
-   Page 12-13—Map of
campus.
^   Page 14-15—Faculty
';      displays.
\,
Page 16-17—Campus
buildings.
Page 18—The view from
the bureaucrat side.
Page 20—Clubs.
Page 23—Sports.
for big weekend
Open House is the university, and the
university makes Open House.
Every poster, every banner, every display visitors will see is the work of a university student—and the sum of all this effort
adds up to a lot of work by a lot of people.
"There are thousands of students working
all over," said Open House Chairman Jim
Taylor Thursday. "They're painting and
hammering and digging and pasting — it's
an amazing amount of work."
Nearly 4,000 students are involved in
building displays and organizing events for
Open House's expected 150,000 visitors.
Crews from the department of buildings
and grounds under Tom Holness have been
rushing to get last-
minute jobs done:
installing electrical
outlets in the Armory for clubs displays, erecting
signs for the parking lots and to identify buildings, and
making sure everything works for the
big weekend.
Taylor's Open
House committee
has been meeting
nearly every week
since October, planning and organizing.
Open House treasurer Yale Chernov, a
third year law student, has supervised a $14,-
000 budget, involving hundreds of separate
purchase orders and requests from the 20
undergraduate societies and nearly 100
clubs.
Faculty displays organizer Warren Wilson
had the job of setting up hundreds of exhibits
in all campus buildings—the result of his
work takes three pages in this edition to list.
(See pages 13-14-15.)
Vice-chairman Derry Nelson and special
events chairman Dick Browne have, organ
ized the happenings, the bands, the speeches,
and  other major events.
Engineer Vic Hardy has spent months
sorting out a traffic and parking plan with
the  first-year  Redshirts.
Taylor also commended secretary Ellen
Akerly, clubs organizer Kim Campbell, public services chairman Judy Greenhorn, and
public relations whiz Keith Mitchell. Mitchell organized the week-long open-line show
and newspaper campaign.
And there are the thousands of unnamed
students who have done the actual construction work.
Visitors who don't want to miss anything
should read through the yellow pages in the
centre of this edition—all displays and services are listed, along with a map showing
key locations and identifying major buildings.
Most displays are indoors, so if it rains—
don't worry. Open House runs until 10 p.m.
Friday and from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Saturday.
And be sure to ask one of the guides if
you can't find something. There are 300 of
them posted at the information kiosks around
campus, and their job is to show you to the
displays.
Further information can be obtained by
phoning the Open House office in Brock
Hall at CA. 4-3242, local 59.
WILSON mmnsti
Open House Edition
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opions are
the editor's not of the AMS or the university. Member, Canadian University
Press. Founding member. Pacific Student Press. Authorized second class
mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of postage
in  cash.
The Ubyssey publishes Page Fridc/y, a weekly commentary and review.
City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242; editor, local 25; photo. Page
Friday, loc. 24; features, sports, loc. 23; advertising, loc. 26.   Telex 04-5224.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies
for general excellence and editorial cartoons.
Ubyssey Editor: John Kelsey
Open House Editor: Mike Hunter
MARCH 3-4, 1967
Go Away
Welcome, lovely people, to UBC as it isn't.
This weekend is open house, as you know, or you
wouldn't be here.
We wish you weren't.
Oh, not that we don't like you, or don't want you
to see UBC. We just think it's a bit silly to show you
UBC at its spruced-up best and then come around next
year asking for your support when we go to the government for money. After seeing what you're seeing now,
nobody could blame you for claiming we of all people
don't need it.
And, mind you, we're proud as hell of what you're
seeing here. But it's not us, at our stay-at-home best, in
our collective bathrobe.
For instance, see that grass over there ? They laid
it last week. Not for us, for you. The clean windows ?
Washed Wednesday. Notice how crowded the cafeteria
is ? Hell, you say, what do you expect with 70,000 people
on campus ? Trouble is, it's like this all the time.
See those huts down across the road, where you're
not being guided? Talk about model communes in China,
and you've got model residences at UBC. We've got our
hovels, too.
Man, feel that spirit of intellectual inquiry wafting
from Buchanan building. The rest of the year, it don't
waft. It sits in a tired puddle and waits for you to slip.
Sure, traffic is absolute chaos these two days. Pretty
long walk, wasn't it, from the back of C-lot where
they put your car. People do that every day, at 8:30
a.m., through the puddles craftily filled with gravel last
week, past the pigpens and across slushy lawns.
Now, don't go away mad, thinking we're crying
down our university. But maybe a real open house
should be all January long, when we're acting like we
really are.
— J. K
Counter-intelligence
There are a few more things you should know
about before you bash back to Burnaby.
Like our board of governors, meeting in secret
there every month, pretending to represent all your
collective interests. Those of you who come from the
upper class know whose interests it represents — yours
— and you from the working class know it's a fraud
composed wholly  of  absolutely  top-level management.
Then there's our academic senate, which deals with
all and sundry academic matters, and which is responsible to the board of governors. Its membership of 70
doesn't include a single student ot recent graduate of
this or any other university. Now, talk is it will soon
have token students, but 50 years of student government
hasn't had the brains to ask, politely, for seats.
Then there are the undergraduates, most of us. Not
only paying higher fees than grad students, but getting
less — much less — for the money. Taught by dull
lecturers 600 at a time. Pushed onto a curriculum with
absolutely no coherence or relevance, which may be
yet remedied if a pilot revision of first years arts succeeds  next  fall.
Fed facts and feeding them back, onto examination
papers marked by a computer. If that's the education
"you wanted for your kids, you're getting it. But if you
think that's education, you've been fooled by the people
who perpetrate it.
The big stone place, you've been told, is our library.
They won't tell you it has far more books than shelves,
and no prospect of enough money to shelve them all.
Study space is a premium and quarrels over an empty
seat have led to blows.
So, yes; we have an academic side, some of the
fruits of which yield the displays around you. It's
fantastically better than nothing, but nowhere near
what it could be. Enjoy what you're seeing. But please
remember that's not all, and ask the questions you
aren't supposed to ask. You pay the bills.
— J. K.
■   »^*»*»^l^»**W»»e^"^^pe^e^e""W*-------_^_______-----________--_-_-_______^^
UBC Open House
THE WAY IT REALLY IS
My goodness, Martha,
it's a little army hut
By STAN LIEBOWICZ
Oh, my Aunt Martha, you
can't believe anything you
read these days.
Take that lovely visitor's
map university information officer Ralph Daly had printed.
It's just like the editorials he
used to write for the Vancouver Sun—not quite a big bad
lie, just a mass of little white
ones.
Start up at the top, where
the map says Acadia Park development. It isn't built yet.
Down the road, though, where
it says Acadia Camp, and
shows nice woods, you'll find
clusters of World War II army
huts with people living in
them. The walls may be thin,
but not thin enough to be invisible.
Let's go over to Wolfson
Field. It's a swamp, partly.
The rest is an enormous parking lot, stretching from the
■ winter sports centre (see it?)
right down to the front of the
Wesbrook building,
Down a bit, between the
dairy barn and Totem Park
residences, is another monster
parking lot. To the left about
an inch, by the little M in the
triangle, is yet another parking lot.
Look around that area, on
the map, and see all the faintly drawn huts? Unlabelled?
Oh, Ralph. Besides containing
most of the music faculty, all
of metallurgy and oceanography and buildings and
grounds workshops, they're
graduate laboratories. Inter-
~% jesttAg, Jwuat _.„*.. ,_..,_-„„.,,
4      Now move your finger left
ward along west mall. More
huts. Blank again. But the
university's administrative offices and half the mathematics
department classrooms are in
them.
Up Memorial Road, all
around the auditorium, the
huts are offices for teaching
assistants — two, three and
four to a small room, all trying to counsel their students.
All the other little monopoly-like houses on the map
aren't as innocuous as they
look, either — Ralph should
have said what they are.
They're classrooms with leaky
roofs, offices without heat,
residences with thin walls and
broken steps. Hell, half of
them aren't even drawn in.
Look behind the library
now. The field house is that
blank square block. In real
life, it's a huge tarpaper
shack. Inside, students write
exams. The heat doesn't now,
and never has, worked.
Uh, Ralph, we know we
shouldn't criticize you, but
your map is purely irresponsible misinformation for a devious end — kidding all the
nice people who are visiting
UBC this weekend.
We mean, Ralph, if we can't
believe you, who can we believe, when you must clear
all official university statements?
The Americans, in Vietnam,
have created a credibility gap
that could yet completely discredit their government. You
shouldn't do the same thing
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'■*'.-.»'tr-_»■««--» bb & a .* _y _" *v.V Tramp, tramp, tramp: Bureaucrats, wierdies get together in march.
THEY'RE NOT IN THE PINK
Bureaucrats too blue
By KRIS EMMOTT
Student government at
UBC is pretty much the same
as ever.
The downtown press interpreted the victory of Shaun
Sullivan in recent Alma
Mater Society elections as a
solid mandate for quiet, "responsible" student government and as a terrific blow to
"irresponsible radicals".
Actually, most of the 4,000
students who voted for Sullivan were voting against the
idea of a week-long strike, included in loser Bob Cruise's
platform. Sullivan promised
to take other action against
rising fees, and students are
waiting to see what, if anything, he will do.
The rest of the executive
mostly rode in on Sullivan's
coattails. Twenty more student councillors represent the
various faculties.
These last 20 are the same
every year. About half are
concerned only with their
own small areas and oppose
the change of any kind. One
or two are genuinely concerned with the future of
education and UBC. The rest
don't even bother to come.
That, in itself, is not too
surprising, since the Monday
night council meetings are always dragged out by endless
bickering, clowning and verbose hassles over Robert's
Rules of Order.
The AMS often spends only
five or six minutes voting
down a progressive policy
stand and half an hour arguing a point in the minutes of
the  finance  committee.   This
Miss Emmott, a second-year
science student, reports meetings of student council for the
"new-Left" Ubyssey. She
doesn't like student council.
Student council doesn't like
The Ubyssey, either.
springs from the basic purposes of student council as
understood by those who sit
on it.
As listed in the constitution,   these   purposes   are   to
direct student activities, make
money, borrow money, build
student union buildings, and
so on; also "to advance the
cause of higher learning in
B.C." No mention is made of
actual academic activities, so
council hesitates to work for
innovations in the university
system, or take any clear
political stand.
It is only with difficulty
that they have been forced to
work for lower fees in the
past.
Generally, they feel that
they were elected to serve
this particular system and it
is not their place to question
it.
Those who criticize the entire concept of the multiversity, and how it turns out
technicians for society, are
dismissed as weirdie-beardies.
The same goes for people
who object to "service station" functions of student
council.
This means approving club
minutes,    hiring    bands    for
(Continued on Page 6)
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UBC Open House UBC Open House
Bureaucrats just sit, knit
(Continued from Page 5)
dances,   arranging   frosh   retreats,   Homecoming,   charter
flights and whatnot.
In the past, the mark of an
AMS councillor was the blue
blazer he received for his services. The . blue-blazer set
hung around Brock Hall,
drinking coffee, criticizing
the pinkos and voting down
all action programs lest they
offend the community.
AMS was criticized as a
playpen for would-be politicians, and an organizer of
playpen activities.
Things were shaken up a
little last year when activist
Charlie Boylan, past president of the student Communist Club, was elected first
vice-president, on the slogan
Put a Radical Voice on Campus.
Boylan, however, was faced
with an entire council hostile
to his ideas, and made little
headway.
This year council stands at
a   crossroads.   Higher   educa
tion is in greater peril than
ever before from growing
impersonality and shrinking
grants. Such questions as universal accessibility, the multiversity concept, and concern
with academics cannot be ignored much longer.
Council may take steps to
become  relevant  to  the  stu-
Or they may remain sunk
dent body, which has ignored
council for so long. Councillors may try to consider the
needs of all students, present
and future, instead of their
own constitutencies.
in a morass of quibbling,
worrying over how next
year's budget cuts will affect
their spring formal. They
may stick to the unimportant
trifling that absorbed the energies of this year's council.
In that case, our student
council will still be typified
by nursing president Allison
Rice. She sits quietly in the
same chair every meeting,
contentedly knitting, blissfully oblivious to the argument swirling around her.
We're proud of you!
Yes, we're proud of the hundreds
of students and faculty members
who have worked together to
make the 1967 Centennial Open
House the show window of the
university's academic and student life.
The Centennial Open House will
communicate the work and the
needs of the university to more
than 150,000 British Columbians
who are expected to throng campus and buildings.
And speaking of communicating, we're not bad at this ourselves.
Every day we communicate news,
ideas, comment, opinion — in
words and pictures — to more
than 150,000 readers throughout Western Canada.
So on the occasion of your Open
House in this Centennial year,
we send you our best wishes.
©he Sun
Western Canada's Leading Newspaper
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742 Granville MU  1-5625 WAS HE THE RIGHT MAN AT THE RIGHT TIME?
Mac's 5 years; still an uneasy mystery
By KEITH BRADBURY
WHEN JOHN Barfoot Macdonald leaves
the president's office of UBC for the
last time this June, it seems certain
he will go as much a mystery as he came In 1962.
One of the major unanswered questions about
the man, of course, is why he chose to leave
after only five years in the job — the shortest
term of any UBC president.
Yet, even if that question is eventually
answered, there seems little likelihood that he
will ever be more than a name to most British
Columbians.
Unlike his predecessor, Dr. Norman MacKenzie, who gained popularity in the community
with his homespun friendly manner and who
won love from the students and faculty by just
Keith Bradbury is a second-year law student
and was Editor of The Ubyssey in 1963 when
the Macdonald Report was published.
turning up at football games, taking walks on
the campus with his dog and drinking coffee
in the cafeteria, Macdonald leaves almost unknown, even on the campus.
PUBLIC FOCUS
This will seem ironic to many people who
recall that the quiet-spoken dentist from Harvard
was the focus of one of the biggest public campaigns of support in B.C. history shortly after
he arrived here. In every village in the province
in the spring of 1963, people rallied to "Back
Mac."
But it also says a lot about the man who
created the revolution in B.C.'s higher education system.
Personal popularity is but one of the many
things that Macdonald sacrificed in his single-
minded drive to bring the changes he wanted.
In fact, it seems likely his sudden resignation
was his final personal sacrifice — a simple
decision that under his continued stewardship
UBC was going to continue to suffer at the hands
of the provincial government because of the deep
and lingering rift between him and Premier
Bennett.
One of the few explanations that seems to
stand up is that Macdonald felt a new man—
say someone more like Gordon Shrum or Patrick
McTaggart-Cowan—would better be able to reestablish the university's shattered relations with
the provincial government.
If that was the decision Macdonald made, it
obviously was a difficult one to make. But,
then,  Macdonald in his five years here never
"You just can't talk to the man (Bennett). He won't listen. I've never run
into anything like it."
shied from difficult decisions—even where his
own feelings were concerned.
When he arrived here in the summer of 1962,
he was fresh from Harvard, where an impressive
career as a scholar and administrator had made
him a professor of microbiology and director of
the Forsyth Dental Infirmary.
The things he was saying were sound and
strong. They were not wasted on a province
which had long been wondering why the government and the university could not get together to create an over-all plan for the development of higher education, rather than follow the patchwork policy that seemed then to
be in effect.
Macdonald's first act was to announce his
baby royal commission — an investigation that
led to presentation of the Macdonald Report on
higher education and its plans for a province-
wide network of universities and colleges.
But even during this period, and right up
until the students left their classes to get signatures on the Back Mac petitions, Mac himself
seemed to be a somewhat unwilling hero, personally.
STRONG RESPONSE
Despite this, however, his personal reputation
was perhaps never higher in the minds of more
people than at the time of the Back Mac campaign.   The public certainly responded strongly.
It was during this early part of his presidency
that the troubles with Premier W. A. C. Bennett began to develop and it was then Macdonald
showed he was determined and tough enough
not to be deterred from his goal.
I recall interviewing him for The Ubyssey
Macdonald: Everything suffered to achieve the goal
7
**«■-__'_'!%
UBC Open House
the day after his first meeting with Bennett, at
which time he had made a sincere plea for increased aid for the university in the coming budget. Exasperated and angry, Macdonald told me
off the record:
"You just can't talk to the man. He won't
listen.   I've never run into anything like it."
Perhaps even more determined by this opposition, however, Macdonald got ready for a
fight. It was at this time that he reportedly put
his job on the line with the UBC board of governors. Unless he got support from the board he
would resign there and then. The board fell in
behind him.
Shortly after, displaying all the cunning of a
seasoned political infighter, Macdonald played a
background role in the Back Mac campaign —
making sure the campaign would go ahead, but
also attempting to make sure it would be responsible and not embarrass his cause.
Confronted one day by a student leader who
wanted to put off the campaign from March of
1963 to the fall, Macdonald told the student:
"What's wrong with holding a campaign now —
and ANOTHER one in the fall?"
At the same time, in a letter which was almost too obvious in its intent, Macdonald practically told faculty members to close up classes
during the Bac Mac campaign period to allow
students to make a success of the project.
"What's wrong with holding a campaign now — and ANOTHER one in
the fall?"
It was not, however, until at least a year
after he arrived that a clear picture of the uncompromising determination of the president was
dirtected to other areas than the government.
And it was hard for many to accept.
Within a year of the Back Mac campaign, he
made it clear that the students who had supported him were going to suffer a fee increase—
perhaps three of them—totalling $150. Despite
the fact his decision was interpreted in some
circles as turning on those who had helped him,
he was undeterred.
It became progressively more apparent—to
groups both on and off the campus—that his concern was for operating a good university and
he would go to whatever lengths required to do
it.
Macdonald was too much an individual and
too dedicated to his goal to be a nice-guy president.
His parting blow to Bennett is one of the
best examples of how the man was willing to
let his own personal reputation suffer for his
cause. Knowing he would not be around much
longer, he deliberately released figures in December — well before provincial budget time — to
show how much government support the three
universities needed this year.
NO PUBLICITY
There were a number of good political reasons for what Macdonald did. For one, it created
public pressure on the government — or at least
the threat of it — if the government failed to
bring in reasonable estimates for higher education.
At the same time, it took the heat off the
two   other   remaining   university   presidents   —
Macdonald's tip-oft on operating revenues took the heat off SFU and Victoria U. — and put it on the Premier.
McTaggart-Cowan at Simon Fraser and Malcolm
Taylor of the University of Victoria — who have
everything to gain along with UBC from such
exposure.
It also crystallized dramatically the fact that
the dispute with the government is one that is
between Macdonald himself and Premier Bennett and only peripherally involves the university itself. It does not seem too far-fetched to
suggest that Macdonald wanted Bennett to be
so glad to see him go that the premier would
welcome the next president openly when he is
appointed.
Now, as John Macdonald prepares to leave
UBC, certain ironies and at least a few disappointments   are   obvious.
For instance, he came here expressing a keen
desire to provide leadership for the university's
academic life. His plan was to leave the administrative end to a deputy.
But because of circumstances, he has spent
the greatest part of his energies trying to overcome   day-to-day   political   realities.
IT'S SFU NOW
Even now, his dream of a strong graduate
school for the university is only partly realized.
In addition, while great changes have occurred in the B.C. higher education system, UBC
has itself suffered, both at the hands of the government and in the eyes of the public. There
is no denying that Simon Fraser is now the university with which the people of the province
most easily identify.
When I asked a grad the other day what he
thought of Macdonald's tenure, he answered:
"He was the right man at the right time."
Someday, maybe even the provincial government will realize this.
* T* ■» •» ■_.-» "> "5
t   *   4  «   # »  *■. t   1
■m. »_ m- 4 * ».«.*.#_. A balloon happens (or something).
Flowers, beards
all over campus
Open House is "happening".
While other campus groups will busy
themselves assuring visiting taxpayers that
"higher" education is not a term coined by
Timothy Leary, others will do their best to
blow—er—change their minds.
The Open House Committee has announced a "total environment" feature and will this
year invite guests to:
• Thrill to the inspired strokes of campus
artists at a "paint in", starring such favorites
as Gabor Mate, Ubyssey editor John Kelsey
and Brian Plummer, head of campus special
events.
• Witness the frenzy of frustrated students as they demolish the body of an ancient
automobile.
• Tremble as the prophets of doom cry
out on every corner.
• Watch "a hundred flowers blossom" as
they shimmer from the palms of wandering
minstrels and poets.
• Hear "a hundred schools of thought
contend" in blasphemous diatribes (weather
permitting) from the Library soap box.
It's all part of a plot to make visitors
"see things in the raw instead of reading
about them" says Open House co-ordinator
Derry Nelson.
"These elements have never been shown
before and visitors should not go away without being aware of this major segment of
campus life," says Nelson.
Saturday's paint in is from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.
The psychedelic happening is at 2:30 p.m.
Saturday. The rest runs continuously over
the two-day event.
Our House
Is Always Open
... and So Is the Look in Shoes!
• BLACK PATENT
• CAMEL KIDALINE
• BONE KIDALINE
• NAVY SEDENO
$12.95
PAIR
PLEASE NOTE: A Large Selection of Silvers and Golds in Little Heels will be in
well  in advance of Graduation Time.
548 GRANVILLE 685.1022
Remember! If we don't have it - Forget it!
Your fiancee's pride in her ring will
be a lasting reflection of your good
taste and judgment
Choose it with care and confidence at a
recognized and reputable dealer.
ENGAGEMENT RINGS FROM $150
0. B. ALLAN LTD.
480 Granville at Pender
Vancouver
Registered Jewellers American Gem  Society
Ask About Our
STUDENTS BUDGET ACCOUNT
"OUR 63rd YEAR OF SERVICE"
Are there London Fogs
in London?
Don't ask Scotland Yard.
Just look around you. You don't have to be Sherlock Holmes
to spot a London Fog, even in a London fog.
Drape a Maincoat'-5 a la Mod, go to Soho, pick your way
through Piccadilly, take time out in Trafalgar Square.
No matter where, there'll always be a London Fog standing
up to the elements like a Coldstream Guard.
Are there London Fogs in London?
Are there tempests in a teapot?
The Poole and Lady Poole, Spilt Shoulder Styling, Calibre® Cloth
(A water-repellent blend of 65% Fortrel® polyester—35%  cotton).
Many Colors.
Mama Goldman
774
"Granville
164 W. Hastings and 760 Columbia, New Westminster Campus will show it
—there's even poets
SKYHOOK hoists Skyroscope, the Open House symbol,
into place on Main Mall. Ppjes were donated by B.C.
Telephone for the plastic - and - colored - lights display,
centrepiece of the two-day festival.
Paint, poetry, happenings
and rock — that's the way
Open   House  bounces.
Soapboxing, a paint-in,
bands of strolling poets and
musicians, plus Buchanan
rock 'n roll. UBC swings
March 3 and 4 as the campus
opens its gates to the public
and introduces its visitors to
typically student activities.
Flowers and balloons set
the mood as UBC's avant
garde poets read original
poetry written for Open House
using the theme 'love-anarchy'
Friday from 12.30 on, and
Saturday from 12 to 5 p.m.
Poets, including Bill Bisset,
Scott Lawrence, David Frith,
Greydon Moore, and Chris El-
sted wil lstroll through the
campus offering flowers and
'balloons as well as words of
wisdom to visitors.
Buchanan Building will,
weather permitting, echo
with the sounds of rock 'n roll
at the Brementown Musicians
sound off in the quad under
the building.
In an extravaganza of color,
Buchanan Building quadrangle will be painted in by campus personalities, faculty members and student artists on
Saturday from 11 a.m. to 5
p.m. at the Open House Paint-
In.
A total environment performance by a leading campus
free thinkers will happen in a
Happening in front of the
Main Library at 2 p.m. Saturday. Be on hand for this event
—impossible to describe before it actually does occur.
UBC multiversity presents
mini-lectures for Open House
in a series of 10 to 15-minute
lectures in subjects, including
Sheepskin
Money.
Your son, the college graduate
Scotiabank Savings Certificates:
the educated way to send your
children to college.
If your youngsters are at the
pre-teen age, now's the time to
start planning for their higher
education. With Scotiabank
Six-year Savings Certificates.
Scotiabank Savings Certificates put
your money to work. They increase
in value every year for six years,
and at the end of that time they're
worth a full third more than you
paid for them.
That's $100 for every $75
you invest now—and you can buy
as much or as little as you need.
So start investing regularly in
Scotiabank Six-year Savings
Certificates right now. Save for
tomorrow's university tuition today.
The easy way.
By degrees.
The Bank of Nova Scotia
Scotiabank Savings Certificates wffl One of Scotiabank's Seventy Services.
current economic situations,
East European and South Asian politics. Department experts will give these lectures
in Buchanan 104, General
times are Friday and Saturday
7 to 10 p.m. and Saturday 1:30
to 4:30 p.m. Specific times will
be posted on the door of Bu.
104.
Other events include:
Soapboxing—Hyde Park debates on Vietnam, the North
American identity and the individual in society, all day,
both days of Open House in
front of the Library. Minor
coke box debates all over the
campus.
iModel Parliament—issues of
current interest debated by
campus political groups in normal parliamentary procedure
with ceremonies all weekend
in Brock Hall.
"Escurial" — Michel de
Gheldrode's play in a theatre
of  the   absurd   metaphor  of
human condition set in oppressive Spanish surrounding. Performances last 45 minutes in
Frederic Wood Theatre Friday at noon and 8 p.m. and
Saturday at 2 and 8 p.m.
Stage show—campus clubs
present a 50-number variety
show in the auditorium Friday
and Saturday 7 and 9 p.m. and
Saturday 2 and 4 p.m. Numbers include excerpts from
"How to Succeed in Business
Without Really Trying", national dances by foreign students and songs by campus
choral societies.
Film show—two films 30
minutes in length each Friday and Saturday in the auditorium, 8 p.m. and Saturday
3 p.m. Cinema 16 presents
Octopus Hunt, a film about
zoologists hunting for octopus
and other marine phenomena
in Howe Sound and The Drag,
a cartoon vividly and humorously illustrating dangers of
smoking.
All events are free.
Barbecues, birds
cellophane dresses
* -a.-*.T* ■»_--_.•*.-*.-*_-__.-» -«_-_---!
-*.'«.  K  K. (-.«.<_  *
■_. fc- *t fc *.  V  ;
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Have you ever tasted cev-
apcici?
Have you ever seen crepe
paper, celophane, and tissue
paper dresses?
Have you ever seen your
name written in Oriental
script?
No???
Well, UBC Open House, is
your chance to do all this and
more.
Fantastic events are taking
place on campus this weekend:
The department of Slavonic
studies is holding a Yugoslav
special barbecue serving cev-
apcici in Buchanan lower
lobby
More culinary delights are
in store in the field house,
where the faculty of agriculture is holding a chicken and
beef barbecue.
To turn to more aesthetic
delights, Paper Capers, a fashion show of garments made
from paper or paper-like materials, will be presented in
Hebb theatre 8 p.m. Friday.
This show culminates a design
contest in which young designers competed, so watch for
originality and creativity in
color, texture and line.
An art display of national
interest will be presented by
the fine arts department in
Frederic Lasserre 202, 204,
and 206. Student architectural
displays, design projects and
studio and figure drawing will
be presented.
Your name will be written
in Oriental script in Buchanan
102.
The department of microbiology will present the making of beer and penicillin in
Wesbrook 103.
The department of psychology is teaching pigeons in
Henry Angus 110.
IBM computor 7040 will
play X.'s and O's with you
in Engineering 201.
What's the solution to the
famous puzzle in mathematical ingenuity which led to
mathematical field called topology? You have the opportunity to test your skill and
find out on the lawn in front
of the Math building.
Other exciting events include:
• A 100 m.p.h. wind tunnel display in the mechanical
engineering building.
• Film Four World Religions, presented by department of religious studies 8
p.m. Friday and 6 p.m. Saturday.
• Glass blown elephants
plus laser beams in the physics
building.
• Aerial photos, slides of
Gemini    flights,    and    30,000
These yellow pages are your
guide to Open House. All
locations are keyed on the
campus map on pages 12-
13.
year old ice in the forestry
and geology building.
• Music undergraduate society recitals — of chamber
music 12:30-1:30 Friday and of
jazz 3:30-4:30 Friday in Music
104.
• Demonstrations of human tissue cells grown in test
tubes and the determination
of sex by cell examination in
Wesbrook building.
• Display of rare books
and manuscripts in BuGhanan.
• "Fritz" the electrical
mouse, scale model of future
subway trains and the Kelvin
water drop generator in the
electrical engineering building.
• Gold panning and a diamond drill in forestry and
geology building.
(All displays unless otherwise specified will be open
for the duration of Open
House. See page 14 for full
details).
UBC Open House
I  **»«*««** «   *   * »  * -m   « -m   t   •   , MESSAGES
The campus is
always open
TAYLOR
On behalf of the University
of British Columbia, I am
pleased to welcome you to
Open House - 1967.
The purpose of Open House
— a triennial event on our
campus — is to inform interested citizens of the work
that we are doing and to
show them some of the important developments taking
place in higher education.
This is a year of national
celebration. For this reason
it is particularly appropriate
that the theme of Open
House — 1967 should be The
University and the Nation.
We see more clearly all the
time that our universities perform a national function in
addition to a local and regional one.
Open House is to a large
extent organized by our stu-.
dents. I'm sure you will
wish to join with me in congratulating all those students
who had a hand in the preparations.    It is a large under-
MACDONALD
taking, one which has been
carried out with style and
efficiency. We hope you enjoy the results.
In a real sense, the University is always "open", and
because in two days it is impossible to do more than
provide a brief introduction
to our work, I hope that
many of you will return soon
and often.
JOHN B. MACDONALD,
President
Restaurant & Dining Room
WELCOMES YOU TO
OPEN HOUSE
4544 W. 1 Orh Ave.
Vancouver 8, B.C.
Ph. 224-1351
• Full Dining
Facilities
• Take
Home
Service
In this centennial year,
the purpose of Open House is
two fold: to acquaint the
people of British Columbia
with the University and to
demonstrate the contribution
the University makes to the
nation.
During this two-day period, we are making a special
effort to compress into several hours the highlights of the
university year. We hope
that in a short tour, the visitor can come to "appreciate
wriat it is really like to work
and live on the Point Grey
campus.
Too    few   people    get    to
know the university. Those
who do too often see the University just as a group of
buildings — we want to get
people inside these buildings,
let them see and hear what's
going on out here every day.
Open House is largely a
student effort. More than
5,000 students, faculty and
staff, have worked on
the general committee and
these people, visitors will
gain some understanding of
the vitally important student
issues at UBC, such as the
impersonal atmosphere which
faces new students at a big
university, and the problems
students have financing their
education.
Having been involved,
along with thousands of other
students, since the project
was first started many
months ago, I can confidently state this is going to be a
most worthwhile   event.
We will consider Open
House 1967 a success if some
of you take from the university not only a conception of
its role in the nation, but a
feeling of the spirit which
pervades its activities and
purpose.
JIM TAYLOR,
Open House Chairman
just in case you haven't heard
Duthie Books Ltd,
UNIVERSITY BRANCH
at 4560 W. 10th Ave.
Phone: 224-7012
has been
REVISED and ENLARGED
Come in and see it — and the books!
or visit our downtown branches at
514 Hornby Street Ph. 684-4496
Paperback Cellar 681-8713
670 Seymour Street 685-3627
\ '
it
V
Lungarno's, all about the girl who's all
about town. She swings. £>he's lively.
She's capricious. She loves to dance and
hike. She's shod by Lungarno.
EATON'S
You can't
beat
the taste
of Player's
filters.
UBC Open House
10 Here's dope
on buildings
FORESTRY AND GEOLOGY
Constructed in 1925 when UBC moved to
Point Grey from the Fairview Shacks adja-
cents to Vancouver General Hospital. The
faculty of forestry will move out in 1967
to the new forestry-agriculture building, under construction at Main Mall and Agronomy
Road.
HORTICULTURAL AND PLANT
SCIENCE BUILDINGS
Divisions of the faculty of agriculture,
these are greenhouses and other research
facilities in buildings at the south end of
the West Mall. Experiemental work is carried out here in the growth, propagation and
development of various species of plants
and trees. Adjacent are nurseries where
experiments are carried out and where
plants for the university's own gardens are
grown.
CAIRN
The Cairn in the centre of Main Mall was
constructed after the famous march by UBC
students in 1923 to draw public attention to
the urgency of completing the university on
its Point Grey site.
UBC BOOKSTORE
The bookstore sells textbooks, periodicals
and supplies to students, faculty and staff.
All supplies are sold allegedly at cost.
LIBRARY
The central stone-iaced building was completed in 1925 and the north and south wings
were added in 1948 and 1960 respectively.
In 1964 completion of a large stack area at
the rear of the building and other interior
renovations were completed. UBC is currently expanding its acquisition program for
the library and aims to expand its present
700,000-volume collection to two million by
1975.
AUDITORIUM, ADMINISTRATION,
AGRICULTURE AND MATHEMATICS
These semi-permanent buildings were
constructed in 1925, the year the campus
moved from the Fairview shacks. The auditorium seats nearly 1,000. The administration building houses the president's office,
All locations are keyed on Map,
Pages 12-13
the registrar's office and the university's
accounting department. The mathematics
building was originally the faculty of arts
building, and the agriculture building houses
the dean's office and also contains lecture
rooms and laboratories.
UBC STADIUM
The existing stadium on the East Mall is
due for conversion to a site for the new
Student Union Building. The stadium was
constructed during the 1930's by the students.
The new Student Union Building will cost
$3.9 million and will be financed by borrowing against future levies on Alma Mater
Society fees.
PHYSICS
The original physics building, completed
in 1948 at a cost of 700,000, has been named
for the late Prof. Albert E. Hennings, a
professor of physics at UBC for 29 years. In
1963 a new addition to the building, which
cost $1,398,503, was opened. The new addition contains a large lecture theatre seating
450 students and a lecture and laboratory
annex for 500 students. The original building houses lecture rooms and offices as well
as highly specialized equipment for graduate
and faculty research, including a Van der
Graff generator for atomic energy research
and laboratories for low temperature and
plasma physics research.
HOME ECONOMICS
The Home Economics building was constructed in 1950 following one of few fires
that UBC has had in the wooden huts
•brought to campus in 1946. Private funds
and a provincial government grant were
made for construction — a total of $226,805.
WOMEN'S GYMNASIUM
The Women's gymnasium was another of
the many projects financed by the students
and built during the 1930's.
Pretty girls to Indian masks await visitors
to faculty displays.
WHERE TO FIND IT
Information booths are located at all major
points on campus, including in front of the
gym, Wesbrook buil'ding, the stadium, Brock
Hall, Buchanan, the library and the armory.
More than 300 guides are posted to assist you
to any exhibits you wish to see. Information
tables are  also   located .inside  major  buildings.
Food
MEALS are available during Open House hours (Friday 3-10 p.m. and Saturday from 10 to 10) at the
following Food Services locations: (Locations are
keyed to map on pages 12-13 and marked with a 'C")
Fort Camp dining room (A-4)—across Marine Drive
at north end of campus.
Acadia Camp dining room (C-l)—at far southeast
corner of campus.
Shrum Common Block (D-4)—west end of campus
in Lower Mall residences.
Totem Park Residence (F-3)—southwest corner of
campus, by parking lots.
Koerner Grad Centre (A-B  4)—near  faculty club,
theatre, and just west of Buchanan building.
Brock  Hall   Cafe  (B-2)  —  on  East  Mall,   behind
Library.
t'<
(Continued on Page 15)
All locations are noted
on Map, pages 12-13
Auditorium Cafe (B-3) — underneath auditorium,
just south of Armory.
Bus Stop Cafe (C-3)—beside the Bookstore on Main
Mall.
Gym Snack Bar (B-l)—in War Memorial Gym.
Ponderosa   Cafeteria   (D-3) — behind   Engineering
buildings on West Mall.
SNACKS ARE ALSO AVAILABLE in addition at the
following locations: Biological Sciences Rm. 2321 (C-2),
Buchanan 100 (B-2), Civil Engineering Rm. 201 (C-3).
Lasserre 107 (B-3), Electrical Engineering 220 (D-2),
Physics Annex 303 (C-2).
Meals in campus units consist of a choice of entrees,
soup, juice, vegetables, desserts and beverages: average
price, 75-95 cents.
Snaeks in snack bars include sandwiches, donuts,
cup cakes, coffee, tea, milk, soft drinks and ice cream
Hamburgers, french fries, etc. available at established
units.
CHICKEN AND BEEF BARBECUE: Agricultural
students, in Field House beside Brock Hall.
COFFEE HOUSE: Folk Song Society, in Clubs display in Armory.
BARBECUE: Slavonic Studies display in Buchanan
Babysitting
Babysitting will be available for children over
two years of age in Mildred Brock Room, Brock Hall
(B-2), during hours of Open House. Sponsored by
Phrateres.
Ambulance, First Aid Stations
Nursing station will be located in Armory, manned
by St. John's Ambulance crew.    More serious injuries
All locations are noted
on Map, pages 12-13
will be taken care of by Health Services at Wesbrook
Hospital.
Washrooms
Located in all the buildings.
Rest Areas
Located in lounges of buildings and residences.
Lost and Found
Articles should be turned in to the Guide Booths
Bus Service
Special  bus  route  is marked  on  map.     Stops  at
all major points on campus, service every 15 minutes.
Jitney Service
Alumni association jitneys make tour of campus,
also marked on map.
UBC Open House Where to find all the exhibits
Parking Lots: Cross-hatched areas marked
"C", "B" and "A" lots.
Bus Route: Solid Line, from Chancellor
Blvd., across Main Mall, and out University
Blvd.
Jitney Route: Dotted line to Cecil Green
Park.	
GUIDE BOOTHS:*
Cafeterias.0
THE FACULT]
Here's a list of all the classroom displays,
put on by the individual faculties for Open
House.
These displays open up the heart of the
University — by touring the classrooms,
poking around the labs, and strolling
through the hallways and lounges of the
various buildings, you will get an idea of
what the university is like.
Many faculties—particularly the sciences
— have  arranged  special  shows  for   Open
House.   Others will let your browse through
, their everyday labs and museums — a real
treat in itself.
All the displays are in buildings which
are identified and keyed to the map in the
centre yellow pages. When you get lo the
building in question, there will be signs and
information directing you to specific rooms
where displays  are  located.
Remember, there are guide booths located al six places on campus — with 400 at UBC's 1967 Open House
DISPLAYS: Elephants, trials, atomic labs
co-eds who will take you on a tour if you
wish.
AGRICULTURE
Field House (B-2, beside Brock Hall). Animals on display. Film of NAWAPA
water use scheme. Dairying, plant science,
poultry and soil science. Chicken and beef
barbecue at reasonable prices.
ANTHROPOLOGY
Anthropology Museum in basement of main
library (B-2). More displays in Forestry-
Geology building (C-3).
ARCHITECTURE
Frederic Lasserre Bldg. (B-3). Structural
models, basic designs. History of architecture. Display of planning and drawings.
Sketches, special fishnet-display at entrance.
CHEMISTRY
AU  displays   in   Chemistry   complex   (C-2).
Information booth for chemistry in foyer
of the south wing.
West wing    Rm. 140: Nuclear   magnetic
resonance.
Rm. 425: Isolation & extraction
of natural products.
Rm. 442: Stereo  chemistry.
North wing Rm. 151: Nuclear  magnetic
resonance.
Rm. 163: X-ray  detraction.
East wing     Rms. 324-326:   Undergrad    lab
work  in  organic   chemistry.   There   will
also be various research labs open to public; dynamic, atomic and molecular models; and an electron beam accelerator used
in high energy chemistry.
COMMERCE
Henry  Angus  Bldg.   (D-2). Various   aspects
of business.  Displays of finance, transportation,    industrial    relations,    marketing.
Movies.
ASIAN STUDIES
Buchanan Bldg. Room 102 (B-2).    Book display; demonstrations of Chinese and Jap
anese writing. Visitors can have names
written in Oriental script. Slides, posters,
prints.
FINE ARTS
Frederic Lasserre Bldg. (B-3).    Design projects, examples of studio and figure drawings.   Rms. 202, 204, 206.
ECONOMICS
Southeast Lobby. Angus Bldg. (D-2).   Visual
displays.
CLASSICS
Buchanan 204. Continuous illustrated lectures on archaeological sites. Models, manuscripts. Short scenes from the comedy
Mostellaria by Plautus. Traditional Greek
war dance by Classics Club.
FRENCH
Buchanan 202 and Lounge. Collage, films,
slides, music & voices. "Voix et image"
technique of teaching French.
(Continued on Page 14) Gemini photos on display
(Continued from previous page)
GERMAN
Buchanan Bldg.—lower lobby.   Famous German literature, recorded drama and poetry.
Free invitations to a first lesson in German in the language laboratory.
ITALIAN & HISPANIC STUDIES
Buchanan  203  and  lounge. Students  in national costumes. Book display, short documentary   films   every   two   hours,   with
' scenes and dialogues by students.
SLAVONIC STUDIES
Buchanan Bldg. 106 and lower lobby. Film,
lecture,   religious   relics   and   handicraft.
Special attraction: hot from the barbecue,
the Yugoslav  specialty cevapcici.
GEOLOGY
Forestry-Geology Bldg. (C-3).    Mine adit in
in south wing.
Rm. 100: 15-min. slide shows on the hour.
Rm. 106: Petrology display.
Rm. 109: Gold panning.
Rm. 116: Geological museum.
Rms.  110-119-120: Minerology, mineral exploration displays.
GEOPHYSICS
Lab   basement,   Chem.   Engineering   Bldg.
(D-2).    Displays showing equipment used
in seismology, gravimetry, geomagnetism
and mass spectrometry.   Films in Physics
Annex rm. 201 (C-2).
GEOGRAPHY
Forestry-Geology Bldg. (C-3) rooms 215. 239.
233.    Display  of  aerial  photography,  including slides taken during Gemini flights.
3-D projections of earth features.   12-foot
model of Vancouver.   Canadian Arctic research projects, including 30,000-year-old
ice. Photos before and after the Hope slide.
DENTISTRY
Medical Administration Hut.    Display of research and teaching apparatus.
FORESTRY
Forestry-Geology   Bldg.   (C-3).     Rooms   208,
210, 204, 212.   Exhibits showing development of tree farms, wood chemistry, marketing.     Spectacular    show   in    stadium,
demonstrating   balloon   logging   (east   of
library). Films.
LAW
Law  Buildings  (A-2).    Justice will be  dispensed to a damsel who has been indecently assaulted by two cads.   Trial at  4:30
Friday and Saturday at 2:30.
MEDICINE
Medical Centre (C-D-l). Labs and classrooms
open.
CANCER RESEARCH
Block B: display of rare books.
PHYSIOLOGY
Block   A   Rm.   102-103-110:   Human   physiology.
NEUROLOGICAL   RESEARCH
Block C 4th floor: Have your brain waves
recorded. Human brains on display.
SURGERY
Block C: Displays of technique.
REHABILITATION MEDICINE
Wesbrook Bldg. (C-2).    Treatment of handicapped persons.    Simulated hospital, film
showing rehab student's work.
PHARMACOLOGY
Pharmacy   Bldg.   (Behind   Wesbrook   C - 2).
Illustrations   of  effect   of  chemicals   and
drugs  on   biological  systems.     Electrical
activity of muscle fibres.   Brain wave tests
for visitors.
PATHOLOGY
Medical   Block   C.   Classification   of blood
types.     Growth  of human  tissue  in  test
tubes; determination of sex by cell examinations.    Electron miscroscope.
OPTHALMOLOGY
Wesbrook Bldg. Front entrance. Various eye
diseases and prevention techniques.
PHARMACY
Pharmacy Bldg. (C-2).   Tests of drugs.   What
goes into lipstick  and  perfume to  make
it  enticing.     Student   pharmacists   will
answer questions about drugs.
EDUCATION
Education Bldg. (D-3).   Teaching techniques
demonstrated.    The word for parents on
the new math, and other modern methods.
PHYSICAL  EDUCATION
Memorial  Gym   (C-l).    Recreation  displays.
Test  your  strength  and  circulatory  efficiency in the physical  performance  lab.
Aggies have a barbecue like this in Field House
LIBRARY
Al  centre  of  campus  (B-2).     Although the
library speaks for itself, you may not hear
it unless  you  venture  through  its  ever-
open doors.
EXTENSION DEPARTMENT
Display al Buchanan—west hall (B-2).    Display of courses available.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
North  end  of  West  Mall  (B-4).     Gathering
place of students from other lands.
COMPUTING CENTRE
Engineering Bldg.  (D-3).    Room 201—Play
Xs and Os with IBM 7040.
OCEANOGRAPHY
Study  of  coastal   waters,   including  recent
manganese deposit finds on coastal shelf.
Display is in Oceanography ibuildings (F-3).
COMMUNITY PLANNING
Lasserre Bldg. 3rd floor — Housing, urban
environment, planning for people.
INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS
Angus Bldg. — History of Labor movement
in B.C.
HOME ECONOMICS
Home Ec. Bldg. and Hebb Theatre (C-2. back
of physics bldg.)   Programs available. Nutrition,   population   explosion,   new   food
sources;   contemporary   clothing   design.
All locations are keyed on Map,
Pages 12-13
Friday at 8, special presentation in Hebb
Theatre of Paper Capers, a paper garment
designing contest and fashion show.
Dressses made of crepe paper, facial tissue, cardboard, wax paper, aluminum foil,
cellophane and wrapping tissue.
MATHEMATICS
Math Bldg. (C-3). Famous puzzle "The Seven
Bridges of Konigsberg" built on the lawn
in front of the building. Animated film
by IBM every hour. Displays of calculus,
number theory and applied mathematics.
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
Chemical Engineering (D-2). Equipment, experiments. Plastic moulding, basic chemical
fluidization, distillation. Demonstration of
analog computer.
CIVIL ENGINEERING
Engineering 200 (D-3). Displays of engineering models. Air bubbling, used to prevent
deposits of sediment in harbors. Wave
generators, surveying, map making. Film
program.
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
Electrical building (E-2).    Fritz the electric
(Continued on next page)
UBC Open House
14
Going skiing at Fabulous Tod? Stay at
WHITECR0FT SKI LODGE
6 MILES FROM TOD -
FAMILY  STYLE,   HOME-COOKED   MEALS   .   .   .
SPECIAL RATES ON  LODGING AND MEALS TO
BUSLOAD   GROUPS
For information write
MRS. F. J. BRADY
Whitecrdft Ski Lodge
Phone Heffley Creek 3-G Heffley Creek, B.C.
VARSITY GRILL
CHINESE AND WESTERN CUISINE
ECONOMICAL STUDENT MEALS
FREE DELIVERY
Join the Crowd at
VARSITY   GRILL
Next to Varsity Theatre
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You're Invited To
UNION  COLLEGE
OPEN HOUSE
March 3rd — 1:30 to 10:00 p.m.
Match 4th — 10:00 a.m. to lOtiO p.m.
Celebrating
75 YEARS OF THEOLOGICAL EDUCATION
PORTRAIT SPECIAL
In, TlcduAol folojVL
TAKEN on APPROVAL TIME and PLACE at YOUR CONVENIENCE
Choice of Proofs Blk/Wht if Preferred
One 8"xl0"   @ $8.95  (Reg. $12.95)
or one 5"x7" @ $4.95 (Reg. $7.95)
COLOURAMA    STUDIOS
Graduations, Weddings, Functions, PasCy--' **.
and Home Portraits &
Phone:   731-8906;   From  9   a.m.   to   10   p.m.   254-5216
224-7384 (evenings  only)
COMPLIMENTS  AND  CONGRATULATIONS
TO
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
AND
IT'S VISITORS
%v f-
Justice weighed by lawyers
(Continued from previous page)
mouse; computers, water drop generator,
stuttering machine.   Film and demonstration of the laser beam.
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
Mechanical Engineering building, main lab
(D-3). 100 m.p.h. wind tunnel. Smoke tnnneT
demonstration of air flow around aerodynamic models. Hovercraft model. Test
your weight and strength on Straing
gauges. Gas turbine and rocket engines
fired at intervals.
METALLURGY
Formation and production of metal, atomic
distribution of metals, microscopes.  High
power torch extraction process.
MINERAL ENGINEERING
Metallurgy Bldg. (D-3). Sorting rocks by
color differences, flotation process and
pelletizing of iron ore.
NURSING
Westbrook Bldg. Rms. 237, 238, 200, 212, 216.
Opportunities for nurses illustrated. Cardiac intensive care unit. Bandaging techniques. Gorgeous nurses to answer questions.
MUSIC
Music Bldg. Rm. 104 (D-2, behind Education
Bldg.) Two recitals: 12:30, chamber music;
3:30, jazz recital.
PHYSICS
Physics Annex. Hebb Theatre (C-2).   Friday,
6:45—Demonstration of matter at 300 degrees below zero (Hennings Rm. 200).
8:45 p.m. — Discussion of proposed high
energy   atom   smasher.   Saturday,   Hebb
Theatre, II a.m. and 6:45 p.m.—John Lees
demonstrates glassblowing and sculpture.
Set of 100 glass elephants graduated in size
from Va inch to 5 inches.
1:15 p.m.—Secrets of physics.
2:30 p.m—Making 3-D slides with laser
light.
4:00 p.m.—History of plasmas, the fourth
state of matter.
8:45 p.m.—Inter - stellar   communication
and possibility of life on other
planets.
PSYCHOLOGY
Henry Angus 110 and lobby (D-2). Series of
live demonstrations and films on research,
Friday at 3, 5:30 and 8; Saturday at 10:30,
1, 3:30, 6 and 8:30. Teaching skills to pigeons, recovery from deception. Development of guilt mechanisms in children. Unusual visual perceptions. Visitors can test
their skill at mirror drawing, memory
drums and reaction time apparatus.
RELIGIOUS STUDIES
Buchanan 205. Development of writing in
the Western world from earliest recorded
times. Religious scriptures of the world,
including precious manuscripts. At 8 p.m.
Friday and 6 p.m. Saturday, the movie
Four World Religions, 60 minutes long,
will be shown. Narrated by Arnold Toyn-
bee.
MICROBIOLOGY
Wesbrook  Bldg.  (C-l, 2).  Industrial  microbiology such as making beer, penicillin,
and control of food products.   Treatment
of disease through virus and moulds.
BOTANY
Biological Sciences Bldg. (D-2).
Basement: Electronic miscroscope magnifies 100,000 times.
Rm. 2125: Infrared  methods  of  studying
forest plants.
Rm. 2219: Genetics—chromosome studies.
Rm. 3008: Visitors may participate in introductory lab experiments.
Rm. 3220: Flowering plants of B.C.
ZOOLOGY
Biological  Sciences  (D-2).    Many  displays,
short lectures.  Electron miscroscope,  lab
sessions, genetics, insects, form and function of animal cells.
Here's dope on buildings
(Continued from Page 11)
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
The Rotary Club of Vancouver donated
$150,000 toward construction of International House, opened in 1959 by the late Mrs.
Eleanor Roosevelt. It is a meeting place for
foreign students who make up about 10 per
cent  of  UBC's   18,000  students.
TOTEM PARK RESIDENCES
A major federal contribution is federal
financial backing to housing. UBC borrowed
$5,682,000 to construct this residence development for nearly 800 students. Funds
were obtained from Central Mortgage and
Housing Corporation and a bank loan. The
residences are operated as a self-sustaining
unit, paid for entirely by the students and
faculty members living in them. UBC now
houses nearly 3,000 students on campus —
more than any other university in Canada.
FORMER ARMY HUTS
UBC has been involved in a systematic
program of removal of converted army huts,
brought to the campus after the end of the
Second World War. They still serve as lecture rooms, laboratories and offices, and students residences. More than 100 of the original 300 army huts are still in use on the
campus and it's a standard joke that they'll
be here for ever.
(Continued on next page)
Both Coca-Cola and Coke are registered trade marks which identify only the product of Coca-Cola Ltd.
Oh-oh,
better
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Ice-cold Coca-Cola makes any campus "get-together" a party/Coca-Cola has the
taste you never get tired of... always refreshing. That's why things go better
with Coke ... after Coke ... after Coke.
Authorized bottler of Coca-Cola under contract with Coca-Cola Ltd.
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UBC Open House UBC Open House
16
Dope on campus buildings
(Continued from previous page)
THE ARMORY
One of the many buildings constructed
with student money. Canadian Officers Training Corps members waived their pay during
the Second World War to build the armory,
headquarters of UBC's armed service units.
CIVH ENGINEERING, MECHANICAL
ENGINEERING AND METALLURGY
The civil engineering building cost just
over $1 million to construct in 1950, and
then housed all of the departments of the
facurty of applied science. Only the civil
engineering department, the dean's office
and the computing centre are located there
now. Behind the civil engineering building
are smaller units for mechanical engineering
and metallurgy. All these departments will
move eventually to separate buildings on a
15-acre area to the south of University Boulevard.
All locations are keyed on Map,
Pages 12-13
ACADIA CAMP
These residences are converted wooden
army shacks brought to campus after the
war. More than 460 single men and women
live in dormitories, with an additional 224
suites for married graduate students. At the
north end of the camp, on President's Row,
there are approximately 2'5 suites in row
housing. This development was completed
in 1*58 and is intended for married graduate
students and for junior faculty members.
WAR MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM
AND EMPIRE POOL
The initiative for construction of the War
Memorial Gymnasium came from UBC's students, who raised $367,000 toward the cost
of  the  $800,000 building,   opened  in   1951.
Empire Pool was built for the British Empire
Games in 1954.
WESBROOK BUILDING
Constructed in 1951-, it is named for
UBC's first president, Dr. F. F. Wesbrook.
The building houses the department of microbiology, public health and preventive
medicine, as well as the school of nursing
and the student health service. At the rear
is UBC's faculty of pharmacy.
WOODWARD LIBRARY AND THE
HEALTH SCIENCES CENTRE
The Woodward Library, which cost $1
million, was instigated by a half million-
dollar gift by P. A. Woodward. The library
houses the university's library for medicine,
dentistry, nursing and foilogical sciences. To
the east of Wesbrook are three ibasic medical
sciences buildings, completed in 1961, at a
cost of nearly $3 million. They house lecture
facilities and research labs.
The university teaching and research
hospital of 410 beds will cost a total of $36
million and is under construction south of
the 'basic medical science buildings. Health
education funds for construction of the hospital will come from the federal government,
the provincial government, and foundations
and private donors such as P. A. Woodward, who has given an additional $3.5 million for the hospital.
HENRY ANGUS BUILDING
The Henry Angus building, built at a
cost of $2,307,309, was opened last year and
is named for Dr. Henry Angus, a former
dean of graduate studies and head of the
departments of economics and political
science. The 'building houses the faculty of
commerce and the social sciences departments of the faculty of arts, including psychology, economics, political science, sociology and anthropology.
(Continued on next page)
AROUND THE WORLD
ON $117 A MONTH
Adventurers set out on a 12-month
work/study tour July 13.
Like the idea?
Mail this coupon
1     To: Travel Master's Guild, P.O.
■    B.C.
i    Please send full details of your
,    $117 a Month" Tour.
Name    __
Box 3093, Vancouver,
"Around the World on
Address                    _                           i
This tour is planned for those who wish to broaden their
understanding of peoples from other lands ... to comprehend
their reactions and motivations . . . and to learn from them.
It is planned for you—the thoughful adventurer.
The quest begins on board the Canberra at 6:00 p.m. on
July 13. You sail south via the Panama Canal to the warm
Caribbean. Thence north to Lisbon and Southampton where
an energetic sojourn in an International Work Camp will
replenish your pocket money. Next, the Continent. Work or
idle your way through Holland, Scandinavia, or the Mediterranean countries—wherever you please. On November 15th
assemble in Athens before leaving for Israel and life on
a Kibbutzim. In mid-January, join the Perm Overlund bus
for Turkey, the Middle East, and on to Bombay, arriving
36 days later. Back to sea again for Sydney and a lengthy
stay in sunny Australia, after which P 8s O again become our
hosts on a long sail home via Auckland, Nandi and Honolulu.
Rates begin at $1,500 depending on shipboard accommodation. This includes all sea, rail and bus fares. However, the
real value to you of such a tour is incalculable.
TRUEMAN S TRAVEL
Brentwood Contro   CY •■■■44
GLOBETROTTER TRAVEL
537 W.»l O.orgi.  MU 4-11*1
GODFREYS TRAVEL
J07J Ofnvllf fff l(2f4
WRIGHT'S TRAVEL
■22 How Si. «i4S_«-
Best Wishes!
University of British Columbia
1967
OPEN HOUSE
The Government of the Province of British Columbia
DEPARTMENT OF INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT, TRADE AND COMMERCE
HONOURABLE RALPH R. LOFFMARK, Minister, Parliament Buildings, Victoria, British Columbia
tf.*»_V-*<W*g.WW*fcV.*<.,AfA-^,A^ '*.*«.
•((.V^V'iV'f *_■ ** «* •
iii^m$WMS#M%9M® ■
nTT-lMUWTTO 17
UBC Open House
The old, new and the shacks
(Continued from previous page)
BUCHANAN BUILDING
The first unit of the Buchanan building,
which fronts on the Main Mall, was constructed in 1958. The 'building seats nearly
3,000 students.   Total  cost  was  $2,625,000.
THE NORMAN MacKENZIE CENTRE
FOR FINE ARTS
The fine arts centre is named for Dr.
Norman MacKenzie, president emeritus of
the university. Two buildings have been
completed — the Frederic Wood Theatre,
which houses the department of theatre, and
the Frederic Lasserre building for architecture ,community planning and the fine arts.
Construction is underway on a new building
to go into service in September 1967 for the
department of music.
FEDERAL GOVERNMENT
RESEARCH LABORATORIES
These three laboratories on Marine Drive
are located on land leased to the government
by UBC. From north to south the laboratories are: A Canada Department of Agriculture laboratory for research on plant vi-
All locations are keyed on Map,
Pages 12-13
ruses, a Fisheries Technological Station for
the federal Department of Fisheries and a
Forest Products laboratory for the Canada
Department of Forestry.
FACULTY CLUB AND GRADUATE CENTRE
The Faculty Club and Thea Koerner
Graduate Centre were gifts to the University
from Dr. Leon Koerner, the retired president
of a B.C. lumber firm. The Graduate Centre
provides a meeting place for more than 1,200
graduate students currently enrolled at UBC.
LAW BUILDING
The faculty of law was the first new
faculty added after the war. The present
building was constructed at a cost of $332,000
and overflow is handled in adjacent army
huts.
BROCK HALL
Brock Hall was constructed by the students in the late thirties, in large part with
student money, and is named for a former
dean of applied science. The original student
contribution was nearly $79,000 and in 1957
a new wing, again financed by the students,
was added at a  cost of $300,000.
SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK
AND CECIL GREEN PARK
The school of social work is housed in
the former residence of the late F.
Ronald Graham, who willed the house to
UBC. Next door is the former residence of
Senator S. S. McKeen, who originally sold it
to St. Mark's College as a student residence.
UBC purchased the house from St. Mark's
in 1964. The university recently received
$200,000 from Mr. & Mrs. Cecil H. Green
to reimburse the University for the purchase
of the house, and to pay for its conversion
as the Alumni Association headquarters.
THEOLOGICAL COLLEGES
The theological colleges adjacent to the
campus are located on land leased by the
university to various denominations. The
colleges do not come under the control of
the UBC board of governors or the senate.
Two of the Colleges—Anglican and Union—
offer work leading to divinity degrees. The
other units—St. Mark's (Roman Catholic),
St. Andrew's (Presbyterian) and Carey Hall
(Baptist)—are residential and social centres.
LOWER MALL
The development houses 800 students,
400 men and 400 women, and was constructed partially with funds raised during the
UBC Development Fund of 1958. The development consists of four dormitory towers
surrounding a central dining and recreational
building.
HAIDA VILLAGE
The Canada Council contributed the bulk
of the funds used to construct Haida Village,
a replica of a Queen Charlotte Island Indian
settlement. The noted Totem carver Bill
Reid, himself part Haida, and other Haida
Indians completed the project in 1962. It
includes a large communal dwelling house,
an adjacent grave house and several totems
and other carvings.
APPLIED SCIENCE COMPLEX
A 15-acre site on Main Mall between University Boulevard and Agronomy Road is
being developed for the faculty of applied
science. Two buildings have already been
completed and others are in the planning
and construction stage. The complete units
are chemical engineering, completed in 1961
at a cost of $750,000, and electrical engineering, completed in 1963 at a cost of $1,421,343.
Under construction is the metallurgy block.
FORESTRY-AGRICULTURE
Now under construction at Main Mall
and Agronomy Road is a new complex to
house the faculties of forestry and agriculture. The building which will cost $4,355,-
000, is being underwritten by the 3-Universi-
ties Capital Fund.
EDUCATION
The new faculty of education building,
designed by the provincial department of
public works, was built at a cost of $1,103,-
877 and was opened in 1962. The north and
south wings, costing $1,767,461, serve as
offices for faculty members and specialized
teaching classrooms. ,
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Phone 684-6018      10S1 Granville St.
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this week?
Show that you care
- phone that night!
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ARTS
ARTISTS' MATERIALS
PICTURE FRAMING
ART GALLERY
4458 West 10th Ave.
224-3933
STOP!!
The World Is Getting Off At U.B.C.
In   Sept-ember   300   New
Foreign Students Arrive —
Join the "Buddy System"
and help them to settle in
SEE  US  NOW Al:
International House, UBC
224-4535
CAR INSURANCE
DUE?
Save with
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rates for
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8455 GRANVILLE ST.,
VANCOUVER  14, B.C.
261-4255
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Complete  Automotive  Repairs
Electronic Tune Up
Free Vacuum Service at
the Pump  Islands
2190 Western Parkway
(Behind the Village)
224-1226
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Rear Entrance from
New Parking Lot.
LEFT RIGHT OUT
Yep, they got
Left; all right
By MIKE COLEMAN
T
1 HE PUBLIC image of students as disrespectful, radical, loud, sloppy, addicts of
wine, women, song, and marijuana is inaccurate.
Students are not radical.
This fact is reflected in campus politics.
The three prevailing attitudes are "bureaucrat", "New
Left", and "student government—who needs it?"
The last group, although
large in numbers, obviously
will have no effect on campus affairs, since it doesn't
bother to vote. The other two
groups are locked in constant
battle for control of the levers of student power.
"Bureaucrats" are centered
in the machinery of student
government. The charge that
they spend all their time
sending each other memos in
triplicate  is a little unfair—
Mike Coleman is a second-
year law student. He owns a
blue blazer and drinks coffee
in (ugh) Brock Hall.
they have to study sometimes.
They want to protect and reform the present student government structure (and ultimately, the structure of Canadian society).
The "New Left" is, a highly
articulate and generally idealistic minority. During the past
two years they gained control
of The Ubyssey, which has
given them a strong platform
from which to voice their
opinions unchallenged. They
favour everything good (Berkeley riots, LSD, student
strikes), and let the campus
know how stupid most students are to wallow in materialistic affluence. The "New
Left"  wants  a  revolution  in
student and university affairs
(and ultimately, the structure
of Canadian society).
Charges and counter-charges
fly. The bureaucracy tramples
on student needs by doing
nothing. The radicals trample
on student rights by ignoring
student opinion.
Occasionally (very occasionally), campus political opinion
is an accurate reflection of the
student body's general attitudes. This happens only
when there is strong positive
or negative reaction to a call
by student leaders.
In the last half-dozen years,
this has only happened twice.
The first time was the positive and full-fledged support
for the "Back Mac" campaign
to rally the B.C. electorate
behind the cause of the entire
university community presenting its united case to the
public.
The second example of general student reaction was to
the recent proposal by campus
leaders of a student strike.
The student answer was overwhelmingly negative; the proposal was rejected by 83% of
the voters in a campus-wide
referendum. Students tagged
with supporting a strike were
solidly rejected in student government elections.
With all the sound and fury
of the press reports, the image
of the university student as a
greedy, irresponsible parasite
is widely held.
The opposite is true. Campus politicians who make the
noise seldom affect the students, and even less often represent them. Students on the
whole are a hard-working,
hard-playing, responsible and
pragmatic group. The coming
leaders of our province and
nation are fun-loving, but sane
and serious. The future lies in
sound and capable hands.
SPECIAL EVENTS
PAINT IN . . . Buchanan Building quadrangle Saturday
11 a.m. to 5 p.m.
HAPPENING . . . Main Library Saturday 2 p.m.
POETRY READINGS . . . around campus Friday afternoon
p.m. and Saturday 12 to 5 p.m.
MODEL PARLIAMENT . . . Brock Hall all weekend.
SOAP BOXING ... all day Friday and Saturday in front
of Library and all over campus.
LECTURES .  . . Friday and Saturday 7 to  10 p.m and
Saturday 1:30 to 4:30 p.m.    See Buchanan 104 for
specific times.
STAGE SHOW . . . Friday and Saturday 7 p.m. and 9 p.m.,
Saturday 2 p.m. and 4 p.m. in the auditorium.
FILM SHOW . . . Friday and Saturday 8 p.m. and Saturday
3 p.m in the auditorium
PLAY "ESCURIAL" . . . Friday 12:30 and 8 p.m.; Saturday
2 and 8 p.m. Frederic Wood Theatre.
Jitneys jog along
The UBC Alumni Association will play their part in
the weekend's Open House
activities by providing service between the bus stop and
their headquarters in Cecil
Green Park.
Jitney buses operated by
the association will tour the
campus all day Saturday.
Cecil Green Park is the
former home of Senator S. S.
ing to the university. It has
since been renovated to accommodate the alumni offices.
Members of the 1967 graduating class are invited to a
formal gathering in the park,
Friday  at  12.30  p.m.
All UBC graduates are invited to tour the building
anytime during Open House,
a guide service has been arranged,   and   coffee   will   be
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683-3045
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Do You Know of
The SPANISH HOUSE
The most interesting store in town where
Mrs. Romero will greet you and help
you select gift items or design a room
for you at great savings and in excellent
taste.
Do visit The Spanish House at 4456 W.
10th Ave. It will be a rewarding experience.
VILLAGE   CAFE
"Where good friends and fine food meet"
5778 University Blvd.
(In the Village) 224-0640
GETTING MARRIED?
PIEASE SEND YOUR LATEST INVITATION
SAMPLES AND PRICE LIST BY RETURN MAIL
TO:
NAME
ADDRESS
MR.  ROY  YACHT,  Consultant
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Corner Robson and Burrard
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Easy   Terms:    10%   Down—Balance    12   Months.
SPECIAL COURTESY DISCOUNT FOR U.B.C.
STUDENTS   AND   PERSONNEL
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THREE STORES TO SERVE YOU
655 Granville St, Vancouver.   683-6651
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All   Stores open every Friday until 9 p.m. New Westminster Store-every Thurs.- Fri. 'til 9pn
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RE 6-4282
UBC Open. House
&%%\\y ,%V,V-".YO a<X*Vv%xV       1 ^ Law fun may be
trying experience
UBC law students will
prove they're a bunch of bad
actors for Open House visitors.
At 4.30 p.m. Friday and
2.30 p.m. Saturday in the law
building, they will stage a
mock trial.
The subject: an indecent
assault.
In the case, a woman with
the   unlikely  name   of  Anna
Gain will claim she was assaulted by two men — one
wearing a bowler hat, the
other  a  kilt.
The accused have the equally unlikely names of Terry
McLust and Derek Brown-
Booting.
Law students will play all
parts in the trial, including
the roles of the accused, victim, witnesses and judge, and
the public is invited to watch.
Guides will help
A guide service will be
available all day, both days
of Open  House.
The service, involving
more than 300 co-eds, will
conduct tours, originating at
each of the seven information  booths.
Guides will also have information booklets to enable
them  to answer questions.
SCHOOL  TOURS
High school tours of the
campus have been arranged
so students visiting Open
House will be able to see the
faculties  and   departments.
Tours will leave the front
of Thunderbird Stadium on
East Mall at 3.30 and 6.30
p.m., Friday, and 11 a.m. on
Saturday.
SORORITIES
UBC's sororities will present   nine   exhibits  depicting
their   campus   activities.
The displays will be presented in Panhellenic House,
the building which houses all
campus sororities.
Panhellenic House is located behind International
House, adjacent to the Nitobe
Japanese   Gardens.
Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
on Saturday.
SPECIAL TALK
Dr. Donald Ivey, Principal
of New College, Toronto, will
address the Vancouver Institute Saturday at 8.15 p.m.,
in Buchanan building 106.
Ivey's topic, "A Soupcon
of Science," is designed for
people with a general interest in science, rather than
for specialists.
He is author of a TV science
series, and is noted as both
an amusing and informative
lecturer.
Mini-lectures  scheduled
Here is a list of the Open House 15-minute Mini-lecture
series, held in room 104 of Buchanan Bldg.
FRIDAY
7:00
HISTORY
Dr. L. Upton
What   is   fact   in   Canadian
History?
7:30
ECONOMICS
Dr. E. Hurt
What   is  Economics?
8:00
CLASSICS
Dr. M. McGregor
Classics:—Antidote to
Arts I
8:30
COMMERCE
Dr.   F.  Webster
Development of the
Marketing Mix
9:00
SLAVONIC
STTJDIES
Prof.  J.  Solecki
Slavonic Area Studies
9:30
HISTORY
Dr. M. Ormsby
SATURDAY
History made  Visual
1:30
ENGLISH
Dr.  J.  Hulcoop
Why read Literature?
2:00
PSYCHOLOGY
Dr. D. Papageorgis
Psychology as a
Psychologist Sees it
2:30
COMMERCE
Dr. J. Swlrles
Qualitative  Methods for
Business
3:00
ECONOMICS
Dr. E. Hurt
What is Economics?
3:30
COMMERCE
Prof.  D.  Fields
Accounting and Taxation
4:00
PSYCHOLOGY
Dr. T. Storm
A Psychologist comments on
how to raise your child
7:00
ECONOMICS
Dr. E. Hurt
What is Economics?
7:30
SLAVONIC
STUDIES
Prof.  A. Wainman
Slavonic Languages  and
Literatures
8:00
ENGLISH
Dr. D.  Macaree
The Place of English in the
University
8:30
SLAVONIC
STUDIES
Prof. B. Czaykowski
Dept. of Slavonic Studies:
general remarks and
future  prospects
9:00
HISTORY
Dr. C. Humphries
The use of History in
Restoration
STARTS TODAY!
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m*-_22_L ——
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ALL OUR SKIS ARE
GUARANTEED AGAINST
BREAKAGE FOR ONE
SEASON
10% Student Discount on
Presentation of Student
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336 West Pender St.
681-2004
19
UBC Open House
BETTER BUY BOOKS
UNIVERSITY
TEXT BOOKS
NON-FICTION
PAPERBACKS
Specializing in
Review Notes
and Study Guides
4393 W. 10th Ave.
224-4144
SINCE   1907
Government, Municipal
and Corporation Securities
Inept iries In i ited
G. M. OLIVER &
COMPANY  LIMITED
821 West Hastings Street. Vancouver 1, B.C.
MUtual 4-')2l 1
Members of:
Vancouver Stock Exchange
Montreal Stock Exchange
Canadian Stock Exchange
B.C. Bond Dealers' Association
Investment Dealers' Association or Canada
ORDERS EXECUTED ON ALL EXCHANGES
Remember!
The College Shop
is open Sat., March 4 for
OPEN   HOUSE
// it has "U.B.C." on it — here is where it was purchased
COLLEGE SHOP of the AMS -
Serving the students and staff of UBC
BROCK
EXTENSION
UNIVERSITY FOOD
SERVICES
Welcomes  You  To
OPEN HOUSE
REGULAR LOCATIONS
FORT CAMP DINING ROOM
ACADIA CAMP DINING ROOM
GORDON SHRUM COMMONS
Lower Mall
TOTEM DINING ROOM
Totem Park
BROCK SNACK BAR
AUDITORIUM CAF
BUS STOP COFFEE BAR
GYM COFFEE BAR
PONDEROSA
West Mall
THEA KOERNER GRADUATE STUDENTS CENTRE
SPECIAL SERVICE AT
Bio Science - 2321
Buchanan — .100
Civil Engineering — 201
Electrical Engineering — 220
Henning — 303
Lasserre — 107 UBC Open House
20
Student activity
shows in displays
The University Clubs Committee's Open House display
in the armory exemplifies
the ethnic, religious, sportive,
and personal interests of UBC
students.
Visitors to UBC have the
opportunity to obtain a perspective of the student's various extra-curricular persuits.
Twenty-seven of over one
hundred campus clubs and organizations are presenting this
glimpse into the lives of approximately 4,000 students
who are club members.
Clubs are the student's
means for following his own
special interests, developing
his talents, and learning to be
both a leader and a participant in group situations.
CO - OPERATION
The joint Progressive Conservative-Liberal exhibit is a
perfect example of co-operation. Canada's oldest political
"V	
Club displays are in
Armory (B-3 on map)
parties have incorporated
their historical displays. The
Liberal Club has obtained
some unique historical mementos of its party's beginning. The Socreds, New Democrats, and Communists have
each planned provocative
booths.
Largest display is the Chinese pavilion and garden built
by the Chinese Varsity Club.
Examples of Chinese costume
and a historical review of
Chinese contributions to Canada during the past 100 years
are included.
The Alpha Omega Society,
representing UBC Ukrainian
students, features national
dress ,and free samples of
Ukrainian pastries and delicacies. The Alliance Francaise,
Nisei Varsity Club, German
Club, and the Slavonic Circle
provide guests with visual and
musical treats.
Varsity Outdoors Club has
one of the more unique displays, with their skiing exhibition on an artificial ski run.
Mountain climbing (on anything perpendicular!) is also a
VOC feature.
Campus religious groups
provide visitors with information regarding their histories
and the role they all play in
the University community.
Lutheran students use
visual representation in illustrating the relationship between God, the university,
and the nation.
SPORTS CARS
Sports car buffs~-ean enjoy
the Sports Car Club's display
of fast cars and roaring engines. The Film Society and
the Dance Club offer relaxing
entertainment while demonstrating their club's activities.
UBC Radio and Television
Society has set up a special
automatic programming unit,
designed and built by club
members. Folk Song Society
brings live and recorded music
at their coffee house. Coffee,,
and donuts are on sale.
Two clubs are not located in
the armory.
The Blind Students Club
have a display in their club
room downstairs in the Brock
extension beside the Campus
barber shop.
NEW YORK
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RENTALS
WHITE    DINNER    JACKETS
TUXEDOS,    DARK    SUITS,   TAILS
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MASQUERADE    COSTUMES
SPECIAL   STUDENT    RATES
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Institute Ltd.
TUTORIAL COLLEGE
University and High School
Subjects
MORRIS HUBERMAN, Educational Consultant
KNOWLEDGE and SUCCESS
THROUGH LEARNING POWER
2158 W. 12th Ave., Vancouver
FOR APPOINTMENT PHONE
732-5535 263-4808
If your life js too dull.
And no fun  atol,
A haircut will probably right it.
Then  go out prepared  to fight it.
Campus Barber Shop
BROCK   HALL   EXTENSION
WHEN  THE  NIGHT  BEGINS
AND THE VANCOUVER LIGHTS
SHINE
ITALIAN   PARADISE   SWINGS.
Take an Angel to
the Paradise
Enjoy the best Italian Dish
Open   every   night   except   Sunday
'•>    5:00 p.m. — 2:00 a.m.
LIVE BAND
NO COVER CHARGE
SPECIAL
U.B.C.  STUDENT DISCOUNT
10%  to  15%  on weekday!
ITALIAN PARADISE
CABARET
1047 Granville       685-9412
Made-To-Meature
PANT
SUITS
Designed by 'Michel'
SKI and
CURLING
PANTS
CASUAL  &
EVENING   SLACKS
Designed   by
'Don  Manuel'
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Tel.: 681-8621
A
tradition
of
fine banking
service
For one hundred years, the Commerce
has been the sign of the finest
in banking services. Either at home,
or wherever you travel, let the Commerce
take care of your financial problems.
There are branches in every major centre
in Canada to offer you the finest
in convenient, courteous service.
<_>
CANADIAN IMPERIAL
BANK OF COMMERCE
WORLD-WIDE
*J£\S      INTERNATIONAL
PRESENTS
A HOLIDAY TRAVEL
PROGRAMME
For Students — For Faculty
PROGRAMME   INCLUDES:
• A.M.S. GROUP TO EUROPE
• FREQUENT 21-DAY GROUP FLIGHTS -
-London fore $345 plus $76 for
hotel arrangements.
-Also departures to Amsterdam, Copenhagen,
Paris, Frankfurt, Rome.
• WE ABE AGENTS FOR:
American Express — Traveller's Cheques, Credit Cards, Tours, etc.
Perm Overland Tours — London/Bombay by bus — Europe and Middle
East Tours — The Holy Land from London — 32 days for $319 Canadian
WORLD-WIDE INTERNATIONAL TRAVEL
B.C.'s Leading Travel Organization
5700 University Boulevard (on Campus)   —   224-4391
and 7  other   branches
WORLD-WIDE INTERNATIONAL TRAVEL — In AU The World, No Finer Travel Service
\Vi%\^VA\^^^VV-\ViVcVtVtVAVii'V*\VtVt'4^vvrt\\v\VA*% Engineers,  Foresters,  and  Sciencemen  staged  log-rolling   at   last  Open   House.
Amazing 50c Reduction
SIMPLY PRESENT THIS CARD
—Offer good on any pizza over $2.00
—Good only on pickup orders
—Good Sunday through Thursday till March 16
PAUL'S   PIZZA
3623 W. Broadway
TRY OUR HAWAIIAN SPECIAL
733-1617
Best Wishes UBC
OPEN HOUSE '67
FABCO
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MANUFACTURING LTD.
60 Riverside Drive
North Vancouver, 929-2321
JOHN FORD'S
BLOODY INCESTUOUS ELIZABETHAN  REVENGE TRAGEDY
'TIS Pin SHE'S A WHORE
An  M.A.  Thesis  Production
FREDERIC WOOD STUDIO,
March 8-11, 8:30 p.m.
Matinee — March 9 at 12:30 p.m.
Adults $1.00 - Students 75c
Tickets at door or call 288-3880
STUDENTS:
For all your formal wear rentals
call
Jim Abernethy, 263-3610
TUXEDOS
WHITE DINNER  JACKETS
MORNING COATS     •    TAILS
COLOURED JACKETS     •     GREY SUITS
STUDENT  RATES
WcQuhk. JohmaL (tisunh. JtlmikcL
2046 West 41st Avenue
263-3610 9:00-5:30 Mon.-Sat.
t^j——*—— * tJBCOperi Hb'use
Visitors
can bridge
the gap
You say you had trouble
with Math in high school?
Don't worry! UBC's math
department says its displays
will be quite comprehensible
to the  general public.
The math building is located on the west side of
Main Mall, about a block
from   University   Boulevard.
The department will have
the Seven Bridges of Konis-
berg set up on the lawn outside the building to greet
you. The bridges are a maze.
You must cross each bridge
bnly once to make your way
into the building. But this
can be avoided.
Once inside you will see
different rooms devoted to
one subject. There will be a
room having to do with analysis, one with logic, one
with numbers, and one with
algebra. In another room a
film on elementary mathematics will be shown.
In the numbers room will
be a display called the towers of Hanoi (nothing to do
with Vietnam). It deals with
the transfer of a large number of discs from one pile to
another. The world is supposed to end when the transfer is completed.
In another room a computer will be systematically
printing everything that has
*_ver been written. It is estimated that it will take 10 to
the 100th power light years
of paper to complete this
project, but it will be started
in about the middle so you
can see what is going on.
A n operations research
model concerning where to
put factories or warehouses
in relation to where the buyers are will also be set up.
1965 and 1966
CAMPUS LIFE'S
& TOTEMS
Only 50c & $1
on sale in publication's
office
BROCK HALL
Architectural Displays
and
Entertainment
at the
Lasserre Building
U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD
WINTER  SPORTS  CENTRE
SKATING SCHEDULE -  1966-67 SEASON
Effective September 12, 1966 to April 15, 1967
TUESDAYS   —
12:45 -
2:45 p.m.*
WEDNESDAYS -
2:00 -
7:30 -
3:30 p.m.
9:30 p.m.
FRIDAYS   —
3:00 -
7:30 -
5:00 p.m.
9:30 p.m.**
SATURDAYS   —
3:00 -
7:30 -
5:00 p.m.**
9:30 p.m.
SUNDAYS   —
12:45 -
2:45 p.m.
7:30 - 9:30 p.m.
♦Special Student Session — Admission — 15c
**Except when Thunderbird Hockey Games scheduled:
Jan. 13 & 14 - Jan. 20 & 21 - Feb. 3 & 4 - March 3 & 4
Students .35
Students .50
Adults .60
Adults .75
ADMISSION: Afternoons  —
Evenings      —
Skate Rental — .35 pair — Skate Sharpening — .35 pair
For further information call — 224-3205 or 228-3197
^000000000000000000000000900000000000000000000^.
Dates! Dates! Dates!
OPERATION CHECKMATE can arrange exciting dates for you. Thousands
of students and young working people across Canada have participated
in CHECKMATE'S computer-dating program. Possibilities include computerized dances, inter-municipal and inter-provincial dating for those visiting other parts of Canada (eg. Expo 671), and many more. CHECKMATE
is the intelligent fun way to meet and date members of the opposite sex.
OPERATION   CHECKMATE
FREE brochures can be obtained at the Ubyssey office in Brock Hall or
by remitting the following  coupon.
OPERATION CHECKMATE
4601   W. 7th Ave.
Vancouver 8,  B.C.
NAME       	
STREET--          _          ..
CITY  _   ZONE
PROV.
Welcome Visitors
to
UBC
and
OPEN HOUSE 1967
from
UBC BOOKSTORE
We're Open Until 10 Friday Night
and 9 to 9 on Saturday ADVERTISEMENT
UBC Open House
22
HOLY SPIRIT-TOPIC OF WEEK
Something new is happening in the student world, and
the Rev. Ed Gregory, who works with John Sherrill, the
author of the widely-read They Speak With Other
Tongues, will be here to speak of it Tuesday through
Friday, March 7-10. The something new is the resurgence,
among university students of the interest in the work of
the Holy Spirit.
Gregory's lectures will be the second in a series on
the work of the Holy Spirit presented under the sponsorship of the Full Gospel Students this year. In January
the Rev. Tommy Tyson, a Methodist minister, spoke of his
extraordinary experiences with practising Pentecostals, a
group he formerly considered to be "the emotional fringe
of a dying church" or (to put it more sharply) "the froth
on the casket." Tyson's personal experience with the Holy
Spirit, which began when he was teaching the Bible class
in his Methodist church, revolutionized his personal life
and for a time was the cause of strained relationships
with his ministerial brethren. He stood firm) however,
for his new Testament experience of speaking in tongues.
Today over 70 ministers in his Conference of the Methodist Church, have the "power to speak in tongues" and
pray for the sick. It was Tommy Tyson who recommended
Ed Gregory, a fellow Methodist, for the March lecture
series on "Charismatic Living in the Twentieth Century"
Ed Gregory whose educational background includes
Indiana State and Fuller, has had wide experience, having
served the Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship as a staff
associate, the Billy Graham crusades as an organizer, and
a group called African Enterprises. In this connection he
travelled in over twenty African countries. Currently he
serves with Inter-Church Team Ministries, a group that
directs its attention to honoring the ministry of the Holy
Spirit today. Others of the group are: Dr. George Pattison
who was until recently reactor of St. Andrew's Anglican
Cathedral, Prince Rupert, B.C.; Dr. Robert C. Frost, currently chairman of the Natural Science Division at West-
mont College, Santa Barbara; and Dr. Timothy Fetler,
Head of the Philosophy Department, Santa Barbara City
College.
In addition to his work with Inter-Church Team
ministries, Gregory is an edftor of Campus Fellowship, a
magazine which has been developed to help serve the
needs of the rapidly increasing groups of faculty and
students who are interested in the ministry of the Holy
Spirit today.
Gregory believes he has the answer to Leary's L.S.D.
gospel. Instead of "Turn on, tune in, drop out", he says,
"Turn toward God, tune in by the power of the Holy
Spirit, get involved in Christion service." Rev. E. Gregory
claims that interest in a Christian experience, particularly
in what he calls the baptism of the Holy Spirit, is high
on campuses across America.
Ed Gregory comes to Vancouver with news of the
activities of Full Gospel Students at Wheaton, Berkley
and Indiana State. After the U.B.C. series he leaves
to take part in a teaching seminar for faculty and
students in the mid-western states.
Ed Gregory of Inter-Church
Team Ministries will be on
campus during the week of
March 7-10 to discuss the increased interest in the Holy
Spirit.
WHO THE HEAVEN ARE WE?
Our constitution says we are people interested in presenting
the claims of Christ to the university community.
Our membership list reveals that we, students at U.B.C,
represent a wide range of academic levels in many different
faculties.
Our church attendance shows that we represent more than
five different denominations, and can be properly classed as
a cross-denominational  club.
Our history says that we have sponsored student get-togethers, special speakers, films, etc., for the past four years
at U.B.C.
No matter who the heaven you are, if you want more
information about the Associated Full Gospel Students please
contact us through Box 12, Brock Hall or phone:
President—Rick Bowering (224-9065)
Vice-president—Ken Gaglardi (228-8615)
Chaplain—Bernice Gerard (266-9275)
PAPERBACKS AVAILABLE
Want to be up-to-date on church history? Raise your
Christian education literacy level?
The Full Gospel Students are making available two paperbacks listed below, free of charge to students, and at a nominal
charge to others:
They Speak With Other Tongues by John Sherrill — an
account of the author's scholarly attempt to see what
the tongues movement is all about.
The Cross and the Switchblade by David Wilkerson—this
books deals  with the miraculous  cure  of drug addiction.
These books may be obtained at the Gregory lecture series
this week in Bu 202 at noon, or through Box 12 in Brock Hall.
GOSPEL STUDENTS TALK OF JESUS
A meeting with Jesus Christ
is a "thrilling, vital, and
totally involving experience,"
according to members of the
Assoc.  Full Gospel Students.
As a result of their convictions concerning the Christian
experience, the Full Gospel
Students have been actively
engaged in bringing people
to campus who also consider
that an encounter with the
living Christ is essential.
One of these persons is
Sonny Arguinzoni, an addict
to heroin for six years. In the
fall, Sonny told students that
God had taken away his desire for drugs, totally transformed his life, and given him
peace beyond  description.
In the fall also, the group
presented four Moody Science
films, and a sacred concert
with opera singer Ken Carter.
For members a highlight of
the groups first-term activities
was the retreat at Crescent
Beach in November. Two days
were given to discussion of
topics relevant to contemporary Christian living and there
also was a strong emphasis on
prayer and worship.
The cross- denominational
Full Gospel Student group
started '67 by presenting the
Rev. Tommy Tyson, departmental head at O.R.U., in a
noon hour series on campus.
Tyson spoke of his experience
with the charismatic and of
the renewal now in evidence
in many churches across
North America. With Tyson
was Jerry Schindler, a Roman
Catholic priest (on leave of
absence from the Portland
diocese) who told of his baptism in the Holy Spirit.
Tyson's meetings were held
during the Week of Prayer
for Christian Unity and the
students followed through on
the prayer effort by meeting
each afternoon in St. Andrew's
Chapel on the campus. Similar prayer sessions will be
part of the Ed Gregory series.
Not the least among the interests of the Full Gospel Students is the publication of a
local, campus-bas'ed Christian
witness. In the fall they published The Wayfarer, a four
page insert in The Ubyssey.
In addition to the four page
effort, by examination time in
April the group will have gone
to press with single-page inserts in The Ubyssey no less
than six times.
The Full Gospel Students
are pledged to be wherever
Christian action is. "We believe that too much can not
be said for the Lord Jesus
Christ, and that every Christ-
honouring club on campus is
a worthwhile part of the university  community."
Rev. ED GREGORY
METHODIST MINISTER
speaks on
CHARISMATIC LIVING
IN THE
TWENTIETH CENTURY
Tues. - HISTORY
Wed. - THEOLOGY
Thur. - PERSONAL EXPERIENCE
Bu 202
Noon
_ «.«m«%%«m«-%«%^v^%'vv'«'k
■ "«  * f    l «>| \     i Is"—.!   I   "i     KM    <  . I ."S     I   (HITI1\ 1-1 .  V !■. A \l     1W )1.
OPEN
HOUSE
SPORTS
RUGBY OUT WEST, 1891-1967. History repeats itself as
the Thunderbird rugby squad hosts the University of
Washington Friday at 3:30 p.m. in Varsity Stadium. The
Northwest Intercollegiate Conference game is part of the
Open House program.
Ice Dinos down,
desperate today
A better-padded team of
successors winds up its season this weekend against the
University of Calgary Dinosaurs Friday, 8.30 p.m. and
Saturday, 2:30 p.m. at the
Thunderbird Arena.
The series has added significance since it involves the
same teams which battled it
out here last year for the
John Owen Memorial Trophy. This trophy, won by
UBC, was donated by the
University District Lions
Club in memory of John
Owen, UBC's athletic trainer,
who passed away in January,
1965.
The current four - game,
total goal series is expected
to draw a capacity crowd.
The ice hockey Thunderbirds took the first two
games in Calgary last weekend, squeaking past the Dinnies 5-4 in overtime and
beating them  again,  5-3.
UBC hosts  gymnastics meet
The five man UBC gymnastics team won    the    WCIAA
Gymnast ic
last weekend,
University of
monton)   119.8
Championship
downing the
Alberta (Ed-
to   117.65.
Bill Mackie won second all
k,S ."....'•#■ . ,.■  ' 11
_*-!__?-,■■• ■'%;$■'■: *»?.   ■'■   ■. ■„-:*■ ■ _;   ■■.■i'v'i     Mn""'-<Ed
round in the tournament,
while John Samela was third.
Dennis Fridulin, Peter Prince
and Ray Stevenson all placed
in the top five in two or more
events.
Each     team     member   has
I*■      ■■   •
~-.:3*
V,
MIKE HANARAN, all round gymnast from Washington
State University, will be one of many competitors in the
Friday-Saturday displays in the Memorial gym.
* rrnTTTTTTTTnTTi
23
TTTTTTTTTT
I I 1 1 II M I I I I 1 .
UBC Open House
been selected to represent the
West in the Canadian Championships, March 5-7 in Edmonton.
Meanwhile, UBC hosts the
Pacific Northwest College
Gymnastic Champ ionships
this Friday and Saturday in
Memorial  Gym.
Friday at 7 p.m. gymnasts
from junior colleges and
freshmen from universities
in Western Canada and the
U.S. will compete in a full
slate of events.
On Saturday at 2 p.m. the
varsity teams will commence
a preliminary round, with
the finals to start at 7.30 p.m.
Top gymnasts from the U
of Oregon, Oregon State U,
U of Washington, Washington State U, Eastern Washington State, U of Alberta,
U of Victoria and UBC will
compete for the championship.
Events include:   floor  exercise,   side   horse,  trampoline,
horizontal   bar,   long   horse,
•paral_eil'.fe>ap^,"^iJil>7ioi^;K.-andl(
all around.
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THE
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for
Spring   67
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Navy Hounds Tooth  Check—worn  just short of the  knee.
ONLY $99.50
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