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The Ubyssey Oct 7, 1983

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Array Vol. LXVI,No. 8
^       Vancouver, B.C. Friday, October 7,1983
48
228-2301
Campus life intoxicates
Jt's Saturday night and the darkened campus seems calm and peaceful when the
bus rolls into the stop. The passengers
including the usual studious types headed
for Sedgewick library, file out. From the
back of the bus emerges a youthful looking
group taking long, calculated drags on their
cigarettes. They make a pretentious exit with
their Sony Walkmans at a volume which allows
anyone within five feet to hear the thrashing
sounds of AC/DC.
The group walks over to
SUB and staggers past the
aquatic centre, yelling
obscenities to people walking
by. Inside SUB, the atmosphere is anything but
peaceful. Members of the
"back-of-the-bus-crowd" are
coming out of the woodwork.
Some head downstairs to The
Pit, drawn by the sounds of
dance music and the thought
of alcohol. Others are on their
way upstairs where a dance
and beer garden is under way
in the ballroom and partyroom.
A similar scene is taking
place on the other side of the
campus. In Totem Park the
weekly mixer is going strong as
the engineers on the security
force watch warily. Over on
fraternity row, cars screech
down the dimly-lit street while
party sounds emanate from
the fraternity walls.
I
-t was outside one of these
fraternities on Sept. 17 that
David, a fourth year arts student, felt the sharp edge of a
broken beer bottle cut his face.
His drunken attackers were
from off campus and attacked
David unprovoked.
The attack almost took
David's life and left him
severely injured.
• his saliva duct was
severed, forcing saliva to pour
out the side of his face. To eat,
David must insert a drainage
tube in his cheek. This injury
could be permanent.
• serious cuts were inflicted
near one of David's eyes, a
millimetre from his iris which
would have blinded him if
damaged. His vision was
blurry in the period after the
assault.
• David's chewing muscle
was torn, preventing him from
eating solid foods.
• his face was lacerated
scarring him for at least a
year.
But David is at ease when he
discusses his injuries.
"Everything should be back
to normal in a month," he
says, still wondering why he
was attacked.
Duncan Chappell, head of
the Simon Fraser University
criminology department, says
David's case is unusual for a
campus.
"It does sound to me a
rather ugly incident and not
one typical of campus
violence," he says.
Chappell acknowledges a
strong connection between the
consumption of alcohol and
violence. Eighty per cent of all
violent crimes fall in to the
assault category and well over
half the assault cases are
alcohol related, says Chappell.
"There is no doubt that
alcohol is a substance that
leads people to violence-
producing situations."
Alcohol is not the only
reason for campus violence,
Chappell says. People from
off-campus who display "antagonism to those who seem
more fortunate" could be
another factor, he says.
Chapell says the current
economic situation could lead
to disturbing trends in alcohol-
related violence.
"There does seem to be
some evidence that in times of
economic hardship and
restraint, violence in certain
contexts increases," he says.
D
ave Kelly, a member of
the Delta Kapa Epsilon Fraternity (Dekes), was at the fraternity party David attended
before the assault. Kelly had
no knowledge of the incident
until the incident was reported
in The Ubyssey. But he is well
aware that off-campus people
often drift into his group's
functions.
"There's always one or two
people coming to look for a
fight," he says.
"I haven't seen a fraternity
party yet that wasn't covered
with people from off-campus.
It totally mystifies me how
they find out."
These people try to take advantage of the fraternities and
cause trouble says Kelly. In
three incidents outside Deke
House a RCMP car had its
tires slashed, a barrier was
broken at the end of the street,
and broken beer bottles were
left strewn on the lawns, he
says.
"We're absolutely sure that
those incident were caused by
people from off-campus but
we're blamed for everything."
Constable Doug Wells from
the university RCMP detach-
But university community
attempts to control violence
ment also suggests that outsiders are the cause of much of
the physical violence and vandalism on campus.
"Non-students make it
rough for everyone. The UBC
students are the innocent ones,
it's the outsiders that initiate
it."
Much of the trouble stems
from consumption of alcohol,
Wells agrees, as another constable carts away a large cache
of beer. Most of the RCMP
exhibits rooms are used to
store confiscated liquor, says
Wells. Some fraternities lost
their liquor licenses for breaking fire marshall rules and
allowing too many people into
their parties, he adds.
The Dekes were one of these
fraternities. Their license was
taken away last June after a
party attracted 600 people,
well over the fire marshall's
limit of 125.
Kelly says the fraternity has
the right to hold large parties
and strongly objects to the
suggestion that drinking is excessive at these affairs.
Kelly is critical of the campus RCMP for their enforcement of rules concerning liquor and overcrowding which
led to the loss of their license
— effectively banning parties
in Deke House for six months.
"We  broke  rules   we  don't
By CHRIS WONG
agree with," he says.
The RCMP is turning the
campus into "a sort of police-
governed state," charges Kelly. Parties which go on late are
shutdown, he says. He noted
one recent incident where two
fraternity members were
charged with drinking in
public for walking down the
street with cases of beer in
their arms.
Wells says liquor is not seized unless bottles are open or if
the liquor is openly consumed.
He adds the RCMP has not
been severe on the Fraternities
and the fire marshall's rules on
overcrowding    were    clearly
See page 2: OUTSIDERS Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 7, 1983
Outsiders attracted
From page 1
known by the Dekes. "This
guy's full of b.s. because they
knew the stipulations when
they were given a license."
"What the hell do they (the
RCMP) think this is? This
isn't a church, and it isn't and
anti-alcohol university," Kelly
says. He says cases like
David's beer bottle attack will
inevitably occur alongside the
fun. "You have to accept that
something's probably going to
happen.    You   can't   expect
Charlebois sees a need for
students to let out their
energies and frustrations
resulting from the pressure of
first year.
"There's a lot of adjustment. During that adjustment
people find alcohol as an alternative," he says.
But vandalism is the main
problem in Totem, says
Charlebois.
Housing facilities manager
Ken Simpson said last year's
vandalism  bill  for the three
%p>
BEER...stocking up for the weekend in The Pit.
everything   to   go   exactly
right."
I
b.n residence a three person
standards committee allocates
punishment to those who
break the rules. Offenders are
either given a damage bill or
evicted.
According to Dave
Charlebois, a senior advisor in
Haida House in Totem Park,
about five eviction notices
from Totem are handed out
each year. Totem is the
residence with the most conflict on campus, says
Charlebois. This is because
most residents in Totem are in
first and second year, he says.
"They're just not as
mature. A lot of them are finding out excess drinking is a
lot of fun."
campus residences was
$32,521. $20,309 of this is attributable to Totem Park, he
says. "Totem Park is bordering on the unacceptable."
The damage usually results
from alcohol-related incidents. One reason for the
high vandalism at Totem is the
layout of the residence — 1250
students live in six houses.
Vanier's layout (1000
students in ten houses) creates
less conflict, Simpson says.
Charlebois says a constant
attitude of aggresion is shown
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by many people in residence.
Kicked-in doors, carved-up
desks, and general defacement
of property are common, he
says.
Physical violence is contained because of the stringent
rules, says Charlebois. "It
happens no more frequently
than at the Pit." Events like
alcohol awareness week (Oct.
10-15) and mid-terms ease
alcohol problems, he adds.
P
it and Gallery Lounge
manager Patrick Chapman
does not think his drinking
establishments are contributing to alcohol problems
on campus. "We're not here
to make alcoholics out of
students," he says.
He admits alcohol "brings
out the worst in people," but
he says violence is not a problem in The Pit because of the
tight security system. It is
licensed for 400 people, but
the maximum allowed in is
350, he says.
The typical Pit conflict is a
shouting match, he says. But
violence erupts on occasions.
"There's no pattern to it.
Even a full moon effects
business. People get a little
crazy."
In a summer student council
meeting, Alma Mater Society
President Mitch Hetman
presented an idea for expanding drinking outlets.
Chapman says the proposal
to start a new pub-style bar in
SUB is not going ahead, even
though UBC has fewer drinking outlets than other campuses.
But a pub could be constructed in the Barn, Chapman
says. This would not be a reaction to increased demand for
more drinking outlets, he says,
but a provision for increased
convenience.
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
University hiring freeze extended
By STEPHEN WISENTHAL
The hiring freeze at UBC will be
continued indefinitely to help keep
the budget shortfall below $4
million, administration president
George Pedersen said Thursday.
The freeze prohibits the hiring of
new professors, teaching assistants
and support staff.
"Only in exceptional cases will it
be possible to hire people to fill
vacancies, Pedersen said.
The freeze is necessary to balance
the university's budget by April
1984, he said.
Chemistry head Larry Weiler said
his department cannot cope with
the larger number of students in the
undergraduate labs if the number of
teaching assistants is not increased.
There ar 605 more students taking labs this year than there were
two years ago, he said. A ratio of
one teaching assistant to 16 students
is necessary for the students' safety,
Weiler said.
"Based on that, we're short 38
TA units," he said.
TA hours from the second term
are already being used to ease the
present shortage, he said.
The political science department
has the same number of professors
as it did in 1977, but enrolment is 40
per cent higher, political science
head Kal Holsti said.
Three or four teaching assistants
have been lost over the same time,
he said.
"We've had to abolish discussion
groups and tutorials. And we had
two members retire in July," he
said.
"Unless we replace them, we are
in serious trouble."
In the applied science faculty
positions cannot be filled because
designated funds have not come
through.
The money earmarked for
engineering programmes has not ar
rived from the provincial government for the fiscal year which began
on July 1, said applied science
associate dean Axel Meisen.
He said the department will have
to make a special presentation to
university officials to obtain funds.
There are about six faculty positions that need to be filled, he said,
adding   they   already   have   two
Funding forces
program cuts
By SARAH COX
Some departments and programs
may be offered at only one B.C.
university if funding continues to be
slashed, says the UBC and Simon
Fraser University presidents.
The initiative for such a move
could come from a Provincial Planning Project, which will be examining ways to preserve the quality of
B.C. universities despite shrinking
resources say the presidents.
SFU president William Sayweil
said Sept. 30 the amalgamation of
programs such as graduate studies
may be viewed by the committee as
the only answer to the universities'
financial constraints.
"That would be very, very unfortunate," he said.
"But if we don't get adequate
funding there really is going to be
only one alternative."
UBC president George Pederson
said universities may be "forced into the position" of cutting entire
programs or departments in order
to centralize programs at one
university.
"We may well want to enter into
some cooperative agreement with
the other universities. We have to
recognize that not all programs get
the same level of demand from
students," he said.
Planning project manager Ken
Strand said recommendations will
be made to the universities after the
project is completed by the end of
1984.
"The project isn't going to
generate any blueprint that forces
individual universities into a
mold," he said.
Each university has a representative on the project, as do the
Universities Council of B.C. and
the universities ministry, he said.
The final decision on how to administer cuts will be made by the
universities in consultation with
UCBC, Strand said.
"I'm not suddenly to become the
Czar of the university system," he
said.
Although Sayweil has expressed
concern over a possible loss of
autonomy for B.C. universities,
Pederson does not think this is likely-
"I don't think there's any greater
risk to a university's loss of
autonomy than there has been all
along," he said.
But UCBC secretary Lee
Southern said some loss of
autonomy is inevitable.
"Everybody has given up a little
bit of autonomy to come together
and look at this matter," he said.
Southern said the idea for the
project had arisen before the recent
announcement of a possible five per
cent decrease in university funding
for next year.
"But the fact that we have less
money force things along faster,"
he said.
Natives 'tee biased'
SASKATOON (CUP) — The native community has sharply
criticized provincial government claims to consolidate adult native
education and employment programs.
The government wants control over the programs put into the
hands of white bureaucrats, says Dell Anaquod, Saskatchewan
Federated Indian College president.
Anaquod admits some programs administered by native people are
mismanaged, but insists the government should not continue with
plans to cut these programs. The government claims they duplicate
similar federally-run programs.
"They want to help Indian people, but don't want to give them
the money and the resources to do it themselves," he said.
High administration costs, lack of co-ordination and unclear objectives were cited as reasons to axe some programs by Colin Maxwell, advanced education and manpower minister.
But Anaquod says the administration savings will not be worth the
damage native education will suffer if control is taken away from the
native community.
He compared the situation to a previous move where the provincial government hired white people to upgrade the curriculum of Indian courses because "Indian people are too biased to write Indian
history."
"I hope you can see the irony there," said Anaquod.
unreplaced retirements.
The mining department is down
to one secretary due to staff retirement, he added.
The engineering faculty has been
able to run all of its labs, this term
but they expect a "very definite
need to have additional people in
the   next   term,"   he   said.
Arts dean Robert Will said the
freeze will affect standards at UBC.
. "You can't have a 15 per cent
(enrollment) increase without some
problems." "We should do
everything absolutely possible to
maintain standards," said Will.
"If faculty have to do more servicing of (highly enrolled) courses
they are going to have to spend less
time on research," he said.
— neil lucente photo
MASSES CONVERGE AT SUB plaza to repent sins and give generously, all to gentle, hypnotic humming of
Reverend George, Son of Peter. Money will be used to build paradise on Earth, just West of Blanca, he conned
innocent into believing. To show devotion to Word according zo George, hundreds ran from downtown hospital
back to Promised Land.
Council debated CFS solidarity
By STEPHEN WISENTHAL
Council discussed Wednesday
whether they would go ahead with
plans for an Oct. 13 special general
meeting.
Some council members were enthusiastic about holding an AMS
meeting directly after a Campus
Community Alliance Rally.
But other people felt that holding
a rally and general meeting so closely together «'ere against AMS bylaws and that arrangements for the
rally also contravened bylaws.
The announcement of the
meeting wasn't posted the required
14 days in advance and the vice-
president's signature was not obtained for publicity or advertising,
said Science representative Brad
Waugh.
A motion to postpone the special
general meeting for two weeks but
support the rally on the 13th was
defeated.
Council also voted to write an
"unbiased" pamphlet based on a
handbill already produced by external affairs coordinator Lisa Hebert.
The pamphlet will be distributed at
a SUB booth today and Thursday.
Council had previously voted
against a booth asked for by the ex
ternal   affairs  committee  for  the
same two days.
The Engineers undergraduate
society was given $2,800 to rectify a
council error.
Council neglected to notify the
Board of Governers of last year's $4
per member fee increse voted on the
EUS, so the fee wasn't collected.
Council Briefs
As the engineers had planned to
use the money to help repay a loan
from student council, the members
decided to pay for this year's fourth
year engineers and lev)' an extra $4
on next year's second to fourth year
engineering students geers.
The financially minded council
members explained that it was
cheaper to pay the money than pay
interest on $7,200 loan for four
years.
The possible closure of SUB during Dec. for asbestos removal was
also discussed.
Board   of   governors   represen
tative Dave Frank complained that
the Bank of Montral has more influence in the timing of the removal
by physical plant than the AMS
does.
A $1.2 million renovation to the
area under SUB plaza was also
discussed. The renovations can be
started by January and finished by
June, said Michael Kingsmill, the
architect in charge of the project.
Plans include shops, club space,
space for photosoc and possibly a
wheelchair ramp for the plaza.
"We'd like to promote this very
heavily over the next month," said
Capital projects acquisition committee spokesperson, Dave Frank.
Delegates for both the national
Candian Federation of Students
conference and non-CFS meeting at
the University of Toronto are Barb
Irwin and Michael Ramesh.
Council decided to send two
delegates instead of three.
The money will come from
$2,577 budgeted for sending three
people to only the CFS conference
and any excess will be covered by
council's contingency fund. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 7, 1983
Cafeteria poisons John
HAMILTON (CUP) — At 3
a.m. Sept. 14, John Brown was
afraid to move.
"The pain in my abdomen was so
excrutiating, I was afraid I had ripped something open."
The same morning Bob was suffering from horrible cramps, diarrhea and a high temperature.
"My first thought was that I had
the flu because this is the season for
it."
Students at McMaster University
suspect food poisoning caused these
and other less severe cases at the
residence cafeteria.
Most of the afflicted students had
dinner at the cafeteria the afternoon
of Sept. 13 but their symptoms only
showed up later that night.
Bob, a second year anthropology
student, called for action on the incident in a letter to the student
newspaper, the Silhouette. "My
main concern is why weren't
students alerted, and why wasn't
this reported to the local health
unit?"
Stan who also asked to have real
name withheld was among the first
who went to Health Services. He
said he asked the doctor three times
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if other people had come in with the
same problem.
"I don't know if he didn't hear
me right but he just kind of laughed
and shrugged his shoulders."
"After the exam, I asked the
nurse the same thing and she said
'Yes, quite a few cases.' "
According to Bob, the doctor
who examined him said, "It's probably the food."
After talking with several people
about it, Brown decided to make his
own investigation.
"People were coming up to me
and saying 'I heard about what happened to you, I eat at (residence)
to,' and they were really worried
even though they hadn't been sick,'
he said.
According to Brown, Health Services said it was probably just
localized cases suggesting contamination, not food poisoning.
Bob, Stan and others are demanding an investigation.
"If no one else is going to get to
the bottom of this, I am for sure,"
said Brown.
Brown said residence students
have no choice but to go on a food
plan and should know what they are
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risking. "We should have a
guarantee this won't happen
again," he said.
A similar incident  occurred at
McMaster in 1977.
PANGO PANGO (UNS) — Hairy
puce blorgs gathered in the
thousands yesterday to welcome
home three long lost fellow blorgs
who had been marooned for five
days on Bora Bora. The wind and
rain allegedly ran wild on Bora
Bora, and the three came back with
numbed minds. Despite continuous
attempts by the Bora Borans to
bribe the three brave blorgs into
defecting, they refused and finally
escaped and swam back to Pango
Pango. Thousands celebrated National Puce Day by warming up to
the three along a five mile parade
route, the Daily Blah described the
event as typical. Said one of the
liberated blorgs: "I Deserve a
reward for this A title, any title, will
do."
Interested In Management Consulting?
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preferably with backgrounds in business administration,
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implementation of management information systems
for both large and small businesses. Submit your personal resume (UPCA form is suitable) by October 21st
to the Canada Employment Centre on Campus, Brock
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All resumes will be acknowledged. You will be contacted the week of November 7th regarding interviews.
Additional information is available at the UBC Canada
Employment Centre.
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BOO PUKE Friday, October 7, 1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Activists to be spyed on by chief
OTTAWA (CUP) — An advertisement placed for a "chief investigator" who would use "intelligence gathering methods" to
keep tabs on campus political activity has embarrassed University of
Ottawa administrators.
The ad, placed under job opportunities in the Ottawa Citizen,
sought an investigator to "be
responsible for protecting the
population and the property of the
University against criminal offences, particularly those which are
politically motivated."
The person would have "to maintain a thorough knowledge of the
current political environment on
campus by interacting regularly
with students ... as well as with
police forces and agencies."
Qualifications listed included
"several years' experience as an investigator, with at least one year in
an intelligence unit."
Vice-Rector Pierre Bourgault
said the ad was drafted by the personnel and security departments.
"We didn't see it," he said.
He said the new security position
was created, in part to combat the
increase of theft and vandalism on
campus, but the investigator would
also "be more sensitive to the personal problems."
Political   conflicts   abroad
— neil lucente photo
OUCH 200201, Big Brother just shet me in bee-hind says prole on right. Fascinated ignorant masses cheered
two proles who were niavely trying to escape bondage of everday existence in world controlled by omnipresent
state. 200201 and 300349 want to escape to state of nature where their lives can be solitary, poor, nasty, brutish
and short but where they will be free. Proles of world unite, you have nothing to lose but your batons.
Education no longer a right
By FRANCES LEW
Provincial government legislation
is destroying the right to an education, says the B.C. Teachers
Federation president.
"Our society believes every child
is entitled to have grade 12 as a
basic level of education," Larry
Kuehn said Wednesday at a public
meeting at Templeton School.
"Along with that came the
assumption that every person who
finished grade 12 also had the right
to go on to some form of post
secondary education," he said.
"We saw the expansion of
universities in our province in the
'60s and the growth of colleges in
the '70s," said Kuehn. "The
natural extension of this is the belief
that every child has a right to an
education," he said.
"But now, what we see in this
province is a fundamental break
with that belief."
There will be a 25 per cent reduction in funding for schools in the
next three years if Bill 6 is passed,
said Kuehn. This would increase
the pupil-teacher ratio, decrease
secondary school electives, and
stimulate drop-outs, he added.
"There will be 3,000 fewer
teachers in the school system in
1987 than there are now, and that's
on top of more than 1,000 positions
that were lost last year," Kuehn
said.
"We can expect more loss of
counsellors and special needs aides
who assist disabled students," he
added.
There will also be fewer librarians
and administrators, said Kuehn.
The Vancouver School Board
predicts that, under the budget
they've been given, in three years
they'll have 25 principals for their
75 elementary schools, he said.
The loss of talented teachers will
grow as teaching becomes an increasingly unattractive career,
Kuehn said.
"As classes get larger, support
systems drop off, and the message
from  society becomes more and
more explicit that what teachers do
is not valued. More people will say
teaching simply isn't a job that can
be adequately done under these
conditions," he said.
"We've already seen the loss of
young teachers who provide a kind
of balance and energy to the
system."
"We have between seven and
eight thousand unemployed
teachers in this province now, and
in another three years we'll have
lost a whole generation of people
who would have come into the
system and provided the energy and
dynamism that is needed."
President kicked out
Alma Mater Society president Mitch Hetman was asked to leave midway through last weekend's leadership conference at Camp Potlatch near
Squamish.
Conference chairperson Robyn Hunter asked Hetman and two
members of the mechanical engineers' club, Maurice Duteau and Glen
Cosma, to leave the island retreat after the trio went off on a joyride with a
boat that was only to be used for leaving camp for the mainland.
Hetman had just led a seminar on Robert's Rules of Order when he
and the other two took of on the three hour boat ride.
The camp manager and owner of the boat noticed the vessel's absence
and alerted the authorities.
The president and his cohorts returned to a shoreline welcoming committee which included members of the Squamish RCMP, who did not press
charges.
After a dressing down by Hunter, the trio reboarded the boat which
was then restored to its rightful purpose — assisting those leaving the
island.
sometimes cause conflict closer to
home, he said, referring to last
year's confrontation between the
Jewish Students' Union and the
Students' Federation.
The Central Co-ordinating Committee of the federation had condemned Zionism as a form of
racism and the JSU complained
that it was denied recognition and
access to facilities in the university
centre. All CCC members were later
impeached.
University Rector Roger Guin-
don said he wanted to prevent such
"nasty" friction between different
groups developing again.
"The main purpose of the individual is to protect the political
freedom of people who would want
to engage in any legitimate type of
political activity," said Etourgault.
But  he said  "there  is  nothing
covert at all" about the ad.
"You have to realize that
sometimes people who draft these
ads don't have PhD's in English
and French," said Guindon.
'I can understand how our
students could read that and feel
betrayed," he said.
Student federation president Tim
Evans said there is no need for such
a position. "The way it's worded
leads one to believe that the university is trying to establish some sort
of intelligence. It is outrageous," he
said.
Evans said the Students' Federation will try to ensure such a person
is not hired. "We want a very
precise definition of this person's
job description."
A new ad will appear soon that
"will better reflect the intent of the
job," said Bourgault.
Modern science
resembles cult
By CHARLIE FIDELMAN
"Big modern science" in today's
society has many properties of a
cult, a UBC physics professor said
Thursday.
There are many "whimsical"
comparisons between past and present "cults," Erich Vogt, director
of the Tri-University Meson Facility
(TRIUMF), told 200 people at Robson Square Media Centre.
Stone Circles, Stonehenge, and
Gothic cathedrals are examples of
past European "cults," he said,
whereas modern science's space
probes, satellites, and telescopes
reveal a new type of cult.
"We have our own cathedral at
UBC — TRIUMF," said Vogt.
TRIUMF contains the world's
largest cyclotron, he added.
Many of the properties of cults
are also shared by the scientific
community, said Vogt. A cult must
contain a major idea that stimulates
the imagination, as must a scientific
theory, he said. It must also occur
in an amiable climate of other
ideas, as did the Theory of Relativity, Vogt said.
Cults also require a large number
of fanatic adherents, Vogt said, and
modern science relies on zealous,
workaholic scientists. They also
have initiation rites (obtaining a
Ph.D.) and a special jargon
(mathematics), he added.
"And lastly, the cult must have a
major impact on society," said
Vogt. He used the example of
TRIUMF to illustrate his point.
"One of the spinoffs from the
cyclotron is the time projection
chamber," he said.
The TPC is an enormous camera
that photographs thousands of consecutive pictures of the breakup of
electrons, said Vogt. It was inspired
by scientists wanting to know how
the sub-atomic particle Muon
works, he said.
The benefit for society from this
technical development is the PET
scanner, which shows pictures of
electrical activity in the human
brain during particular mental activities, Vogt said.
But science is also relevant simply
because it raises the public's general
understanding of their environment, said Vogt.
Redistribution
UBC president George Pedersen
told the board of governors Thursday that a committee has been set
up to examine the possible
redistribution .of classes during the
week.
Some of the buildings currently
being used for classes on campus
are in such disrepair that they
deserve to be demolished, Pedersen
said.
Students might have to accept
undesirable class times in the future
in order to empty some of those
buildings, he said.
Pedersen also updated board
members on the ongoing efforts of
the university in discussing its needs
with the government, the public and
the private business sector.
Two board members will be
meeting with Provincial Treasury
members to discuss an expected five
per cent decrese in university
operating grants for next year,
Pedersen told the board.
Pedersen also expressed concerns
about security for the newly
renovated board room, which contains $2 million worth of artwork.
Chem lab funded
Funds for a cancelled Chemistry
103 laboratory have been found, according to administration president
George Pedersen.
Pedersen said Thursday the forty
students affected by the cancelled
lab will be "looked after". But he
Major survey
WINNIPEG (CUP) — The
University of Manitoba Students'
Union plans to conduct a major
sexual harrassment survey next
month and use the results to push
for a grievance procedure.
The survey will be "one of the
most comprehensive surveys ever
given to students' on sexual harrassment," said Manuela Dias, UMSU
sexual harrassment/assault researcher. She said more than 1,500
students will participate.      "    ** ~
added they may have some difficulty catching up with already four
weeks of classes completed.
Margaret Copping, student
Board of Governors representative
said $5,000 was made available to
finance the lab. She said the decision to allocate the money was a
response to student protests against
the lab cancellation.
"If the students had just laid
down and taken it, it (funding the
lab) wouldn't have happened."
In their Thursday meeting the
board gave approval to financing
the lab, Copping said.
Students enrolled in the course
were told Sept. 27 the lab would be
cancelled, after final course change
date. The course is a prerequisite
for courses in Home Economics,
Dental Hygiene, and Rehabilitation
^IvTetfitnTieT"'"
Wi --*.»J» m*r*   ,» mi Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 7, 1983
CFS tables limitations
TORONTO (CUP) — Canada's
student organizations should not
debate abortion, the arms race,
nuclear energy and other non-
student issues, says the University
of Western Ontario student council.
But a motion to limit what issues
should be discussed by the Ontario
region of the Canadian Federation
of Students was tabled until the
region's next conference in
January.
The proposal met with strong opposition and sparked a long, emotional debate on the nature and purpose of the Canadian student movement.
"It's   fine   to   say   you're   for
WINDSOR (CUP) — Criminal gangs are using the threat of
violence to extort money from foreign students at Ontario universities and colleges, a police investigator said here recently.
George Crowley of the Metropolitan Toronto police said the
criminal gangs, known as "Triads", and their victims are mainly
from Hong Kong. The gangs threaten visa students and often their
families in Canada or China with violence if they do not pay "protection" money.
Crowley and Yau Pat, another member of the Toronto police,
were in Windsor to warn students of the existence of the protection
rackets.
Pat urged foreign students receiving threats from gangs to contact
police. Visa students have the same right to police protection as
Canadian citizens and landed immigrants, he said.
Ken Long, University of Windsor dean of students, said the Triads
are "a threat to the university environment." Fear of extortion could
drive a student away from school, Long said.
Crowley said courts in Windsor and Toronto are currently hearing
cases arising from charges of extortion involving visa students and
Triads.
W^^
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Vines
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ubc^°ra
DOOR^E*
PRODUCED BY BARB BENESH FOR A.MS SPECIAL EVENTS
thurs. October 13, 7pm door    8pm show
sub ballroom,      u.b.c.
advance tickets^   $6   at   above   mentioned   stores
& ams  box  office
Arms race got you down?
Join   The  Ubyssey  and  blow  your  mind
writing explosive news stories. MIRV on up
to   our   silo,   SUB   241k.   Your   student
nukespaper needs you. (P.S.—PEACE)
nuclear disarmament, but it doesn't
affect students directly." said
UWO representative Ross
Marowits.
"Things like housing directly affect them (students) and nuclear
disarmament is something that's
not going to be resolved, so why
waste time discussing it?"
The federation should discuss accessibility to post secondary education, cutbacks in research funding,
foreign students' problems and student aid, he said.
But Cathy Laurier, president of
the University of Toronto's
graduate student union, said it was
impossible to isolate issues of
general social concern from those
affecting students directly.
The same conference easily passed a motion calling for the resignation of Sally Barnes, chairperson of
the Ontario Advisory Council on
the Status of Women, for not supporting the concept of "equal work
for equal value," a committment to
narrow the wage gap between men
and women.
"We're not just students as people shut off in the confines of post
secondary institutions. We're also
students as members of society,"
Laurier said. Military spending
diverts money away from education, and issues such as abortion
also affect students, she added.
Two motions on abortion were
the source of fierce debate at past
conferences. In 1975, students called for the removal of abortion from
the criminal code, and amnesty for
abortion activist Dr. Henry
Morganthaler. A 1983 motion called for free-standing abortion
clinics, and free abortion counselling at post secondary institutions.
First Lady Coiffures - Elio of Rome^
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We're open at 7 for haircare.
MEN & WOMEN
f      RELAX WITH ORIENTAL
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/       $20 25% off students
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4554 W. 10th Ave.  224-5636
NOTICE OF ANNUAL
GENERAL MEETING
Graduate Student Society
The annual General Meeting of the Graduate Society will reconvene on Friday, October 14th at 4:30 p.m. in the dining room of the Graduate Student
Center.
AGENDA:
1. Approval of the Annual financial Statements
2. Constitutional Amendments:
By-law i. Interpretation and Defimlions:
add t) "A.M.S. means Ihe Alma Malor Society of ihe I'lmersilv"
Bv-law 5. Council.
2a) iv. The Graduate Students' representatives on the Studeni < ouncil ot
the A.M.S." (provides for (heir drect election)
By-law 8. Departmental Organization:
Delete 2. 3, and 4. (eliminates cumbersome procedure)
3. Elections: the position of the President; two representatives on A.M.S.
Council. Nominations for these positions close on October 12th. Forms are
available at the Graduate Student Center.
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
THE CECIL H. AND IDA GREEN
VISITING PROFESSORSHIPS
1983 Autumn Lectures
BRIAN SIMON
Brian Simon, professor emeritus of the University of Leicester, is a leading authority on the history and
theory of modern education. His historical, political and psychological studies of education, particularly his work on the education system in Britain, are considered milestones in the field of educational
history. Professor Simon is the author of such well-known works as Intelligence Testing and the Comprehensive School, Studies in the History of Education and the Half-way There report on British educational policy.
CAN EDUCATION CHANCE SOCIETY?
Tuesday, October 11
In Room 100, Neville Scarfe Building, at 12:30 PM
THE HISTORY OF CONTEMPORARY EDUCATION: Problems, Methodologies and Techniques
Tuesday, October 11
In Seminar Room A/B, Ponderosa Annex G. at 3:30 PM
THE STATE AND EDUCATION IN ENGLAND AND NORTH AMERICA
Thursday, October 13
In Room 100, Neville Scarfe Building, at 12:30 PM
THE MODERN PRIMARY SCHOOL IN ACTION: New Research Methodologies
Thursday, October 20
In Room 100, Neville Scarfe Building, at 12:30 P.M
THE I.Q. CONTROVERSY: The Case of Cyril Burt
Saturday, October 22
In Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre,
at 8:15 PM (Vancouver Institute Lecture)
JOAN SIMON
Social historian Joan Simon has contributed to the improvement of educational practices in Britain,
chiefly through her writings on early modern education. Her book Education and Society in Tudor
England is considered the most authoritative survey of educational ideas and institutions of 16th century England. Mrs. Simon is equally well known for her current research in the field of early childhood
education and the history of childhood and the family.
THE HISTORICAL STUDY OF CHILDHOOD AND EDUCATION
Thursday, October 13
In the Penthouse, Buchanan Building, at 3:30 PM
THE HISTORY OF EDUCATION AS SOCIAL HISTORY
Tuesday, October 18
In Seminar Room A/B, Ponderosa Annex G, at 3:30-5:30 PM
NOTE: Brian and Joan Simon will present a lecture together downtown:
SOME CURRENT PRESSURES ON THE HISTORY OF EDUCATION
Friday, October 14
Room TBA, Holiday Inn Harbourside, at 3:30-4:50 PM
ALL LECTURES ARE FREE — PLEASE POST AND ANNOUNCE
Occasionally unadvertised seminars are presented.
Please call Mrs. R. Rumley at Local 5675 for information. Friday. October 7.1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Council Chooses
WINNIPEG (CUP) — The anti-
abortion League for Life gained the
membership of an entire University
of Manitoba college last week,
despite student protest.
The St. Paul's College student
council voted 5-4 in favor of joining.
"We wanted to bring some
human issues into the college," said
one councillor who voted to join.
The decision makes every councillor a member of the League for
Life, whether they supported the
motion or not, said several council
members.
Two councillors have threatened
to resign over the issue.
The intention of the motion is
"to convey the point that St. Paul's
is pro-life," said councillor Kevin
Bridges, the mover.
He said this was not an attempt to
enroll everyone at the college into
the League for Life, adding that
many members belong individually.
One councillor who opposed the
motion disagreed with Bridges, saying that St. Paul's council has a
mandate to speak and act on behalf
of the students at the college. By
speaking out as a council they are
speaking for the whole college, she
said.
St. Paul's Dean Professor
Williams said the motion was a
"good idea."
"I do not know of any students
who would admantly oppose this
move, because there is no conflict
between being a Roman Catholic
and a member of the League for
Life," he said.
"It (council) is not just representing Catholics at the college," said
Heather Steidle. "Are they trying to
separate the college into different
camps because of their religious affiliations?"
"This is a Roman Catholic college, and its allegiance is first and
foremost to the Roman Catholic
church," stated St. Paul's rector
Father Driscoll.' 'Therefore the college is committed to the teachings
of Christ and the Judeo-Christian
morality which says 'Thou shaft not
kill.* "
He explained that while college
membership is open to all students,
there are certain expectations of
those who join.
Steidle said when she applied for
membership to St. Paul's, she asked
whether being a non-Catholic
"would make a difference, and was
told it wouldn't."
"Now I know differently," she
said.
— neil lucente photo
"LOOK AT THAT poor sucker on cover of The Ubyssey," thinks unsuspecting victim of material starved
photog. "Imagine — being shown on pages of vile rag giving blood, I wouldn't wish that terrible fate on my
worst enemy," he says to himself. Little does he know that photo will get him contract with major modelling
agency and he will see the world and make millions in cold hard cash after his movie career takes off; then he will
become president of the actor's union and make a quick rise to president of the world's greatest democracy.
Smile, you could be on candid camera.
Weighted voting debated by CFS
Fees boycotted
TORONTO (CUP) — Large
schools may soon have a larger
voice than small schools in the affairs of Ontario's largest student
organization.
Delegates at a Sept. 22-25 conference of the Canadian Federation
of Students — Ontario directed the
executive to study a proposal to
base the vote of each institution on
its population.
The federation currently gives
one vote to each member institution, regardless of size.
The controversial plan sparked
heated debate, with most large institutions in favor while smaller
campuses objected.
But debate did not split large and
small schools exclusively. Guelph,
one of the bigger schools, opposed
weighted voting, while Fanshawe
and Humber Colleges supported it.
McMaster University delegate
Kathy Popleni said large institutions pay more for membership in
the federation, plus they represent
more students. She said weighted
voting would not significantly alter
the federation's decision-making
process, but the issue has symbolic
importance.
"It's mainly to bring back to
your campus that you are being
represented as a larger school,"
Popaleni said.
But Nancy O'Neill, a delegate
from Kingston's St. Lawrence College, argued the claim. "There are
19 colleges that would have one
vote each and there are six or seven
universities that would have 29 or
30 votes," she said. "They would
have the majority right there."
Cathy Laurier, a delegate from
the Graduate Student Union at the
University of Toronto, cautioned
against ignoring the interests of
small institutions.
"There's a perception among the
small institutions that the federation would not be meeting their
needs adequately," she said. "I
think it's important to take those
perceptions into account in
whatever system is ultimately
developed.
"All institutions should feel the
federation can meet their needs."
Ontario is not the only region in
CFS where weighted voting is an
issue. The University of B.C. says it
will not run a referendum to join
the federation unless it gets more
votes, even though weighted voting
is illegal under the society's act.
In other business, delegates voted
to establish a committee to help
make the federation's actions more
effective.
The four-member standing campaign committee was struck in the
conference's final hours. It will
"make sure all the directions which
the campaign outlines are in fact
met," said the committee's new
chair, John Marcoccio of Toronto's
Humber College.
"In the past, because of the
workload of the executive, it has
been very difficult to implement
campaigns, and as a result they've
been rather weak," Marcoccio said.
WINNIPEG (CUP) — University
of Winnipeg students are being urged by their student union to refuse
to pay extra "incidental" tuition
fees.
The extra fees — $60 for full-time
arts students and $180 for science
students — push this year's total
tuition fee increase to well above
the provincial government's 9.5 per
cent guidelines.
The university administration will
not penalize students who refuse
payment, says student union president Shelly Munro. "Students who
are with us on this have already
been registered with no problems,"
she said, explaining they will simply
refuse to pay a portion of their tuition fee installment next term.
"If they kick out any students
who haven't paid their incidental
fees, we are prepared lo stage sit-
ins, marches on the legislature or
whatever it takes to get action,"
said  Loris  Dumanian,  a  student
union executive.
University president Robin Far-
quhar said incidental fees do not affect basic tuition costs, but are
necessary of offset photocopying
and labor costs.
The extra fees are an excuse for
"providing the university with
another means of tapping students'
limited resources," said Munro.
Meanwhile, science students at
the University of Toronto will not
vote on a $20 incidental fee this year
because the students' union refuses
to run a referendum.
A proposal to charge the $20 lab
fee was withdrawn under student
pressure last spring, but was reintroduced by the faculty this
month with a provision for a student referendum on the issue.
Similar incidental fees have been
introduced at York, Carleton and
McMaster universities and in the
faculties or engineering and
medicine at the U of T.
More UBC women harassed
Pesticides dangerous
Humans are being used as guinea
pigs to test the effects of pesticides,
an environmentalist said Tuesday.
"It is the age of human experimentation. We are all guinea
pigs," said Thelma McAdam,
pesticide chairman for the Society
for Promoting Environment Conservation.
She told people at a graduate
student centre discussion that many
are unaware they could be in recently sprayed buildings, and might not
connect symptoms they experience
to pesticides.
"It is really hard to know when a
building has been routinely
sprayed," she said. "There are doctors who feel that many of the flu
epidemics we have are from spraying."
McAdam warned people about
the cumulative effects of pesticide
exposure.
"You're not only creating a
resilient super-bug, but in the meanwhile you're poisoning your
people," she said.
McAdam supports federal environment minister Charles
Caccia's proposal for a super agency to control the use of pesticides in
Canada. The current policy of leaving pesticide control to the department of agriculture is contradictory
because the department is a major
user of pesticides, she said.
"That's a little too much like the
bank-robber guarding the bank,"
she said.
By VICTOR WONG
Two more women have been sexually harassed in the UBC Main
library stacks.
Both incidents involved a man
who accosted students working
alone on level two and exposed
himself.
Acting head librarian Bill Watson
said the two incidents were reported
Sept. 28 and Oct. 4, bringing the
total number of Main library complaints to four. A separate incident
involving someone of a different
description was reported in
Sedgewick library.
All four Main library attacks occurred during the daytime, he said.
Watson blamed the poor lighting in
the Main stacks for this year's increase in harassment.
"Some parts of the main stacks
are dark at all times, and there are
other places where very little
sunlight gets through," he said.
Watson said there were general
similarities between the flashers
described in all four Main library
attacks. The description is of a
white male, about 5*10", with a
slim build, light brown hair and a
jaw-line beard.
The flasher in the Sedgewick incident was described as a tall, white
male, about 40 to 50 years of age,
with dark brown Jiair, thick-
rimmed dark brown glasses and
wearing a grey three-piece suit.
Neither of the last two attacks
were reported to the RCMP or the
women's students office, said
spokespeople from both places.
Watson confirmed neither attack  was reported.
"There's no use in reporting
them if we can't get his description
pinned down," he said. "Once it's
reported, it just becomes a statistic
to the police that's of no use to
them. I'd like to confront this person with someone who's been accosted. Then we would know for
sure."
CFS may be shot
EDMONTON (CUP) — Student union executive members at the
University of Alberta want to give the Canadian Federation of
Students a $94,000 shot in the arm by joining.
And they're hoping students will back them in the Oct. 21 referendum.
UASU president Robert Greenhil said the federation would be
beneficial for U of A students because there is strength in numbers.
"CFS can act more effectively on a national level than we can individually," he said.
Barbara Donaldson, UASU vice president academic, was also enthusiastic. She said CFS has proven its effectiveness by winning four
major concessions from the federal government:
• $50,000 more in the student job creation budget,
• increased weekly student loan allotments,
• an extended loan repayment period for the unemployed, up
from six months to 18 months,
• student loans for part-time students.
Although a council-funded committee has been formed to launch
a "Yes" campaign, no organized opposition has yet emerged.
If it does, it will receive funding equal to the "yes" committee, according to Donaldson. Page 8
THE   U BYSSEY
Friday, October 7, 1983
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^^veSldgltUsuf^ih
ter'a     nsvchic disturbance
a severe psvcn  ^utable
seemnal environment- s alsC
external en al pressu
Tttner ^^toata
«arp tne    cters, notary        isler,
°on humanity- 	
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.    ..^   her   agmg     f ^*** n   he        ln this way
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untrtOct.W
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man? , uVe^arlene; Sself or
fnetothing to improve^ ^
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the P>a>'   atRUmenl ,n   ;.heT takes
ding. Ans
school,^^1^^
notS°^ofthe^me" ^posing  a
quacies ot he IS  exp» c.
^'^tn^j^etobe
tUl Vuher Marlene°J patents.
fthSccessful and gojd fch   lbe
bo*Se   structure   w
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hieraS^agementtoW
ing-dass'       omen. .    qually
and men to* Leslie eq
rhurchm » 3^    .   ^or^ng ^
aim m lov J
piousness. T"|s vety muc» l'«
entertaining 4       Uon
Kit.
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vtfidsinanen person
rifttl  except *at ^   ctor1t
Beautiful, word that
milM<»sPoUe' , bad
luvJches. k in a
and    fless and brave- in tnc
are selfless a deT 1S ieiv
how much is
fiction
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p\ant avo\as»- _       ^
I    »^** presence be fett «      ^
1 iv bv wild
u   f-u not only W
I    *^-' presence be ^        -s talent.        fl
cheeISpLt came out. oU,
and bc
soared to aftetWe  ^-^S-?^
• =t«rm compare" ^,. ^1«L"PSUf«4'S£
Watching B^51011!^!- -^T-5S?.
Bta^l0r?jXtbePt°^ production)-             {suCb a uni^e ^ ^al^ « ^ fusion,
page newspaper ace.Mn^0mm th(j ^ent o        untested „-ath_tape   to                . t0 the
pae-ultimate expen                 Thls Wi          relatively             s the a          _   ^^  plugs  in ^^
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Coll^' *£ - maintaining -• -
two-hour set by     unfortunate tn
^drYlS;tVvar ^acting
Co^l  £ lms' only d««
material. «- hen  he   y
T,^   he Departure v        wdy
"the "uvtm10^ ""^a "system-   This
tne,   nn\Y>v   sound   sy one
and     Pnt cannot help but^ea^i
statement can wuh any
aPpT°tCTstepticism.
othr than sKep __
BraiOSrS»riStopherVVa*en
ST^Wood
apt^StanM
reduction- sucb a urn aUoW waiK- ^cvusiu^.
With the advent"        untested     ^ ealh-tape   w the
mism ss.«isB
ficent scene v -      t0 place     mediocre movie- Douglas
S toP) ^^fherself and admittedly,   ?^ the d^
T"e ..thoughtman J°_      TeCo - ^uU is faced ^ con
^-^imSexperi^     **^%«gZ$S«
n^ng.^tcber^t of-     ^   T^ ^ afterlife .
r.     „»fnrious  g°vc   .,nntinue     v        f om an i» .     . her 1S wa>
and compact p
,he audience- us\ng songs b"                                   was
* He teased the crow^^n old ^"£^&<^«&*.
h ohrases as Here             >t        Accent        shoW using     ^og
Viim take
—     ———"  1
in the play \ J\   w0men rang
H°mnnth century to ^lraveller,
Vh.%    a  Victorian  laJV        d in
iwd,   a    ■ dinner P^^tion to
meet at  a^      ,s promot^
honour of w*   managmg a T
tbehP°TopG^einplOVTn
of the TOP u, tne courage
CyBachwomanbasbadand
-IS   eSraordi^J-.as
s°m ?n of her times- But
Ihere she «n       hese 0thjs
been       o ot;on pos-
sacriftcesl u question P
This is the on        exernph«e«
edbyTopGfofMatleneandher
*e e^tmn   associates,   ^o.
-^is^^^
XSf^iT^
However,  ^     d lhe more <->
v. V a feminist, ana       difftcUtt "
but a    w   the more u ber
Joyce   «
■sS?S:S;« SSs^=5 'it-5SlS£
•S^sSS' ffisSSfe Sl£3?l":
Arthur   Millers cumulatw^e ^g^   requ^or gofS
SalCSmtded set ^ *^f2iety    ^^es Bven the stag cy Ttou       fedoes m ^
•s^sgsi. Sg£?S ;g^gg
a vehement au
pavmerrt J   where  a  man
house,   ana     llringmg up a
spends ^     ^ dead.	
is worth 5>^> 	
^OctoberW'    __
_—- """     Trt   a   sigh,
Thomas f6*^!orrnance as
Uf-;Ciy^:r^ms.
wtnan; only on infla^d o _s
can nSthos of his existence,
The pah,» hdght of confrdenc6
^^fdow^ntothedeptbs^^
t0lUir£ c^tsPeacockeas^g {Qf
SeCUSkett's stooges- w a,
t0 ? t   Each is never so. lo
Godot- ta     l00tang ^^ched a>
vben he »*        r so crushe
^etTat'somethingsee^^e
when   tte ■     i2-member
maSSSb t^^11^
B^edict C^^on as^one of
production esp
In li
eview Page 10
THE      UBYS5E-T
Friday, October7, 15S3
*,. %*»> -n<E «A-r£ PAYABLE »►*
SiVfcOJ^* wakK this Ma»rfH
IS.«
Budget battle
With the recent humiliating ejection and subsequent banishment
of opposition leader Dave Barrett from the B.C. legislature, the
Social Credit government has yet again shown its callous disregard
for and abuse of the parliamentary procedure.
As the Socreds continue to railroad controversial bill after bill
through the legislature, the opposition has made valiant, yet seemingly futile attempts to stop some of the more controversial legislation from being passed.
Unable to block passage, the NDP has taken the only avenue
left open to them through the parliamentary procedure — stalling
the passage process in the hope that the government might reconsider some of its more contentious bills.
The Socreds recieved barely half of the cast ballots in the last
election. But through the quirks of B.C.'s parliamentary system,
they have total legislative power and are using this to railroad an
extremely controversial legislative package.
This package by far exceeds their campaign promises in the May
election and their mandate as a government.
The Socreds arrogantly ignore attempts by the opposition, or any
other 'tyranny of the minority' to ease the necessary measures of
budgetary restraint and to oppose what clearly appears to be
repressive legislation, pitifully disquised as a budget.
A poor disguise, considering the houseful of clowns.
Peace prize
Back in the good ole' days, they knew how to pick 'em. Nobody
ever got a Noble Peace Prize 'less they'd done something real
peaceful-like. 'Cause the name says it all — this prize is about
peace.
Much as we like and admire Lech Walesa, we can't help but
think the two most worthy peacemakers were gleaned over. We're
speaking, of course, about those two great peace negotiators
Ronald Reagan and Yuri Andropov.
When they're not giving quotes to reporters about their respective peace-loving nations, they're off working hard talking about
arms reductions. In fact, they love peace so much that they are
both building more and more weapons to make sure it lasts.
Maranathas misrepresented and smeared
The Sept. 27 Ubyssey article concerning Maranatha (Maranathas
refused) alleges that they tried to
obtain lists of first year and international students in order to invite
them to a welcoming reception. The
article implies this is a bad thing.
Since,   however,   these   lists   are
available to some campus groups,
such as those without political or
religious agendas, Maranatha and
other religious and political groups
are classified "second class" campus clubs who cannot be trusted to
offer non-exploitative activities.
Since,  however,  Maranatha is a
campus club there is no reason why
they should not benefit from the
same sources of information as
other clubs.
Unfortunately, The Ubyssey
misrepresented the issue at stake.
Furthermore, the articles contain
misleading   and   emotionalistic
Council indifferent to bills
On October 5, I attended a student council meeting at which a
long debate concerning the merits
of holding a special general meeting
together with a rally took place.
There was an expressed fear that
only information which was not
"neutral" would be presented.
What is the nature of this "neutral
information"?. I understand that
there are Social Credit supporters
among Council, but as they repre-
Save my eyesight
The grey boxes in The Ubyssey
got to go. The small print on a grey
background is not the easiest thing
to read. But I read them, like many,
just in case the Ubyssey staff has
some profound experience.
In The Ubyssey's search for the
truth and anything else that looks
good, there should be interesting little tid bits that do not quite make it
to its hallow pages. Instead of printing a grey box with a bad joke inside it, use that space to print trivia.
You know, like what colour is the
Commerce jacket? Yecccch. In doing so, it will help remembering
UBC's glorious past and also save
my eyesight.
Jim Davies
applied science 1
Shocked and outraged
I am shocked and outraged that The Ubyssey is being used as a
medium for intra-departmental, administrative squabbling. I am
speaking in reference to the two letters to the Editor that appeared in
the Oct. 4 Ubyssey. (Campus cops' boss mad at troops and cops: no
'Mr. Nice Giiy'). One letter was written by the university's Director of
Traffic and Security, and the other had all the appearance of being
written by an employee of the same department.
The arguments presented in these letters were irrelevant and very
much out of place in a newspaper funded by student fees. I resent
having to supply money for paper and ink to print this rubbish. It is
definitely not the responsibility of the student body to provide
various administrative departments with an impromptu labour relations forum in which they may wage their labour-management battles.
Perhaps an apology is owed the students in this matter.
R. B. LeDrew
•■ '■■ ■' - ■ c     ;••-■•• ■, ,,,>,,. sciences
sent the interests of the students,
there is nothing they will find in this
budget legislation package that does
not harm us.
I challenge student council, or
any student for that matter, to
come forward with a single piece of
this legislation which helps students
in any way. On the contrary, those
Bills which harm students include
Bill 3 (curtailing Academic
Freedom, among other things), Bill
5 (cutting out the Office of the Rentalsman), Bill 19 (The Institute of
Technology Act), Bill 20 (The College and Institution Amendment
Act), Bill 24 (The Medical Services
Act), Bill 26 (The Employment
Standards Amendment Act) and
Bill 27 (Abolition of the Human
Rights Branch). There are also
budget cuts which will soon make it
more expensive to attend university,
which make less student aid
available, and decreases overall funding to the University. This affects
everything from labs to libraries,
and will make your classes larger
still. Altogether, your education
will greatly suffer for it.
Contrary to the indifference
towards their education which I
have sensed from some student
council members, I find hope in the
concern expressed by the union
members and church members of
the Campus Community Alliance.
Who cares?
Andre Sobolewski
Graduate Student
Chair of the UBC CAA
vocabulary. To use the phrase,
"recruiting techniques similar to
those of some cults," is not to communicate anything substantial
about Maranatha. People are apt to
associate this phrase with practices
of recruitment by exhaustion and or
economic labor exploitation
associated with groups such as Hare
Krishna and the Unification
Church. Maranatha is not guilty of
either of these things.
The article also states as fact that
Maranatha organized welcome
meetings in order to proselytize new
members with official university
support. This is not fact; it is the
opinion of Anglican and United
Church chaplain George Hermann-
son, who has no direct knowledge
of Maranatha's intentions.
The articles also charges Marantha with manipulating the university President and the Alma Mater
Society president for their own
ends. Certain evidence in the articles themselves indicate that the
job was difficult. President
Pedersen denied that he had been in
any way manipulated. Fortunately,
George Hermannson's personal
views rescued the articles' hidden
agendas and "proved" the case
against Maranatha.
The Ubyssey has smeared
Maranatha by editorializing a news
story. By doing so it has accomplished the result, (unintended I
hope,) of holding Marantha's
Christian faith up to public contempt.
Chip Young
theology
'Cult' gets bad press
Recently the Maranatha club has
been getting a lot of bad press, and
their recruiting techniques have
been compared with those of a cult.
Reverend Ray Schultz, in his letter
suggested that a university campus
"debate   and   discussion"   were
preferable to letting accusations fly.
I have some definite opinions on the
subject of Maranatha, and I would
like to invite the Maranatha Club to
a public forum on their purposes
and methods. Mark Reimers
grad studies
THE UBYSSEY
October 7,1983
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Fridays throughout
the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University
of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff
and are not necessarily those of the university administration
or the AMS. Member, Canadian University Press. The
Ubyssey's editorial office is SUB 241k. Editorial department,
228-2301/2305. Advertising 228-3977/3978.
"Conspiracy!" screamed Brian Jones at Stephen Wisenthal who was theorizing with
Charlie Fidelman over why Doug Schmidt didn't act when Chris Wong asked Sarah Cox to
overthrow Sarah Millin who was vying for Frances Lew's job with Victor Wong against the
wishes of Robert Beynon but with the tacit approval of Monte Stewart and the military support of Justin Wyatt's Minister of Opposition Neil Lucente who was just another lackey of
Muriel Draaisma's Warlord Peter Berlin but at the same time ignoring Jack Tieleman's slimey
attempts to seduce Sena Miller into winning Richard Ozimek's trust and thus breaking Verne
McDonald's iron grip on Sylvia Berryman a co-conspiritor of the old guard along with Shaffin
Shariff and the cunning Corinna Sundararajan.
Confusion reigning in the mind of Brother Jones, he was subsequently awarded the Nobel
Prize for a libelous piece on a swimming Herpes epidemic. Friday, October 7, 1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
HunJcy t&c^ stars *** an°tiier
bad flick without proper co**^
By JUSTIN WYATT
Graham Greene's novel The
Honorary Consul has been adapted
to the screen with the utterly vapid
title of Beyond the Limit.
Beyond the Limit
Directed by Jim Mackenzie
Playing at Capitol 6
Unfortunately, the result seems
more to be a curious hybrid of
Missing and American Gigolo, certainly not what one would expect
from the celebrated novel.
Beyond the Limit casts gigolo
Richard Gere as a local English-
Paraguayan   doctor   in   the  small
nouveau Barbara Carrera — a
beautiful South American figure
who seems cast primarily for her
willingness to do the frequent rude
scenes.
Certainly she can't act. All of her
lines are spoken with the same emphasis and she brings no life to the
complex character that Greene
created. Her line readings are so
rote that some are strangely amusing. Carrillo's presentation of "I'm
frightened of the telephone" is one
example of this. Instead of expressing her fear at the discovery of her
affair, her monotonous voice
makes the viewer feel she has a mortal fear of the object itself.
Still, Carrillo's incompetence is
not fit into the film. He can't produce any type of character portrayal.
The film's lack of structure does
not help Gere. Scene after scene unfolds without the development of
any type of drama or story. One
feels that a razor-sharp editor such
as Jerry Greenberg or Paul Hirsch
would have reduced this one hundred minute film into a more tightly
paced film of eighty minutes. Adaptor Christopher Hampton surely is
responsible for some of the
banalities the characters are forced
to say ("It's not easy to love"), and
for some of the more unintentional
humorous lines.
South American border town of
Corrients. Gere is searching for his
lost activist father, and the story
revolves around this search as well
as his tawdry affair with a newly
reformed hooker.
During the course of the film,
Gere becomes involved with revolutionaries in a plot to kidnap an
American ambassador. This involvement added to the affair form
the main drama of the story.
To be fair to the film, one must
recognize the exemplary acting
skills of Michael Caine as the
honorary consul. Caine plays the
role of a seedy, aging diplomat well,
and with such a fine comedic touch
that he almost saves the film. His
character is rather pathetic, yet
Caine managers to elicit emotion
by showing the strong pride of this
broken man.
Caine falls in love with a local
hooker for no discernable reason
except to advance the plot. Elipidia
Carrillo (the hooker) is actually a
no match for the non-existent acting skills of the film's hero:
Richard Gere. Gere\seems amazingly ill at ease during the film, and his
accent is comically unsure and faulty. You start to wonder why he is
famous. Obviously, his good looks
have made him a favorite with
female fans, yet he is such a terrible
actor that no doubt his fame will
fade as he gains more wrinkles.
Gere constantly falls back on set
gestures  and  mannerisms  that  do
By the end of the film, one has
the feeling that Hampton and director Mackenzie were trying to make
a smaller, more personal film. The
complete lack of chemistry between
the three main actors, the rambling
adaption and the salient lack of skill
offered by Richard Gere certainly
sabotaged this intention. We are
left with a passionless film in which
Gere tries to master a British accent. The film is not even enjoyably
awful.
A A+A /*A A+A ,
<'*/
/ /
/ S X / /,
/ A
4/ ,
/*../ a'+a yW
S+,>
A   /'
LovE
*A /■
yMA
A  A
' A*
QuicheS
at
'A*
Ar/
,-v^Hlii' 1:S
A+,
/-;
o
SOUP/SALAD
V".
QUICHE
$4.95
■■'*/■
'" •'•
Everyday
■■%:'
from
5:30 • 7:30
. ■ *,.
■ "•*-
( at the back of the Village )
*
''* •-• *
*                   *              *
•■*.
A* A
*••'     '*.        ¥
"*
UBC DANCE CLUB
WE'RE THE LARGEST CLUB
ON CAMPUS
COME FIND OUT WHY.
CLASSES BEGIN THIS WEEK
Register in SUB Partyroom every noon hour
m
New & popular on the Kits Pt. Grey
scene, the Eatery is considered by a
discriminating many to be the only
place to eat.
The Eatery has an astonishing menu
containing great meals, phenomenal
snacks, dessert that Grandrra would
be envious of, an espresso machine,
and is fully licenced on top of all
that.
A highly recommended restaurant.
Treat youreelfl
IP. S.   Not at all to  imply  that our
customers are hawgs. Just liked the
cartoon.)  ~ . n, ,,,   n
i not far easi of Aim,
-,3tl-i2(J8
^EATIE»Sl>
In i:h« Ubyssey's eternal quest for the truth and anything alia that took* good, tha supreme;
Sovlat of tha collectivized massits and tha gray eminence of tha paper's tetter nemesis, the
eternal first-year applies science Jim, the grayest statutes have been' overturned and this
gray box is being presented in technicolor gray. Thanks tot he latest technology in mind con*
tro i we the people of 241K are abl e to sell Jim on tha idea that this box is unlike the myriad of
previous gray boxes which eternal-first-year Jim has been able to digest between writing let-
tes to his favorite rag of dogma, yes you all know who
FOR THEATRE INFORMATION CALL
687-1615
 ITAR.WARr.
RETURN OF THE
[FEDI
♦18 GRAN VILLI
6855434
St* TRACK mi"*- rrfWg
2-1S 44n    ,„.„  WNING. SOME VIOLENCE
2.18,4:40,   7:16,9:40 Bc. DIRECTOR
111  GRANVILLE
682-746*
WARNING
SOME NUDITY
AND
SUGGESTIVE
SCENES
B C
DIRECTOR
THE
IDNELY LADY
2:15, 4, 6, 8, 10
THE FEEL GOOD
MOVIE OF 1983
TIME MAGAZINE
151  GRANVILLE
"THE BIG CHILL"
(mature)
WARNING, SOME VERY COARSE
LANGUAGE. OCCASIONAL
NUDITY AND SUGGESTIVE
685-6828     2- **• B:«. 7:*. »:«     SCENES. B.C. DIRECTOR
MERRY
CHRISTMAS,
MR. LAWRENCE
DAVID BOWIE • TOM CONTi
VARSITY 7:30-9:46
CORONET 2:15, 4:46, 7:30, 10
varsity       I     coronet
(51  GRANVILLE
685 6828
4375  WEST 10th
224 3730
14 YEARSi
WARNING, NOT
SUITABLE FOR THOSE
UNDER 14. SOME
VIOLENCE AND VERY
COARSE LANGUAGE.
_ B.C. DIRECTOR.
TERESA STRATAS
PLACIDO DOMINGO
CT1RNFII  MACNEIL
Sun. only til '
CAMIIE  AT   18th
876-2747
CcENPua)
A FRANCO ZEFFIRELLI FILM
GlUStrW VftDiS
La Traviata
7:30 - 9:40
MATINEE SUN., MON. 2
WINNER OF
8 ACADEMY
AWARDS
dunbar
DUNIAR  AT 30th
224-7252
GANDHI
SHOW AT 8 P.M.
EVENINGS 7-9
MATINEES AT., SUN.,
MON. 2
broadway
707 W. IROADWAY
874-1927 t'i
CCOIDUL)
CHEVY CHASE IN
NATIONAL LAMPOON'S
"VACATION"
broad way
707 W. IROADWAY
874-1927
WARNING. SOME VERY COARSE
LANGUAGE AND SWEARING, OCCASIONAL NUDITY AND SUGGESTIVE SCENES.
B.C. DIRECTOR
EVENINGS 7:15*16
MATINEE SAT., SUN., MON. 2:16 Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 7, 1983
tfr
Vancouver
after Classes ...
THE KEG
AND
Introduces
A Dinner and Dance Special
Wednesday's
Student Night
Enjoy Caesar's for Dinner
20% OFF ALL FOOD
Afterwards visit Brandy's
Featuring:
- Great music
- Friendly Atmosphere
- ALL NIGHT STUDENT PRICES
(Bring Student I.D.)
The Keg Corner, Providing The Complete Night Out.
HORNBY and DUNSMUIR
Across from
Gassy Jack
in
Gastown
ifer
GOURMET CUISINE OF INDIA
Lunch Smorgasborg
MON-FRI $4.95
GOOD FOOD - REASONABLE PRICES
GREAT ATMOSPHERE
Lunch 8- Dinner (Fully Licensed)
8 POWELL ST.
AT CARRALL
687-0043
"THE PEOPLE WITH BETTER TASTE"
Authentic Greek Architecture
ROMIOS
Banquet Room
for up lo 70 people:
Anniversaries
Receptions
Birthdays
Phone us today.
Enjoy our
Homemade Pizza
and Pasta Dishes!
EAT IN or PICK UP
Lunch & Dinner
Specials Every Day
ROMIOS OFFERS FINE
GREEK CUISINE & A
TOUCH OF THE MEDITERRANEAN, IN THE
HEART OF KITSILANO.
S  2272 W. 4th Ave.     736-2118
(HNVIDACNE
(HA8LB pub
Mon.-Fri.
Sat. &Sun
HONG KONG
CHINESE
FOODS
11:30a.m.-2:00 p.m.
4:00 p.m.-10:00 p.m.
4:00 p.m.-10:00p.m.
1*
EAT IN
OR
TAKE OUT
LUNCH SPECIALS
$2.90
5732 University Boulevard
TEL. 224-1313
At
International
House
1783 West Mall
Oktober Fest
Oct. 15- 7:30 p.m.
Nominal Charge
Full Facilities
*
EI. CEMMITO
Carrot Cake & Cappuccino
.2.95
"Vancouver's Btsl Espresso Bar"
From "Best Places '82"
MONDAY-FRIDAY 8:30 AM-12 PM
SA"H'RDAY-SL'NDAY10AM-12PM
1938 WEST4TH AVE.— 732-3114
fltffF
6txtyrig hjpq SH ui
puy ua^lV/Yikfe sty/77 &0P4tWY)
29U\Hezr4m.AveAjUL?
flkc at 7IO0 BiHtrdge Itay. fli&imyict.
hHOT
!£HILi|
$
Experience Vancouver's Greatest Downtown Hub
For Lunch, After Dinner & Evening Entertainment
Monday and Tuesday
PUB NIGHT
Student Prices
Live Entertainment
"Much More Than A Pub"
(Open from 11:30 a.m. - 1:30 a.m. No Cover Chargejj
681-6341         1006 Granville St.
 Valet Parking	
COOL
SUDS
AT
linis
All the chill
&
bread you can eat
$3.95       .
(at the back of the village)
An experience in dining
An adventure in working.
Energetic and fun loving.
THAT'S US!
HOW ABOUT YOU?
THE KEG
The Spirit Lifters
596 Hornby St.
If you're looking for PART TIME work that's fun
and think you'd have something to offer us, we
may have a place for you.
We are looking for young men and women. People
oriented and active, to join us as a bartender,
hostess or host, or as a waiter or waitress.
Join us for the day for the evening. Either way we'll
teach you everything you'll need to know to get
along!
If we belong together come down and see us.
Applications and interviews
will be conducted Wed., Oct. 12
between 3 p.m. £1- 6 p.m. at
Brandy's - 581 Hornby
Jacfc Damei Distillery NamerJ a National H.^m. Plate by the J-vted Slates bc^ "
AT THE JACK DANIEL DISTILLERY, you
can taste for yourself why our whiskey is so
uncommonly smooth.
As soon as you sip the water we
use, you can tell it's
something special.
That's because it flows,
pure and iron-free,
from a limestone
spring located deep
under the ground.
At Jack Daniel
Distillery, we've used this iron-free
water since our founder setded here
in 1866. Once you try our whiskey,
we believe, you'll know why we
always will.
Iron free  from an underground spring
St   Luuc.
lonrjon Liege World sfjr
1914 1905 1904
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4-ni4ttu -(H1'f*u-trya&toui^—IftAQ^sj Friday, October 7, 1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 13
Store Detective misses apparent truth
By ROBERT BEYNON
Despite a reasonable production
of the Store Detective by the New
Play Centre, the audience sees a
play that can't show the development of a truth it claims is apparent.
The Store Detective
Directed by Pamela Hawthorn
At the Waterfront Theatre
Until O^t. 15
The play portrays the growing
tensions between a middle class
detective at Jimmy Jimmy's new-
and-used store on East Hastings
and the shoplifters he attempts to
control.
The producer's press release
refers to it as a play in the "classic
American detective" form but the
director's notes which describe it as
a classic American revenge story are
closer to the truth. The play follows
the revenge format and is filled with
abusive language, scenes of pain
and violence.
But much of the abusive language
and violence doesn't directly add to
the plot. The play's support of
vigilante justice appears to force a
questionable American answer to
social problems in a Canadian setting. One wonders why the
playwright did not attempt to define
a new, Canadian answer to street
violence instead of merely slotting
in a redundant and foreign
response.
Playwright Jesse Glenn Boydan
who worked as a department store
detective for the last three years
claims the play attempts to portray
life as it is.
"You learn that what they
(shoplifters) want is to play hardball," Boydan says, implying a
detective must do the same.
But how a store detective arrives
at this conclusion is not developed
in the play. The store detective,
South (Derek Boyes), never
develops from his original recon-
ciliatory attitude towards
shoplifters to his violent attitude. In
one act he's reconciliatory and in
the next he's une.xplainably violent.
The play's support
of vigilante justice
appears to force
a questionable
American answer.
But Boydan's text amuses and
captivates the audience in parts. For
example in the second act the pimp
(Blue Mankuma) and the punk
(David Marr) amusingly discuss the
store detective's habits.
And Boydan catches the sense of
Vancouver's downtown Eastside
with realistic dialogue and confrontations.
Both the acting, particularly the
performances of Ed Hong-Louie
(as the storekeeper) and Mark
Acheson (as a down-and-out
alcoholic) help to achieve this sense
of East Hastings.
And Boyes, as the hero, plays a
naive Kitsilano resident well, but
never develops and certainly fails to
convince the audience he's capable
of calculated violence.
And    his    policewoman   wife
(Elizabeth Dancoe) is so simple that
one wonders if she could control '
ferocious kindergarten students.
But Ed Hong-Louie, though
unobtrusive, sets the play's mood
unconvincingly portraying a small
time Chinese businessperson who
generally accepts shoplifting with a
stoical calm.
And down-and-outer Freakley
convincingly explains the area's
philosophy to the audience in an
aside during each act.
The balloon man (Tom
McBeath), (an apparent insane individual who always mumbles,
"Buy a Mazda. Keep off the
grass,") amuses and successfully
fulfills his role as the play's comic
diversion.
Blu Manduma as the pimp puts in
a reasonable performance but both
Patricia Lucwick as a prostitute and
David Marr as a punk lack lustre.
Director Pamela Hawthorne
organized scenes in which the actors
work smoothly together, but the
scenes do not flow smoothly and
the play therefore lacks cohesion.
But Bottieri's two level set
developed the production's mood
well with its grimy cornerstore — including a City of Vancouver
trashcan and window bars — and
the trendy Kitsilano apartment.
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J HE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 7, 1983
Miofic
Tom Keenlyside Quintet: yes the brother of
my ex-French teacher is still going strong with
his hip jazz sounds, what, wait, someone has
just pointed out to me that VISTA is
dominated by a long music column and it has
a very large amount of jazz listings. My only
comment to these very observant people is
FOAD, or better yet, FY and have a meaningful relationship, Sheraton Landmark Jazz
Bar, till Oct.8.
Roy Reynolds: a former member of Stan
Kenton's orchestra now playing to tiny,
smoke filled cocktail lounges, Oct. 8, Hot
Jazz, 36 E. Broadway.
Phoenix Jazzers: I must have put this band
in Vista forty times, but I've never seen them
and frankly, I don't want to but maybe you
do, check it out, Oct. 11 and 14, Hot Jazz.
Ann Mortifee: Jane's sister, esoteric west-
coast, mellow sounds, Oct. 7-15, Plazas, International Plaza Hotel.
Shak'n Pyramids: a rockabilly band in kilts
with bagpipes — how's that for brilliant use of
stereotypes, Oct. 8, Commodore.
Unemployed   Action   Centre   Benefit:
featuring the dancing music of Comminique,
Oct. 8. 138 E. Cordova, 688-9001.
A Rameau Celebration Concert: not late,
on-time, absent, but early music, Oct. 9, 8
p.m.,   Arts Club  Revue Theatre,   Granville
Island, 732-1610.
David Sereda and the Reinforcements:
"poetry in party shoes, post-modern polkas,
and pop with power," this guy can do it, Oct.
9, Vancouver East Cultural Centre, 254-9578.
AC/DC: some people out there may be
wondering just why the hell this listing is here,
one reason, be-kind-to-Jack-week has been
extended, now it's SMOG (Satanic musicians
obsessed with groadiness) week, Oct. 11,
Pacific Coliseum.
John Schneider: guitar, gee-tar, Jimi Hen-
drix in disguise, Oct. 12, noon, recital hall.
Contemporary Players: recent European
chamber music, Oct. 13, 8 p.m., recital hall.
Men at Work/Stevie Ray Vaughan: whoo,
what a show, Oct. 13, Pacific Coliseum.
Dutch Swing College Band: maybe
Muriel's relatives are in this band, Oct. 12-13,
Q.E. Theatre.
Chano: African roots band, as David Byrne
that neurotic genius said, pull up the roots,
Oct. 13, Soft Rock Cafe, 1925 W. 4th.
D.O.A.: Joey, Dave, Brian and a new drum
mer Greg are back to confront the dive-
bombers, skin-heads, mohawks and other
animals that will gather at the zoo known as
SUB Ballroom, Oct. 14, tickets AMS box office.
HoVL£6
SUBFilms (SUB Auditorium, 228-3697I Oct.
7-9: Sophies Choice, 7 p.m.: Frances, 9:30
p.m. Oct. 13-16: Tootsie, 7 and 9.30 p.m
Cinema 16 (SUB Auditorium, 228-3697I Oct.
11: The Front featuring that nervous Jewish
guy with glasses, Woody Allen, 6:30 and 8:30
p.m.
Vancouver International Film Festival for
Children and Young People: See 82 internationally renowned films including 25 full
length features; until Oct. 10, Robson Square
Media Centre, 669-1389.
Pacific Cinematheque (1155 W. Georgia,
732-6119) - Oct. 12, Rome: Open City, 7:30
p.m.; Oct. 13, The First Classics of French
Talkies (documentary), 7:30 p.m.; La
Kermesse Heroique, French comedy with
subtitles, 9:30 p.m.
Vancouver East Cinema (7th and Commercial, 263-54551 Oct. 7-9: Dark Crystal. 7:30
p.m.; Poltergeist. 9:30 p.m ; Oct. 10-11: The
Phantom of Liberty, 7:30 p.m.; Discreet
Charm   of   the   Bourgeoisie;   find   out   all
Tfor2
from
3 to4
%2 M
V:  ■: ,\  v I r 1/ ; / :
$125
1                         MiAfi/V.    //,'//>.-Vi
	
RED LEAF
RESTAURANT
IM$£
Luncheon Smorgasbord
Authentic Chinese Cuisine
228-9114       j
10% DISCOUNT ON
PICK UP ORDERS
LICENSED PREMISES
Mon Fri 11 30 9 00 p m
CLOSED SATURDAYS
Sundays and Holidays
4 00 p m   9 00 p m
2142 Western Parkway
UBC Village
about it, you former East Ender, 9:30 p.m.;
Oct. 12-13; Path's of Glory, 7:X p.m.; Far
from the Maddening Crowd 9:05 p.m.
Savoy Cinema (Main and Kingsway,
872-21241 Oct. 10 and 11: That Man From
Rio, 7:30 p.m.; Le Magnifique, 9:40 p.m.;
Oct. 12 and 13: On Golden Pond, 7:30 p.m.;
Same Time Next Year, 9:30 p.m.
Ridge Theatre (16th and Arbutus, 738-6311)
The Draughtsman's Contract, 7:30 and
9:30 p.m. Next showing Heart Like A
Wheel.
The Chastitute: a rollicking comedy performed by Stage Eireann and directed by William
Forbes, Oct. 13-15, 19-22, 8:30 p.m., James
Cowan Theatre, 6450 Gilpin, Burnaby,
Heritage Village, 263-7800.
The Store Detective: vigilante justice and
shop-lifting are considered in this provocative
play reviewed by the dashing T.V. star, Robbie Beynon, till Oct. 15, Mon.-Sat. 8:30 p.m.,
Waterfront Theatre, Granville Island,
685-6217.
The Diary of Anne Frank: dramatized by
Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett, Oct.
12-15, 19-22, 26-29, Vagabond Playhouse,
Queens Park New West, 521-0412.
The Unknown Soldier and his Wife: by
Peter Ustinov of American Express fame, Oct.
12-15, 18-22, Presentation House, 333
Chesterfield, 922-1345.
Good: The Guardian said this is "light in texture but serious in content," what marvy am-
bivilance, till Oct. 22, Studio 58, 100 West
49th, 324-5227.
Love Mouse: a one-act comedy looking at a
marriage gone stale, 12:10 noon. City Stage,
751 Thurlow, 688-1436.
Sweet Bird of Youth: by Tenesse Williams,
vehement iconoclast or alcoholic schmuck,
you decide, opens Oct. 14, Arts Club Granville
Island, 687-5315.
Ever Loving: by Canadian playwright,
Margaret Hollingsworth, till Oct. 29, Arts Club
Seymour, 687-5315.
Judy: Judy, Judy, Judy, let me count the
Judies, I always go senile at this point in
VISTA, TILL Oct. 29, Arts Club Revue
Theatre, 687-5315.
Top Girls: portrayal of noteable figures from
feminine history and mythology, till Oct. 22,
Vancouver East Cultural Centre, 254-9578.
Death of a Salesman: my roomate said this
is utter and complete trash. The Ubyssey says
it's just peachy, you be the judge, till Oct. 22,
G.E. Playhouse, 872-6622.
Eyluhifc
Exhibition to be Destroyed: just like my
mind and body, till Oct. 22, Unit/Pit Gallery,
163 W. Pender, 681-6740.
Nora Blanck: photographs and sculptural
work, till Oct. 7-30, Presentation House
Gallery, 333 Chesterfield, 986-1351.
The Ubyssey: see a bunch of crazed, tedious
zombies walk around this God-forbidden office which I think we all need a long holiday
from, and let me say this, if one more person
dumps on me in the next two minutes, ohh,
I'm flying to Addis Ababa, every day, SUB
241K, 228-MOPE.
TODAY
THUNDERBIRD SOCCER
Canada West  League match vs   University  of
Lethbridge, 4 p.m.. 0.J   Todd Field, UBC
Traditional
Greco-Roman Cuisine
7 Days a Week: 5 p.m.-1 a.m.
Fri. and Sat.: 5 p.m. to 2 a.m.
FREE fast delivery!
228-9513
4510 West 10th Ave.
UBG Gampus
Pizza
UBC
Steak & Pizza       Lasagna
Spare Ribs       Ravioli
Chicken       Greek Salads
Souvlaki
Fast Free Local Delivery
224 4218 - 224 0529
Hours Mon   Thurs   11:30 a.m        2:00 a.m.
Fri   11:30a.m.   -   3:00 a.m
Sat. 4.00 p.m    -  3:00 a m.
Sun. 4:00 p.m 1:00 am
2136 Western Parkway
COOKS
of the world unite!
neil lucente photo
COMMERCE UNDERGRADUATE
SOCIETY
Obstacle race, noon, at boulevard in front of
Henry Angus.
NEWMAN CLUB
T.G I F. Werner Roast, after 4.30 p m mass at
St. Mark's College.
UBC ACUTE CARE HOSPITAL
SOCIAL WORK DEPT
Free stop-smoking program every Friday morning beginning Oct 21 to Dec. 9, 10 a m to 12
pm .1 Acute Care Hospital (room to be
decided).
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Volleyball team practice. 6 30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m.,
Osborne, Gym A.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Welcome back dance (party), 8:00 p.m., International House.
IRANIAN STUDENTS CLUB
Volleyball game, 4:30 p.m to 6.30 p.m..
Osborne, Gym A.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Images fashion show, 7 30 p.m., Images dance,
10 p.m. to 1 a.m., tickets ($10 and $5 resp.l at
AMS box office, Denman Place Inn, 1773 Com-
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
General meeting, noon.
attonal House
SATURDAY
UBC KENDO CLUB
Practice, 3 p.m., Armouries 200.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Volleyball practice, 7:30 p.m , Osborne Gym \
UBC CHESS CLUB
Vancouver Open chess tournament, $1000 of
guaranteed prizes, entry fee $20 for club
members and $30 for non members, $2 for new
Chess Federation of Canada members. Prizes for
players of various playing strength. 10:30 a m.
registration deadline, SUB 209.
THUNDERBIRD HOCKEY
UBC JVs take on the T-bird Alumni, 7.15 d m..
Thunderbird Arena.
THUNDERBIRD SOCCER
Canada  West  League  match  vs.   University  of
Calgary, 2 p m., O.J   Todd Field.
DEBATING SOCIETY
General meeting and elections, noon, SUB 211
UBC WATER POLO CLUB
Practice (all welcome), 5 p.m , Aquatic Centre
SUNDAY
UBC MOTORCYCLE CLUB
Sunday  ride with  destination  to be decided  at
Thursday meeting,  10 30 a m   Iweathe' permit
ting), SUB traffic circle
UBC WATER POLO CLUB
Prarvcv. (all welcome'   5pm     Aquatic Centre
AFRICAN STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
General meeting, 230 p.m., SUB 213.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Practice, all equipment provided, 10 pm , UBC
aquatic centre.
MONDAY
RESIDENCE DISCUSSION GROUPS
Christian  discussions  at   Totem   Park,  8  p.m
Salish House No   644
DANCEWORKS UBC
Signup of dancers, stagehands, production
coordinators publicity coordinators, etc.,
noon-130 p.m , SUB 216E.
TUESDAY
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Video night last year's spring performance.
6:30-8 p.m , SUB partyroom
SCIENCE FICTION SOCIETY
Artwork for Horizons SF will be assigned to any
interested artists, as well as acceptance of
freelance artwork or ideas for artwork,
10:30-11 30 and 2:30-3:30. SUB 228.
DEPARTMENT OF RELIGIOUS STUDIES
Religious studies lecture, "Jesus' social teaching
and John the Baptist" by Dr. David Flusser of
the Hebrew University, noon, Buch A100,
PRE MEDICAL SOCIETY
Lecture on sports medicine given by Dr. Doug
Clements, new members welcome, noon, IRC.
UBC JAPAN CLUB
Open meeting to discuss exchange program and
introduction to club, noon. SUB 215.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Co-op supper, 6 p.m.. Lutheran Campus Centre.
DANCEWORKS UBC
Signup of dancers, stagehands, production and
publicity coordinators, etc., noon, SUB 216E
WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF CANADA
Film about Cuba,    "I am an Old Tree," noon,
Buch A204,
ISMAILI STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Women s soccer game, noon, SUB field.
GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
Fireside discussions: Operation Solidarity and
graduate students, 8 p m., Fireside Lounge,
graduate student centre.
UBC STUDENT LIBERALS
Sign-up for the B C Liberal party policy convert
tion, noon, SUB 226
Whether il takes place before,
during or after usual class hours,
anyone with any sense puts a notice
of what they are doing in the
'Tweens section of the paper.
All they have to do is come up to
SUB 241K and fill out one of our
handy-dandy little forms by Monday noon for Tuesday papers and
Thursday noon for the Friday edition.
Please fill out the forms completely, and if you have extra info
add it on the back and put 'hot
flash' on the front (as well as making sure we know there's something
on the back).
Hey, what are Hot Flashes? See
below.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders — 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines,
1 day $4.20; additional lines, 65c. Additional days, $3.80 and 60c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications, Room 266, S.U.B., UBC,  Van., B.C.  V6T2A5
mWmm
Charge Phone Orders over $5.00. Call 228-3977. VKA
COMING EVENTS
THE VANCOUVER INSTITUTE
Free Public Lecture
EDUCATION UNDER SIEGE
ACADEMIC FREEDOM AND
THE CULT OF EFFICIENCY
President George Pedersen,
University of B.C.
SATURDAY, OCT   8 at 8:15 p.m.
Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Building
1072 MONTEGO 2-DR. Looking for an inex-
pensive car? First $200 takes it! 663-3049
(days); 738-5848 (eves,). 	
'78 HONDA CB400 motorcycle. Only 18,000
km, good cond., runs well. Asking $850
Bob a 261-8677 eves.
1981 HONDA Passport Motor Scooter
$495. Mint condition, low mileage. Call
224-0083. Helmet also for sale
80 - TUTORING
TUTORESS    WANTED    IN    MATH    and
French for 15 yr old highschool girl White
Rock Cloverdaie area Telephone Mr
Forbes at 688-0401 or Mrs. at home
536-9147
20 - HOUSING
HOUSE TO SHARE: 3rd person wanted to
share house with 2 male dent, students
$265'mo. 261-5467 after 7 p.m.
35 - LOST
BAHA'I FAITH. Building a United
World Community. Formal and informal
discussions on selected topics every Friday.
For more information phone 222-0261.
7 - LEGAL
JUDITH ALEXANDER
LAWYER
731-8323 or 261-8614
Family Law
— Change of name
— Custody
— Divorce            ~
— Family Property
— Separation
Personal Injury Law
LOST AT BOOKSTORE - Blue UBC
clipboard with Psy 305, 301, 401, 304 notes.
Please call 224-4849.
40 - MESSAGES
FAREWELL TO CHILDHOOD
CAROL BAROL
Happy 20th Birthday
2 PETER 3:18
Love J.S. & K.R.
85 - TYPING
PROFESSIONAL    TYPING,    essays
thesis,   manuscripts,   etc.   Choice of  type
engineering exp. Reasonable 271-6755.
TYPEWRITING - Essays resumes MINI
MUM NOTICE REQUIRED Tapes
transcribed Elite, Pica or Script UBC
Village location   224-6518 day or night.
EXPERT TYPING, Essays, term papers, fac-
tums, letters, manuscripts, resumes,
theses, IBM Selectric II. Reasonable fate.
Rose, 731 9857.
WORD PROCESSING SERVICES available
at $20/hr. Flexible hours. Call Francine at
682-8691 or 681 9882
10 -
- FOR SALE -
- Commercial
11 -
- FOR SALE -
- Private
HP   41-C   WITH   MATH   MODULE   &   2
Memory   Modules.   $300,   733-9062.   Pis.
leave message on machine.
Tl 59 $150. 3 Modules. $15 ea. PC 100C
printer for T1 58/59 $150. 438-4259,
438-1673,
WITH SUCH A PLEDGE class it's easy to
see that Alpha Delts are number one.
Crooster.
65 - SCANDALS
FINALE: And you thought we'd forgotten.
Well, not so. We are religiously irreligious
and seriously full of humor. We are committed to studying questions of justice and
religion. You are invited to pot luck dinner
and various programs with us (the Cooperative Christian Campus Ministry). 6
p.m. Wednesdays at the Lutheran Campus
Centre. (Is the Pope Catholic?)
70 - SERVICES
LSAT, GMAT, MCAT preparation. Call
National Testing, 738-4618. Please leave
message on tape if manager is counselling.
YEAR ROUND EXPERT typing from legible
work, essays, theses, 738-6829, 10 a.m. -9
p.m. King Edward bus route.
90 - WANTED
FLOAT FREE in a flotation tank in
the psychology department. Phone
228-6666 or come to room 13 in the basement of the Henry Angus Building.
HELP END THE ARMS RACE. Volunteer to
Canvass your Neighbourhood. 224-4266 or
736-2366.
99 - MISCELLANEOUS
INTERESTED        IN        JOINING        a
sorority? For more info, call 324-3111 between 7:30-9:30 p.m. Thurs. Oct. 6 & Tues.
Oct. 11 Friday, October 7,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 15
Frank Smith ends era of wins at UBC
By MONTE STEWART
The Frank Smith era will officially come to an end in June of next
year. The most successful coach in
the history of UBC football surprised everybody Tuesday afternoon by
announcing his resignation, effective June 30, 1984.
Smith does not intend to join the
professional coaching ranks. Instead, he plans to give up coaching
and says he hopes to get a job in
athletic administration or as a color
commentator doing radio or television football broadcasts.
"Don't you think I have a great
voice for it?" said Smith when asked about the possibility of a broadcasting career.
When asked about a future in administration, Smith said, "I
wouldn't mind being the one who
makes the decisions instead of having them made for me."
Smith's departure will occur
almost one decade after his arrival
at UBC. He came to UBC in 1974
from Sentinel High School in West
Vancouver where he had been a
history teacher as well as the football coach.
For the first few years, Smith
served as a co-head coach with Bob
DeJulius. Frank took over completely in 1976 when DeJulius left
UBC to take over the SFU football
program.
Going into this season, Smith had
a 57-39-2 record. Smith has led the
'Birds to three Western Intercollegiate Football League championships, one College Bowl appearance, and, of course, on Vanier
Cup (the College Bowl renamed)
championship.
Also, UBC has defeated Simon
Fraser University in four of the last
five Shrum Bowl games. This year,
the 'Birds are defending national
champs, have a 3-1 record and are
in first place in the WIFL. The
Thunderbirds are also in third place
in the national rankings.
Smith was born and raised in
Vancouver. He attended Vancouver
WAITING FOR THE PARADE
by John Murrell
An M.F.A. Thesis
Production
Directed by Catherine Caines
OCTOBER 11-15
8:00 p.m.
Tickets: $5
Students: $4
Box Office: Room 207. Frederic Wood Theatre
DOROTHY SOMERSET STUDIO
University of British Columbia
Intervarsity Athletic Union coach
of the year in 1978 when the
Thunderbirds went to the national
championship only to lose to
Queen's University. He was; named
WIFL coach of the year in 1981 and
1982.
The truly surprising aspect of
Smith's announcement is the fact
that it came when it did. Since he is
not leaving until June, Smith obviously could have waited until the
end of the current season.
However, Smith, the eternal team
man, probably wants to use his
resignation to motivate his team.
"I hinted about two or three
veeks ago (to the Athletic Department) that I would be leaving, but
the players didn't know about it until practice (Tuesday)," said Smith
just before Wednesday afternoon's
workout.
The question now is: Who do you
get to replace a legend? Smith will
not make any recommendations as
to his successor. "That's not for me
to decide. I'll leave it up to the
Athletic Department."
The successor could be one of
Smith's assistants. Defensive coordinator Bob Laycoe has been here
since 1973 and knows the players
and Smith's system inside out.
And there is assistant David
Easley, also a proven "winner. The
former B.C. Lion defensive back
coached the Renfrew Trojans to the
Canadian Junior Football championship last season after guiding
the juvenile Trojans to a national
crown the year before.
Regardless of what happens to
the Thunderbirds this season, one
thing is clear, Frank Smith will
leave as the most acclaimed and
most heralded coach in UBC football history. The man who replaces
him will have an unenviable task
ahead of him.
((
FRANK SMITH
College from 1947-1950. He then
studied at Olympic Junior College
in Bremerton, Washington before
embarking on a playing career in
the Canadian Football League. He
toiled for the B.C. Lions and, later,
the Calgary Stampeders as both an
offensive lineman and a linebacker.
He landed his first head coaching
position with the new defunct Burnaby Spartans of the Junior Big
Four Football League. However, he
stayed there for only one season.
Smith is a disciplined individual
who considers education to be very
..leaving 'Birds
important. After receiving his
bachelor of education in K'61 from
Eastern Washington State College,
Smith obtained his master of education degree from the same school in
1964. He also has post-graduate
credits from Montana State University and UBC. There is not space
here to give all of Smith's coaching
experience. This list of his
achievements is also rather lengthy.
Several of his players are currently playing in the CFL while others
will move up in the not too distant
future. Smith was named Canadian
^1*1 WEEXIj\IJ NJR AM[URALS'
Weekend and one day events
Bookstore 3-on-3
<2l Basketball Tournament
Saturday and Sunday Oct. 22 & 23
_ Register^ct^ 10-14th	
Great Trek
horseback riding
Sunday Oct. 16
Alpine Riding Academy
Register by Wed. Oct. 12
from the
Intramural Staff
9SOO
£ (£      XEBOX COPIES    £ <t
ASH FOB OUOIIJ UN LAMOI OftOERS
Copies better than your original
kinko's copies
5706 University Blvd.. Vancouver IS04) 2221688
WOMEN'S ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION
NOTICE
OF ELECTION
NOMINATIONS FOR THE W.A.A. EXECUTIVE:
- POSITION OF SECRETARY
OPEN: OCTOBER 11, 1983 CLOSE: OCTOBER 21, 1983.
ELECTIONS TO BE HELD ON OCTOBER 25, 1983 AT
12:30 P.M. IN ROOM 211 WAR MEMORIAL GYM.
MANAGERIAL POSITIONS OPEN FOR:
-FENCING - TRACK & FIELD
- J.V. BASKETBALL - J.V. VOLLEYBALL
FIRST MEETING OF THE W.A.D.: TUESDAY, OCTOBER 11, 1983 AT 12:30 IN RM. 211, WAR MEMORIAL
GYM.
- ALL NOMINATION FORMS AND MANAGERIAL APPLICATIONS ARE AVAILABLE AT THE ATHLETIC OFFICE: ROOM 208 WAR MEMORIAL GYM.
£AfcL'S OCXO&Xm
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While-H\€^ lw»t, yow- c&rxbuy
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6R6AT CHEDOAfc 4 BACON
456H West \0^ We,. \J&k.      222-1342
fflESPLflCB Page 16
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 7, 1983
JAMIE BOWERS
SEPTEMBER 27■OCTOBER 15
Tuesdays thru Saturday
NO COVER CHARGE
"DAILY DEUCHTS"
Available at Reduced Prices ONL Y Once a Week
MONDAY - Hawiian Punch
TUESDAY Long Island Ice Tea
WEDNESDAY  Strawberry Daiquiri
THURSOAY - Sangria
FRIDAY-La Margarita
SATURDAY  Sea Breeze Cooler
mm
STUDENT UNION BUILDING
University of British Columbia
6138SUB. Boulevard
WAIN CONCOURSE
The Newly Expanded
Games Room
Celebrates
• LADIES WEEK •
OCT. 10-OCT. 16 inclusive
$1.00
complimentary
coupon
for the 1st
50 ladies
each day!
(Limit one
per day)
(Available at
the Games
Center Counter)
A.M.S. CONCERTS &
SPECIAL EVENTS
Thurs., Oct. 13 - FASHION "84"
Refreshment Avail. SUB Ballroom. Doors 7 p.m. Door prizes
Fri., Oct. 14 - D.O.A. & GUESTS
SUB Ballroom. Doors 7 p.m.
Wed., Oct. 19 - PUNCHLINES
SUB Aud. Free. 12:30 p.m.
Wed., Oct. 26 - VIOLENT FEMMES & GUESTS
SUB Ballroom. Door 7:30 p.m.
Thurs., Oct. 27 —  BISON. From Ottawa —
R.C.M.P. Band
SUB Ballroom, Free. 12:30 p.m.
Fri., Oct. 28 & 29 - POWDER BLUES -
Halloween Ball
Armories. Doors 7 p.m.
Tues.,  Nov.  1   -   PARACHUTE CLUB
with Beverly Sisters
SUB Ballroom, No Minors Please. Doors 7:30 p.m.

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