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The Ubyssey Sep 14, 1971

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 .*Dr Schwarz didn't check up
Drug study questioned
y
\*
—david bowerman photo
BALEFUL BANDIT is The Ubyssey's David Schmidt, researching story on new bookstore policy of prosecuting
each and every petty pilferer caught trying to beat the system of inflated prices.
Books get closer watch
Security measures are being taken by the
library and the UBC bookstore in an effort to
reduce book thefts.
A metal detector system, in which small pieces
of metal are inserted in book covers to set off a
ringing alarm if they are not properly checke; out at
the turnstile, has been initiated in the fine arts
division of the main library and Woodward library,
said associate librarian I. F. Bell.
"The system which is called checkpoint is
similar to that used by airlines to dect guns," said
Bell.
"We felt that book losses were high enough to
justify putting in some sort of security equipment,"
he said.
Bell did not know what the losses were as
inventory is no longer taken but he said requests for
books not traceable indicate that it is quite high.
Additional security agents have been hired by
the bookstores and are constantly patrolling the
store, said Bob Smith the new assistant manager of
the bookstore Monday.
He said anyone caught stealing books or
materials from the bookstore will ber prosecuted.
On each of this reporter's two trips to. the bookstore
Monday, the RCMP was whisking away a student
shop lifter.
"We lost over $250,000 last year ($12,500 due
to thefts) and we are trying to find ways of cutting
that loss," said Smith.
Other policy changes include the elimination of
the five per cent rebate given to students and the 10
per cent discount given to faculty, he said.
Rebates will be available during December and
See page 2: AND A MAZE
—brett garrett photo
CAMPUS RCMP investigate another case of student shoplifting as Schmidt, the one that got away, unveils booty
outside bookstore, which is conducting intimidation policy against students.
SCHWARZ
By JOHN TWIGG
A study by health services psychiatrist Dr. Conrad
Schwarz that contains such questions as: "Has your sex
life changed after smoking marijuana?" will be
investigated by a presidential ad-hoc committee.
Prof. Frank Forward, organizer of the Committee on
Research Involving Human Subjects, said Monday an
investigation will be made into the Schwarz study "to see
if it conforms to university principles."
The committee is administered by the office of the
president and screens questionnaires and studies on the
university population for invasions of privacy and physical
risk to participants.
Schwarz has not yet made a formal request to the
committee for permission to do the study, Forward said,
Schwarz said Monday a questionnaire on the possible
effects of tobacco, alcohol, marijuana, and chemical drugs.
was drawn up over the summer and the first interviews
were done during registration week.
He said less than 50 students
have so far been interviewed for. the
study by himself and his two
assistants.
Students are approached at
random by the interviewer and asked
if they will "sit down with me and
take part in the study."
The study includes questions on
a subject's memory, concentration,
sense of time and sex life.
Forward said anyone doing a
study which involves university
subjects is usually required to submit
a copy of his questionnaire and a
description of how the study will be
carried out.
"The university (through the committee) is trying to
protect the individual's privacy," said Forward. "You
can't just walk around campus embarrassing people with
personal questions."
Heather Wagg, a 23-year-old grad student, was sitting
in Wesbrook Monday waiting to set up a table for
women's studies when she was approached by a man who
did not identify himself.
She said she was handed a piece of paper and asked if
she would participate in his study on the use of drugs.
The handout said: "We are conducting a study of
some of the possible effects of drugs, e.g. tobacco,
alcohol, marijuana, chemicals, etc.
"We are approaching students at random and asking
them to participate in responding to a questionnaire. For
comparison purposes we need individuals who have not
used drugs as well as those who have.
"The material is confidential and you need not give
your name if you do not wish to do so.
"Will you sit down with me and take part in the
study?"
At the top of the sheet, written in, was the name Dr.
Schwarz.
"He asked me if I had noticed any changes in my
personality since I started using marijuana," said Wagg. "I
didn't know anything about the study.
"For all I know he could have been a narc.
"This man just popped out of nowhere and asked if I
had a minute."
Among the questions she said she was asked were:
"What are your friends like?", "How is your sex life "
"How do you rate your attention span?".
Schwartz declined to give a copy of the questionnaire
to The Ubyssey, saying publication of the questionnaire
would bias the answers of people interviewed.
He said the study asks questions about
"dysfunctions" brought about by use of the various drugs.
Schwarz was one of the first 'experts' to speak
publicly on marijuana and he has been noticeably vocal in
newspapers.
In March, 1968, he was quoted in the Sun as saying:
"While young people are widely informed that marijuana
is not physically addicting, they are much less aware of
the observations that some people become subtly
dependent, in a psychological sense, on this drug to the
point where they come to use it as the first resort
whenever frustration or anxiety develops in relation to
real life."
In January, 1969, he said in the Sun that personality
types attracted to marijuana include the insecure,
emotionally immature, passive, lonely, socially-iltat-ease
and distrustful.
This August he challenged people who claim that pot
smoking is not affecting their lives to submit to
psychological tests. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September  14,  1971
CHEAP BOOKS GALORE are there for the browsing and buying in SUB basement where the AMS has
set up a second-hand textbook operation. Dougal Haggart peruses the stacks, where lurk books designed
to please the minds and wallets of students in all faculties.
Alternate student bookstore
offers second-hand bargains
Not long ago there was only one bookstore at
UBC.
Now there's a second bookstore, and it's run by
students.
In the first day of operation Monday, the new
co-op bookstore sold well over 100 books, and took
in about $300.
The bookstore, operating under the auspices of
the Alma Mater Society, is in room 30 of the SUB
basement — directly across from the base of the
flight of stairs beside the south cafeteria entrance.
The bookstore is open every day starting at 9
a.ra
It takes all student books — the university
bookstore only buys current editions of books on
current reading lists — and sells them on a
consignment basis at 75 per cent of the original sale
price.
Students get 60 per cent of the proceeds when
a book is sold, and the other 15 per cent covers the
co-op's costs.
Although the university bookstore gives cash
immediately for books it buys on consignment, the
student bookstore yields more money after the sale
is made.
Bookstore co-ordinator Murray Kennedy said
Monday. the co-op bookstore will be collecting
students' books for the rest of the week at the
Armory, and at the student bookstore in the
basement of SUB.
He said there are a number of current science,
engineering and medical texts, still on sale and
emphasized that the co-op bookstore is not just for
arts students.
And a maze in the armory
From page 1
January for sales slips issued up until Dec. 31, 1971,
said Smith.
The bookstore has also computerized its
operations this year, allowing one person to place
up to 300 orders a day at less than half the cost,
Smith said.
"We have virtually eliminated delays in ordering
at this end. The computer will also give us
up-to-date information as to which books are in
stock and which are not," he said.
Each book is given a special slot in the shelves
and if it is not available an "out of stock" marker is
placed in the slot, he said.
The bookstore is adding wider aisles to make
things easier for students, he said.
Many new  saleable  items such  as cards and
records are also being added, Smith said.
"We have an image with the students and we
are trying to change that image."
'The bookstore will be open until 9 p.m. this
week and next and it is hoped this policy will
continue through the year.
The armory will also be open until 9 p.m. thisf
week but will close at 5 p.m. next week.
Cursed thirst burst
For those with a giant thirst, the Pit will open
Wednesday.
The Pit, located in the SUB party room, will
shake Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 4 to
12 p.m.
TUXEDO
RENTAL & SALES
+ D.B. & S. B. Tuxedos
+ D. B. & S. B. White Coats
+ D. B. & S. B. Suits
+ COLORED SHIRTS
Parking at Rear
BLACK & LEE
Formal Wear Rentals
631 Howe 688-2481
PITH*
EAT IN .TAKEOUT* DELIVERY
3261 W. Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
SfjOC 5f)0ppC5
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JfT9IOSr:VJLUCEKcUXAnOHf
Jump out of bed and into your tie-ups.
Leathers, Brown, Black, Tan — Navy & Rust Suede.
By Brayco only $18.99
Handbag in leather or Suede.
All colors    only $18.99
Open Thursday and Friday nites. C.O.D. orders accepted.
Credit and Chargex Cards accepted.
542 Granville and 435 W. Hastings St.
776 Granville — Adams Apple Boutique
*  "Design and word Trade marks in Canada of the
Village Shoe Shoppes Ltd." Tuesday,  September  14,   11971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
The Shadow
oy Lamont Cranston
What ever happened to arts dean Doug Kenny's
grandly announced plan to "launch a full-scale
investigation" into the affairs of UBC's English
department?
At the beginning of May, after a lot of pressure from
students and concerned faculty members, Kenny
announced the formation of two committees — one to
conduct the investigation and the other to help
beleaguered English department head Robert Jordan run
the disintegrating department during the investigation.
Kenny said at the time that he would invite
discussion from both students and faculty, but he refused
to have students on either of his committees and refused
to take part in a students' commission on the English
department which the human government initiated.
In fact, during the four-and-a-half months since he
announced his "investigation" Kenny seems to have done
nothing but try to stifle free and open discussion.
He has refused direct invitations from several sources
to make any public announcement about the English
department, and has let it be known that he will look very
unfavorably on any department faculty members who
open their mouths on that rather touchy subject.
Four-and-a-half months have passed and no word of
any progress has been issued from the keeper of the faith's"
office.
In contrast, the human government's commission on
the English department, which has been rebuffed at each
attempt to get information, has been trying to promote
open discussion and get the issue out into the light of day,
where it should be.
Human government secretary Evert Hoogers said the
student commission, which he heads, has been given little
or no co-operation by anyone in the faculty of arts.
But he said the investigation will go ahead anyway,
until enough information can be gathered to report back
to students.
"At  first,  we  wanted  to  have an inquiry which
included some of the people involved, just like big
governments and universities do, but the dean of arts and
the head of the English department wouldn't have
anything to do with it. So, it's become a student inquiry,"
Hoogers said.
"We sent out a preliminary questionnaire to every
faculty member in the English department and we were
going to send out a more detailed one later, but the
response so far hasn't been very gratifying in terms of the
number of replies we've got back.
"It was a mild questionnaire — the questions weren't
inflammatory at all—so we have to assume either that the
English department faculty members are arrogant and
don't give a damn what goes.on in the department or that
there's repression in the faculty and they're afraid to take
part in the investigation."
See page 12: MORE SHADOW
—david bowerman photo
GO DOWN ON YOUR KNEES in the Armory bookstore and someone may take pity on you but then
again they may not, so prepare yourself for the worst. Best bet for your book-buying expedition is a
supply of food, strong legs and endless patience and be ready to be told the book you waited an hour in
line for is either sold out, not ordered or not in existence.
Place Vanier
maids get
workday cut
An attempt by housing administrator Les Rohringer to cut the
working days of Place Vanier cleaning women has been stalled by
union representatives, but the possibility of a wildcat strike by the
women remains.
A meeting today or Wednesday between officials of the
Canadian Union of Public Employees, Local 116, and Rohringer and
UBC personnel director John McLean will discuss the proposal to
reduce the women's workdays and hire students to do some cleaning
jobs.
Rohringer called a meeting Friday of the women who clean
Place Vanier and Totem Park and informed them of changes in their
hours and workload which were to start Monday.
The job of maid, he said, was to be divided into two jobs —
house maid and room maid. The house maids would clean the
non-room areas of the residence towers and the room maids, under
the new job descriptions, would no nothing but clean rooms.
The catch was that the house maids in Place Vanier and Totem
Park were to have their work days reduced from eight to six hours and
their pay reduced accordingly. Students were to be hired to do the
work formerly included in the maids' job descriptions.
Despite the protests of some of the 20 women' at the meeting,
held in the Place Vanier common block, Rohringer said the students
had to be given jobs because "if they can't pay for their rooms, we'll
have to close the residences and you'll all be out of a job."
Two students for each residence tower — a total of less than 30
- would be hired under the new plan.
At the meeting, Rohringer was informed by CUPE national
representative Mike Kramer that the union, which has sole bargaining
power for the workers, had not been informed of the proposed
changes. Such a tactic is contrary to the union's contract with the
university.
Rohringer said McLean had given him the impression it was all
right to proceed with the changes, and has agreed to hold off
instituting them for a week.
See page 14: Cut
a consumer column
This column is for your mind and your
pocketbook.
It's an attempt to give students a little
more power over their environment both
on campus and off.
In a sense most of us are not only
consumers of physical goods and services
but of education as well. As such we
should have a say in our day-to-day
existence and the development of our
future.
This is a reader participation column.
Myself and the other Ubyssey staffers
who will be writing in this space have
neither the time nor the resources to
cover everything. So we need a little of
your help and of your time. Write in!
BOOKS: It's time again to play the
textbook game. Readers of this column
who spot a book selling at a different
price (higher or lower) than the one at
the  university  bookstore   are asked to
drop me a signed note at the address
below. Please list the title and the author
of the book, the two prices and the name
of the non-university bookstore.
If you don't want your name to
appear indicate this but be sure to leave
your name and telephone number.
Shop around!
POLLUTION: Typical of the
conflicting forces gripping the
administration are ecology conscious
deputy president Bill Armstrong on the
one hand and the tight-fisted, narrow
thinking food services head Ruth Blair
and deputy president Bill White on the
other.
Armstrong was instrumental in helping
the Joshua society set up their re-cycling
operation on campus.
Typically enough, the SPEC-infested
library has been most active in helping
the   re-cycling   project   by   setting   up
collection bins on each floor.
White and Blair, oblivious to the filth
on campus, are madly creating more piles
of rubbish with their new "save money,
make garbage" plan.
This plan includes a host of disposable
paper containers and plastic utensils (that
don't work worth a damn) being
substituted for the dishes that were being
used last year.
Typically enough these are the people
who are NOT participating in the
re-cycling project.
Perhaps to top it all off we aren't even
using Canadian goods. Our plastic
"Diplomat" cutlery is produced in the
good old U.S. of A.
A similar move was made by the
administration at Sir George Williams a
few years ago. Concerned students raided
the offending lunchrooms and burned all
the paper and plastic crap, forcing Sir
George's   food   services   to   haul   their
washable dishes out of storage.
I wouldn't be surprised if the same
thing doesn't happen here before long.
WAGES: Some graduate students this
year face a 33 per cent increase in tuition
fees over last year. At the same time there
has been little or no increase in the
salaries paid them as teaching assistants.
The faculty, however, this year won a
10 per cent pay hike. Last year it was 13
per cent.
JOHN YOUNG: please stop promoting
yourself as UBC's next president and get
your ass in gear. Why not investigate this
situation or is it too personally politically
hot?
Art Smolensky
Got a gripe? Prices high, quality low?
Drop me a signed note c/o The Ubyssey
giving full details. Exposes solicitated. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September  14,  1971
Just in time
Things simmer along at UBC over the
summer, when most students aren't around to
watch over the operation.
It's the time when guys like Conrad Schwarz,
The Marijuana Man, undertake studies that only
prove whatever their authors thought in the first
' place.
It's the time when arts deans like Doug
Kenny brush unpleasant matters like English
departments under faculty club rugs.
It's the time when food services bureaucrats
like Ruth Blair replace dishes with things like
plastic cutlery and collapsible paper plates.
It's the time when administration libraries
 r-r—
and bookstores install detectors and detectives to
guard books against people.
It's the time when housing directors like Les
Rohringer try to cut work hours of underpaid
residence maids
It's lucky we're back.
If we hadn't arrived until November, the
corruption and confused thinking might have
been next to uncontainable.
Just the same, it's going to take a lot of work
to straighten things out.
Thanks to students and student money, the
salvage job is already under way.
We have a new co-op bookstore, with an
alternate food service in the offing.
And a women's studies course, and a special
events committee and a union of radical social
scientists — all of which offer rational directions
for study and sources of information normally
left out of the university smorgasbord.
Not to mention the first student government
in   UBC   history   with   a   sound   program   of
education and action.
The summer is over.
It's 1971, and we're on a campus that has
been more or less asleep for the past three years,
in a province dominated by government and
industry whose sole purpose seems to be to bleed
the land and the people, in a country that isn't
even our own.
But an awakening is occurring, and the time
to start the surmounting these obstacles is now.
the umsser
Factual errors
1 feel I should respond to some factual errors which
appeared on page 29 of the Sedate(d) Student Guide to
the University of B.C. in an article concerning the whys
and wherefores of the left at UBC. I am referring to the
so-called aversion of the Young Socialists to nationalism.
That is incorrect. In Canada, for instance, we strongly
defend the nationalism of the Quebecois, their right to
determine their future in the way they see fit. We are
builders and supporters of their struggle for national
self-determination, a struggle which centres today around
their right to protect and speak their own language in
every aspect of their life. We also support the nationalist
struggle of the peoples of Bangla Desh who are currently
fighting for separation from the reactionary and bloody
regime of West Pakistan.
One must of course make a distinction between
various "nationalisms". The imperialist chauvinism of the
United States today which is raping the countries of
southeast Asia has our undying opposition, whereas we
actively defend the nationalist struggles of the southeast
Asian peoples through building the anti-war movement.
Regarding what is described as our "chronic inability
to work constructively with other left-wing groups"
perhaps I need only say that this particular rumor speaks
more compellingly than do the facts. All those who are
interested in building movements for social change —
women's liberation, anti-war, student struggles, etc., will
have our most hearty and strong co-operation and
support. To paraphrase the referred-to article in the
sedated guide — "What's good for the revolution — that is,
Letters
what furthers the struggle against a society which breeds
and continues racism, war, poverty, pollution and ills and
alienations of all sorts, and constructively attempts to
bring about its only rational alternative — socialism — is
good for the Young Socialists!"
Joan Campana,
President, UBC Young Socialists
Ombudswoman, Alma Mater Society
THE UBYSStr
SEPTEMBER 14, 1971
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the
AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly
commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are
located in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial   departments,   228-2301,   228-2307;  Page   Friday,
Sports, 228-2305; advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Leslie Plommer
Staff: And so the teams lined up for a quick game of Class
Warfare. Bernard Bischoff picked Art Smolensky and Judy
McLeod for his side, but David Schmidt countered with John
Perry, Nettie Wild and Leigh Harrison. As Lisha Nokony, Ian
Street and Jennifer Alley exchanged credentials, Maurice
Bridge and John Twigg announced a rout and Jennifer Jordan,
Ginny Gait pitched in to woman the barricades.
John Andersen took carbine and musket in hand, and nearly
missed Jan O'Brien, Sandy Kass and Linda Hossie, who asked
for time out to present a list of non-negotiable demands. John
Kula nailed Paul Knox to a T-square, while Gord Gibson asked
to be referee. George Mapson posed provocatively for Jerry
Schmidt and David Bowerman. Brett Garrett said his red jacket
came from the Kremlin, and his team almost won until Nate
Smith formed a breakaway Canadian union and took the day
(not to mention the citadel) by storm. Lamont Cranston was
amused, but not too amused. Likewise, Chris and Mike Sasges.
Writer's reply
The article said "a general aversion to nationalism,"
not an aversion to nationalism—an important difference.
Granted the YS defends the nationalism of the
Quebecois and other oppressed peoples. However, it is
interesting to note when this support started.
Where were your people in Quebec when the national
struggle started there?
Were you in the leadership of those working for
national liberation or were you repeating your tired, old
doctrine of unity of the Quebecois and Canadian workers
against the ruling class?
We suspect the latter.
Only when it became obvious to even the most
dogmatic that nationalism at present is the motive force
of the Quebec revolution did you change your line.
It appears your position on Canadian nationalism will
follow much the same pattern as it did in
Quebec—switches which are commonly called
opportunism.
Which brings us to the final paragraph of your letter.
You say any movements for social change will get the
support of the YS. The support of the YS is like the
support a rope gives a hanged man, to paraphrase someone
whose name we've forgotten (it was probably either Marx
or Lenin so maybe you could enlighten us.)
The strategy of the YS is well known to anyone who
has attempted to work with it. You give support to a
movement only as long as it is to your advantage to do so.
Then you split.
This fact does a good deal to explain why the YS
remains a tiny sectarian group despite your claims to the
contrary.   J.A. Tuesday,  September  14,   1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
Purdy the public poet
Canadian poet Al Purdy will read his
poems in the SUB art gallery tomorrow at
noon, in the first of a series of readings
by Canadian and Quebecois writers
sponsored by the human government.
Ubyssey reviewer Stan Persky looks at
Wild Grape Wine, Purdy's large collection
of verse published in 1968 by McClelland
and Stewart.
Although poet George Bowering, in a
recent, lively critical work (Al Purdy,
Copp Clark, 1970) rightfully calls North
of Summer Purdy's most successful and
sustained book, it is Wild Grape Wine I
return to for an intoxicated sense of the
poet and his work.
In "Spring Song" we hear, in the wry
wit, the voice of a real goat-footed satyr
Include me out of it all?
Not yet
so long as the farm girl has
my two eyes twinkling hard against
her jiggling jelly buttocks swaying
down the lane to the mailbox
wearing short in figleaf weather
I'm gratified but rueful
at the young man's vehement twitching
lechery
inside an old man's
inconvenient morals
under a senile Pontiac in the butter-yellow
sunlight attempting to change the oil
The actuality of Pan — who is the
great image of an authentic part of male
sexuality - comes through, and it is one
of the hardest things for a poet to do: to
successfully invoke that large and ancient
world without being obscure, pedantic, or
"literary". Perhaps it is because Purdy's
Pan is so inseparably located in the
Ontario landscape:
crows thronging the June skies and
everything still
everything suddenly goddam still
with the sun a hovering golden bird
nothing moves soft clouds wait
soft clouds wait
like floating houses in the sky
and the strom beyond the horizon
waiting high
over the village of Ameliasburg
Through all of the
wandering-in-other-places poems, it is
Purdy's rural place in Ameliasburg, Ont.
that remains the measure for him. Sitting
in the gallery of Ottawa's House of
Commons, as he sees "cabinet ministers
rising / un-Venuslike from the sewage / of
words", he thinks to himself:
Writes of ancient lore,
Roblin Lake and Che
none here seems remotely capable
of running the affairs of my small
village of A meliasburg
when the reeve retires next month
or again:
I am the governed
A t Roblin Lake a rabbit confronts an owl
but a leaf hides the moonlit meeting
and the news is not published
a snake slides up to a fat green frog
addressing him about the food problem
but there is an undertaking of silence
the reporter closes his eyes
I wish to retain the alternatives
loitering among the centuries
watching Mitchell Sharp and Paul Martin
but Hansard cannot be written
until the frog dies or the rabbit speaks
and I have turned my head away
from moonlight on Paul Martin's glasses
Purdy is a public poet — that is, he gives
you a sense that you have a relationship
to the events of this country — and he has
the great attractiveness of writing a
completely colloquial, yet elegant
language. However, when he moves from
his sure sense of the average person's
powerlessness in the public realm to the
near-adulation of figures like Diefenbaker
and Trudeau, one becomes dubious about
the quality of his political
discriminations.
Of the poems Purdy writes from such
disparate places as Baffin Island, Cuba,
Ottawa, Newfoundland and Toronto,
many   have   the   weakness   of   "travel
Discover Canadian poets at UBC
I've broken the mirror of poetry
shattered that image on the
wall
Tm casting my eyes my forehead
and my bare fists in the mould
of a naked wind howling
through chinks of anger
and nothing nothing can shield me
ever again
from the anguish of my people
naked I walk remote in a
bloodless silence where the
fusillade-poem is arming itself
to the teeth. . .
So writes Paul Chamberlain, a
young Quebecois poet who is
almost unknown on the West
Coast.
But he and many other
Canadian and Quebecois poets
will be coming to UBC to read
their works thanks to a new
program instituted by the Alma
Mater Society special events
committee.
"This series of readings was
provoked by the total failure of
social scientists and politicians to
define the Canadian Identity,"
said committee worker Julian
Wake. "So we turned to poets to
give some clues. We've tried to be
representative of the different
regions of Canada and we've
tended to shy away from poets
like Layton and Cohen who
already receive a lot of exposure.
"We've tried to get young
poets who are not that well
known and give them a chance to
read their poetry. Until now local
poets for example have had
nowhere to read. They should be
able to read in their own city at
least two or three times a year."
Wake pointed out that many
established poets such as Earle
Birney, George Bowering,
Margaret Atwood, and Michael
Ondaatje have also been invited,
and a special group of Quebec
poets including Chamberlain,
Jacques Godbout, and Cecile
Cloutier. The program begins with
Al Purdy who will be reading this
Wednesday noon in the SUB art
gallery. And best of all no
admission is charged for any of
the readings; this poetry is, as all
poetry should be, completely free.
=o=
=0=
o
=o=
poems", but when the work rises to a
public level, as in "Hombre", written on
the occasion of Che Guevara's
assasination by the Bolivian fascists, there
is a clarity and power:
/ remembered Guevara
along with structural details of Cuban
girls
the Grand Hotel at Camaguay with
roosters
vaulting into my early morning sleep
an all-night walk in Havana streets with
a friend
a mad jeep-ride over the Sierra Maestras
to visit a sugar mill attacked by raiders
and Castro talking solemnly to his
nation
a million people holding hands and
singing
And I remember Che Guevara
a man who made dreams something
he could hold in his hands both hands
saying "Hiya" or whatever they say
in Spanish
to the flower-like Vietnamese ladies
cigar tilted into his own trademark
of the day when rebels swarmed out
ofOriente Province down from the
mountains
It is Purdy's grasp of "home-land"
that allows his entrance to deep, big
poems in Wild Grape Wine, like
"Lament For The Dorsets" and "The
North West Passage". Though the latter
is a formal, historical poem about the
explorers of the Canadian north, Purdy
manages an intensity of particular
detail:
on expeditions across the barrens
in stone cairns under the snow
that reappear in spring posing the
same riddle
of lost races and ghost tribes of the
tundra
there were hints in the mood of grey
weather
hills moving with caribou and in the
skull
of one old bull underfoot like a piece
of orange peel
Inevitably, Purdy returns to his literal
homeland   of Ameliasburg   and   Roblin
Lake and a relationship between himself
and   the   landscape   that   moves   like   a
conversation:
No sun or wind on the grey lake
all morning and thru the long afternoon
summer co ttagers go ne
a pair of tall elms
dead long since from dutch elm disease
are indistinguishable from other trees
their small bones leafless
WelU've no doubt weather
does influence moon and
when it rains people are seldom
optimistic
in middle age the body itself
slows to contemplate nothingness
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THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September   14,   1971
Linguistics initiates
Canadian instruction
EHftHDERBiRD SHOF
By LISHA NOKONY
The linguistics department at UBC has
expanded its program this year to include courses
directed at linguistics in a Canadian context.
Dr. Bernard Saint-Jacques, acting head of the
department, said the aim of the department is "to
produce students who are not only well-trained in
linguistics but who have the ability to use and apply
their knowledge in a Canadian context."
He said the number of positions in Canadian
educational institutions and government agencies
calling for. trained linguists is increasing and that
those filling these positions must be able to deal
with distinctly Canadian linguistic problems.
For example, the recent federal government
program for teaching French and English to civil
service employees required linguists with special
training in second language teaching and
bilingualism
Most foreign language teaching programs are
seeking students trained in linguistics. Community
colleges are now opening up in linguistics and
instructors arc needed to fill these positions.
One new course offered this year, Linguistics
Shinerama
rebuffed
The 1971 Shinerama fund drive will not receive
any money from student council.
A donation of $250 was turned down at
council's Wednesday meeting.
"The decision was made on a general principle
of not supporting charities," Evert Hoogers, Alma
Mater Society secretary, said.
Shinerama, organized by the Canadian Cystic
Fibrosis Foundation, is a shoe shine drive.
Hoogers said Wednesday funds to cystic fibrosis
research should come from the government rather
than private charity.
"Because of this feeling the AMS will not
support any future charity drives," he said.
PANGO-PANGO (UNS) - The president of this
island republic Monday laid a snivelling charge
against the editor of the island's only newspaper.
Sources in the capital report that the mucous
membranes are considering laying a counter-charge
alleging libel, but the editor, Cynthia Cilia, denied
the rumors. Life, however, goes on.
FRANCOIS TRUFFAUT
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535, will be concerned with the problems of
bilingualism and biculturalism. This course will
examine questions about second language
acquisition and the socio and psycholinguistic
implications of bilingualism.
"Linguists have a tendancy to analyze language
in ideal situation, with an ideal speaker, in a
homogenous community," said Dr. Saint-Jacques.
"It, is evident that this kind of analysis does not
cope with reality, particularly in the case of a
bilingual person."
Linguistics 440 and 540 will concentrate on
Canadian dialectology, French and English, he said,
since "Canada is unique as a bilingual state...
because her two official languages, English and
French, have international status and worldwide
prestige."
But in Canada, he said, both these languages
have become "Canadianized."
"There is a distinct Canadian English accent,
and the French spoken in Quebec is different from
that spoken in Paris. Within Canada there are
dialectal differences in both languages.
"English pronunciation and intonation varies
from the Maritimes to Vancouver, and the French in
Montreal has characteristics different, from the
French of Quebec."
A student must be competent in this field, said
Dr. Saint-Jacques, and dictionaries in Canadian
English and Canadian French require mapping of
dialect areas and tracing of differences in sound and
grammar and idiom.
A fourth course, Linguistics 530, will survey
Canadian Indian languages in general and will
concentrate on B.C. Indian languages, covering 10
Indian language families in Canada, each of which
contains one to fifteen different languages or
dialects.
Many of these languages have no writing system
to preserve the native literature and to provide a
means of teaching the languages formally.
"The structures of these languages as well as the
cultures they represent are so different from
Western language and thought, that every effort
should be made for their study and their
preservation."
The areas covered by these classes involve
elements involved in major Canadian political issues.
Although most of these courses have been planned
for graduate students, Dr. Saint-Jacques said that
there is an opportunity for undergraduates without
the necessary prerequisites to enrol with the
approval of the instructors.
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'Support Your Campus Theatre Tuesday, September 14,  1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
The Canadian woman
The Canadian woman, what is
it?
"It's our story — the story of
our history and an analysis of our
present situation," says Anne
Petrie, co-ordinator of the Alma
Mater Society's women's studies
program, The Canadian Woman:
Our Story.
The program consists of a
20-lecture series beginning SepL
28 at 7 p.m. in the SUB
ballroom.
Each evening's session will be
open to both men and women,
and made up of an hour lecture or
panel discussion followed by small
seminars which will discuss
specific issues raised in the
evening's lecture.
"The program will try to deal
with both the psychological and
political implications of women's
position as second class citizens
and less than human beings," said
Petrie.
"We will be working from the
basic biological questions, through
the socialization of the child and
adolescent and then discuss
various other more general topics
such as love and sexuality,
consumerism and the women's
liberation movement."
The program started with
$5,000 Opportunities for Youth
grant from the federal government
last summer.
The seven women involved in
organizing the course had initially
planned only to establish both the
need and the desire for such a
course on campus and present a
The whys
and whats
of it all
Victorious and exhausted,  Anne
Petrie     cites more    than    125
applicants in women's studies
course.
model course outline to senate
where curriculum changes and
new courses are approved, said
Petrie.
"However, after doing several
weeks of interviews with faculty
and students it became apparent
that such courses should be made
available this session for both
students on campus and people in
the Vancouver community," she
said.
"This course should not have
to be presented by the AMS," said
Petrie.
"It should be presented for
credit by the university
administration.
"As the system of university
rewards goes, a student should not
have to give his or her time
voluntarily in order to study a
contemporary subject which has
already received serious academic
attention — witness the women's
caucus of the 'venerable' Modern
Languages Association," she said.
"To this end we have started
on the process which we hope will
lead to the eventual accreditation
of this course."
A brief has been submitted to
the agenda committee of the
senate for referral to the
curriculum committee which will
then present it back to the senate.
"At this point it is important
that everyone on campus be aware
of this course and those who are
anxious for its accreditation ought
to lobby with senate members,"
Petrie said.
More than 125 people have
signed up for the course after only
five days of registration which
continues in the main foyer of
SUB and the women's studies
office SUB 218. For more
information call 228-2082.
SUS trashed, guide ruined
Science students have been robbed of a service
this year as a result of a weekend break-in at the
science undergraduate society office.
The SUS office in hut 07 was found in chaos
Sunday by Piers Bursill-Hall. science representative
on student council, and editor of a proposed
20-page guide for science students.
Bursill-Hall said Monday he left the SUS office
locked and in good condition Friday night. In the
office was the almost-complete student guide.
At noon Sunday he returned to find the office
and lounge had been ransacked: Glue had been
sprayed on the walls, a radio and windows were
broken, holes bashed in the walls, and the student
guide material crumpled, stepped on and spread
across the floor.
Now, he said, there is no time or people-power
to salvage the guide for publication.
On the blackboard "EUS Rules" - the
traditional battle cry of the engineering
undergraduate society — was sprayed in glue.
However, Bursill-Hall said he checked with
engineering president Doug Aldridge who said his
group had nothing to do with trashing the SUS
office.
The only breakable item left untouched in the
SUS office, according to Bursill-Hlll, was a television
set belonging to a member of last year's SUS
executive — a group which is hostile to the current
executive.
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THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September  14,   1971
Radicals give registration information
Arts students cramming
through the guarded doors of
Buchanan to go through the
annual registration wringer
encountered something new this
year.
Stationed just inside the front
door was a group calling itself the
Union of Radical Social Scientists.
The union, which was formed
during the summer, originally
planned to distribute critiques of
introductory humanities courses.
"But in the mass confusion of
people coming in the door, we
also ended' up being a general
helpful information service for
students," political science
graduate student Scott Fast said
Monday.
"The administration didn't do
anything to help the students
except put up a couple of vague
signs," said graduate philosophy
student Stan Persky.
"This is the first time a group
of students has got together and
tried to do something about the
situation of registration," Persky
said.
The group, composed mainly
of graduate students, handed out
leaflets on first and second year
level courses- aimed at letting
students "know what you are
getting into before you get into
it."
Persky said this was the start of
a "year-round plan to make
critiques of what's going on in the
classroom."
Meanwhile, an early count
shows a slight decrease in the
number of students registered at
UBC this year.
This year's enrolment figure in
the science and engineering
undergraduate programs is about
the same as last year's at 4,471.
Enrolment in the undergraduate
arts and education programs is
slightly down with 7,545 students
registered so far.
Late registration and graduate
students registration continues
this week.
UBC registrar Jack Parnall
Monday cited an increasing
number of junior colleges in the
province as one of the reasons for
this year's decreased enrolment.
He said the programs offered
by junior colleges are just as good
as those at UBC and the fees are
lower.
Parnall said financial reasons
could be another factor in the
lower enrolment. Either students
can't afford to attend the
university this year or they are
working later into September than
usual.
"A $25 late fee is nothing to a
student who can work 10 extra
days," he said.
Parnall anticipates a large
influx into third and fourth year
when students are ready to leave
the junior colleges. This could
po.se a problem for the university.
"The university has difficulty
budgeting when the enrolment
fluctuates widely," he said. "This
will have be looked into when the
smoke clears."
The development of junior
colleges also has affected the arts 1
program.
Arts I officials say the
integrated humanities seminars,
worth nine of the required 15
units, could easily accommodate
80 more first year students.
About 280 students have
enrolled* in the program so far.
You win some, lose some
By LEIGH HARRISON
English students are being divided into winners
and losers on their first day of class says Barbara
Coward, an English 100 teaching assistant.
She is unhappy about the "diagnostic essay"
that is being given to all 100 students to write
during their first English class.
A department circular said the purpose of the
essay is to "find those students whose writing skills
are too weak to enable them to pass in a regular
English 100 course."
These students will be advised to transfer to a
remedial section of the course, the circular said.
Besides creating "first-day failures" Coward and
several other TAs are upset because they are not
being permitted to mark the essays which are being
given to other English graduate students to assess.
David Mackeree, who is in charge of English
100 markers admitted there had been a lack of
communication with the TAs.
He said the only reason the instructors were not
being allowed to mark the papers was to ensure that
the essay did not bias them towards their new
students.
However, Coward said, "It is just one more way
of intimidating already terrorized students and
making sure that both students and instructors are
thwarted from learning anything or discovering their
own ways of expressing and knowing."
Canadian policy backs Amchitka
The whole logic of the Canadian defence policy
is to support the Amchitka nuclear blast, a political
science professor said Monday.
"The Canadian defence policy is to defend the
See also Pages 10 and 11
American nuclear deterrent since the Canadian
defence research board has been participating with
the U.S.A. for the last 13 years secretly on the
anti-missile defence system," said Prof. Philip
Resnick.
"This defence policy has been reiterated in a
defence white paper," Resnick said.
"Let us talk about this another time, right now
let us talk about the one specific blast at
Amchitka," said MP Ray Perrault (Lib. -
Burnaby-Seymour).
"There is an imposition on the people of
Canada by a government which on one hand claims
non-proliferation but its natural policy is acceptance
of nuclear strategy which assumes explosions like
Amchitka," Resnick said.
Perrault earlier said external affairs minister
Mitchell Sharp's speech in Geneva last week
emphasized the government's unanimous opposition
to the Amchitka blast and all nuclear blasts.
10
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The arts II program has been
dropped this year "because
nobody seemed to want it that
much," said former arts II prof
Fred Stockholder.
Stockholder said only 67
registered for the course which
can handle 120.
The arts faculty administration
refused to give credit for English
200 to Arts II students going into
third year, he said.
"When push comes to shove,
students don't have time in the
prerequisite system to take a
second-year course."
Another problem was that
several faculty members were
leaving the program and no others
appeared  interested in replacing
them, he said.
Meanwhile, the computer
centre is taking steps to eliminate
some of this year's registration
wrinkles, says computer director
Rudy Jahelka.
Jahelka said this year students
were faced with the problem of
not enough course cards to go
around.
His department is planning a
new pre-registration system which
will do away with course cards
altogether.
The only thing that marred last
year's attempt at pre-registration
was the fact that all 4,576
timetables had to be re-processed
because of errors in the scheduling
program.
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THE       UBYSSEY
Page 9
Support Burau — take his courses
Karl Burau is a person most
students see around campus
during the year. He has been at
UBC on a regular basis for about
six years, trying to initiate what
he calls an "experimental
college "
The Ubyssey is affording him
this space to set out his program
for the coming year. -Ed.
By KARL BURAU
The following three courses
start this week.
It is hoped that they will be
credited as electives in a program
of studium generate as 1 have
suggested to UBC senate.
From my brief before senate:
(1) A weekly forum on what is
wrong with Canada, and what to
DO about it. Besides reserving for
me two hours at noon one day a
week for such special events as a
discussion with the Hon. John-
Turner, I wish to have two hours
one morning. In general, I shall
provide two speakers of opposite
views; sometimes I will be one
myself, and have a general
discussion with all students. There
also will be the work of special
committees doing research to
follow up on main statements.
This will be divided according to
subject matter.
This course starts Thursday,
Sept. 16 from 8:30 to 10:30 a.m.
in SUB 111, with a discussion of
university reform.
(2) What is especially wrong
with Canada, of course, is also
drug addiction and pollution, but
I wish to include these two topics
in a special three part course: (a)
the revolution in the biological
sciences and its social
consequences; (b) on drug
addiction there is no chemical
way to wisdom or virtue; (c)
pollution and population. One
morning two hours, each third
week, each part. For (a) I shall
have a committee of UBC
professors of biological science as
regular teachers.
The professors of the biological
sciences will set a final paper for
credit purposes. Dr. Suzuki will
take part, but not regularly. For
(b) the regular expert teacher will
be Dr. C.'J. Schwarz. He will set a
final paper for credit purposes.
For (c) I shall invite from time to
time, experts with opposite views.
Credit for the whole course if
passed by two of the following
three persons: the biological
professor (a), Dr. Schwarz, and
myself.
Topics of this course include
genetic engineering, cloning of
individuals, tampering with the
human egg and embryo, synthesis
of life and biological weapons.
The course will also deal with the
responses of the biological
community to current problems
in the field.
This course starts Wednesday,
Sept. 15 from 8:30 to 10:20 in
SUB 111.
(3) Adventures in German
Literature and Poetry.
I do mean "adventures." This
course is not meant or pretended
as an expert course of learned
lessons but as an intellectual
involvement of students and
teacher trying to achieve a more
profound understanding of
relevant literature by genuine
discussion — dialectic in the
Platonic sense.
Therefore, there will never be
any readings of written lectures
but free presentation of ideas
without artificial learnedness, but
with simple honesty. The
adventure springs from this
intellectual honesty, and though
I have a final responsibility of
giving some formal guidance, no
"one man show" is aimed at.
As of my courses, all meetings
will be public. For credit purposes
of course only registered students
can participate. Otherwise
everybody is welcome, especially
faculty, especially also if wishing
to probe or challenge or correct or
disprove me.
In principle I suggest to make
it a rule for all studium generale
course that the teacher in charge
may — and ought to — keep them
"public", Le. the general public be
invited as long as no additional
expenses are incurred for UBC.
This is an essential part of a true
university in a democracy and also
an obvious obligation to the
public, in return for being
financed chiefly by public funds.
For this course, it will not be
necessary to understand German
for I shall discuss only such books
that have been translated into
English and we shall speak
English. Only if there are enough
students would we divide into two
groups meeting at different times:
one group knowing German and
perhaps discussing in German;
otherwise it would be in English,
except reading poetry in the
original German. Such poems as a
rule would be distributed
(multigraphed) in advance, and
students without the knowledge
of German would have to look up
the   English   translation   or have
Burau
expressing
opinions
in 1968
Warrant issued
for Quebec patriot
By CUP INTERNATIONAL
MONTREAL — A warrant is out for the arrest of Quebec
intellectual Pierre Vallieres after he chose not to "submit interminably
to fake political trials" and went underground Sept. 7.
Vallieres failed to appear in court Sept. 7 to have a trial date set
and Crown Prosecutor Stephen Cuddihy announced a bench warrant
had automatically been issued for his arrest.
The warrant was originally suspended until Sept. 27, the
tentative trial date, but the suspension was lifted when Vallieres
released a communique saying it is necessary to take the initiative in
overthrowing the government of Quebec, rather than submit to the
government's initiative.
The communique, received Friday by the French-language daily
tabloid Montreal Matin, bore the letterhead of the outlawed Front de
Liberation du Quebec.
It said Vallieres had gone underground "because to overcome, it
is necessary to know how to take the offensive and to determine
ourselves the place and form of the struggle."
Vallieres, who has spent the last four years in jail appealing
various charges of FLQ activity, without being convicted, faces trial
on charges arising out of the War Measures Act.
His previous charges have been dropped and he is now accused
of seditious consipiracy and membership in the FLQ.
His co-defendants, teacher Charles Gagnon and former
broadcaster Jacques Larue-Langlois were acquitted last spring.
them translated by a
German-speaking friend.
For credit purposes it will be
possible to rely on a paper proving
knowledge of our discussions of
literature and/or on having
memorized a good deal of poetry
in German.
On the whole, about two-thirds
of the meetings will be reading
and discussing poems giving a
broad segment of the best of
German poetry but also somehow
taking into account the special
interests of the students who
participate. The literature to be
discussed may finally be decided
upon after meeting with the
students.
But for the present, I propose
to use the following works:
Steppenwolf, Klein and Wagner;
The Glass Bead Game; Narziss and
Goldmund; Goethe; Werther's
Sufferings; Ibsen: Peer Gynt;
Kafka; Zuckmayer; Bergengruen
or Frisch; Schiller: Don Carlos;
Sophocles: Oedipus; Hebbel:
Agnes Bernauer; Faust.
I include Peer Gynt and
Oedipus for I do not think it
necessary to stick strictly to
German literature.
Before The Glass Bead Game, I
shall have four discussions of the
most basic ideas of: Plato; Kant,
Hegel; Schopenhauer, Nietzsche;
Freud, Jung, Fromm, Reich,
Lorenz, (Vanggaard).
This course starts Tuesday,
Sept. 14 from 8:30 to 10:20 a.m
in SUB 111. But this first lecture
will be repeated Friday, Sept. 17
at the same time and place. It will
then be decided which is the best
day for most students.
BUY LOW-SELL HIGH!
The day you sell your car could very
well be a "Black Friday."
But never — ever with used
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IN KERRISDALE
Your Nearest Volkswagen Dealer
will tell you why.
Margaret Zittier
Phone me personally at 266-8391 or at home 277-0848 Page 10
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, Septem ber 14,  1971
Philip Resnick
A Political
AMCH
The planned explosion of a five-megaton nuclear warhead at the
bottom of a 6,000-foot hole on Amchitka Island in the Aleutians by
the US Atomic Energy Commission is indeed an outrage. This much the
wave of protests by concerned citizens groups, ecology freaks,
scientists, trade unions, politicians, and even, unlikely protesters, the
Real Estate Board of Vancouver, makes clear.
At least in B.C., all would appear unanimous in their opposition
to the most powerful underground nuclear explosion yet conceived,
pointing to to the potential danger of nuclear radiation leaking into the
sea and air, and of seismic shock and tidal waves reaching our shores.
Even the Canadian government, never a forceful critic of
American policy, has, through the mouths of its External Affairs and
Environment ministers, called for the cancellation of the Amchitka
blast.
In the United States, as well, various scientists and politicians
have attacked this explosion whose total cost is $190 million, labelling
it "a pointless experiment in support of an unnecessary weapon," and
"an experiment waiting to be cancelled." With the Strategic Arms
Limitation Talks between the United States and the Soviet Union
showing signs of progress, and with American policy towards China
beginning to shed its twenty-year obsession with containment and
anti-communism the logic of the Anti-Ballistic Missile program with its
nuclear-tipped rockets is dubious in the extreme.
Yet the AEC and the Pentagon assure the American public that
"the alternative to not testing this particular explosive would be to
make impossible the development of nuclear weapons technology of
significance to our national security requirements." Neither Congress
nor Richard Nixon, an old spokesman for the military-industrial
complex, are likely to over-rule this.
What has been lacking in so much of the opposition by B.C. and
other groups to the Amchitka blast is an elementary understanding of
American military strategy, of which Amchitka is but a tiny part, and
of Canadian support for that strategy ever since 1945. Bodies such as
the Real Estate Board of Vancouver or the Liberal Party of B.C., or the
Premiers' Conference, meeting at Victoria, which have never been
critics of American involvement in Vietnam or of Canada's junior
partnership to American military and economic policy, have suddenly
become paper tigers over Amchitka.
However, any protest against Amchitka that is to raise people's
consciousness and lead to significant change must be directed against
the very structures of continentalism and imperialist integration, of
which Liberal governments from Mackenzie King's to Trudeau's and
provincial  governments  such as Bennett's have been a  mainstay.  A
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political   critique   of   Amchitka   is,   therefore,   a  criticique  of  the
colonialism of the Canadian ruling class and a call to militant action.
American strategy since 1945 has been directed at containing
both the Soviet Union and China, militarily, economically, and
politically, while developing and consolidating a far-flung American
Empire. Techniques of American domination have ranged from the
deployment of American troops in Germany, Korea, Formosa, and
Japan, military intervention in support of right-wing governments in
Indo-China and Latin America, subversion and cultural penetration, to
economic hegemony through the Marshall Plan, direct capital
investment, the multi-national corporation, the reserve position of the
dollar, etc
Beyond these, the United States has developed a fantastic nuclear
force, not simply as a defence against "aggressive" Soviet or Chinese
policy, but as an instrument for reinforcing its hegemony over the
so-called free world.
It was the United States, not the Soviet Union, that first
developed atomic weapons, and the military-industrurial complex has
made sure that the US has largely set the pace of the arms race and
nuclear build-up.
The role of Canada in all this has historically been to support the
United States. In the post-war period, the Canadian government
accepted a defence alliance with the US, in Europe and Asia, as well as
in North America, and came to integrate Canadian defence policy,
especially air policy, into a continental, i.e. American-controlled,
framework.
Canadian troops in Europe and Korea, radar lines in the Canadian
Arctic, the North American Air Defence Agreement (NORAD) of 1958,
were devices, not of some independent Canadian defence policy, but in
support of American cold war objectives. Canadian defence policy was
overtly defined as "helping to protect the thermonuclear rataliatory
capacity of the United States," and in the late 1950s and early 1960s
Canada was forced into accepting a nuclear role by its alliance with the
US, witness the famous Bomarcs.
Continentalism in defence, of course, went hand in hand with
continentalism in economics. The post-war period had seen a massive
inflow of American direct investment in
and the mortgaging of whole sector
particularly resources, to the US.
In  defence,   this had the  furthi
continentalism in defence production,
their   way   to   Vietnam,   even   as  Can
International   Control  Commission,., su
spokesman of the American hard line to
The point of this brief history is t
defence relations between Canada and
American policy, following its reverses,
inwards in recent years, but this h*^
emphasis on defending fortress America,
American nuclear arsenal.
It also heralds greater, not lesi
Canada, and redoubled American interes
water and electricity, euphemistically |
policy. j
The most significant addition to
years has been the ABM. The cost of th
to defend existing first and second-stri
between  $5  and  $50  billion.   Essentia
missiles armed with nuclear warheads, u
rockets over northern Canada, and short
up.
The bases for the ABM are all in tt
US Secretary of Defense, Melvin Laird, v.
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THE      UBYSSEY
Page 11
ri»
Perspective
LfiJ
anada, which is continuing,
[ the_ Canadian  economy,
insequence of leading to
that Canadian arms found
n representatives on the
is  Slair  Seaborn,   became
it sets the stage for present
United States. To be sure,
ietnam, has begun to look
mything, meant a greater
ice on development of the
economic penetration of
Canadian resources such as
bed a continental energy
American arsenal in recent
borate network of missiles,
,BMs, will range anywhere
it involves using Spartan
fercept and destroy enemy
print missiles to back them
nited States, and when the
asked at hearings of the US
1 Senate Foreign Relations Committee in 1969, whether Canada would
have any voice over the use of these rockets, which would detonate
H-bombs over her territory, he bluntly replied: "The Canadian
Government has no veto power of any kind, no matter how close the
ABM bases are to the border and despite the fact the anti-missile could
explode over Canadian soil."
The Canadian government, far from expressing misgivings about
the ABM, equivocated. Trudear reserved his position, following his visit
to Nixon in 1969, and a year later Donald Macdonald, Canadian
defence minister, in an interview with the Toronto Star, stated: "It is
better to have nuclear missiles intercepted over James Bay than over
Montreal and Toronto. Canada would accept ABMs on Canadian soil
only with 'deep regret', but this might have to be considered."
In the meantime, the Canadian Defence Research Board and
other bodies had participated in secret research for the ABM for eleven
years, and Canadian radar stations were involved in relaying
information for the ABM system.
We come then to Amchitka, whose purpose is to perfect the
nuclear warhead of the Spartan missile. Having refused to condemn the
AMB system, tout au contraire, the Canadian government is in a strange
position to attack a test which seems logically necessary for the Spartan
warhead. It is somewhat reminiscent of Diefenbaker's refusal of nuclear
weapons for Bomarc missiles which he himself had accepted.
If one is to be colonialist in one's defence policy, there can be no
half-way measures. One either rejects a policy of continentalism in
defence and proceeds accordingly, or one stands passively on the
sidelines, a spectator and victim of American strategy.
The recently published Canadian white paper on defence is loud
with words about independence and sovereignty. But when one
examines the substance of this document, the only significant changes
in emphasis are the ominous passages about the role of the Canadian
military in policing internal dissent, as in Operation Quebec last
October.
On fundamentals, the white paper repeats the old shibboleths
that "co-operation between Canada and the United States in the joint
defencr of North America is vital for sovereignty and security."
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The purported enemy for Canada remains the Soviet Union, or
perhaps China, launching a strategic nu ;lear attack against the United
States, That the real threat to Canadian sovereignty and independence
may come from the United States is never mentioned.
To mobilize protest against Amchitka, therefore, it is not enough
to frighten people with visions of nuclear radiation and tidal waves. The
simple truth of the matter is that Amchitka is perfectly rational, if
one accepts the logic of nuclear deterrents and continental
defence alliances.
It becomes irrational, only when that very logic is put to
question, and when one begins to demand Canadian disengagement
from the American empire.
Recently, France began to conduct a series of nuclear tests in the
Pacific, depite the protests of a large number of South Pacific nations.
Peru, unlike the others, was prepared to back up its protests with
action, threatening to cut off diplomatic relations with France and
sabotage French plans for trade and military exports to the whole of
Latin America. The French promptly cancelled the remainder of their
tests, an admission of the effectiveness of Peru's action.
One can hardly imagine Trudeau's government even wet-dreaming
a break in relations with the US. But it is not by Canadian ministers
going hat in hand to Washington, begging for favours, that we can
assume control over our own political economy, defence policy,
environment, or what have you.
The answer to Amchitka is not mealy-mouthed statements from
Ottawa and petitions to Nixon, but the sundering of Canada's defence
alliance with the US, beginning with the radar lines and NORAD.
The answer to American national interest is Canadian national
interest, not it must be stressed, for the benefit of the colonial-minded
ruling class, but for the Canadian and Quebec people.
If the Amchitka blast takes place, large mass demonstrations at
various border points across Canada in early October, to make it clear
that Canadians will no longer simply buy American defence policy
second hand, would be one step towards such an independent position.
Another would be vigorous protest against the Canadian and
provincial governments, such as B.C.'s, whose policies integrally support
the closest inter-relationship between Canadian and American
capitalism, and make Amchitkas as much a part of Canadian as of
American policy.
When Canada has stopped defining its defence policy in terms of
supporting the American nuclear deterrent, we will be in a hell of a
better position to protest.
Welcomes All Students & Faculty
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THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September   14,   197
More of The Shadow
From page three
A number of English teachers
Told this reporter that they threw
"the damndest things in the
wastebasket" or circular file, as
it's also known, and others who
are fairly sympathetic to the
students' cause, said they just
didn't want to get involved in the
inquiry.
Hoogers said most of the
replies the commission did get
were not friendly. He said further
contact will be made with English
teachers, especially those who
didn't reply at all to the
preliminary questionnaire.
"We're also going to send a
preliminary questionnaire to
honors and majors students in the
department, asking what they'd
like to see in the department or
whether it is meeting their needs,"
he said.
"Later this year, hopefully in
October, we're going to hold open
hearings where anyone can testify.
We don't expect members of the
English department faculty to
participate, but if the shit flies,
that'll be the reason."
Hoogers said the student
commission will have a
comprehensive report ready for
students by the end of the year.
For those who don't already
know, the English department
hassle  came  to a head, last year
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when the department tenure
committee refused tenure to two
junior professors, Dave Powell and
Brian Mayne.
The two contested the
decisions, but the refusal to give
them tenure was later upheld by
the senior appointments
committee.
By that time, however, the real
crux of the issue had surfaced,
and both students and faculty
members expressed concern that
the American-born Jbrdan was
trying to change the emphasis in
the English department from
teaching to research.
Jordan has said that he favors
publication and the PhD degree as
the sole criteria for promotion in
the department. (The Ubyssey,
Jan. 30, 1970).
Both Mayne and Powell said at
the time of the initial conflict that
they considered teaching and
lecture preparation as the main
focus of their work. And, not
surprisingly, both were considered
excellent teachers by their
students.
Jordan's     views     on     the
democratic process in the
university were expressed in The
Ubyssey in January, 1970, when
he said that he thought too much
emphasis had been placed on
democracy in his department and
that a handful of good old boys
(sometimes known as senior
hatchetmen) should make all
decisions on hiring, firing and
promotion.
And when the first rash of the
proverbial hit the fan (i.e. when
the press publicized the whole
English department mess) Jordan
made it quite clear that it was a
bloody poor show which
exhibited "a petulant disregard
for proper university procedure."
By that, he quite clearly meant
the "proper university procedure"
and democracy are somehow
mutually exclusive.
At least you know where
Jordan stands. Kenny is much
sneakier.
In May, when Kenny
announced his investigation, he
appeared to be acting out of some
initiative from within, but in
reality,  he only acted after The
Ubyssey and the downtown press
had exposed the English
department mess to the extent
that the whole faculty of arts was
sharing the discredit of the
English department.
And since that time, he has
kept such tight control on any
information about the English
department that many
department faculty members
don't know what's going on.
Unless he can come up with
some sort of statement that will
show something is indeed being
done, Kenny, the psychologist,
will simply have to be viewed as a
shuckster who had no intention of
ever doing anything about th
English department's sa
situation, but who simply wante
to get the issue out of the public
eye for a while.
If he had been serious aboi
the inquiry, how could he -ha\
rejected the very reasonah
request that students take part i
the investigation?
Students, after all, play a fairl
important part in the classrooi
process, and are supposed to b
what universities are all about
You know where Jorda
stands; he admits it.
Kenny is just the same, but h
_ tries to hide it.	
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to the worldwide development of
Hoechst, which is now among
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that last year totalled approximately 3.5 billion dollars.
In Canada, sales have almost
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office staff, and have been designed for expansion to accomodate increased Canadian production.
Research: Window to
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Today's research creates the
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3.5 billion dollars last year,
Hoechst spent close to 100 million in pure research, and on
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Helping Build Canada
Products and ideas from Hoechst
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area around the world, in a
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worldwide Hoechst organization,
Canadian Hoechst has a full century of research and achievement
to draw upon. In Canada,
Hoechst is an autonomous company employing Canadians to
serve Canadian needs.
This new building is just one of
the more visible indications of
Canadian Hoechst Limited's
continuing investment in
Canada.    >
Hoechst in Canada concerns itself with supplying both the
present and future needs of Canadians. The range of products
and services covers the spectrum
through industrial chemicals,
dyestuffs, plastics, human and
veterinary medicines, pharmaceuticals, and textile fibres.
Hoechst products and services,
Hoechst techniques and know-
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with a large international fund of
experience, have given the Company a reputation for expertise
which takes constant striving to
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THE      UBYSSEY
Page 13
>
U of T student guidebook
censured by administration
By FRANK BRAYTON
Canadian University Press
To
lORONTO - The 1971 University of Toronto
student handbook has been vehemently attacked by
Toronto's establishment press and repudiated by its
publisher, the Students' Administrative Council.
The main target of criticism was the
handbook's lead editorial, entitled, "The Year of
the Siege." It concludes that the administration's
violent tactics must be met with violence.
One of the administration's tactics outlined in
the editorial was ordering the violent eviction of the
Wacheea tent city by calling metro police on to
campus earlier this year — an unprecedented action
at the U of T.
Seizing the opportunity to distort the
editorial's message, the establishment media quoted
its conclusion out of context, implying that the
handbook was designed to incite unprovoked
violence.
Although the handbook was distributed to
27,000 undergraduate and graduate day students at
0 of T, the press labelled it a "freshman
handbook", accusing the editor Alex Podnick, a
graduate political science student, of seeking to
mislead "impressionable" first-year students.
The Toronto Star proposed that the university's
administration issue "a counter-manifesto to the
incoming freshmen, warning that any resort to
illegality or violence will be answered with prompt
expulsion." In its editorial, it demanded Podnick's
expulsion as penalty for his "open incitements to
defiance of the law."
The Globe and Mail suggested that "Mr.
Podnick's ravings, if he attempts to translate them
into action, can be dealt with by the police."
lodi
lodnick said the press was guilty of
sensationalism and deliberate misrepresentation of
the editorial, and said the papers "implied that it
was meant to incite an unprovoked campaign of
"violence and intimidation."
"When the administration called in police to
evict Wacheea — well aware of the likelihood of
violence — despite Sword's pledge to negotiate with
them later that morning and despite the fact that
they weren't disturbing anyone, this same press
remained mute," he added. (Sack Sword is acting
administration president of U of T.)
While SAC spokesmen praised the handbook as
"one of the best and most useful booklets in some
years", they repudiated "the tone and methods
expressed in its "inflammatory pages".
Acting vice-president and provost Don Forster
said he was "very pleased the students'
administrative council has said that i:his is not their
policy in any way."
M
luch of the editorial focusses on a criticism of
Sword, the man responsible for calling police onto
the campus. When contacted following his return
from the Commonwealth University Administrators
Conference in Ghana, he said he had not yet read
the handbook and could make no comment.
However, Sword's associate, Forster, picked up
copies of the handbook for his lawyers to determine
whether it was libelous. According to SAC officials
metro police intelligence officers also came for
copies.
The handbook, now in its 70th year of
publication, contains 80 pages of information for
both new and returning students. Only the Globe
and Mail news report acknowledged the book's less
controversial elements. These include a
comprehensive community guide, information on
how the university really works, an exclusive report
on the confidential proceedings of the presidential
search committee, articles about campus clubs and
political groups, and background material on recent
political struggles on the U of T campus.
A major aimot this year's book was to provide
students with sufficient information to allow them
to organize effectively in the fall without the
traditional lag following summer vacation.
D
"iscussing the university's eviction of Wacheea,
the editorial observes that it showed the students
who the university serves and how it acts (with
legally sanctioned violence). It describes Sword as
"the servant of this province's ruling class,"
committed to maintaining the status quo.
"And if the student population gets restless, he
knows he can rely on the power of the state to
suppress them. It worked with Wacheea, and it
undoubtedly can work in the future — if we allow it
to," the editorial continues.
Dismissing liberal politics as useless in the long
run, the editorial advocates "direct action".
It says the administration "must be shown that
this university cannot and will not function unless it
functions in the interest of society."
"If the administration remains adamant in its
policy of ignoring students and the community, it
must be crippled — by whatever means are
necessary.
"If Sword again calls police on campus, students
cannot remain passive.
"1971-72 must be 'the year of the siege' at U of
T, a year in which student and community rights are
indelibly entrenched by direct action and those who
seek to retard this process are frustrated."
Tent city fades
TORONTO (CUP) - Wacheea, Toronto's
controversial tent city, closed Thursday having
weathered a summer of demonstrations.
The site of the tent hostel for transients was the
source of a bitter dispute between the University of
Toronto administration and Grass Roots, the
coalition group that ran the project using a $29,000
Opportunities for Youth grant.
An agreement was eventually signed between U
of T and Grass Roots which made the site of the
abandoned Mercer Reformatory available as a
campground for travellers.
The project was backed by the Students
Administrative Council and the Graduate Students
Union in the form of a $5,000 performance bond.
The total OFY grant to the project was
$28,480. Of this, 18 full-time workers received a
total of $13,950 and part-time workers received a
total of $8,400.
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the first instalment is due on or before
Friday, September 24, 1971 Page 14
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September  14,   1971
U of A students uneasy in employer role
EDMONTON (CUP) - Students at the University of
Alberta have suddenly found themselves in the unlikely
role of an employer appealing against union certificatioa
The provincial Board of Industrial Relations ha4
granted employees at the Student Union Building the
right to form a union and engage in collective bargaining
with their employers, the 'students at U of A. On behalf
of 20,000 students, students' union president Don
McKenzie has decided to appeal the board's decision to
the Supreme Court of Alberta.
The SUB workers, who were certified in July as local
1368 of the Canadian Union of Public Employees
(CUPE), are concerned that the students' union executive
will be able to suspend their union rights by engaging in
lengthy court action.
Past management actions have made it clear to SUB
workers that a strong union is important.
One of the major difficulties was negotiating with the
student union general manager, Darrell Ness, who was
granted a two-year contract in July. Other grievances
concerned the wide salary differences between the general
manager, who earns about $16,000 yearly, and the
workers, who get from $3,000 to $8,500 yearly.
There were also cases of workers losing their jobs
when another company took over the vending machines;
and obvious sex discrimination when a long time female
employee was passed over for promotion in favour of a
male applicant.
Prior to certification as a CUPE local, SUB workers
were represented by the Students' Union Staff
Association.
The students' union president claims that the workers
were acting in bad faith by demanding an increase of $44
per employee, only three months after a 20 per cent
retroactive wage increase had been granted for the
previous year.
Local 1368 president Percy Wickman said the "20 par
cent wage increase" included increases given
"management and possible additional staff." He said that
since McKenzie's term began as student president "the
only salary increases have been for management."
McKenzie also claimed that the workers' demands
would increase the wage budget by $50,000, or 16.5 per
cent. According to Wickman this figure is incorrect as
there are 32 union employees, which, at an increase bf
$44 per employee, would equal only $16,000 more per
year.
McKenzie has threatened increased students' union
fees or a curtailment of services if the wage demands are
met.
Cut in maids charred
from page three
Meanwhile, the women who work in the
residences are still dissatisfied.
They have complained to Rohringer that their
workloads are too heavy, but they point out that
the new plan offers no solution because they are
simply asked to take on a reduced workload in a
reduced period of time.
This injustice comes as .a slap in the face to the
housing workers, who along with those in food
services accepted a $70 monthly increase over two
years in recent wage negotiations when other
campus workers got a $ 100 hike.
According to Kramer, they did this partly in
the realization that the university wants these two
services to be self-sustaining (although food services
in fact turns a profit) and partly because they
realize students should have to pay only the
minimum for these services.
Most of the maids are recent arrivals in Canada
and have been reluctant to stand up to the housing
administration.
Although they work from September to April
and some work through the summer, they are not
classified as permanent staff by the housing
administration. This means they are not eligible for
benefits such as the employees' pension plan, and
they can be laid off on 24 hours' notice.
The average worker will make $105 per month
less at six hours a day then she made even under the
old contract wage rates.
Furthermore, they lose seniority if they go on
unemployment insurance in the summer — a
practice not followed by other university
departments.
The Ubyssey has been told that a wildcat strike
is under consideration by the employees if the
housing administration refuses to reconsider its
position.
"If there is work to be done, why can't we do
it?" one woman who has been with the university
five years asked. "We've nothing against the
students but we have families to support."
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NORTH VAN
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Open Fri till 9 p.m. Tuesday, September  14,  1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 15
ONE DAY THIS WILL BE A LIBRARY, or underground bomb shelter or something,
but in the meantineit is a hugh muddv.hole you should avoid as you trip about the
campus. The plan is to build an underground extension to Sedgewick library so that
—david bowerman photo
some of the books can be taken out of storage and put on the shelves. Rumor has it
the extension will be in operation next fall and there will be grass and so forth where
there used to be before, but until then, it's a quarter-mile detour in the rain.
Caucus
loses two
members
The human government caucus
within the Alma Mater Society
lost two members during the
summer.
Sharon Boylan, former
external affairs officer, and Brian
Sproule, former arts
representative on student council,
have both resigned.
In her letter of resignation,
Boylan, who was instrumental in
organizing the new women's
studies course, said she had
decided to accompany Charlie
Boylan to Edmonton where he
has a teaching post.
"I think the human
government program is excellent
and provides the basis for a
growing student movement on
campus, as well as a good deal of
intellectual excitement," Boylan
said. "I'm sorry that I won't be
around to participate."
Arts rep Sproule also handed in
his resignation after financial
difficulties prevented him from
returning to UBC.
~ Byelections are slated for
October to fill the vacant posts. In
the meantime, Boylan's position is
being filled temporarily by Gilies
Malnarich.
Bar rejects
easing law
, BANFF (CUP) - The Canadian
Bar Association has rejected by a
73 to 68 margin a motion in favor
of easing Canadian abortion laws.
The motion favored making
abortion a decision between a
woman and her doctor.
< The present regulations require
approval of an abortion request
by a three-man committee in an
accredited hospital.
The CBA decision was reached
during its annual convention held
in Banff early this month.
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AT 5796 UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD
CANADIAN IMPERIAL
BANK OF COMMERCE Page 16
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September   14,   1971
Citizens to investigate 1VA14
MONTREAL (CUPI) - A ten
person citizens' commission will
hold its first public hearings on
October 12, 13, and 14 in
Montreal to investigate all phases
and effects of the War Measures
Act and the subsequent Public
Order Act.
The group is composed of five
Quebecois and five persons from
various Canadian provinces.
Its Quebec members are:
Fernand Daoust of the Quebec
Federation of Labor; Laurier
Lapierrc,  journalist   and   McGill
University professor; Michel
Bourdon and Alonzo Leblanc of
the Confederation of National
Trade Unions, and Adele Lauzon,
a journalist.
Non-Quebec members are:
Woodrow Lloyd, former
Saskatchewan premier, John
Morgan, a Toronto minister,
Richard Dunlop, a Vancouver
professor, Trevor Berry of the
Manitoba Civic Liberties
Association and Linda
Meisenheimer, president of the
Simon Fraser Student Society.
The commission will hold
hearings across the country with
testimony from police,
governments, interested groups,
and individuals affected by the
federal government's imposition
of martial law last October.
It hopes to publish its findings
in a report next spring.
Lauzon said it was not the
purpose of the commission to
uncover new facts but to "impress
on people that the repression that
followed the crisis is still going
on."
PANGO-PANGO (UNS) - Fifteen bloated blorgs took a lucky
break today and called for a blue meany to revoke repressive laws
affecting the island nation's famous black labels. When he was smiling,
the meany said the old style wasn't his style and threw up his tartan in
disgust. As two young redcaps took his bags, bound for old Vienna,
reporters noticed a thin silver spring running down his leg. "It's the
water, he explained."
Speakeasy needs volunteers
Speakeasy needs volunteers for cooking problems Speakeasy has
its information and counselling decided to try to put together a
services cookbook   explaining   where   to
buy food cheaply in Vancouver,
Speakeasy chairman Carol how to store it and how to cook
Railton     said     information   jt.
volunteers    absorb     and    share        First year students and those
information   on   such   topics   as
housing  and  tenant  rights,  legal
aid,  medical  services,   food and
cultural programs.
new on campus are encouraged to
volunteer. Expertise is not
necessary, only an interest in
people, she said.
Speakeasy is located in SUB
100 A and B, next to the art
gallery. Their phone is 228-3700.
Counsellors are expected to
handle any type of personal
problem and to participate in
counsellor training sessions, she
said Monday.
Speakeasy, started in 1968 by
students in the social sciences, is
student-run.
Both information and
counselling volunteers will have to
commit themselves to a regular
shift for the sake of simplicity,
but publicity work can be done
on an irregular basis, said Railton.
Anyone interested in
advertising, posters or writing will
be welcomed and well used, she
said.
Railton said because many
people have come to them with
'/Wj&tt
3*frP$
-y
GASTOWH
WELCOME BACK STUDENTS
Come down to Gastown
and see us soon
Great dinners from $1.75
53 WATER ST.
DAILY 5:00 p.m- 11 p.m.
- Lunches 11:30-2:30 p.m.
B.C.'s
LEADING
TRAVEL
ORGANIZATION
2 UBC LOCATIONS
your agent for
ALL YOUR
TRAVEL
NEEDS
your trip  home  .   .   .  your
SKI EXCURSION .. .
your    MEXICO SUNBREAK...
your   MEETING IN VEGAS . . .
your    PLANS FOR SUMMER
visit us or phone us at
5700 UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD
PHONE 224-4391
(on campus) Tuesday,  September  14,   1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 17
AMS to build pub, restaurant
The Alma Mater Society has decided to build a
pub and alternate food service in SUB.
Council voted Wednesday to use a $225,000
pub expansion fund established in 1970 to
construct a pub, a lounge, a restaurant and a
second-hand book-store.
.*. "The original architect's estimate was $100,000
for a pub but with a little more money we can get
the other facilities," AMS co-ordinator Sue
Kennedy said Monday.
Kennedy said the facilities will be set up in a
6,000-sq. foot area in the southeast corner of SUB
behind the Thunderbird Shop.
"The new ventilation and mechanical plumbing
will cost the greatest amount," she said.
The pub will probably be serving bottled beer
to begin with, she said.
"We probably won't get a draft beer licence
with the present government unless it changes its
present policies," Kennedy said.
She said that organic food will be served in the
restaurant and that an organic food store is being
planned for the development.
"Optimistically the whole thing will be opened
by November or December — it's hard to tell," she
said.
"The human government caucus on council
wants to establish services we think are valuable and
what students think are valuable," Kennedy told
council while moving the motion.
PANGO-PANGO (UNS) - The Holy Bubble
came under severe attack from representatives of
the Animal Government who object to the practice
of taking bubble baths. The struggle, seen here as
another manifestation of class strife that threatens
to envelop this letter, is expected to continue for
days. Who knows?
Tween classes
In the 'Tween Classes section,
The Ubyssey fulfills its role as
campus bulletin board. Herein are
listed notices of all kinds of
events, productions and general
happenings.
Notices for these events must
be' in the special box in The
Ubyssey office by 12:30 p.m. the
day before publication. Use the
special form if you want better
service.
And please be complete and
accurate. Two Fine Arts
department notices weren't used
today because they were
incomplete. Thanks.
ALL WEEK
SUB ART GALLERY
Photo display, executed under the
auspices of the Opportunities for
Youth project for delinquent teenagers.
SOCCER
Tryouts, Sept. 8, 0, 10; 12 to 1 P.m.
Sept. 15-17, 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. Gym
field behind SUB, or enquire at
Men's gym, room 216C.
TODAY
INTERNATIONAL  HOUSE
CUSO information night. Meet returned volunteers. All welcome. 7:30
p.m., room 404. Returned voluteers
interested in helping with information sessions, meet at IH CUSO office, 5:45 p.m. for supper and discussion.
ANARCHIST   DISCUSSION   GROUP
Meeting, SUB 215, 8 p.m.
NEWMAN   CLUB
All   welcome   at   meeting,   noon,   St.
Mark's   College  music  room (university Catholic centre).
CANOE   CLUB
First meeting, noon,   SUB  125.
UNIVERSITY   CLUBS   COMMITTEE
Executives    of    all    clubs    expected.
Noon,   clubs  lounge.
WEDNESDAY
UBC  VIETNAM COMMITTEE
The Pentagon Papers: Canada's Dirty
Role in Vietnam. Speaker: N. Knox.
SUB 213, 12:30.
UBC 'GO' PLAYERS' ASSOCIATION
'GO' is played on a 19xl9-inch board,
roughly as difficult as chess, although the rules are simpler. All
are invited to the board room of the
grad student centre, 7:30 p.m. and
every Wednesday. Bring your board
if  you  have one.
HUMAN   GOVERNMENT
Canadian   poet    Al   Purdy   reads   in
SUB art gallery, noon.
TENNIS   TEAM
Men's tryouts and registration, even
if it rains, 4:30 p.m. behind the Memorial Gym.   All  haclcs  welcome.
ONTOLOGY  SOCIETY
The New Sense of Self with Ron Po-
Iack.  Bu.  216, noon.
VARSITY  CHRISTIAN  FELLOWSHIP
Rap with  Gene  Thomas. Secular  and
Sacred:  Is There   a  Division  for  the
Christian?     1750    Allison    Rd..     7:30
p.m.
THURSDAY
KUNG-FU   CLUB
General meeting, SUB 125, noon.
KARATE  CLUB
Meeting,   0:30   p.m., new   gym   beside
ice rink.   New  members welcome.
VCF
Gene Thomas, The Role of the Christian Student on Campus, SUB party
room,  noon.
WOMEN'S   BASKETBALL
Tryouts,    4:30    p.m..    War    Memorial
Gym. All welcome.
SOCCER
Tryouts.
VCF
Rap   with   Christian   profs.   New   students   especially  welocme.   7:30   p.m.,
Lutheran Campus Centre.
SATURDAY
NEWMAN   CLUB
Wine and cheese party, 8 p.m., St
Mark's  College.  All welcome.
•       •       •
HAVEN'T YA HEARD
''^^ FOR NEW & USED
BOOKS
USED TEXTBOOKS
PAPERBACKS
MAGAZINES
MONARCH NOTES
SCHAUMS OUTLINES
COLES NOTES
LARGEST SELECTION
OF REVIEW NOTES
IN VANCOUVER
BETTER BUY BOOKS
4393 WEST 10TH AVENUE — 224-4144
VANCOUVER 8, B. C.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Campus — 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; 3 days $2.50
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $1.25; additional
lines 30c; 4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable
in advance. Closing Deadline is 11:30, the day before publication..
Publications Office. STUDENT UNION BLDG., Univ. of B.C.,
Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
"SUNSHYNE"
PLAYS   FREE   CONCERT
Thurs. noon SUB Plaza.
UNDERCUT '71 IS COMING SOON.
Be there.
Greetings
12
Lost & Found
13
Rides & Car Pools
14
WHEELCHAIR STUDENT NERDS
ride from 41st & Nanaimo. Call
Audrey Hill 434-7052.
NORTH  SHORE —  UBC
DIRECT DAILY BUS
Second Bus Now Filling
Full or Part Time
Phone  985-2224   or  988-5819
RIDE   OR    CAR    POOL    WANTED
daily     from     Boundary     Bay     or
Tsawwassen.  943-1658.
Special Notices
15
Travel Opportunities
16
POTTERY CLASSES JUST OUT-
side the sates. Register now for
courses beginning Sept. 20. 12 lessons. 12 wheels. 12 students. Call
Huyghe School of Pottery. 224-5191
or 733-3019
MEN—YOUR ATHLETTC TALENT
is required by the U.B.C. Men's
Field Hockey Team. For information  please rail 224-0415.
Wanted—Information
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
WANTED: WORKING JAPANESE
abacus. Ph. Ranrly (Rm. 241) at
224-9551 after 6:00 weekdays.
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
KHARMANN GHIAS. A SF.LEC-
tion of three Mercedes Benz 180,
190, & 220. Allgas Hillman '63, excellent cond. Volvo 544, a real
good one. Austin 1100. Very economical. V.W. one 68. 69 & 71
Super Beetle. Jaguar MKY for the
connoisseur. Studebaker 1950. fully
reconditioned. Priced 25-500. And
many more for the student's bud-
fret. Ph. 873-1608.
'65     ANG-LIA     EXC.     CONDITION.
Snow   tires   mounted,   chains.   $500
or  offer.   Contact  224-7095   after 6
p.m.
Autos Wanted
22
Auto Parts
23
Auto Repairs
24
Motorcycles
25
BUSINESS
SERVICES
Art Services
31
Babysitting &
Day Care
32
Dance Bands
33
Duplicating &
Copying
34
Photography
35
Rentals—Misc.
36
Scandals
37
HOMOSEXUAL? SEVERAL UBC
students would like to help the
naive homosexual become acquainted with fray life. Send a
brief summary, phone, address or
meeting- place to Box 6572. Station
"G" Van. 8. Remember, homosexuals are indistinguishable from
heterosexuals. You won't be discovered by someone walking down
the street. Not a sex ad.	
GASTOWN'S A RIOT BUT THE
Gastown Saloon's pretty cool. Tally Honks playing there next two
weeks. No entry fee, just .$1.00
worth of garbage. 137 Water Street
Ph.  683-9469.	
HARVEY KIRK: MEET ME AT
Undercut '71. Signed Doug. Fir.
Sewing & Alterations
Typewriters & Repairs
Typing
38
39
40
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
ATTRACTIVE FEMALE AND
well-groomed male required for
full-time employment with Ivor
Williams Sporting Goods. Skiing
experience preferred. 2120 W 41st'
Tel. 261-6011.	
KEG'N CLEAVER
PART-TTME    EVENING    WORK
Guys & Chicks. Earn $4-6/hour.
Waiters
Cocktail Girls
Bartenders
Hostesses
Hours:   From   4   p.m.,   Monday
through Sunday
At   the   Keg'n   Cleaver,    fully   licenced   steak   and   lobster   house,
features an open broiler and self-
serve salad bar.
Located in North Vancouver at 107
West   Esplanade   at   the   foot   of
Lonsdale.   Don   Carpenter.   Mana-
_   ger:  985-2812.	
STUDENTS
EARN WHTLE  YOU  LEARN.
HELP  FORM G.A.S.   CLUBS
APPLY:
Thurs.   12:30  - 2:30 p.m.
Sat.  9:30   - Noon
EDUCATION  DYNAMICS  CENTRIC
2102 Western Parkway
(University Square)
PART    TIME    TYPIST^REQUTRED
for   booking   agency.    Phone   688-
7271.
Work Wanted
52
INSTRUCTION  &
Music Instruction
SCHOOLS
61
Special Classes
62
Tuioring Service
Tutors—Wanted
63
64
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
DISCOUNT    PRICES   ON
STEREO COMPONENTS
1   Equipment New - Full Mfrs.
Warranties
Phone 987-5612 Anytime
or write to
Stereo  Studio,  Box  281,
North Van., B.C.
GUILD FLAT TOP GUITAR. GOOD
cond. Cheap.  Mike, 261-6861.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
Room & Board
82
ROOM       AND   BOARD   FOR   GTRT.
in exchange for babysitting and
help around home. Experience
with young children required. Ten
minute walk from SUB. Two private rooms plus bathroom. T.V.
224-3522.
BEST FOOD ON CAMPUS! ROOM
and Board at Delta t'psilon Fraternity   House.   Phone   224-9811.
Furn. Apts.
83
BASEMENT SUITE. BED-STTTER.
kitchen, bathroom, private entrance. Two blocks from gates.
$75 single, $100 double. After 5
p.m. 4416 W. 11th. Female(s) or
couple	
RESPONSIBLE COUPLE RE-
ouires low priced S.C. suite near
U.B.C. Don't smoke or drink. 731-
5626.
Unf. Apts.
84
FEMALE GRAD STUDENT SEEKS
aecom.  with  same.  Phone 6S7-4249
evenings.	
STl'DEXT   SPECIAL
:1   Rooms  of  Furniture
From $199.95
HOUSE OF GROUPS
1278   Granville
Day 687-5043 Kve.  277-92 17
Halls For Rent
85
Houses—Furn. & Unfurn.
86
Accommodation —
Other Cities
87
Use Ubyssey Classified
TO SELL - BUY - INFORM
The U.B.C. Campus
MARKET PLACE Page 18
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September  14,  1971
VARSITY SPORTS
CENTRE LTD.
tt
— John Wurflinger —
EXTENDS A WARM WELCOME TO ALL
RETURNING and NEW STUDENTS
and FACULTY and STAFF
We would like to meet you in person, so why not drop in and
get acquainted and incidentally see our wide range of Sports
Equipment and Sportswear!
4510 W. 10th Ave     224-6414
JOHN SKINNER (31) on his way to Golden Bear touchdown.
—jerry Schmidt photo
ROYAL BAN K
THE HELPFUL BANK
• CANADA STUDENT LOANS
• NEW LOANS
• CONSOLIDATION OF EXISTING LOANS
• DEPOSIT ACCOUNTS
• TRANSFER ACCOUNTS FOR CONVENIENCE
• SAVINGS WITH CHECKING PRIVILEGES
UNIVERSITY AREA BRANCH
DAVE STEWART, Mgr.
10th at Sasamat - 224-4348
Birds lose first one
The UBC Thunderbird football team started their
1971 season following the great tradition set down
by preceding teams.
They lost.
On Saturday afternoon, before a crowd of 400
docile spectators, the 'Birds' went down to defeat at
the hands of the University of Alberta Golden
Bears.
The score: Golden Bears, 27 — Thunderbirds, 3.
The Thunderbirds were seeking to improve upon
last year's dismal record of one win, eight losses.
At least they got on the scoreboard, a feat not
seen too much at UBC in recent years.
In fact, they were the first to hit the scoreboard,
a field goal by Jim Hill at 7:23 of the first quarter
after recovering a Golden Bear fumble.
After that, it was all downhill for the
Thunderbirds.
Joe Petrone, formerly with the University of
Calgary Dinosaurs, and now quarterbacking and
kicking for the Golden Bears went to work.
Before the half ended, Petrone had kicked two
field goals - U. of A., 6 - UBC, 3.
But a half time score of only six to three is
somewhat of a miracle at UBC.
The second half was a disaster.
Alberta coach, Jim Donlevy, obviously must have
out-talked UBC coach Frank Gnup during half time.
His boys came out fighting and promptly scored
a touchdown after recovering a UBC fumble.
Petrone scored nine points for the game,
including two field goals and three converts.
But Petrone was getting good protection with
plenty of time to find his receivers.
UBC quarterback, Gord Diewert, was continually
rushed to get rid of the ball, and when he did get a
pass away, his receivers would invariably drop the
ball.
UBC managed only four first downs, three by
passing.
Their ground game obviously needs some
improving.
Gnup had better teach his charges how to hold
onto the ball, or similar results in the next game will
be forthcoming.
The Thunderbird defence could also use some
instruction on pass defending and more important,
on how to tackle efficiently.
The Golden Bears could rush almost unmolested
through the UBC backfield, confident that the UBC
defenders would fall like flies if touched.
The Thunderbirds are a small team, relying more
upon speed in their backfield than upon size.
But they'll need more than speed if they are to
get out of the Western Intercollegiate cellar this
year.
The Thunderbirds will be seeking revenge next
weekend when they travel to Edmonton to meet
these same Golden Bears on their home grounds.
FOR PREFERRED RISKS ONLY
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Name	
Residence
Address	
(Please Print}
City  Pfov.
Phone: Home - - Office	
Occupation— - 	
Age -—     Married □ Divorced □      Male □
Separated □  Never Married □ Femaie Q
Date first licensed to drive  -.-.
Have you or any member of your household been involved
in any accident in the past five years?
Yes n No n (!• "yes" provide details on a separate sheet).
In the last five years has your
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Are you now insured? .
Date current policy expires  _.	
This  coupon   is  designed  solely  to  enable  non-policy
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Car No. 1
Car No. 2
No. of cylinders
Model (Impala, Dart, etc.
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Days per week driven to
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  Miles
Yes Q NoD
One way,driving distance
Is car used in business
(except to and from wor
Mils
k)?
Yes O No [
Give number and dates
of traffic convictions
in last 5 years.
LIST INFORMATION ON ALL ADDITIONAL DRIVERS
Age
Male or
Female
Relation
To You
Years
Licensed
Married
or Single
% of Use
Car#1
Car #2
%
%
%
%
%
%
FPR UBC23 lesday, September  14,   1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 19
—jerry Schmidt photo
ON CAMERON breaks for one of UBC's longest runs, a punt return.
Team Notices
TENNIS FIELD HOCKEY
The   mens'   tennis   team   will The   UBC men's field hockey
W    registration    and    tryouts    team is looking for bodies. Those
jdnesday, September 15 at 4:30
i  the  courts  beside  Memorial    interested should meet outside the
/m. Tony Bardsley will again be    new     Spencer     building    on
ach of the team this year. All ..
ckers and bashers are invited to " '
/ out.
224-0415.
Men's
Intramurals
By GEORGE K. MAPSON
The chariot race is off. Those
frosh-dunking 'Gears are out to
quash Forestry's Green Machine
in an intramural badminton game.
Why not? Intramural is clean,
honest, action-packed fun.
But how does one become
involved? Register at the
Intramural desk in the SUB during
orientation week and Clubs Day,
pr at the Intramural Office, Room
308, War Memorial Gym.
The program is designed to
cover all levels of competition.
You don't have to enroll in any
sport in order to participate.
Competitions are held at noon
hours and 4:30. Consult The
Ubyssey and the Student
Handbook for entry deadlines and
game times.
The season is not underway as
yet, but rumor has it that Beta is
out to put the 'Gears in their
place.
Water-bomber pilots have
spotted Forestry's volleyball team
practicing all summer in the UBC
Research Forest.
The Men's Intramurals is
shooting for another successful
year. Naturally we need AMS and,
above all, your support not as
spectators, but as participants.
Anyone interested in refereeing
for the Intramurals is asked to
come to the office and leave their
name.
Touch football, Softball and
swimming fans are reminded that
the deadline for entry is
September 17.
TOTEM PARK
FROSH DANCE
CROSSTOWN BUS
ATURDAY, SEPT. 18
'- 8:30 - 12:30
TOTEM PARK
WITH RESIDENCE CARDS
$1.00 a head
WITHOUT
'■' RESIDENCE CARDS
$1.50 a head
George & Berny's
VOLKSWAGEN
REPAIRS
COMPLETE SERVICE BY
FACTORY-TRAINED
MECHANICS
^FULLY GUARANTEED
AT REASONABLE RATES
731-8644
2125  W.   10th  at  Arbutus
Welcome to UBC
For Your Convenience
THE BOOKSTORE HOURS
AT BOTH LOCATIONS
For the next two weeks will be
Sept.       -Tues.7th to Fri. 10th
Sept.      -Mon. 13th to Thurs. 16th
Sept.      -Mon. 20th to Fri. 24th
-Mon. 20th to Thurs. 23rd
8:45a.m.-5:00 p.m.
8:45 a.m.-9:00 p.m.
8:45 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
8:45a.m.-9:00p.m.
(Main Store Only)
TEXTBOOKS
TEXTBOOKS    FOR   THE   FOLLOWING   FACULTIES   AND
SCHOOLS Wl LL BE SOLD AT THE BOOKSTORE:
Architecture
Dental Hygiene
Dentistry
Law
Librarianship
Medicine
Textbooks for all other Faculties will be sold at the Armoury
from September 7th to 24th inclusive. The Armoury is located on
the West Mall (North), entrance on south side.
Planning
Pharmacy
Rehabilitation Medicine
Restorative Dentistry
Social Work
the
bookstore
UBC - 228-4741
Sports Light
By GORD GIBSON
Sports at UBC, whether from the participant or the
spectator point of view is an unusual happening.
One would think there were only three
intercollegiate sports at UBC, football, hockey, and
basketball.
No spectator recognition, and as an indirect result,
no publicity is ever gathered by the so-called minor
sports on this campus — volleyball, rowing, track and
field, etc.
Few students on campus realize that our university
women have their own intercollegiate teams, even when
those teams bring home trophies from their successful
bouts with other Western Canadian universities.
If you are reading this sports page, I suppose you're
interested in UBC sports. If so hand this page to an
uninterested friend.
Take a friend to the university games. They're free
with your student card. After all, the five dollars you so
reluctantly part with at the beginning of the year goes
towards making it free for you.
The entertainment is free, and quite often, even
with the 'minor sports' very interesting.
But UBC students refuse to support their teams
unless the team is destined to make the playoffs.
Take the football game on Saturday as an example.
Surely there must have been more than 400 people
who knew that the Thunderbirds were playing, be it by
radio, newspaper, or campus advertising.
It was well advertised.
But only 400 people chose to support their team.
Sure there was the possibility they might lose, but
that's not the point.
How can anyone play to their potential before
empty stands, or at least very quiet stands?
Even the cheerleaders refused to be enthusiastic
about Saturday's game.
This brings us to the point of this article.
The Ubyssey sports department cannot function
without reporters, writers or photographers.
If you have a flair for newspaper sports writing or
photography, or even if you are just interested in
introducing your favorite sport to other UBC students,
let us know.
Drop in, leave your name. We'll be happy to let you
help us.
Group Sensitivity
Training Program
The latest techniques in contact therapy
are now being made available to a limited
number of applicants.
THE THUNDERBIRD
ALUMNI
ASSOCIATION
is prepared to offer financial assistance to
football players with a modicum of talent
who feel that they can be psychologically
enriched through this type of program.
If you are interested in making money in
your spare time by playing football, please
call
Don Vassos
at 688-5611
We     know     you're    out    there
WE'RE SERIOUS — ARE YOU ??? Page 20
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September  14,  l?j
By Sandy Kass
5
imon Fraser University administration president
Kenneth Strand has recommended plans for the
establishment of concrete procedures for the
dismissal of faculty members.
In a report sent to all faculty members Friday,
Strand said:
"Hearing panels should be standing internal
panels in order to reduce delays and costs, to decrease
the sense of adversary commitments, and to increase
the continual viability of any set of procedures;
"The scope of procedure should encompass a
broader range of discipline than discharge; but
"For legal reasons flowing out of the judgment
in Prudence Wheeldon vs. SFU the decision of hearing
panels cannot be legally binding."
Wheeldon was one of nine faculty members of the
political science, sociology and anthropology
department fired October 3, 1969, after over 700
PSA students, faculty, and staff members declared a
strike on the university. She was reinstated June 15,
1971.
PSA department members went on strike
September 24, 1969 after Strand refused to negotiate
with department representatives on demands from
department members.
The demands included an end to an external
trustreeship imposed upon the department making it
directly responsible to Strand, revoking the
department's autonomy; reinstatement of department
chairman Mordecai Briemberg removed of his
position when the trusteeship took effect July 15,
1969; student parity on the university tenure
committee; and acceptance by the UTC of the PSA
department tenure committee's recommendations.
During the following week the history student
association struck in support of the PSA, the English
department censured the UTC and called for
abolition of the trusteeship, and the economics and
commerce students association voted to support the
PSA in the dispute.
The SFU Student Society overwhelmingly backed
the PSA, called for abolition of the trusteeship, and
recognition of PSA-elected chairman Briemberg.
In late September, 1969 the Canadian Association
of University Teachers called for an external
investigation of the PSA "relationship" to the SFU
administration; an appeal board for PSA department
members affected by the administration "purge"; and
suspension of the trusteeship.
0
^OFn October 3, 1969, nine PSA faculty were
suspended: Kathleen Aberle, David Potter, John
Leggett, Louis Feldhammer, Nathan Popkin, Saghir
Ahmed, Harold Hickerson, Wheeldon and Briemberg.
On the same day the Graduate Student Union
met and censured the UTC in support of the PSA
department.
Three days later English students struck the
faculty of arts and education students formally
condemned the administration.
Scab courses in striking departments were set up
by the administration, but were disrupted by striking
students, faculty and staff.
On October 23, 1969 the SFU administration
obtained a blanket injunction from the B.C. Supreme
Court against picketing and disruption of classes.
The PSA strike was called off on November 4,
1969 and department members pledged to continue
the struggle in other ways, "including the
revitalization of department unions."
During the summer of 1970 a committee was set
up by the B.C. Supreme Court under the
chairmanship   of   E.E.   Palmer,  to   rule   on   the
YOU
HAVE
0T
CONVERTED
A
MAN
BECAU5E
YOU
HAVE
SiLENCED
HiM
(John, Viscount Morley, On Compromise, 1874)
fifc ^/Cc/^-
proceedings after the dismissal of education prof
John Burbidge, because Strand said: "He had not
finished his doctoral dissertation."
Of three others in the same position, two had
their contracts renewed and one was granted tenure.
After some protest, Burbidge accepted the
dismissal.
After three days of hearings, the committee ruled
unanimously in favor of profs Aberle, Ahmed,
Briemberg, Feldhammer, Leggett, Potter and
Wheeldon.
Strand rejected this decision, offering instead a
new hearing to all but Leggett whose contract expired
at the end of August, 1970.
Aberle and Potter refused a second hearing and
were subsequently dismissed. The remaining four
accepted new hearings but only Wheeldon's was
granted by the administration.
Popkin was reinstated by Strand in November,
1970 after an administration committee ruled in his
favor. The remaining three professors who had
accepted second dismissal hearings were then fired
without their cases being heard by a second tenure
committee.
On May 14, 1971 CAUT imposed a censure on
the president and board of governors of SFU "for
their summary dismissals of two faculty members and
the improper treatment of five others in disregard of
academic due process and of the proper safeguards of
academic appointments and tenure."
s
^■pitrand's only reaction was the condemnation of
CAUT for what he called "meddling in SFU's private'
business."
Wheeldon was reinstated by Strand on June 14,
1971, after the administration committee hearing her
case made a ruling which the university
administration claimed would "compromise the
statutory separation of powers between the board of
governors and the president and raised such
contradictions that continuation was impossible."
Four days later, Strand announced the immediate
dismissals of Briemberg, Ahmad and Feldhammer.
In announcing the dismissals, Strand claimed that
"genuine attempts to implement the agreed dismissal
procedures" had been made but that the procedures
have been "totally unworkable."
H
T
Ihe
I he censure in effect blacklists SFU and warns
all CAUT members not to accept teaching positions
at the university.
CAUT previously imposed a censure on the SFU
president and board of governors in May, 1968 for
"administration interference in traditionally faculty
affairs."
It was lifted the following November.
|e added that it was impossible to find a tenured
faculty member to serve as chairman of adminstration
hearing committees and maintained that "the
university has tried to be just in the lengthy period
since the PSA department strike.
Many have accused us of unwarranted delay while
we sought an equitable hearing for these teachers. If
we have erred, then it has been on the side of
justice."
Strand's report released Friday requests all"
faculty members to contact him for comment and
criticism.
He remains "unconcerned" that CAUT has
maintained its second censure of SFU, a move^
unprecedented in Canadian university history.

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