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EVENTS        V THIS WEEK, CHECK
TUESDAY   ' 30
PANIC TO POWER
3:30-5:00P.M. @SUBROOM215
UBC CareerServices is holding
a workshop on how to overcome
nervousness and uncertainty in
searchingforandgettingajob. Learn
techniques for relaxation, stress-relief
and securing the job you want.
Free; RSVP online.
TUESDAY     x    30
KARAOKE NIGHT
9:00 P.M.® THE GALLERY
Bring your best Sinatra, Elvis, Bon
Jovi, Timberlake or Lady Gaga
to The Gallery's karaoke night.
Sing your heart out in front of
friends and strangers in a relaxed
environment.
Free; 19+ to go inside.
TUESDAY
30
DROP-IN RESUME CLINIC
11:00A.M.-3:00P.M. TUESDAYS
WEDNESDAY @ SUB PARTY ROOM
improve the chances of scoring your
dream job by bringing your resume
by the SUB party room for a free,
in-depth critique by UBC Career
Services staff.
Free
ON
THE
COVER
A friend told me not to be such
a sguare.
- Nick Adams
M?.\.
Want to see your events listed here?
Email your events listings to
ourcampus@ubyssey.ca.
<*-
^^*f^  ¥ ■ < -v t  ■  «
UBYSSE
\JTHE
Y
3EPTEMBER25.2014 | VOLUMEXCVI | ISSUEXI
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OUR CAMPUS //
ONEONONE1
OPLE AND BUILDINGSTHAT MAKE UBC
=HOTO MACKENZIE WALKER/THE UBYSSEY
UBC swimmer Colleen Nesbitt has taken the skills she developed in sports beyond the pool.
For UBC swimmer Colleen Nesbitt,
teamwork goes beyond the pool
Elsa Gomez Navas
Contributor
"I like to say I came to UBC to
major in swimming and minor in
school."
And indeed, Colleen Nesbitt
has a stellar swimming record.
As a part ofthe UBC swim team,
she embodies all ofthe qualities
that generally distinguish elite
athletes: strength, discipline,
and unyielding passion. But
there is another trait that Nesbitt possesses that is integral
to her sports life and beyond:
teamwork.
"I think people think that
swimming is an individual
sport but when you're plowing
through the water day after day
doing really tough sets, it's the
people that are surrounding
you that are holding you up and
motivating you."
"So [in our club] we're
really aiming to create
a community for
female undergraduates
in the Faculty of
Science, and there's a
couple of ways that we
really want to do this,
and one of these is a
mentoring program
which is one-on-one
partnerships between a
women undergraduate
student and a woman
professional in a
science field; the
relationship goes from
September to April
and we can learn about
that woman's job or
challenges she faced."
Colleen Nesbitt
Fifth-year biology major, UBC swim
athlete and Women in Science VP.
For Nesbitt, teamwork has
always been a vital part of her
surroundings — from her sporty
family to, in more recent years,
her academic life. As vice-president ofthe start-up club
"Women in Science" — a club
aimed at leveling the scientific
playing field for women through
the mentoring and empowering
of female science undergraduates — Nesbitt aims to bring an
atmosphere of cooperation and
camaraderie.
"Every year, women from the
science and engineering industries come and talk to undergraduates and it's really an
amazing night, but that's all the
extent to which the women in
science community [went] — it's
just that night," Nesbitt said.
"So [in our club] we're really
aiming to create a community
for female undergraduates in
the Faculty of Science, and
there's a couple of ways that
we really want to do this, and
one of these is a mentoring
program which is one-on-one
partnerships between a women
undergraduate student and a
woman professional in a science
field; the relationship goes from
September to April and we can
learn about that woman's job or
challenges she faced."
"You're always going
to get better ideas the
more people you bring
to the table. I think
women have a lot to
offer and that what's
happening now in
health care is that it's
all about teamwork."
Nesbitt mentioned that the
latter is especially valuable for
female undergraduates given
that "... there are still many
challenges for women, they're
still a marginalized population
in the STEM fields and there
are things that a woman in a
career field would know that an
undergraduate wouldn't realize
yet."
Although it's a relatively
fresh face amongst the clubs
at UBC, Women in Science has
expansionary plans for the
following years, according to
Nesbitt.
"We're hoping to get corporate funding and corporate
recognition that will help us
achieve bigger goals and set
bigger events and become an established and recognized club,"
she said.
As for the fact that she's
graduating this year (currently
a fifth year majoring in Biology
and minoring in Kinesiology,)
Nesbitt is excited to do some
barrier-breaking of her own.
"I'm very interested in some
ofthe research that our mentors
are actually doing and I'm minoring in kinesiology so human
movement and athletic application."
Not straying too far from her
core principles, Nesbitt considers herself and other women
entering the STEM fields to be
crucial, given current challenges in the health care industry.
"You're always going to get
better ideas the more people
you bring to the table. I think
women have a lot to offer and
that what's happening now in
health care is that it's all about
teamwork."
This sentiment is reflected
in many health care sectors — from organizations, to
policy-makers and practitioners, who have to adjust to the
transformations occurring due
to changes in demographics —
where a growing sector of the
population will be heavily relying in the health care system,
Nesbitt mentioned.
"All of that requires collaboration and cooperation and that's
one thing I think that women do
is to really try and initiate that.
They're not looking dominate a
conversation if there's a better
way about doing this."
As a last golden nugget of
advice, Nesbitt — who found her
niche at UBC by expanding her
sports values to her academic
life, said that ultimately, "... the
point of these years is to explore
and find your passion; that's
what the undergraduate experience is about." tJ // News
EDITORS JOVANAVRANIC +VERONIKA BONDARENKO
ALUMNI»
MONDAY, SE
MONEY»
Retired UBC prof draws link between art and children's literacy
Mariam Baldeh
Contributor
What's the connection between art
and children's literacy?
That is a question that Bob
Steele, a retired associate professor of art education at UBC,
has been occupied with for over
20 years. Having always been
a strong advocate of art for
younger children in the classroom, Steele aims to promote the
understanding that children use
spontaneous drawing as a language medium, and that its daily
use enhances literacy.
"Children use language in
their drawings," said Steele. "We
always [hear] ofthe 'language
of music' or of art, but we never
take it seriously [and we should]
because the language of art is the
most important language that
young children have."
Steele attributes the importance of art to the idea that unlike
literacy, drawing does not have a
"code." Children can simply invent a language and it all begins
with a scribble.
"[In literacy], you learn the
rules and you're chastised if you
break the rules, and [the process]
works, but it doesn't do much for
the psychology of most children
because they are constantly struggling with this code," said Steele.
He also pointed to the psychological benefits that come when
children are free to explore
language through art.
"From [as young as 18 months],
children have experiences that
are difficult to understand, and
so language [expressed through
drawing] becomes a way to
articulate those experiences,"
said Steele.
So what's the connection? According to Steele, drawing is a huge
facilitator of literacy, particularly
if parents are actively involved in
engaging in conversation about the
drawing with the child. A child
makes a drawing, then tries to ex-
Retired UBC professor Bob Steele is passionate about art's power to increase children's literacy.
=HOTO CHERIHAN HASSUWHE UBYSSEY
plain the drawing to a parent, thereby nurturing a facility with words.
Steele also said that drawing is
a means through which children
can communicate their deepest
and most subtle perceptions,
thoughts and feelings. The problem, he said, arises with the arrival of self-consciousness, when
children absorb their culture and
have social values built into their
way of thinking about art.
"One ofthe beautiful things
about children's drawing is that
there's never a misplaced line,"
said Steele. "They don't put a line
down and then scribble it out,
then put another line down and
scribble that out. That happens
once they become self-conscious
— say, age 9 or 10. [Before that],
every line is perfect."
Bridging this self-consciousness gap then becomes key in
making this spontaneous and
uninhibited drawing a language
that works for people from childhood through adolescence and
even to adulthood.
Steele also pointed to the
"drawing game" — an exercise
whereby a line being drawn must
keep moving and cannot stop,
while focused on making a recognizable form — as a way to help
self-conscious drawers, including
both pre-adolescents and adolescents, get over their embarrassment about making mistakes.
"It's like basketball [or any
sport], when you first start
it's awkward, but you become
good at it by playing a lot," said
Steele. "Gradually, your body just
knows what to do and things are
automatic so you're no longer
controlled by that self-conscious
nagging and criticism. That's the
point ofthe drawing game."
With more parents nurturing
that connection with art and exposing their children to art, Steele
remains confident that there will
be an increase in literacy.
NEWS BRIEFS
Male body found at foot of cliffs
at Wreck Beach
A male body was recovered on
September 24 after being found
partially unearthed in Pacific
Spirit park near Wreck Beach.
UBC RCMP are currently investigating the death and working
on identifying the body.
Sgt. Drew Grainger told CBC
that the body was found partially
unearthed near Trail 6.
"We had to use an abundance
of caution using geotechnical
experts and search and rescue
experts to assess the scene,"
said Grainger.
The sandy cliffs in the Pacific
Spirit Park area have been known
to collapse on occasion. The
RCMP confirmed that the man
was not a UBC student. Xi
Former UBC prof accused of
voyeurism scheduled to appear
in court Tuesday
James Rupert, a former UBC kinesiology professor charged with
one count of secretly observing/
recording nudity in a private
place, is scheduled to appear at
the Richmond Provincial Court
on September 30.
Rupert was charged by the
RCMP on July 24 and has already
appeared before the Richmond
court on August 19. None ofthe
allegations have yet been proved
in court. Xi
CONSTRUCTION »
Wooden residence building to be erected on campus by 2017
Elina Taillon
Contributor
UBC is proposing a unique solution to the increased demand for
student housing: a new residence
building that will be made primarily out of wood.
The new tall wooden building
will cost $40 million, plus an additional $4 million 'wood premium'
that is being funded by the Canada
Wood Council and Forest Innovation Investment. It will be located
at Brock Commons near the
existing Walter Gage towers and
is expected to accommodate 400
upper-year students by 2017.
According to John Metras,
Managing Director of Infrastructure Development, the
wooden structure will both stand
out from all the buildings that are
already on campus and meet several development goals of Vancouver
and UBC community.
"Equally importantly is the
economic development opportunities for the province, so this is very
much aligned with provincial goals
around developing local industry,"
said Metras. "I think for all those
reasons: student beds, research,
innovation, economic development;
it's a positive project."
While there are already a few
wood-integrating structures on
campus, including the Earth Sciences and CIRS buildings, the new
residence will be the tallest wood
structure at UBC once completed.
_LUSTRATIONJULIANYUffHE UBYSSEY
Expected to be between 16 and 18
storeys, it will also be the tallest
building of its type in the world.
According to Brent Sauder, Director ofthe Strategic Partnerships
Office, using wood makes sense
because it's sustainable, closely
tied to the provincial economy and
will demonstrate the practicality
of newly engineered mass timber
products in building applications.
"The two big issues are the
fact that this addresses the need
for student housing, and that's
something we can't forget, and the
second thing is the demonstration
of wood as a building material,"
said Sauder.
The nature ofthe building makes
the design process different from
that of a typical concrete and steel
building. Solutions to questions of
sound transference, insulation and
fire safety will have to be engineered. On the other hand, wood acts
as a carbon store and is a renew
able resource, making it easier on
the environment.
Emily Sunter, a fourth year
Forestry student, said that a
residence designed specifically for
upper-years is necessary, but also
expressed concerns about increased
construction on campus.
"It seems that a lot of older students aren't getting places to stay,
but more construction on campus is
never welcome," said Sunter.
Still, 'Innovation' certainly seems
to be the by-word of this proposal. Sauder and Metras explained
that, by joining the growing global
market for tall wood buildings, UBC
would help the province become a
world leader in supplying, manufacturing and building with wood.
"There's been huge discussion
around the world about moving the
new engineered wood products into
the tall building market," said Sauder. "This is a chance for us to grow
into that market." Xi
AMS businesses
to use new
cashless
payment app
=HOTO MACKENZIE WALKER^HE UBYSSEY
Mateo Ospina
Contributor
The AMS is teaming up with app
developer nTrust to implement a
new cashless payment system at
AMS businesses.
The app allows students to
load money into the nTrust
system, which allows instant
fund transfers to other nTrust
accounts, whether they belong to
other people or select affiliated
businesses. This new payment
system will be accepted at a
number of AMS businesses as
an alternative to cash, debit and
credit payments.
AMS businesses that will
be joining the nTrust program
include The Pit Pub, Burger
Bar, The Gallery, Bernoulli's
Bagels, Blue Chip Cookies, Pie
R Squared, The Honour Roll,
The Outpost, The Moon Noodle
House and Canada Post.
nTrust is using UBC as a
starting point for their project
because ofthe large market of
university students who are more
likely to try it out. UBC AMS
Director of Operations, Uli Laue,
is in charge of coordinating the
AMS partnership with nTrust.
"Students are generally early
adapters of technology," said
Laue.
The immediate goal of nTrust
is to reduce waiting times in
lines. However, it is also expected to cut transaction fees
that are common with other
credit cards. According to Laue,
if the drop in price is enough for
businesses, it could possibly lead
to price adjustments in certain
products.
"Everything is modern nowadays, but with cash we're still
dealing in the way we have been
dealing for hundreds of years,"
said Laue. "We still have coins. I
hate coins. It's a lot of waste."
During this initial trial phase,
AMS is offering a five per cent
discount for students on nTrust
payments to AMS businesses.
The discount is also coupled with
the stacking plan ofthe RTown
loyalty program, such as receiving
a free a Blue Chip Cookie after
purchasing 10.
This system can also be used to
create one-time use credit cards
with preloaded money, so that
inputting credit card information
for online purchases will carry
fewer risks.
Laue also said that nTrust is
planning a big launch in October
on top of other advertising campaigns, but the specific details of
which are yet to be revealed. For
now, Laue hopes that nTrust will
prove to be popular with students.
"Technology is funky and we
like to be a part ofthe future,"
said Laue.1!! NEWS    |    MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2014
RESEARCH»
UBC professor links
increased fruit
fly populations
to warmer
temperatures
LKER/THE UBYSSEY
Tyrone Chenne
Contributor
UBC professor Hugh Brock is
researching the affects of warm
weather on fruit fly populations
in Vancouver.
Brock, a professor in the
department of zoology, has been
working as a lab biologist at
UBC since 1982. As part of his
research, he works with fruit
flies to learn more about developmental biology and genetics.
According to Brock, fruit flies
can offer valuable and interesting
insight into all kinds of aspects
of science, whether it be climate
change or cancer research.
when it comes to the increased fruit fly numbers in Vancouver this summer, Brock said
that the warmer temperatures we
have seen over the past year have
been largely to blame.
"We've had an exceptionally
sunny, long, warm, time [this
summer]," said Brock. "And fruit
flies, unsurprisingly eat fruit,
and long warm summers are
good for the food source as well
as what feeds on them."
According to Brock, warm
weather increases fruit fly reproduction rates by making them
breed much more quickly.
"Nearly all cold-blooded things
don't generate heat the way
humans do," said Brock. "Their
growth rate depends on temperature because their basic metabolism speeds up as the temperature
goes up. So basically if there's a
long warm summer, you get more
generations per unit time and the
more generations you have, the
more fruit flies you have."
So what do we do about the
excessive number of fruit flies?
Brock said that while part ofthe
problem will be solved on its own
as the weather turns cooler, it is
also likely that climate change
will have us seeing more fruit
flies in the years to come.
"We get a good mosquito year
when it's a warm but wet summer, we get a good fruit fly year
when it's a warm but dry summer," said Brock. "And actually,
dry summers are not yet that
common, but I think they may
become more common."
Luckily, Brock said that while
excessive fruit flies can be annoying, they also pose absolutely
no threat to humans.
"If you bring home a big crate
of peaches from the Okanagan,
it's annoying to find your kitchen
full of fruit flies," said Brock.
"But, from a biologist point of
view, they're completely harmless. They carry no diseases, they
don't lay their eggs in you and
they don't bite."
As such, it looks like we'll just
have to put up with a few fruit
flies for the time being. Xi
PROGRAMS »
Sauder to offer new accelerated dual degree program
Angela Tien
Contributor
The Sauder School of Business
will be offering a new dual degree
program as a result of UBC's last
Senate meeting.
The Bachelor + Master of
Management (MM) initiative
combines an undergraduate degree with the Master of Management in an accelerated program
designed to be finished in four and
a half years.
Students will be able to choose
from pursuing a Bachelor of Arts,
Fine Arts, International Economics, Kinesiology, Media Studies,
Music, Science, or Science-Wood
Products before entering the six-
month intensive MM program,
which will focus on the study
subjects like accounting, statistics,
economics, entrepreneurship, and
information technology.
Peter Marshall, chair ofthe
Curriculum Committee ofthe
UBC Senate, was among one ofthe
first to review the proposals this
year, citing the unconventional
aspect ofthe project.
"This idea of linking sequentially an undergrad degree with
a graduate degree, it's a first for
UBC," he said.
According to Marshall, students
are free to pursue whatever undergraduate studies they choose to,
and upon third year, enter into the
Masters of Management program.
However, students must qualify
academically in their third year.
"It's not direct entry into the faculty of graduate level studies," said
Marshall, "The student would still
have to qualify into the Masters'
program upon completion of the
undergraduate program. That's got
to be very clear to students."
So what exactly are the benefits
of the program?
According to Marshall, there is
a guarantee of space if a student
qualifies for the MM program.
Sauder will be offering their new dual degree BMM program starting September 2015.
Because the standards of entry
are academic, qualification guarantees a place. This differs from
a student not in the dual degree
program in that they are not
guaranteed a place solely based
on academic performance.
In addition, Marshall said
that a reduced number of credits
is required to complete the dual-degree program.
"The idea would be that [students] could do some courses at
the undergraduate level towards
some ofthe elective credits offered by Sauder in the commerce
degree," said Marshall, explaining how some undergraduate
credits could be applied to subsequent MM requirements.
The cost ofthe dual degree program is composed of an average
domestic undergraduate tuition
plus an additional small portion of
MM fees that would otherwise be
paid in the future.
One issue with this is that once
students drop out ofthe program
or do not qualify for third year
entry to the MM program, no
refunds can be offered for MM
fees, since those are paid in the
first year.
There was some pushback at the
September 17 Senate meeting in regards to the direct from secondary
school entry policy ofthe program.
"Many of [the prospective
students] don't know what they
want to do. And if they go into this
=HOTO MACKENZIE WALKER/THE UBYSSEY
[program] and they change their
mind, they're losing some tuition
money that they would have had,"
said Marshall.
According to Marshall, the
program is expecting a small, specialized group of applicants. Admissions are planning for a group
of top students who are already
keen on applying for graduate
school, and are unlikely to fail out
ofthe program.
Even if a student was to fail,
they could revert back to their
undergraduate degree.
The program is launching in
September 2015, with applications closing January 15 for new
students, and April 10 for second-
year students. tJ
BOARD OF GOVERNORS »
BoG Briefs: Campus Safety report,
Tall Wood Student Residence Project
Veronika Bondarenko
News Editor
On September 24, some of UBC's
highest-ranking officials, including new president Arvind Gupta,
gathered for the first Board of
Governors standing committee
meeting ofthe year. Here is a summary ofthe topics they discussed
and the decisions they made.
CAMPUS SAFETY
WORKING GROUP REPORT
The Campus Safety Working
Group (CSWG) presented on the
specific steps that they have taken
to increase student security on
campus in wake ofthe string of
sexual assaults that happened
in the fall of 2013. The group
reported that UBC's Safewalk
program has been strengthened
while $700,000 has also gone
into improving campus visibility
through lighting and landscaping.
As part of its commitment to increase education surrounding the
topics of safety and sexual assault,
the group has also been holding
training sessions for various campus groups at UBC.
BASEBALL TRAINING
FACILITY
After quickly going through the
project's budget, the Board of
Governors has issued a de
velopment permit and $250,000
for the construction of a new
Baseball Training Facility. The
proposed 12,000 sq. foot baseball training facility will house a
batting cage and training space
and is intended to replace the
current baseball training space
that needs to be moved to make
room for the National Soccer
Development Centre. Schematic
design for the centre is expected
to begin immediately.
BOARD APPROVES TALL
WOOD RESIDENCE
UBC has made plans to construct
an up to 18-storey residence building made entirely out of wood at
Brock Commons. The building has
a projected height of 53 metres,
a gross floor area of 157,000 sq.
feet and is expected to be finished
by 2017. After going through the
potential costs and risks of this
project, the Board of Governors
approved a $750,000 funding release to begin project design.
After that, the meeting went
into closed session and we were
required to leave the room. Some
ofthe topics still left on the
agenda included the adoption
ofthe Campus and Community
Planning Engagement Principles,
the Staff Pension Plan report, and
presentations from the Audit,
Finance & Property and Governance committees, ts
INTERESTED
IN SHOOTING
FOR US? 1
ubyssey.photo@gma II Opinions
CLOUD
MONEY
"MAKIN' IT
) RAIN"
V ATA
CAMPUS
NEAR YOU
LAST WORDS//
THE NTRUST CLOUD
CANT MAKE IT RAIN
Do we really need another way
to pay for things through the
internet? nTrust brands itself as
an intuitive, easy-to-use app that
will help you pay for things faster
than cash, credit or debit. Never
mind that this is almost exactly
the same as Google Wallet, Paypal
and regular online banking — it's
called Cloud Money, so you know
it's legitimate.
It has the word cloud in it.
It has to be sleek, modern and
helpful. Intuitive. Integrated. Any
other tech buzzword your little
heart desires. But hey, maybe one
could argue in favour of all of
them — except the "faster than
cash." Take a look at the video
embedded on their website for a
hilarious example of exactly how
much longer it'll take you to use
their revolutionary service than
good ol' fashioned cash.
Apparently, all you need to do
in order to pay for a cup of coffee
is slide your bubble over to the
correct vendor on the proximity
screen (already this is sounding
like a parody of a sci-fi movie), enter the amount you need to pay as
well as a tip (using a handy dandy
slider feature), add a comment on
the service if you so desire (which,
clearly, everyone will use), then
slide unnecessarily animated pay
slider to finish the transaction.
Faster than cash.
The worst part is, you can't
make it rain with cloud money.
Not that we at The Ubyssey do that
often. Not that we have enough
money to do that ever (unless we
use quarters, which probably isn't
the best idea.) But at least with
cash, we have something to strive
toward. With cloud money our
only hope is to someday be able to
afford to toss our smartphones in
the air.
BMM DUAL DEGREES ARE
GREAT FOR PRODIGIES,
PRODIGIOUS PLANNERS
So, the Sauder School of Business
is doing some crazy things again.
No, don't worry, it's nothing offensive — unless you're a Grade 12
student with a dream of finishing
a graduate degree in management
one day.
They'll be offering a dual degree
program starting next fall that
will allow students to finish an
undergraduate degree in the arts
or sciences, and follow it up with
a six-month intensive Master of
Management program focusing
on statistics, economics, logistics
and marketing.
GARBAGE WE SENT TO LANDFILL IN 2013:
3000 TONNES
OR19BLUE
WHALES
You can make a difference
Use recycling stations
to sort your food scraps
and recyclables into
the proper bins.
'325
UBC SUS
Sort it Out.
LLUSTRATION JULIAN YU /THE UBYSSEY
Let's back up for a second and
break this down.
Students will be coming straight
from high school and investing a
large sum of money in an uncertain future, which they will lose
forever if they decide that a graduate business degree isn't for them.
To be fair, there is a small number of young students who come to
UBC with their paths planned out
and eager to get going with their
careers. If someone is 100 per cent
certain that a Master of Management is what they will need to
succeed in life, then this program
is probably a great idea. But that
number is small, and the number
of students that Sauder will be
taken under its wing as part of this
program is even smaller. Only the
brightest young minds (in other
words, the ones who are unlikely
to fail), will be admitted into the
program.
There's a lot of pressure to
succeed when you're entering an
accelerated program straight from
high school, but it's bound to work
out in someone's favour. To the few
brave souls who will be entering
this program and have their
futures planned out before even
entering UBC, we salute you and
wish you the best of luck.
UBCS PLANNED WOODEN
BUILDING HAS LEFT US
STUMPED
An upper-year residence building
made out of wood? Now there's an
idea.
When we first heard about
plans for this project through the
grapevine, we were intrigued and
a little suspicious. Even though we
feel that almost any decision to add
more upper-year residences to UBC
is a good one (we complain about the
dearth of student accommodations
in The Ubyssey a lot!), it also leaves
us with more than a few questions.
Why wood? Was the decision made
on what was felt to be the best fit
for UBC or simply to continue with
and outdo the look-what-we-have
attitude to other universities by
branching out with their architecture styles?
And then there are the safety concerns. It seems like having a wooden building is good for some things
(earthquakes), but bad for others
(fire safety), so it'll be both interesting and important to see what UBC
does to make sure these concerns
are addressed. Safety issues are
the root ofthe problem; if they are
adequately addressed, we wholeheartedly support UBC's decision to
go forward with this project.
It's great that the university
is placing such an emphasis on
innovation and sustainability,
though making students living in
rez the guinea pigs is, admittedly, a
little dubious. tJ
Ask Natalie: On making
friends and getting involved
"ASK NATALIE"
NATALIE MORRIS
Advice Columnist
"I've been at school for a month
and I haven't made any friends
yet. What should I do?"
Chances are if you feel this way,
you've looked at all ofthe internet articles on "how to make the
most of your first year" and "how
to make friends in university."
They don't really help, do they?
UBC is a huge school and finding
friends is hard when lectures
have 150 or more people and no
one seems to want to chat. It can
be hard, but it's not impossible.
If you live on campus, especially if you live in a first-year
rez, you're already a step ahead.
There are 30-some other people
just waiting to make friends with
you. It may seem like everyone is
already in cliques, but I promise
they will welcome you in with
open arms if they're worth their
weight. My advice: if you hear
loud laughter, wander in. Even if
you're the shyest person on your
floor, if you join in, it won't be
long before you're being invited
to dinner and to hang out. You
will have to make the first move,
but the worst that will happen is
you watch a terrible movie with
people you realize you don't like
halfway through.
If you don't live on campus
or are having trouble finding
friends on your floor, join a club
or activity. Look on the AMS
website to look at the clubs, find
one you are interested in and
send them an email. Smaller
clubs may be more excited for
a new member and may offer a
more intimate setting, but larger
clubs will offer you more people
to talk with. Student societies
for your faculty or major can
offer you people with similar
classes and interests, giving you
ready made questions to ask.
Either way, if you go to meetings
you will feel more comfortable
around other members which
will allow for an opening for
friendship to grow.
For classes, focus on your
smaller ones, labs and discussions. The same people at least
every week? It's a gold mine for
making friends. Ask people if
they want to form a study group.
Joke to whoever is sitting next
to you about your prof's handwriting. Make conversation.
Finally, you have to be friendly. No one is going to talk to you if
you're on your phone all the time.
If you're locking yourself in your
room every day, you're missing a
world of social interaction. Talk
to people, no matter if it's just a
few words, they'll remember you
talked to them.
Of course, you have to know
that friends don't just happen.
You have to put some effort into
friendships, but it's worth it. Be
confident. You'll make friends.
Good luck.
"I want to get involved, but
clubs' days are over. What
should be my next step?"
Even though clubs' days are over,
doesn't mean the clubs themselves are closed to new members.
Looking for a list of clubs?
Check out the AMS website for
a list. Look over the ones you
find interesting and send them
an email. They'll let you know
things like their next meeting,
how much member fees are, and
some of their activities. There
are so many really interesting
clubs you don't hear of everyday, such as the Amateur Radio
Society, Aqua Society, and the
Equestrian Club. There are over
370 clubs approved by the AMS
and they're just waiting for you.
There are other groups that
are a great way to get involved.
CiTR has opportunities to host
your own radio show or just
volunteer. Sounds great, right?
Check out CiTR's website to find
out more. Of course, The Ubyssey
is a great place to get involved
(yes, this is a shameless plug.)
We're always looking for volunteer writers, photographers,
and illustrators. Head down to
room 24 in the SUB to learn more
about us.
Student societies are always
excited to have people involved.
Check out not only the AMS and
your faculty's society, but also
your major's. There may be more
opportunities to become directly
involved then you think. Sitting
in on meetings can be a great way
to find out if a student society is
the way for you to get involved.
If you live on campus, look
out for things like house council
or activities run by your RAs.
There are musicals put on by
both suite-style and traditional
residences that heavily involve
residents, as well as Totem's
flag football league and Vanier's
ultimate league.
Sports teams, clubs and Rec
classes are also a great way to
meet new people while getting
fit. Two birds with one stone!
Check out UBC Rec's website to
find out what classes and teams
are running for this term and
how to sign up.
There are tons of different
ways to get involved on campus,
so don't stop looking until you
find the perfect fit for you! Xi
Need some advice? Write to
Natalie at asknatalie@ubyssey.ca
and have your questions answered
in an upcoming issue. II Culture
JENICA MONTGOMERY
THEATRE»
UBC Theatres Twelfth Night a fall must-see
Twelfth Night is a success and a fantastic way to start this year's season
UBC Theatre's production of Shakespeare's Twelfth Night is a must see for students this fall.
Olivia Law
Contributor
Mardi Gras is all about indulgence, excess and purging all
superfluities before the fasting
period of Lent — something
which, one might argue, is what
much ofthe plot of Shakespeare's
Twelfth Night is based upon. One
ofthe most commonly performed comedies, Twelfth Night
has seen numerous adaptations,
from star-studded, Globe Theatre-based plays, to the popular
ART»
movie She's The Man. But Director
Stephen Heatley's Mardi Gras
themed Twelfth Night is a never
before seen motif. The sense that
'anything goes,' as labeled in the
Director's Notes was evident
throughout the performance, with
Dixieland music, masks and movement at the centre of each scene.
For want of a better word,
the 'banter' between the Dio-
nysian Sir Toby Belch, played
by Javier Sotres, and the sassy
Maria, played by Ghazal Azar-
bad, was superb. The essence
of Mardi Gras is celebration,
community and camaraderie,
and this translated through the
excessive flirtation, scheming
and chemistry the two characters possessed. Thomas Elms,
as the unfortunate Sir Andrew,
was a delightful addition to this
duo, provoking laughter and pity
alike as he struggled to fit into
the fast-paced society of New
Orleans Mardi Gras.
Another unique feature of
UBC's Twelfth Night was the
transition of several traditionally
=HOTO CHERIHAN HASSUNfTHE UBYSSEY
male roles to female. Feste, the
fool, was changed to Festa —
played by a hilariously sarcastic
Demi Pedersen, who seemed to
relish the opportunity for singing
that the role allows. Singing
words from Shakespeare's text
set to the traditional jazz-style
reminiscent of New Orleans, the
audience were expertly guided
through the story through Festa.
One standout performance,
however, was that of Allyce
Kranabetter, playing Malvolia.
The decision to change the puri
tan steward Malvolio to a female
role was daring, but almost perfectly executed by Kranabetter.
Certainly one ofthe most iconic
of Shakespeare's 'villain' roles,
the fatal attraction demonstrated towards Olivia (Charlotte
Wright) made her descent into
madness even more conceivable,
pushed by the utter humiliation
in the infamous 'yellow stockings' scene.
The power struggle between
Viola (Jenna Mairs) and Olivia
was engaging and true. Bringing
Olivia to the present day, Wright
was the source of much laughter
amongst the audience with her
asides, connections to the audience and transitions between
longing for Viola and light-
hearted mockery of Malvolia
with Maria.
The excess and superfluous
nature of Mardi Gras was aided
in this performance by the
costume design of Shelby Page.
Using colour schemes of purple
and green, a sense ofthe overwhelming was achieved — and
the use of decorated, somewhat
garish masks added to the confusion and deception, which is
essential to the play.
Based off ofthe reactions of
the audience, UBC Theatre's
production of Twelfth Night is an
enormous success. There were
moments of heartbreak, followed
quickly by moments of hilarity, all of which came together
through the evidently close
bonds held by the entire cast. A
production with a unique theme
delivers a superb rendition of this
much-loved Shakespearean classic — a definite must-see. ^3
Belkin 101 lets gallery goers explore art in a new fashion
=HOTO CHERIHAN HASSUN /THE UBYSSEY
Belkin 101 gives people the opportunity to have a new understanding of art
Marina Martyn-Hemphill
Contributor
The Belkin 101, conducted by Shelly
Rosenblum, Curator of Academic
Programs at the Morris and Helen
Belkin Art Gallery, is an informal
reading group that offers readings
and discussions to compliment the
artwork on exhibition in the gallery.
With a wide variety of exhibitions,
Rosenblum ensured that "each
semester the readings change to
accommodate a set of questions or
themes or interests that come out of
the show."
Currently showing a curated
selection of Ai Weiwei's "New York
Photographs, 1983-1993," Rosenblum compiled a series of accessible
articles to study alongside the 227
black and white photographs, in
order to further an understanding
of their contemporary relevance and
raise a number of questions about
photography as an art form.
"Belkin 101 is an opportunity for
anyone who has an interest to come
in and sit around a table together to
discuss seminal, theoretical texts
that will enhance our experience
in the gallery ofthe exhibition,"
said Rosenblum. Conducted in the
style of an informal reading group,
Rosenblum said that in the past
she has heard it referred to as "the
safe seminar," where students,
faculty and staff are welcome to
freely voice and explore their ideas
and opinions.
"You have amnesty to not
know, to think out loud together,"
said Rosenblum.
For many, entering an art exhibit
can be overwhelming and challenging. Belkin 101 is an opportunity
for audiences to gain a higher understanding and knowledge ofthe
exhibits displayed. "A lot of us have
a visceral experience when we come
into a gallery and we butt up against
more resistance when we try to
think through ways of making sense
of an exhibition, and [Belkin 101] is
meant to provide various ways to
'sense make,'" said Rosenblum.
It is through these readings and
discussions that Rosenblum helps
to deconstruct academic arguments
and concepts surrounding the perception of art and its significance.
Belkin 101 provides an opportunity
for people outside ofthe fine arts
disciplines to explore areas of interest and to gain a newer understanding and knowledge of both the art
on exhibit and art in general.
"I found part of what makes Belkin 101 such a pleasure to facilitate is
the really varied disciplinary homes
of its participants and the willingness to speak openly about not just
our interests, but what we know and
don't know and build conversation
and build knowledge together in
that way," said Rosenblum.
It is in hosting Ai Weiwei's
curated exhibition of documentary
style snapshots in New York that
Vancouver's own rich history of
street photography and photo con-
ceptualism is brought to light.
"It is an important way to have
a conversation about things that
matter to us in Vancouver, in terms
of our constituencies and points of
origin, migration and art practices,
all kinds of cultural, intellectual and
unlived experiences that inform
the way we inhabit our own city,"
said Rosenblum.
"The whole idea of 101 is to allow
people a greater purchase on what
they see in the gallery, a little more
investment." The program not only
gives people a deeper, richer and
more varied experience, but also
allows them to use this new perception of art and apply it to their
everyday surroundings. Xi
Want to write culture?
EMAIL CULTURE@UBYSSEYCA OR
COME BY OUR EDITORIAL OFFICE
SUB 24, FOLLOW THE SIGNS
-ffi GREEN
IB  COLLEGE I UBC
Scholarship in Society
SPECIAL LECTURE AND
DISCUSSION SERIES
IDEAS OFTHE UNIVERSITY IN THE
EARLY 2 Ist CENTURY
David Eby
MLA Vancouver
Point Grey
Tuesday, September 30,2014,5-6:15pm
COACH HOUSE, GREEN COLLEGE, 6201 CECIL GREEN PARK ROAD
www.greencollege.ubc.ca for more MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2014    |    CULTURE
ART»
AMS Art Gallery: Environmental Design students Bricolage
Michelle Nguyen's Bricolage opens on Monday in the SUB Art Gallery
=HOTO CHERIHAN HASSUN/THE UBYSSEY
Environmental Design student Michelle Nguyen will have her art on display at the AMS Art Gallery from September 29-October 10
Keagan Perlette
Contributor
Michelle Nguyen is one day
away from her first solo art
show, Bricolage, at the AMS
Art Gallery.
"My mom is actually coming
to help me hang, all the way
from Toronto," said Nguyen. The
third year environmental design
student is bashful about such
an extravagant show of familial
support. Nguyen has never taken
herself or her creative work too
seriously. She likes to have fun
with it. Bricolage "is a French
word that means 'tinkering',
and talks about the importance
of play in the creative process,"
said Nguyen.
For Nguyen, experimentation and playfulness are the
cornerstones of art making.
This approach is evident in the
variety of abstract painting she is
presenting in Bricolage. She describes herself as an improvisor,
unafraid of making an error,
seeing each stroke — for good or
bad — as a step in her progression
as an artist.
"Painting is more like a zen
thing for me. I'm like: 'Okay this
doesn't look good, I'm just going
to paint over it until it does,'"
said Nguyen. Her zen extends
to a mindset of non-attachment:
Nguyen has lost paintings in big
cities and accidentally ruined
sections of work that she really
liked. Nothing is too precious.
To get ready for the opening
of Bricolage, Nguyen has been
working during her sparse free
hours: squeezing in episodes of
American Horror Story while
trying some new creative techniques she hopes to debut at the
show. Cutting it a little close
doesn't scare Nguyen.
"I've done it long enough and
I know my style and how to mix
paints and just all the basic techniques. I can just do this, I know
I have a good eye and I know
what works and what doesn't so I
just dive in," said Nguyen.
Nguyen was accepted into the
environmental design (ENDS)
program and began her foray
into design at the end of August. Environmental design isn't
Nguyen's dream field, however;
she is there because she deeply enjoys making things. It's
another extension of her experimental nature, dipping her
toes into a new medium, always
growing. Design challenges her
laid back mentality towards
art making.
"They don't expect you to be
messy or goof around as much.
It's pretty straightforward. Like:
'You have two minutes of my
time tell me why this matters.'
It's terrifying."
But Nguyen has her own
advice on coping with fear: "You
just go for it. That's just part of
being an artist. You've just gotta
be confident. Even though you
don't know what you're doing,
you just make it seem like you
know what you're doing. You're
not going to grow unless you actually take chances and 'let's play
with this medium, let's try this
technique, who cares if I waste
this canvas.' You can see your
own progression and it's a nice
thing to see."
Despite her heavy ENDS workload, Nguyen won't stop tinkering anytime soon. She's drawn
equally to the bold, gestural
painting of Cy Twombly, the
sound art of Janet Cardiff (shown
at the Vancouver Art Gallery last
month), and the sculpture-performance work of Janine Antoni.
She's not afraid to mix mediums
and step out of her comfort
zone. Her next creative pursuits
include learning taxidermy:
she's inspired by Claire Morgan's
installations which often include
once-live animals.
"I just have a bunch of clay and
stuff, paints and canvas ready
in my room in if I ever feel like
I need to do something," she
said. Nguyen's creative outlook
remains steadfast: "Art shouldn't
be a difficult, angsty, emotional
thing. Don't hesitate, don't be a
coward." tJ
Bricolage will be shown at the
AMS Art Gallery in the SUB from
September 29 to October 10. The
gallery is open Monday to Friday
from 11:00 a.m. to 5:00p.m. Xi
FILM»
What I LOVE about being QUEER challenges steroetypes of queer identity in film
Amy Ryder
Contributor
The queer story is one of struggle. In media the narrative goes
something like this: the queer
character dies; they don't get a
happy ending; or the entire movie
is about their struggle and the
very end we see one moment
of happiness.
What I LOVE about being
QUEER breaks this narrative
habit. Artist Vivek Shraya's
short film, of which a screening
was hosted by UBC Equity and
Inclusion Office last Wednesday
at the Norm Theatre, shows 34
queer-identified people answering just that question: what
do they love about being queer?
Their responses make for a 18
minute long anthem of love about
being queer.
Many of their answers were
about community. They explained
how the queer community has
allowed them to find unique
connections and link them to
humanity around the world. A
shared experience allows them
to find solidarity and compassion
in not only their queerness, but
also as fat, transgender, non-binary, or a person of colour. For
Shraya "it felt like I was the only
gay person on the planet and so
meeting others has been such a
huge part of coming into my own
queerness."
Other people responded that
they loved their freedom from
heteronormativity and how that
gave them total ability to self-determine themselves. This position
also allows queer communities to
deconstruct and challenge nor-
PHOTO COURTESY ANDI ALVAREZ
Artist Vivek Shraya came to campus on Wednesday, September 24 to show his film What I LOVE about being QUEER.
mativity and conformity.
The inspiration for the film
came from Shraya's day job as a
human rights advisor and positive
space coordinator at George
Brown College in Toronto. "I
meet with queer and trans youth
and often you know in those discussions there is sort of disclosure
of homophobia but also how that
homophobia leads to a form of
self-hate," said Shraya. The film
was created to counter those
notions and to show youth the
richness of being queer.
Right before the film's original
release in 2012 Shraya created a
Tumblr page to allow a diverse
group of people to continually
submit their own answers to
what they love about being queer.
"[The] queer communities are so
vast, I would love to include more
voices," said Shraya. About a year
later when he had received over
200 submissions, at the suggestion of a friend he made them into
a book, of which all proceeds go
to the Positive Space Award at
George Brown College. He said
what convinced him to make
the book was thinking of "being
a 17 year old kid in Edmonton
that I was and flipping through
this book of people talking about
loving queerness."
On what to say to those queer
and trans youth struggling with
acceptance both within themselves and from others, Shraya
said "Just that, you know, they're
beautiful. I mean the big thing
for me honestly was supports, I
don't think I would have survived high school and junior high
if I didn't seek out support.... Like
whatever supports you have, just
hold on to those." tJ // Sports + Rec
EDITOR JACKHAUEN
MONDA1
HOMECOMING
Top Scorers
Cole Wilson
18G 17A 35P +14
Brad Hoban
7G 18A 25P
Anthony Bardaro
7G 15A 22P
Neil Manning
5G 14A19P
Goaltending
Steven Stanford
© m a
924 44GA        .906SV%
Mins 2.86GAA       (7-7-0)
Team
Record
(.393)
Home
5-9
Away
6-8
Jack Hauen
Sports and Rec Editor
There's been no love lost between
the 'Birds and the Bears.
Last Friday and Saturday evenings saw a rematch ofthe playoff
bout that took the UBC Thunderbirds out ofthe playoffs last year
as they took on the University
of Alberta Golden Bears at Doug
Mitchell Arena. Although the
T-Birds didn't skate away with a
sweep, they must be somewhat
pleased with a split after taking
on the best team in the league.
Friday saw the 'Birds begin
their season in a packed stadium,
partially thanks to the team's
party beforehand — six dollars
for a burger and a ticket to the
game was too enticing a deal for
many UBC students. All the fans'
pep, however, couldn't prevent
the home team from dropping a
3-2 decision to the Bears after they failed to capitalize on
eight powerplay opportunities.
They were solid in the first two
periods, and entered the third
locked in a 2-2 tie, but Alberta
defenceman Jordan Rowley was
able to rifle a shot past UBC goal-
tender Matt Hewitt to give his
team their first lead ofthe night.
2013 CIS goalie ofthe year Kurtis
Mucha would make sure it stayed
that way.
"I thought we were pretty
good," said rookie head coach
Tyler Kuntz, "but in the third period we kind of fizzled."
If they fizzled on Friday, the
'Birds shone on Saturday. UBC
proved that they could not only
skate with the best of the best,
but they could beat them as the
Thunderbirds gave Kuntz his
first CIS win as head coach in a
dominant 5-2 outing at Father
Bauer Arena.
The game started out feisty,
as the teams battled in what was
clearly going to be a hard-fought
game — clearly they had some
history. Neither team skated in
a style that could be described
as "dirty", but players on both
sides were looking over their
shoulders before long, as well
as participating in uncharacteristic after-whistle scrums and
crease-crashing. By the end ofthe
game, 14 infractions and 83 penalty minutes had been handed out
to each team, including three ten-
minute misconducts, a boarding
major, and nine roughing calls.
"I think it's a bit odd," said
Kuntz ofthe penalties. "I don't
think you'll see that much. Alberta plays real hard and they're
also pretty clean. They play so
fast that they don't need to hook
or hold or anything else."
Alberta's first goal came 14:20
into the opening frame from a
beautiful crossbar deflection
by former Edmonton Oil King
Stephane Legault. From that
point onward, only a floating
wrister late in the third would get
past Hewitt, and by that point,
it wouldn't matter. Kuntz called
him an "obvious choice" for his
standout player ofthe night.
UBC ended the first down one,
and began the second by turning the opening period's spark
into a flame. The refs began
to let things slide as the game
opened up and the rough play
got rougher. The Thunderbirds
defended their net as fiercely as
they attacked Alberta's, sacrificing the body anytime a point
shot seemed imminent. Their
commitment paid off at 9:38 of
the middle frame — their original
rush was broken up, but newcomer Adam Rossignol salvaged
the play and fired a hard and
short pass to Nate Fleming who
slammed in the bang-bang play.
The crowd exploded, making
even more noise due to the
acoustics ofthe packed audience in the relatively tiny arena.
They each got a face-washing as
their reward, and coincidental
minors were handed out from the
ensuing scrum.
It wouldn't be long before UBC
potted the go-ahead goal; at 11:27,
another rush straight to the front
of Alberta's net was foiled by
goalie Luke Siemens' pad save,
but he couldn't find the rebound,
which was handily slapped in
by Jessi Hilton. Siemens threw
up his hands in disgust, and the
Golden Bears on the ice threw up
theirs for some more roughhous-
ing. UBC's best period saw them
add one more before the whistle
blew, as Adam Rossignol scored
in much the same way as every
other UBC goal that night: a
slapshot along the ice from three
feet in front ofthe net. It wasn't
pretty, but it gave the 'Birds a
cushion to take into the third.
The final frame saw UBC's
prettiest goal ofthe night, and
perhaps the season — Manraj
Hayer threw a sweet pass from
the sideboards to Anthony
Bardaro who was alone in front
ofthe net and made no mistake.
Bardaro had limited space to
work with, but managed a simple
but effective forehand-backhand-forehand deke and made
use of his right-handed shot to
pop it in over the glove of Siemens. 4-1 'Birds.
A high open-ice hit on Dillon
Wagner by Golden Bear Kruise
Reddick at 7:16 kicked off a slew MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 2014    |    SPORTS
WEEKEND
Top Scorers
of penalties that saw 4-on-4 play,
an Alberta 4-on-3 (which the
'Birds killed effectively), and a
short UBC 5-on-3 that saw just
one good chance.
The game slowed down
considerably once the teams
had gotten that stretch out of
their systems, but a Greg Fraser
blueline floater and a tricky T.J.
Foster wrist shot meant that the
scoring wouldn't stop until the
game was completely done.
The crowd left pleased with
the fast-paced, energetic game,
and Kuntz expects this rivalry
to keep its entertainment value
in the future. "That's a team that
expects to win every game ... they
knocked us out ofthe playoffs last
year. We're going to play those
guys extremely hard, and they're
going to play us hard."
Although the new head coach
is happy with his first regular
season win as UBC bench boss, he
made sure to put the win squarely
on the shoulders of his players.
"You work real hard and you hope
that what you're doing is what's
going work to win games — it's all
the guys on the team. They're the
ones that play the game."
The 'Birds' next home game will
be on Friday, October 10th against
the Mount Royal Cougars at Doug
Mitchell Stadium at 7:00 pm. U
Jenny Tang
Contributor
After a rocky Friday night, with the
team barely snatching a win, the
Thunderbirds finished their final
preseason games, and their homecoming game, with a confident
5-0 shut-out for a pair of back-to
back preseason victories against
the Northern Alberta Institute of
Technology (NAIT) Ooks at the
Protrans and Father David Bauer
Arenas last weekend.
One ofthe biggest mistakes from
the Thunderbirds was underestimating their opponents on Friday
night. Being back-to-back champions in regular season, and coming
from the top of their league (the
Canadian Collegiate Athletic Association) in playoffs, the Ooks caught
the 'Birds by surprise. UBC only
barely cinched their late goal after
the puck bounced in off of one of
the Ooks, which made for a rather
unhappy win.
"Last night I don't think we
were mentally ready... I think we
took them a little too lightly and
they played us hard..." said Coach
Thomas. "We weren't happy with
our overall effort, and our mental focus and preparation for the
game."
The bad feelings were shortlived as the 'Birds went on to win
Saturday's game with a 5-0 shut
out. This game was to mark the end
ofthe preseason for the 'Birds and
the Ooks, so they decided to have a
little bit of fun with that in mind.
While the actual game only
lasted 2 periods, the last period
was played on a lighter note, with 3
minute l-for-2 power plays on both
sides, and the preseason finished
for both teams with a friendly
shootout.
"But we played much better
today, we had better effort." said
Thomas. "We felt like today was a
better game."
But starting next week things
will start getting a bit more
serious for the 'Birds. With the
season getting closer and closer,
each game has been a lesson for
the team.
The 'Birds are in good standing right now, having won the
BC Challenge Cup and coming
off wins against their rivals the
Calgary Dinos and having a good
weekend away in the Calgary Exhibition Tournament, where they
won two of their three matches.
"We're sticking with weekly
goals," Thomas said. "This week
was about consistent energy, and
then our upcoming week we're
transitioning into communication
and specific and direct communication; what works, and certain
things we should use."
This weekend the 'Birds will
be facing their first official season
rivalry in the Saskatchewan Huskies. The Huskies placed second
in the Canada West Playoffs after
the Regina Cougars, finishing just
above UBC. Saskatchewan is one of
UBC's toughest rivals in the league,
winning the next weekend will be a
big plus for the Thunderbirds.
"We've learned some lessons,
we've built on our foundations and
are just ready to go, and ready to
play next weekend," said Thomas.
"We're looking to build and get
ready for them."
Things are looking good for the
season's opening match. The 'Birds
have placed first in the 2014-15
exhibition standings in the Canada
West league, and they will be
playing at home, which has always
been an advantage for the team.
Last year they went on a nine-game
home winning streak.
Coach Thomas is confident,
and things look promising in the redemption that the 'Birds have been
chasing since last season.
"We're excited," he said. "We
played well in our pre-season and
we're ready for next weekend."
The 'Birds will go head to head
with the Huskies next Friday,
October 3rd at the Doug Mitchell
Thunderbird Stadium. Puck drop is
at 7.00 pm.®
Tatiana Rafter]
20G18A38P
Nicole Saxvik
10G14A24P
Stephanie Schaupmeyer
7G 15A 22P
Sarah Casorso
6G13A19P
Goaltending
Danielle Dube
® m *
1025 37GA .925SV%
Mins 2.17GAA      (12-4-0)
Team
Record
(.750)
# #
Home
13-0-1
Away
7-6-1 10    I   SPORTS   I    MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 29,2014
FOOTBALL»
First win of the season
T-Birds stomp Alberta 49-13 at home
PHOTO WILL MCDONALD/THE UBYSSEY
Marcus Davis had two touchdowns and 253 all-purpose yards Saturday.
CANOEING »
C J Pentland
Staff Writer
"We've got a good group of
kids, and there's some talent
here — we've just got to put it all
together."
That's what UBC head coach
Shawn Olson said on Thursday when discussing his team's
early-season struggles and what
the Thunderbirds needed to do
to take down Alberta on Saturday afternoon. The 'Birds were
the only winless team in the
conference at 0-3, and were dead
last in nearly every offensive
category — all this after being
ranked number seven in the CIS
preseason rankings.
Saturday showed that the good
group of kids really does have
some talent, and when they put
it all together the rest ofthe conference needs to take notice.
In what looked to be a defensive battle at first with UBC continuing to lack firepower on offence, the T-Birds started to click
on all cylinders in the second half
to put up 36 points and coast to
a 49-13 victory. Those 49 points
more than doubled the amount of
points UBC put up in their first
three contests combined.
Olson has said much about a
lack of "explosive" plays by the
T-Birds over the course ofthe
year, with one such example
being that their longest run was
just 21 yards. On Saturday there
were two runs of over 50 yards,
two touchdown passes over 40, a
touchdown thrown by a running
back and a 98-yard punt return.
Behind many of those plays
were the Davis brothers, Terrell
and Marcus. Two highly-touted
prospects out of Mount Doug
high school in Victoria, they
have combined to win the past
three BC AAA High School MVP
awards, and showed on Saturday
the skills they possess. Marcus
returned a punt 98 yards to the
one-yard line, ran for a rushing
touchdown, and hauled in a 43-
yard TD pass for 253 all-purpose
yards. Terrell chipped in with 85
rushing yards on just six carries,
and threw for a touchdown on a
beautifully designed trick play.
"When you've got a guy who's
that fast it opens up a lot of possibilities, and he does a good job of
taking what they gave him and
making a big play out of it every
time," said UBC quarterback
Carson Williams on Marcus,
who he hooked up with for a
43-yard score.
Yet it was the little things as
well that propelled the T-Birds.
Carson Williams had by far his
best game ofthe season, completing 21 of 31 passes for 302
yards and two touchdowns with
no interceptions, relying on
short passes to a wide range of
volunteers running crisp routes.
Nine different receivers hauled
in a pass, with Josh Kronstrom
leading the way with six receptions and Alex Morrison,
Ryan Couper and Marcus Davis
scoring touchdowns.
On defence, the T-Birds continued to improve with a sound
effort that limited Alberta to
under 400 yards of total offence.
Golden Bears quarterback Curtis
Dell entered the game as the conference's leading passer by averaging 342 yards per game, but the
'Birds remained calm throughout the game and didn't fall for
Alberta's attempts to confuse the
defence by repeatedly stalling at
the line before the snap. Bryan
Rideout and Dominique Ter-
mansen had interceptions, and
Donovan Dale and Steve Mawa
recorded sacks.
As for the third facet of UBC's
game, the special teams unit
put it all together as well. Olson
stressed earlier in the week the
importance to improve tackling,
and his squad responded with
clean takedowns that repeatedly gave Alberta a long field to
work with.
Not only does the win start
the ball rolling for UBC, but it
also puts them right back in the
playoff picture. Regina, Alberta
and UBC all sit deadlocked at 1-3
and in contention for the fourth
and final playoff spot, and a part
of a carousel that's seen Regina
beat UBC, Alberta beat Regina
and UBC beat Alberta. The
T-Birds take on the Rams two
weeks from now at home, which
will most definitely carry playoff
implications, but Olson refuses
to look any further than next
week's game; on Thursday he
stressed how his team just needs
to win one game before they can
even think about playoffs, and
echoed similar thoughts after
that win came.
"We're going to focus on
Saskatchewan — they're a tough
competition. By no stretch of
the imagination does this win
change our mindset because our
backs are against the wall and
we need to go to work tomorrow
and get a little better than we
were today, and take it one day at
a time."
It may just be one win, but most
importantly it's a step in the right
direction that proved that UBC
really can put it all together. Xi
Concrete canoers paddle unlikely vessel
Their pet project weighs just under 700 pounds — and it floats.
Jordan Ly
Contributor
"Does it float?" is the question
that seems to be at the top ofthe
UBC concrete canoe team's FAQ.
The answer — which the UBC
concrete canoe team is probably
tired of dictating — is yes.
In fact, the concrete used to
make the canoe is actually less
dense than water. But the UBC
concrete canoe team is more than
just an affirmative answer to a
frequently asked question. The
=HOTOCOURTESYUBC CONCRETE CANOETEAM
tradition of building canoes out
of concrete runs its roots back
to 1960, when the first group of
ASCE (American Society of Civil
Engineers) began holding intramural concrete canoe races.
Flash forward some forty
years, and a ragtag group of UBC
students would expound all their
hidden talents and take on unconventional roles to be competing
in Portland, Oregon with their
own concrete canoe, charmingly
named Pre-Castaway, where they
would come an impressive fourth
place out of thirteen teams. As
a small side note, Pre-Castaway
weighs in at just shy of 700
pounds, whereas some ofthe
nationally recognized boats get as
low as 110 pounds.
The project takes the entirety
ofthe academic year. Term one
consists of design and the other
construction. The team is an especially devoted bunch, and their
buckle-down efforts will probably
hold all the way until April when
they compete at the ASCE national concrete canoe competition
in Idaho.
UBC competes in the Pacific Northwest division against
schools like Boise State University, University of Idaho, and the
reigning champions: the University of Washington. The UBC concrete canoe team hopes to place
top three this year in Idaho.
On top ofthe competitive
aspect, the team holds an ulterior
value. Over the course ofthe
year, the team is allowed to be
exposed to not only the design aspect, but the hands-on
lab work as well. Through this
experience, they gain project
management skills, industry
knowledge, and even a bit of
marketing and business experience. The hands-on building of
the concrete canoe yields a lot
of experience that a classroom
wouldn't offer.
One ofthe greatest things,
said team captain Bradley Ho,
is that the team is allowed to
see the project come to life from
start to finish. Oftentimes, the
projects done in CEME (Civil
and Mechanical Engineering)
are long-term. It is extremely rewarding to see your project come
to fruition and see it in action
in April. Overall, the concrete
canoe team is a righteous way to
go about getting your hands dirty
and gaining employable skills.
The team is willing and eager
to teach technical skill to anybody who lacks. Dedication and
motivation are the two things
the UBC concrete canoe team is
looking for. The meet on Saturdays and can be reached on their
Facebook page and by email at
ubcconcretecanoe@gmail.com.
"It's not too late to join,"
stressed Ho. tJ MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 29,2014    I    SPORTS    I   11
LONGBOAT»
Teams battled competitively and just for fun in one of UBC's strongest traditions this weekend.
PHOTO WILL MCDONALD/THE UBYSSEY
Smooth sailing at Jericho
A UBC tradition: Day of the Longboat 2014
On the
ground
&
Paul S. Jon
Contributor
What made the longboat sink? Pier
pressure. What do you do with a
sick longboat? Take it to the dock.
Nautical jokes of such calibre
could only be inspired by one thing:
UBC Rec's 27th annual Day ofthe
Longboat, which took place over
the gloriously sunny September 26-
27 weekend at Jericho Beach.
The Day ofthe Longboat is UBC
Rec's biggest off-campus event and
the largest voyageur canoe race in
the world. This year saw participation from about 3,500 racers, usually in teams of 10, composed of UBC
alumni, graduate students, undergraduates and various members of
the community. The competitive
brackets included men's, women's
and co-recreational divisions, while
those out of their depth in the
competitive scene had the chance
to test the waters in various "Just
For Fun" races.
The titanic size ofthe event
can be attributed to its signature
status in UBC culture, with many
considering Longboat a mandatory
experience for every student.
"This is the classic UBC experience," said Daniel Shearer, a
fourth-year biology student. "It's
something you really can't do
anywhere else. It's my last year at
UBC so I want to make the most
of it. You have to do it before you
graduate."
Fourth-year chemical engineering student Adeline Peter and a
group of her friends shared similar
rationales. "This is our last year,
right?" Peter said. "So we decided
to participate because we wanted
the experience."
The event's popularity extends
well beyond that of four-year UBC
veterans. Erika Poletti, a transfer
student from Italy, raced with a
group of fellow transfer students
from every corner ofthe world,
having heard of Longboat's reputation via word of mouth. "Apparently it's one ofthe biggest events of
the year," Poletti said.
"I wanted to be part ofthe
community," said Nao Umeda,
a third-year geography student.
"We had a lot of fun. It was very
intense. I thought we were going
to capsize."
While Umeda's team managed
to avoid capsizing, others weren't
so lucky, including a team representing Place Vanier house Tec
de Monterrey, whose boat flipped
over shortly after the race began.
"It really dampened the mo
ment," said team member Rohan
Nuttall, proving sports reporters
aren't the only ones capable of
nautical wordplay. "But it was a
lot of fun," Nuttall added. Wet or
dry, everybody seemed to have a
good time.
According to event coordinator
Gordon Newell, the tireless efforts
of over 100 volunteers including
all intramural staff of UBC REC
were responsible for keeping such
a massive undertaking afloat.
"They love the event and all the
camaraderie and fun they have
together," Newell said.
As volunteer Mariah Mulligan put it, "It's a great way to get
involved on campus. It's full of
really, really outgoing, positive
people. You can look around and
see how happy everybody is, how
excited they are." tJ
Mormei Zanke
Contributor
There's something about being
on the water with your team, three
strokes behind another boat that
causes any moral limitations to fly
out the window. In that moment,
there's nothing more you could
ever want then to sail by that other
team and splash them with the
under spray of your boat as your
paddle stabs into the water.
Of course, Day ofthe Longboat
is pretty fun too. UBC REC did a
good job of keeping things lively
with loud music suggested by students via twitter. Another addition
was their selfie-armthat allowed
team members to take photos post-
race. All the Rec organizers were
approachable and made sure the
day flowed smoothly.
One ofthe most memorable
moments ofthe event was when
early Saturday morning, just
two seconds into a race a canoe
capsized dunking an entire team
into the water. Rec organizers
immediately came to the rescue
and helped get the boat right side
up. Seeing those 20 bodies in the
water helping this one canoe made
any observer smile. However un
fortunate, it was nice to see UBC
Rec had their back.
Some capsized, some lost a
paddle, and some were just proud
they made it to the finish line. But
whether your intentions were to
have some fun on one ofthe last
sunny days ofthe season, or to
decimate the competition, it's safe
to say Day ofthe Longboat was a
success for all. tJ
CHARITY »
UBC students raise awareness with 10km charity walk
Jenny Tang
Contributor
Making one's way over to Stanley
Park at 9:00 am on a Saturday
morning isn't an attractive idea,
but for second year Hannah Far-
rell, it's all for a good cause.
Farrell, a Biology Honours
major in Science, participated
in Walk the Wall on Saturday
morning, walking ten kilometres
to raise funds and awareness for
International China Concern, a
charity that works with children with disabilities in China,
particularly those who have been
abandoned, and tries to provide
"love, hope and opportunity to
every child."
Farrell has done Walk the Wall
for several years in Hong Kong
with friends and family, and her
family sponsors two children in
orphanages in China. "The idea is
that even if we can only do a small
amount each, as a community we
can do great things," she said.
In China, there is greater
pressure for parents to abandon
disabled children due to the one-
child policy. Since most parents
can't afford to fund their child's
needs, they feel it is more humane
to leave them.
ICC hopes to intervene and
provide care homes and local
caregivers to support the children
and the local economy, as well as
encourage kids to go to school and
join clubs, and live normal lives
until they are old enough to find
work.
"What ICC has been trying to
do with them is teach them useful
skills that they can use, and show
everyone that these kids can
actually be an integral part of society," said Farrell.
The walk itself took place last
Saturday with a great turnout,
though there was a clash for most
UBC students as the traditional
Day ofthe Longboat took place at
the same time. Farrell didn't mind
too much.
"It's a great tradition with UBC
so I can understand why everyone
is excited, but it's also great because
there have been positive responses
from most people," she said.
The money raised by Walk the
Wall goes straight back to the ICC's
funds, which they use to help the
children directly by hiring local
nannies for the children, fund personalized therapy programs and do
everything in their power to help
the children achieve their personal
goals.
Farrell hopes to encourage more
students from UBC to look up Walk
the Wall and ICC themselves, and
even hopes that there will be a
bigger turnout next year.
"When you think about the big
issues in the world today, thinking
'what can I do to help a child in
China?'just seems like a far-away
idea, and by just doing a small bit, it
will go a long way," she said.
"Just by walking 10 kilometres,
or telling a family member about
ICC, or telling friends, it's a small
thing, but it really helps a lot." Xi // Scene
Photo of the Day
PHOTO WILL MCDONALD/THE UBYSSEY
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WE
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ACROSS
1-Ain't right?
6-Liquid food
10- The closest one to us is the
sun
14-Cut off
15-About, in memos
16-Actor O'Shea
17- Pal, south ofthe border
18-Pipe
19-Bluesy James
20-Corrupts
22-Deodorant type
24-Apple player
25-Purposeless
26- Lengthier
29-Sicilian peak
30-"Hard !" (sailor's yell)
31- Systematic description of
diseases
37- Bearings
39-Doctrine
40-Governs
41- Immeasurably deep
44-Seldom seen
45- Hammerhead
46-Table attendant
48-Stored away
52- Bust maker
53-Collar
54-Harsh
58-Large cat
59- As previously given, in
footnotes
61- France
9-Lookinq closely
62-Moving vehicles
10-Sniff
63-Workers' rights org.
11- Name
64-Squelched
12- Choir members
65-Writer Wiesel
13-Some horses
66-Skedaddles
21-Ripped
67- Long lock of hair
23-Astroloqer Sydney
25-Tiny particles
DOWN
26-Gyro meat
""    27-Potpourri
1- Quickly, quickly
2-San       , Italy
28-Depilatory brand
29-Ruhr city
3-Wicked
32-Greased
4- Indifferent
33-Aura
5-Company of actors
34-Land map
6- Located
35-Roll call response
7- Blame
36- River of Flanders
8-Metro area
38-Second-year stude
short
42-Assembly
43-Attack a fly
47- Painter, e.g.
48- Medicinarointment
49- Experiment
50- Rice-	
51-Meaning
52- Deadens
54- Frobe who played Gold-
finger
55- Nerve network
56- Brouhahas
57-Optical device
60- Half of MCII

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