UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Dec 5, 2013

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0126622.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0126622.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0126622-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0126622-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0126622-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0126622-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0126622-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0126622-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0126622-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0126622.ris

Full Text

Array THE
SPORTS REPORT CARD // From amazing As to dreaded Ds, the grades are in for UBC's varsity programs P8
FASHION STREETERS // Find out how to stay stylish in UBC's ocean of ugg boots and leggings this winter P5 // Page 2
WHAT'S ON i    THIS WEEK, MAY
THURSDAY   05
CHRISTMAS
ARTISAN FAIR
9 A.M.-5 P.M. @ REGENT COLLEGE
Illustrated cards, beeswax
candles, handmade pottery and
jewelry — get them all at Regent's
annual event.
FRIDAY ' 06
ICE SKATING
9 A.M.-11 P.M. @ ROBSON SQUARE
Venture downtown for this wintry
sport. Skating is free if you bring
your own skates, but skates will
be available for rental. If you can't
or don't like to skate, you can
always shop.
$4 skates, $2 helmets, $2 ice
cleats
SUNDAY ' 08
FARADAY SCIENCE SHOW
2 P.M.-3:30 P.M. @ HEBB THEATRE
UBC's 10th annual science
lecture presented by the Departments of Physics and Astronomy
and Chemistry. This show is for
children of all ages, and adults
who are young at heart.
Free, but bring non-perishable
food items for the food bank
ON
THE
COVER
^|THE UBYSSEY
EDITORIAL
Coordinating Editor
Geoff Lister
coordinating@uby ssey.es
Managing Editor, Print
Ming Wong
orinteditor@ubyssey.es
Managing Editor, Web
CJ Pentland
webeditor@ubyssey.es
News Editors
Will McDonald +
Sarah Bigam
iews@ubyssey.es
Senior News Writer
Brandon Chow
ochow@ubyssey.es
Culture Editor
Rhys Edwards
eulture@ubyssey.es
Senior Culture Writer
Aurora Tejeida
atejeida@ubyssey.es
Sports + Rec Editor
Natalie Scadden
sports@ubyssey.es
Senior Lifestyle Writer
Reyhana Heatherington
"heatherington@ubyssey.es
Features Editor
Amo Rosenfeld
features@ubyssey.es
Video Producers
Lu Zhang +
Nick Grossman
video@ubyssey.es
Copy Editor
Matt Meuse
eopy@ubyssey.es
Photo Editor
Carter Brundage
ohotos@ubyssey.es
Illustrator
Indiana Joel
joel@ubyssey.es
Graphic Designer
Nena Nguyen
nnguyen@ubyssey.es
Webmaster
Tony Li
webmaster@ubyssey.es
Distribution Coordinator
Lily Cai
cai@ubyssey.es
STAFF
Catherine Guan, NickAdams
Kanta Dihal, Marlee Laval,
Angela Tien, Carly Sotas, Alex
Meisner, Luella Sun, Jenny
Tang.AdrienneHembree^
Mehryar Maalem, Jack Hauen
Kosta Prodanovic, Olivia Law,
JethroAu, Bailey Ramsay,
Jenica Montgomery.Austen
Erhardt, Alice Fleerackers
Nikos Wright
SATURDAY ' 07
MOB THE DRIVE
12 P.M.-4 P.M. @ COMMERCIAL DRIVE
Also called the Good Money
Mob, this event aims to encourage people to support local
businesses by doing their holiday
shopping on Commercial Drive.
Entertainment, food and more.
Free to browse, $$$ if you want to
actually buy stuff
"Depicting mental health without
being cheesy is a difficult thing
to do. in the end, the human
face and figure seemed like the
best symbols to use, along with
random textures and colours
and inverted outlines to give you
that mysterious mind feeling."
illustration by Indiana Joel.
DECEMBERS,2013 | VOLUMEXCV| ISSUEXXIX
BUSINESS
Business
Manager
Fernie Pereira
fpereira@
jbyssey.ca
604.822.668l
Ad Sales
MarkSha
advertising®
jbyssey.ca
604.822.1654
Ad Sales
Tiffany Tsao
webadvertisinc
©ubyssey.ca ~
604.822.1658
Accounts
Graham
McDonald
accounts®
jbyssey.ca
Editorial Office:
3UB24
SO 4.822.2301
Business Office:
3UB23
Student Union Buildinc
6138 SUB Boulevard ~
Vancouver. BCV6T1Z1
Web: ubyssey.ca
Twitter: ©ubyssey
LEGAL
The Ubyssey Is the official studentnews-
aaper of the Unlversitv of Rmish Cn-
umbla. It is publish^
anclThursclaybyTheUbyssey Publications Society. We are an autonomous,
democratically run student organization, and all students are encouragec
to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written by the
Jbyssey staff. They are the expressec
opinion ofthe staff, and do not necessarily reflect the views ofThe Ubyssey
Publications Society or the University
of British Columbia. All editorial content
appearing In The Ubyssey Is the property ofThe Ubyssey Publications Society. Stories, opinions, photographs anc
artwork contained herein cannot be re-
aroduced with out the expressed, written permission ofThe Ubyssey Publications Society.
_etters to the editor must be under
300 words. Please Include your phone
number, student number and signature (not for publication) as well as
your year and faculty with all submissions. ID will be checked when submissions are dropped off at the editorial office ofThe Ubyssey; otherwise
verification will be done by phone.
The Ubyssey reserves the right tc
edltsubmis: ir length and clar-
ty. All letters must be received by 12
noon the day before Intended publication. Letters received after this point
will be published In the following Issue unless there Is an urgent time restriction or other matter deemed relevant by the Ubyssey staff.
It Is agreed by all persons placing dls-
alay or classified advertising that If the
Jbyssey Publications Society falls tc
aubllsh an advertisement or If an er-
'orin the ad occurs the liability ofthe
JPS will not be greater than the price
aald for the ad. The UPS shall not be
•esponslble for _, ■ ■ angesorty-
aographlcal errors that do not lessen the value or the Impact of the ad.
OUR CAMPUS//
ONE ON ONE WITH THE PEOPLE WHO MAKE UBC
It's not easy being blue, but Jesse Labrecquehasa heck of a time doing it.
PHOTO KAITLYNTISSINGTON3THEUBYSSEY
Sweaty, jolly fun: being
Thunder, the UBC mascot
Tara Chan
Contributor
Though the sport may change,
the players may graduate and the
venue may differ, at the heart of
each Thunderbird game is their
mascot, Thunder — and Jesse
Labrecque is the man under
the suit.
When he is not juggling seven
engineering classes, the second-
year student canbe found either
helping out with campus social
aggregate TheCalendar.ca or
running around as Thunder at
varsity games.
Labrecque was offered the
mascot job by UBC Athletics after
he asked to borrow the blue suit
for the UBC Harlem Shake video;
they wanted to find a designated
person to be Thunder.
"[It's] hot — very hot," said
Labrecque. "[But] if you get over
the heat inside the suit then it's a
ton of fun. It's a free pass to run
around and be a complete weirdo
and get away with it."
While Labrecque does not
travel with the teams, he's in
the suit for about 90 per cent of
Thunder's appearances, and is
in character roughly eight to 10
hours a week. He says UBC Athletics staff are very understanding of his full schedule and try to
work around his timetable.
There's a sneaky side to
Labrecque when it comes taking
pictures with Thunder.
"When everyone in the picture
is smiling as big as they can so
they can have a nice new profile
picture, I'm inside the suit making the absolute most ridiculous
face you can think of," he said.
"It's like photobombing every
picture, but Thunder is always
smiling!"
Aside from not being allowed
to speak — he does not want to
ruin the fantasy for the children
— he loves the freedom to do
whatever he feels like under the
suit. In fact, "complete freedom"
is how he describes his job.
Labrecque promotes school
spirit in other ways, too. In
addition to being Thunder, he is
also an ambassador of TheCalendar.ca, whose goal is to increase
school spirit and fun on campus.
If you have not seen him in
action, you will likely find him at
Thunderbird football, basketball
and hockey games, entertaining
the audience and pumping up
the volume.
Although he loves the gig,
Labrecque knows it will not
pay the bills after graduation.
He plans to become a professional engineer, and eventually
wants to come back to UBC for
more school.
Labrecque has an inspiring
message for the next potential
Thunder: "Be great. I'll find you
and give you this job.
"Be prepared to be an absolute
babe magnet. Also, get used to
crying yourself to sleep knowing
that it's not you the women want
— it's Thunder." XI // News
ACTIVISM »
/ILL MCDONALD + SARAH BIGAM
RESEARCH»
Activist group UBCC350 is asking the university to pull $100 million out of fossil fuel investments.
PHOTO CARTER BRUNDAGE3THE UBYSSEY
Fossil fuel divestment makes referendum
Amna Elnour
Contributor
UBCC350, a campus group
dedicated to fighting climate
change, recently earned fossil fuel divestment a spot on
the January referendum after
successfully gathering 1,000
student signatures.
Launched in early November,
UBCC350's Divest UBC campaign
asks the university to pull its
investments from fossil fuel companies. Currently, $100 million of
UBC's $1.06 billion endowment
fund, which helps to fund university operations, is invested in
fossil fuel companies.
"A single campaign can make
a massive difference," said Divest
UBC student coordinator Cohen
Hocking, pointing to high school
student demonstrations against
apartheid in South Africa as examples. In the comingweeks, Divest
UBC will be workingto educate students about divestment and to raise
awareness about the referendum.
To get a question on the referendum, a group needs to get 1,000
student signatures, which Divest
UBC reached last week. The question that will appear on the ballot
will ask the AMS to get involved in
the campaign.
The question will be: "Whereas
the University of British Colum
bia has demonstrated a strong
commitment to environmental
sustainability, and whereas it is
unconscionable to fund our education with investments in fossil
fuels that threaten our future on
this planet, UBC should immediately forgo further investments
in fossil fuel companies, and
divest from all existing fossil fuel
holdings within five years.
Do you call on the Alma Mater
Society to make all reasonable efforts to urge UBC to divest from
fossil fuels?"
If students vote in favour
ofthe above referendum, the
university is not required to
respond.
"It's not binding to the university in any way," said AMS
archivist Sheldon Goldfarb.
However, Goldfarb said a passing
referendum would oblige the
AMS to take action by urging the
university to divest, and possibly
incorporate it into AMS policy.
If the referendum doesn't pass,
it can be asked again in future
elections. Goldfarb pointed
out that the current SUB exists
today thanks to an AMS referendum which failed the first
time around.
The question will appear on
the ballot during this year's election period, which runs from Jan.
27 through 31, 2014. a
NEWS BRIEFS
UBC alumni make power list
UBC alumni Amiee Chan, Allison
Grafton and Lisa Vogt were named
in a recent list of Canada's most
powerful women.
Lindsay Nahmiache, a curriculum
advisorfor UBC's digital communications program, also made the list.
The list, released on Tuesday by
the Women's Executive Network
(WEN), highlights the professional
achievements of women.
"We believe that by recognizing
and sharing the accomplishments of
these women, we are encouraging
the next generation to reach higherso
that one day there will be no ceiling,
just possibility," said Pamela Jeffery,
WEN founder.
Architect of Chan Centre wins
prize from U BC Architecture
On Tuesday, the UBC School
of Architecture and Landscape
Architecture awarded the $50,000
Margolese National Design for
Living Prize to architect Bing Thorn.
This prize is awarded to a Canadian who has contributed to the
improvement of living environments
for Canadians.
"So many issues related to better
living are bound up in transforming
oursuburban environments," said
judge David Beers. "Those issues
range from making the built landscape more environmentally sustainable to whether it just feels good to
be a citizen in that place."
Thorn's portfolio of completed
projects includes the Chan Centre, xi
FUNDRAISING »
Student group
raises $6,200 tor
typhoon relief
Karen Wang
Contributor
In two weeks, a group of UBC students raised $6,200 toward Super
Typhoon Haiyan relief.
As the school term draws to a
close, so does the UBC50K fundraiser for those affected by the
devastating Phillipines typhoon.
The UBC50K fundraiser brought
in $6,200 from students, faculty
and community members to send
overseas through the Red Cross, an
amount matched by the Canadian
government for a total donation of
$12,400.
Donations were collected in
boxes created by volunteers around
campus, as well as through a booth
set up in the SUB by the UBC Dollar
Project, the organization behind the
initiative. An Indiegogo page was
also created for those who could not
donate in person, which has so far
received $831 in donations.
"[The fundraiser] was actually
pretty successful," said Dan Kim,
the co-president ofthe UBC Dollar
Project. "[In just] two weeks, we
raised $6,200.... That's pretty good
progress."
While the initial goal was
$50,000 - a dollar from each
student — Kim realized the target
was "a pretty big reach" given
the timeframe.
"In the end, we didn't raise
$50,000, but a lot of positive [outcomes] came out ofthe campaign
Dan Kim, right, helped lead the project.
itself," Kim said. "I feel like in a
way, because it was a campus-wide
fundraiser, it kind of brought a sense
of community within UBC."
Kim attributes this success to
the support of various groups and
students on campus. For one part of
the fundraiser, the Science Undergraduate Society (SUS) collaborated
with UBC50K to host a coffee house
event, where students were admitted by donation to a night of free
food and performances. The AMS
also helped to back the initiative.
By the end ofthe two weeks,
over 65 donation boxes were created, including many by clubs and
faculty offices.
"I think [the most donations]
came from people who made their
own boxes," Kim said. "We had
some really, really helpful people."
Kim recounts a professor who
passed a donation box around the
PHOTO STEPHANIEXU3THE UBYSSEY
lecture hall, and a young boy who
emptied his piggybank to support
the fundraiser.
The fundraiser ended on Nov. 29,
the last day of classes. In addition
to the semester finishing and finals
beginning, Kim said another factor
was that the Canadian government
originally planned to match donations for Super Typhoon Haiyan up
to December 8, but the deadline has
been extended to Dec. 23.
"Of course, if it continued,
[UBC50K] probably would
have continued next semester,"
Kim said.
Kim still has big plans for the
future, though. "What I want to do
before I graduate is make UBC50K
an actual UBC relief fund for natural disasters anywhere in the world,"
he said. "I want to help set it up...
maybe with the AMS, so every time,
UBC can [raise] $50,000." XI
UBC finds untold
fish catches with
Google Earth
=HOTO COURTESY DALAL AL-ABDULRAZZAK
Five times more fish were caught in the
Persian Gulf than have been reported.
Edmund Henry
Contributor
Fish catches in the Persian Gulf
may be five times higher than
reported, a UBC study has found.
Researchers at UBC, as part of
the Sea Us Around Project established by UBC professor Daniel
Pauly, have found an alternative
method of data collection using
satellite imagery provided by
Google Earth to better understand maritime trends and the
ecological impacts of overfishing.
The study suggests that 31,000
tonnes offish were caught in the
Persian Gulf - but only 6,260
tonnes were reported.
"Time and again, we've seen
that global fisheries catch data
don't add up," said Pauly in a
press release.
Using the Persian Gulf as their
case study, researchers led by
UBC PhD student Dalai Al-Ab-
dulrazzak found and marked
1,656 fishing weirs — traps in
the water — present on the coast
of all countries along the Gulf.
Compensating for variables such
as poor resolution or issues with
glare or cloud cover, the total
figure was estimated to be 1,900
weirs.
Although Al-Abdulrazzak
hesitated to brand this method of
data collection as "more accurate" than the accepted method,
she was confident that the study
provides "a better reflection on
what's happening on the ground
[and] a better estimate than zero,
for example."
By contacting fishery scientists in the region, researchers
estimated how many fish each
of these traps were catching in
a 24-hour period. These two
figures were combined with
the length of fishing seasons to
come up with the total estimated
annual catch. When compared
to the official figures reported
to the United Nations' Food
and Agriculture Organization,
researchers found that official
figures were being grossly under-
reported.
Al-Abdulrazzak said that, in
addition to insufficiencies with
the accepted method of data collection on fisheries, the majority
of countries in the Gulf region
neglect to report their data.
"The majority of countries
in the region, they actually just
don't report the catch from these
traps," said Al-Abdulrazzak.
While Al-Abdulrazzak's study
is the first to take advantage of
Google Earth to estimate fish
catches, satellite imagery has
been used in the past to estimate
other ecological trends such as
forestry biomass and archaeological dig site investigation. XI II National
INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY »
Students want patent rights on inventions
Andy Fidel
The Link
MONTREAL (NUW) - For his
final-year "capstone" research project, graduating Concordia engineering student Michael El-Jiz was
curious about the applications of
music in engineering, and created
Bothoven, a robot that could read a
sheet of music and play piano.
Four days before his final presentation in March, Bothoven had
transcribed and was ready to perform Mozart's "Turkish March."
All it took was one click of a button.
Before El-Jiz had time to swivel his
chair around to see the robot play,
he could hear it.
He's not hearing it anymore.
"When you finish a project,
you're proud of it," said El-Jiz, an
electrical engineering master's
student. "But now it's stored in a
dark warehouse. It goes from being
a trophy to being a dead project."
Since El-Jiz used a Concordia
computer with a licence for the
M ATL AB programming language,
Concordia University owns the
code and the copyright to Bothoven
— and to many of his fellow engineering students' projects.
But in the past month, both
the Engineering and Computer
Science Association (ECA) and
the Faculty of Engineering and
Computer Science Faculty Council
have adopted motions to request the
university change its intellectual
property policies.
Their ultimate goal is to have
the policy revised to give students
the option of waiving Concordia's
ownership policy and owning the
patent on their own projects.
According to VPRGS-9, the university's current IP policy, students
with an invention must report it to
the research office, and the office
FILE PHOTO CHRIS BOERCHERT3THE UBYSSEY
Engineering students at Concordia have raised concerns about intellectual property rights to the work they do at school.
decides whether they will patent it
or not if it is considered a "qualifying invention." If they choose
to do so, there is a sharing agreement between the inventor and
the university.
If the university decides to take
the work to the market, the student
will get a share ofthe income but no
control over commercialization. If
the office refuses and the student
pays to patent it, the university still
has the right to sublicense it.
"If you're Mark Zuckerberg and
you make Facebook, it becomes
this massive legal battle," said ECA
electrical and computer engineering
representative Gregory Gibson.
A motion on IP policy was passed
at the ECA council on Nov. 18 and
recommends that "Concordia revise
the policy such that intellectual
property created by students would
remain the legal property ofthe students responsible for its creations."
"I want the university to stay out
of my IP," said Gibson.
Concordia spokesperson Chris
Mota says Vice-President of
Research and Graduate Studies
Graham Carr or someone from his
office will meet with the ECA to
get a "better understanding" ofthe
concerns behind this motion.
Until then, she says the administration is unable to provide further
comment, although Concordia
President Alan Shepard said at the
Oct. 16 Board of Governors meeting
that by the end of the academic year
he planned to look into how the
policy affects students.
Another IP motion was passed
on Nov. 29 by the Engineering and
Computer Science Faculty Council.
ENCS-FC now officially supports
the ECA, saying the current policy
on intellectual property is "very
burdensome" and resolved to
officially request that the university
"revise the policy on IP such that
the rights of students to the intellectual property they have created be
respected."
An opt-out agreement exists for
the capstone project, which allows
ENCS undergraduates to patent
their inventions without the university having any claim to it. However,
if a Concordia faculty member is
found to be an inventor ofthe project under VPRGS-9 guidelines, the
opt-out agreement is rendered null
and void, and the university retains
rights to the invention.
"This opt-out form has a big
loophole because part ofthe
capstone project means you have
to have a professor as your supervisor," said Allison Hipgrave,
ECA mechanical and industrial
engineering representative.
"Because you're using and collaborating with faculty advisors, the
capstone technical coordinator and
using the university's facilities, the
actual concept design belongs to the
university," said Gibson.
Scholarly writing, productions,
artwork and other similar creative
or research products are excluded
from this IP policy. Gibson said it's
questionable why the policy isn't
applied across the board.
"If the university just wants to
milk students dry, well, what if we
have the next J.K. Rowling?" said
Gibson.
Gibson says he believes the university doesn't apply this policy to
art students because they "wouldn't
be creative [or share their] best ideas
during workshops."
But he said the same is true for
all students, engineering majors
included. Gibson said to be creative,
students must have an environment
where they canbe "innovative without [being] penalized for it."
"The university is shooting themselves in the foot," said Hipgrave.
"Students are not creating what they
are capable of. They're creating to
pass the class."
FEES»
U of T charges for access to its libraries, accesses others for free
Jerico Espinas
The Varsity
TORONTO (NUW) - Ryerson
pays the University of Toronto
$90,000 a year for access to U of
T's libraries.
University of Toronto students
have access to libraries across
Canada with no extra fee. However, members of other universities must pay a flat fee to be able
to borrow books from the U of
T system. Under the Canadian
University Reciprocal Borrowing
Agreement (CURBA) — enacted
in 2002 — students, faculty, and
staff of participating universities
are entitled to borrowing privileges at other university libraries.
CURBA combines the resources
ofthe four provincial university
library councils, comprising 87
Canadian universities from all
10 provinces.
In 2009, U of T introduced fees
for direct borrowers, while still
benefiting from CURBA. Students, faculty and staff at all other
Canadian universities must pay
an annual $300 fee to access and
borrow books from U of T libraries. U of T students are required
to pay no additional fees to access
other universities' materials.
Larry Alford, chief librarian
at the University of Toronto, said
this fee agreement was necessary to maintain the university's
library system.
"Our research library is one
of the very best in North Amer-
=HOTO CAROLYN LEVETT3THE VARSITY
The University ofToronto's libraries pay over $27 million a year to acquire academic materials.
ica, with only Harvard and Yale
ranking above it," he said. "In
order to maintain its quality, we
— and that, of course, includes
our students, through their fees
— spend over $27 million a year
on acquisitions alone." U of T
recently acquired the letters of
General James Wolfe — a $1.5
million purchase paid for largely
by Helmhorst Investments, a
Toronto-based company.
For Alford, the asymmetrical
access to other libraries for U
of T students is not a problem.
"Our reciprocal [fee] agreements
therefore ensure that students
and faculty from other universities can share in our valuable resources, but that U of T students
are not subsidizing this access,"
he said.
U of T currently has flat-fee
agreements with other univer
sities. Ryerson University, for
example, currently pays $90,000
that allows its students to access
a University of Toronto Libraries
card. The card expires after one
full year of access.
There are other exceptions to
CURBA in Toronto. The Ontario College of Art and Design
(OCAD) allows access to its resources only to Ryerson University and York University, and the
libraries at Ryerson and York lend
to all other Canadian universities
except U of T.
"Our collection is very small and
highly specialized," explained Jill
Patrick, director of Library Services at OCAD. "Allowing undergraduate students from Canada's
largest university to freely borrow
our books would very quickly deplete our shelves and leave our own
students, who cannot borrow from
U of T [without paying a fee], with
no resources to do their work."
Cecile Farnum, communications
and liaison librarian at Ryerson,
said this exception for U of T students was effective in the original
2002 agreement, even before the
fee was charged.
These exceptions do not mean
that U of T students are completely unable to borrow books from
these universities, or that students
from other universities are unable
to borrow books from U of T. The
Ontario Council of University
Libraries (OCUL) is one ofthe four
provincial councils in CURBA, and
ensures that all Ontario university students are unhindered by
library politics.
Students may request books in
OCUL libraries through the Inter-
library Loan (ILL) using the Rapid
Access to Collection by Electronic
Requesting (RACER) service.
These ILL RACER requests,
however, take weeks to process and
order without a $15 Urgent Request
Form, making the loans accessible
but untimely for many students. II Culture
RHYS EDWARDS
AY, DECEMBER 5,20
FASHION »
MUSIC »
Exam time wrap-up
How to stay cool while keeping warm
Bed hair, sweatpants and exams — it's the time of year when essays, rain and snow dampen student fashion sense. But
there are always a few students who are so effortlessly chic, they look as if they're catching a plane to attend Paris Haute
Couture. How do they stay stylish in the middle of all the academic chaos? We tracked a few of them down around on
campus and got them to share their winter fashion tips with us. —Words by JolinLu, photos by Carter Brundage
Chris Lee, third-year engineering
How would you describe your style?
It's unique. You know that feeling
when you see someone wearing
the same stuff as you and you don't
feel that good. So for me, it's very
important to get things that are a
little bit different.
Where do you usually go shopping?
I like to go to thrift shops, or there
are some online stores that aren't
that popular right now, like Frank
&Oak.
Do you have any tips for students
at UBC?
No sweatpants.
DezyNair, first-year Arts
How would you describe your style?
Comfortable.
Where do you usually go shopping?
Downtown, thrift shops, the Salvation Army on Broadway.
How do you manage to stay fashionable during the exam period?
Jeans and a sweatshirt. And I
always keep my coats clean.
Is there one item that would complete any outfit?
Mittens.
Alice Hu, fourth-year commerce
How would you describe your style?
Sometimes I dress like a dude.
Sometimes I dress like a girl.
I think today I'm kind of
in between.
Where do you usually go shopping?
I like to shop abroad, as in
Taiwan or China. Everything's
overpriced here.
Do you have any tips for students
at UBC?
Get some boots [or] waterproof shoes. That's the biggest
fashion tip.
Kate Dumbrell, fifth-year psyc
How would you describe your style?
I'd say my fashion style is urban.
Where do you usually go shopping?
I like to get my clothes from Urban
Outfitters and Aritzia.
What's your go-to outfit when
you're running late for school?
Black pants, boots, a blazer or jean
jacket or something, and a shirt!
Max Eayrs, third-year comp sci
How would you describe your style?
Whatever is on the floor. So I
would say it's serendipitous.
Where do you usually go shopping?
Cheapskates. It's a sporting goods
thrift store on 16th and Dunbar.
I got a lot of windproof clothes
from there.
What's your go-to outfit when
you're running late for school?
As I said, just whatever's on the
floor.
Olivia Hart, first-year Arts
How would you describe your style?
I like to try a lot of different
things. Versatility, I guess. I wear
whatever is comfortable and
looks good.
Where do you usually go shopping?
I like American Apparel and Zara
and Topshop.
Do you have any tips for students
at UBC?
Just know your own style. tJ
CiTR celebrates 30 years of local
talent at Shindig finale
Gabriel Germaix
Contributor
The final soundcheck is
coming fast.
In less than a week, CiTR's
annual Shindig music contest will
wrap up its 30th edition. Sunglasses, dancing shoes and saturated
guitars will invade the Railway
Club on Dec. 10, and Dunsmuir
Street will resonate with the
sound of garage rock and surf pop.
Since mid-September, no less
than 27 groups have taken part in
the weekly contests. Ben Lai has
been the organizer and host of
Shindig for the last 12 years; it's a
huge organization which he has
grown accustomed to.
"I do pretty much everything,
except for dealing with the sponsorships," he said, before adding
that he does receive "a little help
from here and there."
Shindig is undoubtedly one
ofthe largest events CiTR radio
organizes every year. Lai's pre-se-
lection process produces a varied
roster of artists who accommodate
the one and only UBC-based radio
station's philosophy of showcasing
alternative, local music. Lucky for
Vancouver's soon-to-be rock stars,
CiTR keeps its horizons wide
open; this year, Shindig introduced
rappers, punk bands and many
more to audiences.
"We had Dream Baby," Lai said.
"Some would say she sounds like
beat poetry."
The competition is stiff — only
three bands remain for the finals.
This year, garage rock seems to
have the upper hand on the contest:
Skinny Kids, Zen Mystery Fogg and
War Baby will compete for the first
prize, which includes studio time
for recording as well as showcases with NXNE and AMS Events,
among others. If Skinny Kids have
something ofthe Black Keys in
them, Zen Mystery Fogg combine
a taste for grunge distortion with
Beach Boys-esque choruses. War
Baby rely on much heavier riffs,
and complete the scope with their
evident appreciation for Nirvana.
"Catchy" is how Lai plainly describes the contenders' music.
LAUREN RAYCOURTESYSKINNYKIDS
Garage rock band Skinny Kids is one of
three finalists in CiTR's 2013 Shindig.
But competition is not everything
at Shindig. The battle ofthe bands
is also an excuse for people to have
fun watching live music while escaping, say, studying for their final
exams. For the bands themselves,
it's a way to meet other musicians
and play their music live in one of
Vancouver's oldest venues.
"We like to think of it as less of a
competition but more of a way for
the public to check on new music,"
said Lai. "It's good to give bands exposure." Not winning doesn't imply
a lack of talent; since several genres
with different merits are represented, skilled artists always risk
losing against an equally talented
bands of a different style.
Shindig's veteran host is aware of
the difficult task the musicians and
music writers face every week. "It's
tough to judge: how do you judge a
really good folk singer [against] an
[equally] good punk rock band?"
he said.
For the last few years, some of
the audience have begun to dress
up for the finals. And listening
to this year's finalists, there will
probably be more leather jackets and
sunglasses than tuxedos and long
dresses. In Vancouver, it seems, rock
and roll is not dead yet. tJ
The Shindig finale will take place on
Dec. 10 at 9:30 p.m. at the Railway
Club, 579 Dunsmuir St.
do They know it's
Christmas?
STOP
UBC ANIMAL RESEARCH 6    I    CULTURE    I    THURSDAY, DECEMBER 5,2013
The
changing
of
face
mental
If you didn't know better, you would think she had her
life together.
Ainsley, a senior English major, takes a sip of her
pumpkin spice latte and adjusts the collar of her navy
wool pea coat. Next to her stack of notebooks and
pens is a copy of Thomas Pynchon's The Crying of
Lot 49 and a Blue Chip cookie.
Ask her why she's on campus at 8:30 a.m. even
though her first class isn't until 10, and she explains
that her morning ritual-reward system — consisting
of coffee, and the concomitant cookie — helps her to
stay grounded.
"There will always be a stigma with mental health
and a push to define what's healthy," said Ainsley, who opened up on her struggles with anxiety
and depression on the condition of anonymity, but
agreed to be identified by her middle name. "In [my]
case, and in many cases, it's ultimately what can
help you function in a healthy way, and in a healthy
lifestyle."
For some, it may be enough to have a daily routine,
or a constant reward system where they have goals
and reward themselves. However, others might need
a little more push, and a little bit more support. And
what form that support comes in varies.
"The point of sharing is not to push medication,"
added Ainsley, who has been on antidepressants
for the past two years, "but to show us that there
is hope. There are alternative methods to wellness.
People shouldn't be scared, and sometimes a whole outlook on life can be changed if
you know what tools you have and what your support system — whether it be work,
school or family — can offer you."
Ainsley said she would not have been in the same position to speak two years ago.
When she was going through a depressive episode, it would interfere with her appetite, her sleep schedule and her ability to attend class.
"The worst part is when every day you get up and you dread the day for no particular reason," she said. "You wake up and your heart is pounding so fast and so
hard and you're scared because everything seems to take a lot of effort and you don't
have a lot of energy.
"When you're so down, you feel abandoned. Your mind is so foggy you can't think
of anything. Confusion sets in, and you lose sight of who you are and any sort of
direction. You can't have a conversation with anyone where you are truly yourself
because your mind is so clouded.
"The stigma comes from not knowing the prevalence of mental illness," Ainsley
continued. "There are so any uncertainties in life for our generation, and I wouldn't
be surprised if [other] people felt the same way."
health
Eradicating stigma
How the treatment
of depression has permeated
the fabric of campus culture
By Sandy Young
Although this pervasive melancholy seems to be the Zeitgeist of our era — we have
been dubbed the "broken generation" by Macleans — it is nothing new.
Poets and philosophers alike have been producing their own artistic interpretations on the perennial themes of misery and despair. Dante describes it as a "dark
wood"; Milton hails divine melancholy in II Penseroso ("whose saintly visage is too
bright / To hit the sense of human sight"); Danish philosopher Soren
Kierkegaard calls the "demonic despair ... an alienation from the self" in A Sickness Unto Death.
Despite the open dialogue concerning depression in the tradition of Western intellectual
history, there remains a stigma concerning
mental health issues in our modern day campus, which may form a barrier for students
who are reticent in seeking out resources
regarding mental health concerns.
However, in recent years, UBC has taken
steps to address mental health as a structural
issue and has sought to implement policy
changes. According to Patty Hambler, student
development wellness officer at UBC Student
Health Services (SHS), the university's new
Student Mental Health and Weil-Being Strategy
includes multi-tiered structural adjustments
that target the needs of students at both at an
institutional policy level and with respect to
personal well-being.
"A central premise of our mental awareness campaign is changing the perceptions towards mental health and
promoting dialogue," said Hambler,
describing the continuum of "mental
health" and "mental illness" model
the UBC Mental Health Network
(MHN) is working to reframe. "Mental health is a concern and priority
for the UBC community, regardless of
the individual struggles with a diagnos-
able mental illness."
Hambler elaborated on the different levels of intervention and support UBC offers, such as the therapy support available at Counselling Services and the psychiatric treatment at SHS. "Counselling and SHS have worked towards a service model to
support students. They operate in a reciprocal relationship, and UBC students canbe
further referred to SHS Psychiatry when they come into Counselling Services."
This symbiotic relationship of different services working together is a sign of
shifting campus culture.
"Mental health is only possible when you have the support ofthe broader community in place," Hambler said. "[Every] individual has responsibility for their own THURSDAY, DECEMBER 5, 2013    |    CULTURE
mental health and as a community we
have a shared responsibility of accountability and support."
Thriving
"Mental health is something we
all have," said Chris Kim, a junior
kinesiology student, speaking of
the distinction between mental
health and awareness.
"Mental health is like physical health: you go to the gym to
become fit. There are things you
can do to be mentally healthy ... regardless ofthe preexisting condition
of mental illness."
According to Kelly White, UBC
Wellness Centre coordinator, the
formation ofthe MHN — an umbrella network organization consisting
of Counselling Services, SHS, UBC
Thrive, the UBC Wellness Centre and
various student-run health organizations — is evidence of such cultural
change.
The fact that these different services
within the university now operate cohesively
means improved communication and awareness of
available resources amongst students, and enables the
MHN to better connect with and address the health and
well-being of students. "This would not have been possible five years ago,"
Hambler said.
Today, mental health awareness is not an initiative exclusively directed by the
Mental Health Network on campus. Annual events such as Thrive Week illustrate
the impact and increased levels of awareness and ownership of mental health issues
on campus. In recent years, Thrive Week has adopted a partner model and moved
towards inviting broader campus participation. In fact, most ofthe outreach events
during Thrive Week 2013, which took place Nov. 4 through 8, were not solely organized by the MHN, but were the initiative of various schools and clubs across campus
For example, the School of Kinesiology organized a booth, "Kintervention," with
which Kim was actively involved as a leader. The AMS organized a self-care workshop, and the Yoga Club rolled out their mats for lunchtime drop-in Hatha.
Another organization taking their own initiative is Power to Change, a faith-
based campus group, which organized a lecture series on spirituality and mental
health last week in coordination with UBC Thrive. The main guest speaker was
Sharon Smith, an adjunct occupational therapy professor at UBC, who
has developed a four-point framework based on community
engagement and spiritual experience. According to Smith, the
framework encourages her clients to create meaning out of
their experience.
"Catholic scholars, for example, refer to depression
as the 'dark night ofthe soul,'" said Smith. "By framing
things as a spiritual experience, it helps to shift things
and create meaning to what may seem like meaningless suffering."
"We're encouraged by all the great work that the
student clubs are doing, taking steps forward to overcome the barriers that students may face in seeking
out mental health resources," said White. "One of
the new initiatives we're putting forth in 2014 is the
Peer Wellness Coaching. It's about facilitating student engagement, and helping students help other
students to access support. Some students may find
their peers more accessible and less intimidating if
they want to share their personal or academic struggle. The goal is to make it okay to talk about mental
health, to learn how to be flexible
and resilient.
"Students might still go
through difficult times
and face setbacks and
stressors, but resilience
is about learning how to
bounce back life's challenges."
Hambler further emphasized that building skills is
an integral part of health
promotions at UBC, and
a signifier ofthe culture
change that is happening on
campus. Part of thriving at UBC,
she said, is a holistic approach that encompasses
"building resilience to feel good about and taking
care of oneself... to meet goals and achieve academic success."
Moving forward: strength and resilience
"It's harder to understand what mental health is, but it's easy to explain
what mental health isn't — the absence of mental illness," said Kim.
"We all have mental health. There has been growing research on the
impact mental health has on well-being. The better [mental] health
you have, the better grades you're going to get. An analogy would be
thinking about your mental health as your physical health, and being
accountable to maintaining it."
According to Kim, being active, having a regular sleep schedule and
eating healthy are three key factors to building resilience.
Ainsley explained that there was always a feeling inside of her
reminding her that the way she was living two years ago was not how
it was supposed to be — that there was a time when she felt like she was
in control of her feelings. It was through constant conversation with
her family doctor that she made the decision to pursue medication.
"What pushed me from the low stage [of my life] was knowing that I
have certain goals in life that I have to work towards, and I will regret
not doing so. It is realizing that mental illness is holding you back from
enjoying what you want to do in life.
"There are enormous ways of
dealing with anxiety and
sadness. Anxiety can
be triggered by no
particular reason,
and it can make you
cry, [or be] sad and
emotional. When
that happens, people
realize it's not just
external factors, and that it's
in combination with internal
biological factors.
"My doctor explained to
me that it's not my fault,"
she continued. "It's a very
healthy view: a combination
of social, environmental
and biological factors. Some
people may not have enough
serotonin to counteract anxiety or enough melatonin to
sleep well."
For Ainsley, depression was
often a vicious cycle. "It's
hard to sleep because you're
always thinking about what
you couldn't accomplish during the day," she said. "Try
to take little steps to make
your life better when you're
anxious or depressed. One ofthe
things you can do is learning how
to relax, how to relax your brain and
pumping heart.
"The medication didn't solve all my problems. It was a catalyst to kick-start things
mood-wise. Other things can fall into place once you can have the energy to do
things and stop feeling anxious all the time. Realize that small steps are huge accomplishments."
Ainsley advises anyone who is holding back on treatment to talk to a healthcare
professional. "Be aware that sometimes help comes in many different forms, and different methods work for different people. There are alternative methods to wellness.
It's important that you weigh the pros and cons and ultimately make the decision
for yourself.
"I realize that I'm not Superman, and it's not about being perfect and being able
to do everything you want. It's about tackling one task at a time, and understanding
that, first and foremost, you are a person that has the right to be happy and healthy."
Or, as Kim puts it: "Mental health is being happy about the way you live." tl
Illustrations by Indiana Joel EDITOR  NATALIE SCADDEN
II Sports * Rec
UBC VARSITY SPORTS REPORT CARD: TERM ONE
Words by Natalie Scadden and CJ Pentland
Men's soccer (12-1)
Canada West standing: 1st
The lads won their 15th Canada West title and 13th CIS title,
the first men's soccer team to go back-to-back as national
champions in over a decade. They are so dominant that they
have lost just one of 45 games in the past two years.
Best Player: All of them. This is the definition of a
complete team.
Needs Improvement: It's hard to find a weakness with this
squad, but with some key players, such as Canada West MVP
Reynold Stewart (eight goals, five assists), graduating in the
spring, they'll need to continuing evolving.
Women's field hockey (4-1-3)
Canada West standing: 2nd
The 10-time defending Canada West champions lost their
conference title this year, but rebounded to win all four games
at the playoffs for their 14th national title; UBC scored 25 goals
while UVic and Calgary scored a combined 22. UBC also swept
the Canada West individual awards.
Best Player: Hannah Haughn, Katherine Gillis and Natalie
Sourisseau combined for 19 goals.
Needs Improvement: There's only eight UBC players on the
Canadian senior national team. We want a UBC takeover!
Women's volleyball (12-0)
Canada West standing: 1st
The six-time defending national champs are undefeated so far
this season, but were pushed to the brink by both Manitoba
and Winnipeg. They last lost on Oct. 27,2012 to Trinity Western, having played 37 games since.
Best Player: Lisa Barclay is leading Canada West in kills and
points. She's frequently set up by Kirsty Setterlund, who has
stepped into a starting role beautifully and is averaging over 10
assists a set — second best in Canada West.
Needs Improvement: Must stay focused for the long haul as
they seek a record-breaking seventh straight national title.
Women's basketball (7-3)
Canada West standing: tied for 1st in Pacific Division
Kris Young and Harleen Sidhu are arguably the best one-two
punch in Canada West, averaging 16.0 ppg/6.3 rpg and 15.4
ppg/9.8 rpg, respectively. They've led UBC to a decent first half
record, but will need more help to avoid more blowouts.
Best Player: Young and Sidhu. Second-year point guard Maggie Sundberg has also stepped up her game from last year.
Needs Improvement: The bench doesn't score much. Stats
show that opponents need only limit Sidhu to significantly
hamper this team: she's shooting 53.6 per cent (52 of 97) when
the team wins, but just 28 per cent (9 of 32) when they lose.
Football (4-4)
Canada West standing: 4th
They weren't expected to be contenders, but pushed some top
teams to their limits. They also managed a 60-0 victory over
Alberta, the biggest margin in team history. However, they
couldn't come up big when it mattered, and suffered some epic
fourth-quarter collapses. Luckily, the core of their roster will
be back again next year.
Best Player: Brandon Deschamps (143.9 yards per game) and
Donovan Dale (five sacks and 7.5 tackles for a loss).
Needs Improvement: Win in front of your own fans. Three out
of four wins were on the road. And work on the passing game.
Women's rugby (1-3)
Canada West standing: 4th
Their record and overall fate was the same as last year, but they
made significant improvements. Winning just one game isn't
much, but the scoring margins were much better: -27 (82 goals
for, 109 against) this year compared to -143 (26 for, 169 against)
last year. It didn't go unnoticed: new head coach Maria Gallo
was rewarded with Canada West Coach ofthe Year honours.
Best Player: Cat Ohler's 27 points were third most in
the conference.
Needs Improvement: Gallo herself said this team needs more
size and strength.
2013 NAIA
rs CROSS C0UN"
I0NAL CHAMPI0
Cross country
The women's side recently snagged their second straight NAIA
national title, while the men finished eighth — good enough for
a combined championship. Six UBC women placed in the top
30 in a race with over 300 competitors.
Best Player: Maria Bernard won an individual bronze medal
at NAIA, then finished sixth at the Canadian Cross Country
Championships at Jericho Beach the following weekend.
Needs Improvement: The men's team is good enough to help
UBC to the overall title, but it'd be nice to see the guys match
the girls' success and bring home a UBC sweep.
Women's hockey (12-3-1)
Canada West standing: 1st
UBC has 44 goals for and 29 against, and leads the Canada
West regular season standings for the first time in team history.
Best Player: Tatiana Rafter (forward) is leading Canada West
with 11 goals and 20 points; Sarah Casorso (defence) has the
third most points in the conference (five goals, 11 assists); Danielle Dube (goalie) has a 0.946 save percentage.
Needs Improvement: Six games have gone into overtime -
don't tire yourselves out and don't let up. And although coach
Graham Thomas' mo wasn't that great, it did coincide with a
nine-game win streak...
Men's volleyball (9-3)
Canada West standing: 2nd
They lost their season openers to Trinity Western and one
game in Winnipeg, but otherwise have only dropped four sets
in their nine victories, despite some key injuries.
Best Player: Setter Milan Nikic is fourth in Canada West in
assists per set and first in aces. He does a great job spreading
the ball around. Captain Ian Perry, typically a libero, also impressed while filling in for an injured Nikic earlier on.
Needs Improvement: They're ranked third nationally in CIS
polls, but have yet to face Alberta (fourth) or Brandon (fifth), so
we need to see how they stack up against other top teams.
Women's soccer (8-1-3)
Canada West standing: 1st
After allowing just two goals all season, they gave up a hat trick
in the final game versus Alberta, their only regular season loss.
Alberta got the best of them in the playoff semifinal too, meaning UBC missed out on nationals for the third straight year.
Best Player: Rookie Jasmin Dhanda had five regular season
goals and two key playoff markers.
Needs Improvement: With just 29 goals compared to 46 last
year, it seems like this team forgot how to score. It was another
playoff bust after a strong regular season.
Men's basketball (4-6)
Canada West standing: 6th of 8 in Pacific Division
Struggling with injuries, the defending Canada West champs
have already lost more games than they did all last year,
including two to Thompson Rivers, to whom they've never lost
before. They're dead last in three-point field goal percentage
(24.3); the next-worst team is Winnipeg with 30.2 per cent.
Best Player: David Wagner averages 13.5 points and 6.9 rebounds a game, shooting a smooth 54.8 per cent from the floor.
Needs Improvement: Rest up and get healthy so you can get
into a rhythm in the second half and be ready for playoffs. (We
hope...)
Men's hockey (5-10-1)
Canada West standing: 7th of 8
This team hasn't won a banner of any kind in over 40 years,
and barring a Christmas miracle, it probably isn't happening
this year, either. On paper, their roster is stacked, but for some
reason they can't seem to put together wins. They've managed
51 goals, but have allowed a whopping 64.
Best Player: Cole Wilson is fourth in the conference in points
with seven goals and 12 assists. Rookie Luke Lockhart also has
seven goals.
Needs Improvement: Defence and goaltending. It's pretty
tough to win when you allow an average of four goals a game. THURSDAY, DECEMBER 5, 2013    |    SPORTS + REC
T-BIRDS 5-ON-5
WINTER ATHLETES
NIKOLA
BROWN-JOHN
Hockey
NATE
FLEMING
Hockey
■
w
1. What's your favourite way to procrastinate
Napping, forsu re.
Bouldering at the
Watching Ellen DeGe-
Either extending my run
I'll do whatever it takes to
during exam season?
Birdcoop.
neres.She keeps me
laughing andsmiling
when school gets
tough!
orcleaning my room.
avoid hitting the books,
but 1 definitely need
to stay on stop of my
shows: Sons of Anarchy,
Suits, Game of Thrones.
2. Your favourite winter beverage?
Starbucks eggnog chai
tea latte.
Peppermint hot chocolate with Baileys.
Hot chocolate, with
marshmallows of course.
An eggnog latte.
Eggnog. But it's too
good to dilute with rum
— I'll take that on the
side, please and thanks.
3. Something Santa should bring your team
for Christmas?
An injury-free rosterfor
the new year!
Team T-Bird race suits.
We would love it if
Santa brought us cold
weather and lots of
snow.
Afullwaxboxandski
form.
Some wins would bea
real treat.
4. A random item off your bucket list?
Something off my UBC
bucket list is to Storm the
Wall before I graduate.
Hike and ski Denali.
would love to go skiing
in Alaska.
Getting to fly around the
Alaskan range.
really want to kite-
board, so I have to go
with that one.
5. Finish this sentence: The best way to warm
...curl up bythefire.
...getting into a mummy
...tosnuggleabigdog.
...tostartskiing harder.
1 need to plead the fifth.
up IS...
sleeping bag.
Gotta stay on Santa's
good list here before 1
get the bootduetoage
limitations.
SNOWBOARDING»
Allen to rep UBC, Canada in snowboard cross
Jaime Hills
Contributor
For most snowboard cross athletes, the day ofthe competition
is spent with their coach and the
course. Particularly at an event
like the FISU Winter Universiade, a coach is key in helping
athletes get the results they want
to see.
For Richard Allen, a UBC Arts
student, the day ofthe competition will be one spent in his own
head, going over his own race
plan while he represents Canada
on the world stage.
The 26th Winter Universiade — which will be hosted in
Trentino, Italy, this month —
features over 2,800 university
student-athletes from around
the world in 11 days of competition. Allen is one of 11 snow-
boarders to represent Canada,
five of whom are competing in
snowboard cross.
Snowboard cross is an exciting
event that features four athletes
racing through a course full of
drops, turns and gates to be the
first to cross the finish line. It
was not included in the Olympics
until the 2006 games in Torino,
and is still seen as a new sport in
the world of competition, but it
is fast paced, extremely competitive and thrilling to watch.
Before the snowboarders can
even race against each other,
they must complete a time trial to
qualify. At the Universiade, this
will take place on Dec. 11. "That's
when you've really got to lock in
and focus in and go," said Allen,
who explained that this is what
determines whether athletes
move on or if their day is done.
Each snowboarder gets two
timed runs and, depending on
the number of competitors, the
time trials leave the top 32 or 16,
=HOTOMICHAELSPEARMAN3THE UBYSSEY
Unlike mostsnowboard cross athletes, Richard Allen doesn't have a coach, which has made things challenging.
from which the heats are drawn,
and then the real fun begins.
Four people tackle the course at a
time, with the top two advancing
from each heat until only four
remain for the final.
With four people going down a
slope at astonishing speeds, you
would think there would be some
collisions — and there are, but
that's part ofthe appeal, Allen
insisted. Just like any athlete
adapts to the ways of their sport,
snowboard cross racers know
what they can and can't do during their races.
As an athlete without a coach,
the route to the Universiade has
been a bit different for Allen.
Coaches are normally responsible for getting their athletes
considered for the competition,
and so without a coach, Allen had
to get himself on the team.
"I noticed a bulletin that said,
'Some athletes may qualify for
the Universiade,'" Allen said.
"I emailed Natasha Burgess [of
Snowboard Canada] and asked,
'Do I qualify?'" Turns out he
did, and will now be competing
at an international level for the
first time.
Competing internationally
is what most athletes aspire to.
"I'm really excited to see the
international competition and see
people who I don't usually get to
compete against," said Allen. "You
want to be able to compare yourself against them and see where
you rank, and where you stand."
After taking a six-year hiatus
from racing, Allen returned to
the competitive scene about two
years ago, and immediately made
his presence known. In both his
first and second competitions
back from his break, Allen placed
third — quite an accomplishment
considering the length of his
break, while his fellow competitors had been at it non-stop
during the time he was away.
Not only does Allen not have a
coach, he does not have a varsity
team to compete with during the
school year, but he is still representing UBC at the games. This
is a somewhat unique situation,
as the majority of Team Canada
athletes are also members of
their varsity teams. This makes
it a difficult situation for Allen
in terms of getting support from
the university.
However, with the mentality
Allen has going in, he seems to be
ready to compete with the best
ofthe best. Despite not having
a coach, he feels prepared, and
is going to do everything in his
power to perform to the best of
his ability.
"I should be able to just get in
the zone and do my thing." XI II Opinions
iiBajiiawwamwi
laawawi
»jglTT]
AMS President Caroline Wong, UBC President Stephen J. Toope and UBC mascot Thunder wish you happy holidays!
Thunder, Lightning and the Kids'
Club: the glory days of UBC Athletics
EDITOR'S
NOTEBOOK
By CJ Pentland
Thunder is a pretty great mascot.
At nearly all UBC sporting
events, the blue bird in the No.
1 jersey is out there giving it his
all to pump up the crowd, and
his efforts definitely don't go unnoticed. While I don't know the
exact talents of all the CIS mascots, I can imagine that Thunder,
when considering the uniqueness
of his appearance and his dance
moves, ranks up there among
the best in Canadian university
sport.
However, the success of
Thunder also reminds me of a
time when he had a partner in
crime who doubled the antics:
Lightning. The two teamed up
to deliver choreographed dance
routines, led halftime contests
and basically provided a fun
atmosphere at sports games —
especially for kids.
UBC sports games used to be
a haven for kids. When I was in
elementary school in the late
'90s and early 2000s, Athletics
offered a Kids Club that gave
children a pass similar to that of
Blue Crew, which gave them access to all UBC games that year.
With me being obsessed with
sports and my dad being a former
UBC student himself, my entire
family found ourselves out at
Point Grey every couple of weeks,
watching whatever sport was on
that weekend. We had a routine:
we picked up Domino's pizza on
Dunbar, and then ate our dinner
while watching both the women's
and men's games that evening.
Getting the whole family out
was a key strategy for UBC: every
time the kids come, at least one
parent comes as well, and they're
the one with the wallet. Add in
parking and the fact that kids
most likely want some T-Birds
memorabilia, and UBC had themselves a nice little profit.
But the games weren't the only
part. Athletics hosted several
pre- and post-game events for
children, where they had the
chance to meet athletes and win
signed stuff. My brother and
I ended up with several autographed footballs and hockey
sticks, and we were thrilled
beyond belief to have them. I
PHOTO UBC ARCHIVES
A 1990s iteration of UBC's mascot hangs out with kids at a local elementary school.
didn't know that the athletes
weren't going pro — in my mind,
former basketball standout Kyle
Russell was going to be number
one in the 2003 NBA Draft -
but I did know that they were
unreal athletes.
Getting the whole
family out was key
strategy for UBC: every
time the kids come, at
least one parent comes
as well, and they're the
one with the wallet.
There was also a great variety of in-game events meant for
everyone in attendance. A table up
in the concourse during one game
encouraged everyone to make
paper airplanes, and then at half-
time everyone would throw them
and try to get it as close as possible to centre court. Other games
it was shooting from half court
or doing an obstacle course. I
once won a souped-up lime-green
scooter — it had shocks — through
an in-game draw. I thought UBC
was the best.
UBC still has their little
intermission contests, which
are great, but they don't tend to
involve elementary-aged kids as
often. While there is obviously the need to cater to older
audiences as well, making a fun
atmosphere for children can have
significant benefits in the short
and long term. Even something
like autograph sessions would go
a long way.
The Kids Club back in the day
made me believe that UBC really
wanted me to be there, and it
kept me coming back. There's a
reason that I ended up attending
UBC, and I'd be lying if Thunder,
Lightning and everything else
about that Kids Club didn't sway
that decision. XI
Asking out your TA and
staying quiet in the library
GET THEM QUIET
WITHOUT A RIOT
Dear Konrad,
I was in the basement of Koerner Library trying to study for my
exams. I went to Koerner because it
is designated for silent study. I had
already moved desks to get away
from a group of people who wouldn't
stop talking. Just as I got back into
my studying groove, a couple sat
down near me and wouldn't shut
up. What's the appropriate way to
handle the situation?
-Kranky in Koerner
There are plenty of places on
campus to make conversation, but
silent study space is at a premium,
especially at peak hours. When
somebody rudely refuses to follow
the rules, you can take a passive or
an active approach. Moving away
from people is one solution, but it
only works temporarily. You may
also bring noise cancelling headphones and play some non-distracting music.
Asking people to be quiet is the
most effective solution, but it can
be uncomfortable if you dislike
confrontation. When someone
around you starts talking, take
a one-minute study break. If the
conversation lasts longer than
that, it is time to ask nicely. In a
polite library voice, say something
like, "Sorry to interrupt — I'm
talkative myself — but I have lots
of studying to do. That's why I
came to this silent study area. Can
you please stop talking?" If they
still don't get the message, glance
at them a few times, then ask again
in a less friendly manner.
NOT(ES)SOFAST!
Dear Konrad,
It was the last class of my econ
class, and this guy out of nowhere
comes and asks if he could borrow
my notes. I want to say no, but
I don't want to seem mean. But
I've never seen him before and he
doesn't deserve it! But he also said
he was sick. I don't know what to
believe. Should I give him my notes?
(I'll see him at the review session
later this week, so I need an answer
by then.)
-Notes McGoats
It isn't mean to be assertive. You
likely got your notes by going to
class and reading the textbook.
=ILE PHOTO STEPHANIE XU/THE UBYSSEY
Letting a classmate borrow them
is no small favour, especially when
you don't even know the person.
Whoever is askingyou is well aware
of this, and chances are he tried
getting them off of someone else
before you. It doesn't matter why he
needs them; there are resources for
students who miss school because of
a legitimate illness.
From what I can tell, you don't
feel comfortable sharing your notes,
but still want to help somehow.
You can suggest he visit one ofthe
many course note websites where
he can find previous years' notes
and assignments from your specific
course that other students have
uploaded. If you want, offer to study
together. Helping him learn the
material might give you a better
understanding, and perhaps a new
friend as well.
GOT A CRUSH ON YOUR
TA? DON'T MAKE YOUR
MOVE RIGHT AWAY
Dear Konrad,
My TA is so cute and I think we get
along really well (though I suppose
that's kind of her job). I want to
ask her out, but I knew I couldn't
until the term was over. Now it's
over, and I want to ask her to grab
a coffee before she leaves for break.
But we still have our final exam,
which she'll be grading some of and
I don't know if it's okay to ask her
out before the final. Thoughts?
-Heartstruck in History
As you are aware, this poses some
ethical problems. I am in no position
to advise you on UBC's policies;
that's something your TA would
know more about. Even if there is
nothing against meeting for coffee
with students, however, it might
present a conflict of interest when
she marks your final. It could also
make her look bad if your professor
found out. For this reason, she may
decline even if she does like you, and
you'll never know why!
Since there isn't much time left
in the year, there is some urgency
here. Before your final, you can add
her as a friend on Facebook if you
haven't already. This will be a good
way to stay in touch and possibly
find out when she is leaving. Once
you write your exam, wait a few
days and then ask her to get together
"when she is free." She will likely be
finished marking and you'll have a
better chance.
Good luck!«
Email your etiquette quostions to
etiquette@ubyssey.ca.
Looking for the Last Words?
Visit ubyssey.ca for unsolicited
opinions and more.
k LEANING TOWER
OF PIZZA.
#FOODLER100
What'll you do with $100 in free food delivery?
We're giving away $100 in Foodler credit from Dec 5-12. Post to Twitter, Facebook,
and Instagram and tell us what you'd order if you win. Use #FOODLER100 and you'll be automatically entered to win $100 worth of FREE food delivery from foodler.com!
The fastest delivery for pizzaf
sushi, Indian, burgers, you name it!
foocfle/r
m       order online or qet the app! foodler.com 12    I    GAMES    I    THURSDAY, DECEMBER 5,2013
Crossword
ACROSS
1
2
3
*
5
G
7
•
'
10
11
12
13
14
"
"
17
"
"
20
21
■
23
■ 24
25     1       ■ 26
27
28
29
■
31
32
33
34
35
38
■ ll~
■
1
3,
40
41
■ 42
43
44     1      ■ 4E
■
47
48
43
■ 50
■ 51
■
53
54
55
56
57     1       ■ 58
53
60
61
62
1
"
64
1
-
EG
"
68
69
"
"
=UZZLECOURTESY BESTCROSSWORDS.COM. USED WITH PERMISSION.
1-Flat sound
5- This can be guilty or not guilty
9- Bullwinkle, e.g.
14- Desire
15-Norwegian king
16-Type of sanctum
17-A shivering fit — often a precur-
sorto malaria
18- Poi source
■Aquarium fish
- Two wrestlers on the same side
■Indigenous inhabitants
■The devil
■Bus. bigwig
■Entirely
■Toothless
■Old Finnish money
■Den
■Mogulcapital until 1658
■Gl mail drop
■Capital of Kenya
■Fall back
■Overfill
■Boxer Max
■Bridget Fonda, to Jane
48-Railway ties
50-Haggle
51-Actress Charlotte
52-Trouser materia
54-Strong green liqueur
58-Supposed
62-Words to live by
19-
20-
22-
24-
26-
27-
30-
35-
36-
37-
38-
39-
42-
43-
45-
46-
63-Other, inOaxaca
65- Revolutionary War genera
Thomas
66-Foot bones
67- Goes bad
68-Long time
69-Hilton competitor
70-Eye sore
71-Colleen
DOWN
1- Attack a fly
2-It's a long story
3- Cozy
4-Felt hat
5-Edible tuber
6- South American ruminant
7-Listening device
8- River which flows through Stratford in England
9- Fingerless hand cover
10-Thetiniest bit
11-Airing
12- Shrivelled, without moisture
13-Periods of history
21-Kind of kitchen
23-Sour
25-Most proximate
27-Bridge declaration
28-Sherpa'shome
29-Govt, security
31-Designer Christian
32-Shoelace end
33-Vestige
34-Enthusiastic
36-One telling tales
40-Red as	
41- Counting everything
44-Most strange
47-Forbidden bylaw
49- Man highly esteemed for his
wisdom
50-Furry
53-Like a toad
54-Pituitary hormone
55-Donkey cry
56-Antitoxins
57- d'oeuvre
59- Greek goddess of the earth
60-Freudian topics
61- Bears' lairs
64-Little one
Dec. 2 answers
'l
~D
*A
H
*0
E
7F
SR
JE
M
'b
U
c
w
0
M
A
N
A
L
E
T
A
0
N
A
0
0
0
L
A
G
0
0
D
S
A
1
M
|r
1
L
E |   | :
A
R
T
E
c
A
B
0
0
S
E Is
0
A
N
D
S
0
H
0
0
P
L
A In
E
N
R
1   |
A
R
1
E
L H  -
A
R
C
A
S |"
1
c
R
T
s | Im
A
Y
B
E 1  Il
S
E
T
A
E |"k
W
0
N
D
0 I'j
E
P
A
L
l'E
A
T
E
N lc
U
N
E
A
L
P
S
A
L
T
E
P. H~A
R
T
D
E
C
0
L
0
U
P
E   |     |     :
T
0
M H
A
N
D
R
A
1
S
A
E
R
R
0
R
S
E
1
E
S
T
E
R
A
N
E
R
A
H
S
T
D
H
0
T
1
T
A
N
C
Y
9
5
2
1
6
8
7
2
6
8
6
7
2
4
8
9
6
3
2
6
8
3
1
4
5
9
6
1
=UZZLE COURTESY KRAZYDAD USED WITH PERMISSION.
CJYEAWAT
WHAT IS YOUR
FAVOURITE
RON BURGUNDY
QUOTE?
LET US KNOW AND
YOU COULD WIN A
DOUBLEPA55TO
THE ADVANCED
SCREENING!
EMAIL YOUR QUOTE TO
MOVlECONTEST@SHAWBIZ.CA
IN THEATRES DECEMBER 18™
2 WINNERS WILL BE DRAWN AT RANDOM AND NOTIFIED VIA EMAIL
NON OPT-OUT STUDENTS ONLY
HOLIDAY MAD LIBS
ve this to your pr
Dear Professor,
I cannot make the exam tomorrow. I have a
that is
(adjective) (noun)
preventing me from coming to school to write the final. This may sound like
excuse, but this  ,-—, is anything but. I went to
(adjective)
and
(noun)
said I was a
for thinking the school
(location on campus) (UBC admin staff) (pejorative noun)
could help with my problem. I hope that even though I can't make the final,
you can still figure out a way to let me pass this course. I have to pass it or
else my
will pawn my
(organization)
Sincerely,
(your name)
the student who
(relative)
Please, from one
and force me to join the
(slang noun)
(favourite possession)
to another, help me pass.
(verb, present tense)
in your
(name of course)
class.
PS. All year long, I've wondered why you don't	
(verb)
if you would integrate
teaching. It would be very
of your lectures.
(adjective)
(noun)
when you're
as part
COUPON
iwPiro li«»'i«m«i
X

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0126622/manifest

Comment

Related Items