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The Ubyssey Nov 4, 1969

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 'I AIN'T MARCHIN' ANYMORE'
50,000 U.S. deserters are living in
Canada. Here's why
they came and haw
they're living now.
By JOHN ANDERSEN
Call it peace
or call it treason,
Call it love
or call it reason,
But I ain't
marchin' anymore.
-Phil Ochs
Those lyrics tell where it's at for thousands of
American ex-servicemen.
Steve Watters operates two hostels in Vancouver for
American deserters, under the auspices of the American
Deserters Committee.
The hostel, one at 1386 East Second and the other at
3490 West Seventh house about 40 deserters at any given
time.
Watters by his own admission, is "guilty of aiding and
abetting" the rapidly-increasing desertion from the U.S.
armed forces.
"They get fed up with all the bullshit that's handed
them and decide to say to hell with it and come up here."
Watters said.
"And they don't stagnate politically when they get
here.
"They begin to realize why there has to be a war in
Vietnam."
The following passage from the emigres' newsletter,
"Yankee Refugee", illustrates Watters' view.
"We left the U.S. because existence for us there was
ultimately untenable. The system and its rulers which are
responsible for the way our lives were manipulated did
not wish but required us to take part in the ultimate
insanity—the sacrifice of our lives for the profit motive.
'The brass are scared'
'To the extent that it becomes clear to us that the
same system rules our lives here, we will join Canadians in
making lives untenable for the rulers."
Of the 250,000 men who have deserted from the U.S.
armed forces since the war in Vietnam began, Watters
estimates 50,000 are in Canada.
"An average of 20 to 30 deserters arrive in Vancouver
every week," he said.'
"We're getting more deserters than draft-dodgers
now."
He described the situation as getting worse for the
U.S. military.
"The brass are scared. They're coming down hard on
everybody," he said.
"Fort Lewis (the army base in Washington state) is
really tense.
"There are large-scale hassles on many bases that are
hushed up.
"We've been getting people up here with teeth
knocked out, bayonet wounds and all that sort of shit."
Watters described the average deserter as being about
19 years old and from a working-class background.
"Most of the people from the middle-class have the
benefit of a better education and are able to dodge the
draft entirely," he said.
He said the majority of the deserters are enlisted men
although a few officers have deserted as well.
"They feel they are going to be drafted anyway so
they enlist without really knowing what they are getting
into," Watters said.
He said most are from the army although an
increasing number are coming from the navy and air force.
"We've even had a few Green Berets," Watters said.
Potential deserters hear about the deserters'
committee through underground newspapers, anti-war
coffee houses and by word of mouth.
If they write asking for information, the committee
sends pamphlets describing how to desert and what to do
on reaching Canada.
A lot of deserters make it on their own, however,
Watters said.
Many servicemen decide not to desert but remain in
the army to carry on anti-war work.
Underground railroad
Others desert but decide to remain in the U.S., even
though they could spend up to 10 years in a military
--stockade    if   captured.    Thousands    are    now    living
underground because of the unwillingness to leave the
country.
The deserter is warned not to go to his home town or
to remain near military bases.
Apparently one of his best bets is to go to a college
town and pose as a student.
If coming to Canada, the deserter is advised to look
—Ins photo
STOCKADE ENTRANCE at New Jersey's Fort Dix stands as ugly symbol of repression American deserters are
attempting to avoid. Deserter aiders estimate there are 3,000 in Vancouver right now with 20 to 30 arriving every week.
straight and to have enough money for several days.
Most deserters simply drive across the border. Others
hitchhike or walk.
Besides these conventional methods, there is also an
underground railroad (with secret rest stops) running up
the Pacific coast from San Diego to Vancouver.
Deserters picked up along the network are shuttled
from city to city until reaching Canada.
Relatively few reach Canada by this method,
however.
Until last May, the big hassle on reaching Canada was
getting   landed   immigrant status.
At that time, immigration minister Allan McEachern
. made a statement to the effect that deserters applying for
landed immigrant status would be accepted, provided they
could meet the standard requirements.
Members of the deserters committee work full-time
operating the two hostels.
Costs include $325 a month in rent and the cost of
utilities and food for the men. Watters considers himself
lucky to break even.
Added to the financial trouble is the fact that Block
Brothers Realty owns the entire block on which the East
Second hostel is situated and plans to tear the houses
down to build apartments.
New arrivals ill at ease
"Capitalism is screwing us up again," Watters said
ruefully.
The deserters come from all parts of the U.S., as
evidenced by the variety of twangs and drawls heard
throughout the hostels.
The newer arrivals were easily recognized by their
crew cuts, a temporary reminder of army life. As a general
rule, they seemed to be ill at ease, unlike the earlier
arrivals who appeared to have adjusted to the situation.
Many of them had brought their wives and girlfriends
and one had even brought his mother-in-law.
Photographer Dirk Visser and I went into the living
To page 2: see I COULDN'T Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 4, 1969
PhD degree will soon be
useless as BA, brief says
By BERNARD BISCHOFF
Many Canadian PhD and Masters graduates,
specifically at UBC, are experiencing difficulty
finding jobs.
According to Art Smolensky, president of the
graduate student association, the situation is
becoming serious and, if present trends continue,
will soon be critical.
Smolensky will present a brief on the subject at
the meeting of the Association of Universities and
Colleges of Canada this week.
The brief claims that the demand for PhD and
Masters graduates in Canadian industry,
government, and universities is not keeping pace
with the increasing supply that is being churned out
annually by various universities across Canada.
One section of the report argues that Canadian
universities discriminate against Canadian students
in hiring new personnel.
"During 1967 Canadian universities graduated
5,039 Canadian persons (4,220 Masters, 819
Doctorates) with advanced degrees, yet only 362
Canadians and 2,249 non-Canadians were hired in
1968," says the report.
It adds that 1,013 of the non-Canadians were
Americans.
Smolensky says it is not true to say that foreign
academic recruits are more highly qualified than
natives.
In an attempt to meet the problem, the report
makes the following recommendations:
• The AUCC should research the economic
situation regarding graduate employment in Canada.
• The AUCC-sponsored "Operational
Retrieval," which publicizes employment
opportunities in Canada to Canadians abroad, should
'I couldn't take
any more of it'
From page 1
room to rap with some of the deserters.
It turned out that Visser had come to Canada
to avoid induction into the Dutch army, so the rap
flowed easily.
Joe (they asked that last names not be used)
deserted from Fort Lewis, hitchhiking into Canada.
Don was previously in the air force, deserting to
Sweden while stationed in Germany. He spent
several months there and then came to Vancouver
via Montreal. He is thinking of returning to Sweden
because ofthe shortage of work in Canada.
Al is a blond Californian, the type of guy you'd
expect to see on the cover of a Beach Boys album.
He deserted from Fort Knox army base* in
Kentucky, returned to California and from there
came to Canada.
I asked him why he had deserted.
"No other army in the world is doing quite
what the American army is doing," he answered.
"I just couldn't take any more of the shit."
be replaced by a system which publicizes
employment opportunities to Canadian students
both at home and abroad.
• The Canadian government should discontinue
the two-year waiver of taxes for foreign nationals
entering Canada to teach at her universities.
• The Canadian government should discontinue
the present cutbacks in academic research and
should try to expand and encourage permanent
research establishments both in government and
industry.
• A minority recommendation was that
academic tenure not be granted to non-citizens.
AMERICAN POET Robert Sward, now
poet-in-residence at the University of Victoria, will
read at 8:30 p.m. Thursday in Bu. 106. Admission is
free.
WATTERS ... helps deserters
Loyola sit-in
may save job
MONTREAL (CUP)-More than 250 Loyola
college students sat down in the corridors of the
Loyola administration building Monday and may
have prompted their administration to reconsider
the case of fired physics professor S. A. Santhanam.
Their five-hour protest trapped administration
president Patrick Malone in his office, along with
several members ofthe executive committee.
Malone triggered the protest earlier in the day,
when he announced that "no type of contract is to
be offered nor will further study or arbitration be
authorized" in Santhanam's case: a six-month
contract dispute which has already resulted in the
resignation of ten members of the Loyola senate
and a three-day class boycott by nearly half of
Loyola's 4,600 students.
Santhanam was not re-hired by Loyola's board
of trustees for the 1969-70 term: no reason for his
dismissal was given. On Oct. 8, three student and
seven faculty members of the Loyola senate
resigned, declaring they had "no confidence" in the
college's administration due to the affair.
Malone's statement was the first official
response to a three-day class boycott held Oct. 27
to 29, demanding binding arbitration in
Santhanam's case and greater student representation
on the academic senate. The boycott, narrowly
approved in a student referendum, received the
support of nearly 100 of Loyola's 270 faculty.
What is wrong?
The resident head of the campus experimental
college has challenged Alma Mater Society council
members to verbal combat this week.
Karl Burau will be waiting in SUB 125
Wednesday noon, ready to debate the topic "what's
wrong with student government" with unwary
council members.
All those interested, in particular opalescent
tangerine blorgs, are asked to attend.
DEBATING TOURNAMENT
UBC vs. U. Vic.
"Resolved that Canada recognize
The People's Republic of China."
8:30 p.m. Fri. Nov. 7        SUB Party Room
GRADUATION
Special rates oa Grad Portraits now in
effect at Catmpbell Studio's where
we've been taking Grad Portraits for
the past 20 years.
Campbell Studios — traditionally up-
to-date with all the skills and techniques of modern photography.
Send someone your Grad Portrait for
Christmas.
For an appointment call 736-0261.
•THK BEST OF TIMES"
Piclurn Pc;rti**ct from
2380 BURRARD STREET VAXf'Ol.VER !i. B.C.
CAREERS AT CGE
for
Engineers and Science Majors
Canadian General Electric's GRADUATE ENGINEER
DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM provides an avenue of
entry into careers in Information Processing, Manufacturing, Marketing, Research, Development and Design,
and Employee Relations.
There are continuing opportunities for professional
development. The broad diversification ofthe Company
and its decentralized organization provide a dynamic
environment for self-development and the opportunity
through your career to move not only across functions,
but also between product businesses.
Company recruiting officers will visit
your campus to conduct interviews on:
NOVEMBER 12, 13 and 14
CANADIAN GENERAL ELECTRIC Tuesday, November 4, 1969
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Bill 63 situation gets ugly in Quebec—Page 6
NARP speakers
rap on where
red power's at
By GINNY GALT
* White man's society will destroy itself and once again Indians
will rule this land.
At least, that is what members of the Native Alliance for Red
Power believe.
NARP member Henry Jack spoke about the organization in Bu.
106 Friday.
"We are a group of young Indians. There are academic Indians,
ex-convicts, drop outs—Indians of every type in our group and this is
where we differ from other Indian organizations," said Jack.
"The primary purpose of NARP is to operate as a pressure
group. We confront and we demonstrate."
Jack said NARP is not a militant group.
"Several people associate the name "Red Power" with violence,
but so far no policemen have been killed and no shootings or riots
have occurred," he said.
"But society has been violent towards our people.
"Violence occurs when there is a high birth rate but an even
higher mortality rate. Babies and children often die because of the
isolated locations of the reserves."
In NARP's official publication, NARP Newsletter, an
eight-point program is outlined.
The first point is that the Indian Act and the Indian Affairs
branch of the federal government, which NARP calls the colonial
office, should be abolished.
"Indians do not have sufficient representation on comittees
governing Indian affairs," Jack said. "You have non-Indians deciding
the fates of Indian children all across Canada."
Jack called the Indians who do serve on these committees
"mouthpieces of the government."
"Some of our people call them Uncle Toms," he said.
Other points include the abolition of taxes, and end to
harassment by "racist" police, just trials with Indian juries and
freedom to develope remaining Indian resources in the interests of the
Indians, not in the interests of the "white corporate elite."
Jack said members of NARP do not want to join white man's
sick society. They want to maintain their own way of living.
"The trouble with all the federal Indian programs is that they
try to integrate us with the rest of society," he said.
Jack said the Red Power movement,started two years ago, is
spreading all over North America, but would not say how many
members the movement actually has.
Council cans Boyd:
here we go again?
By JIM DAVIES
Dermot Boyd has been fired.
A previous motion of the Alma Mater Society council under
which Boyd was employed until Jan. 31 was amended to give him 30
days notice from Nov. 1 in the termination ofhis contract.
The Boyd issue was dealt with in a review by a management
consultant firm, Kates, Peat, and Marwick. The review was phoned to
AMS president Fraser Hodge and transcribed in report form.
The firm interviewed the two prospective candidates for the
position of SUB building manager. The two were Boyd and Graeme
Vance, the present SUB manager.
The report discussed the capabilities and personalities of the
two individuals. But it made no concrete statement as to who should
in fact get the job.
The general inference of the report, however, was that Vance
should be re-hired.
The issue, many councillors said, was between the managerial
efficiency of Vance and the ability of Boyd to establish good rapport
with students.
"I feel that personality is a more important factor than material
efficiency," said arts rep Denis Newman.
Medicine rep Russ Ellison said: "Rapport with students is far
To page 9: SEE RAILROAD
Under the covers
UBC's senators have already decided to limit
enrolment in the near future although there's
been nothing official — page 12.
Also on   page   12,  some   interesting  ideas  on
drug  usage which came out at Friday's drug
commission  hearings.
The SFU  PSA strike  is  losing  its  potency as
an issue — page 9.
And  page  tuesday  has  pro  and  con   reviews
on Saturday's Coliseum Donovan concert. See
page 5.
—dominie yip photo
FRIDAY'S FOG rolled in, enveloping bell towers, buildings and huts. Come to think of it, the campus
has never looked better.
Socio/ aid program to be available
as faculty-stud ent operation in SUB
By FRAN McGRATH
Social work's answer to legal aid will be coming
soon to UBC.
The student information centre will soon have a
comprehensive social aid program available, Joyce
Marvin, social work 2, said Monday.
"We aren't setting any limits on the type of
problems we will deal with. They will include
personal, parent, academic, financial and sexual
problems," Mrs. Marvin said.
"It will be a crisis-oriented service.
"We    will    build    up    complete    resource
Vietnamese speak
Two representatives of the Vietnamese
National Liberation Front will speak at noon
today in the SUB auditorium.
Huynh Van Ba, charge d'affaires in Havana
for the provisional revolutionary government of
South Vietnam, and Le Psuong, of the North
Vietnamese embassy in Stockholm, will be
speaking on the topic "End the war in Vietnam
now."
The  two envoys will also speak at the
Queen Elizabeth at 8 p.m. Wednesday with
pediatrician Dr. Benjamin Spock.
* Tickets   for   the   QET   presentation   are
available for $1 from Mrs. S. Young, 1768 West
11th Avenue, Vancouver 9. Telephone
733-9018.
information on all the services available on campus
and in the community and refer students to agencies
we think can help them.
"We plan to follow up the people we send to
various agencies so we "can build up an accurate
picture of what they do and how effective they
are."
Mrs. Marvin said the service will be confidential.
"We will also deal with problems by phone so that
people don't have to give us their name if they don't
want to," she said.
She said the Alma Mater Society has approved
the concept of such a service. Her group hopes to
have it in operation by Christmas.
Mrs. Marvin said the service will be student and
youth oriented. It was conceived as an extended
field placementby three social work students.
It will be manned by social work students with
professional experience and supervised by faculty
members.
"We got the idea from a survey taken on
campus of what student needs were," she said.
"There were some profound needs. The survey
shows that a considerable percentage of students
contemplate suicide at some time."
The centre's office will be in SUB, but
interviews will be conducted anywhere. The
students want to keep the service open as many
hours a day as possible and have after hours phone
service.
"We want to make this thing as informal as
possible," Mrs. Marvin said.
"We have received information about the same
sort of service operating at Toronto and they are
swamped." Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 4,  1969
TH( UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial
opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian University Press.
The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services of Pacific Student
Press, of which it is a founding member. Ubyssey News Service
supports one foreign correspondent in Pango-Pango. The Ubyssey
publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City
editor, 228-2305; editor, 228-2301; Page Friday, 228-2309;
sports 228-2308; advertising, 228-3977.
NOVEMBER 4,1969
Retort, retort
Two articles of opinion have appeared on this page in
the last two issues and since they both in some way
concerned The Ubyssey, we feel some comment is
necessary.
First, Pat Moan's defence of fraternities.
We have nothing directly against fraternities. As
long as they don't step on other people's toes, frats or
other clubs can go along their merry ways and we really
don't give a damn.
But we do question Miss Moan's insistence that
frats mean "getting involved." We have yet to see what
it is that frats are involved in, if it is not parties and
gang-banging the cook.
There is no involvement in joining a bunch of
people to spend money on yourselves and have a riotous
time. That's fine to do, but don't tell us.that is "getting
involved."
And don't tell us about the thousands raised for
charity by Mardi Gras. We have seen Mardi Gras and
question the ethics in raising money for charity through
debauchery.
We admit that The Ubyssey is as much a fraternity
as Psi -Phelta Thigh, but we build friendships
(brotherhood) through hard work toward a common
goal, not through having wild parties together.
Finally, don't feel so paranoid, Pat. This is the first
thing we've said about frats this year. Maybe it's your
subconscious guilt that sparks your fear of criticism.
And secondly, something ought to be said about
Stan Persky's exhortation to this newspaper.
Stan knocks us for doing some of the things that
everyone else knocks us for not doing. (You can't win).
We are not, Stan says, supposed to reflect the
campus, we are supposed to distort the news to make it
a better campus.
(In the office here, Stan said we should report that
hundreds of people turned out for an election, even
when only 50 do, so that we will spark the campus to
become interested.)
And he says we should take note of the "hippie
planned-inefficiency" of underground papers and not be
afraid to disorder our overly neat paper.
Now really. Since when did incompetence become
a virtue? What is inherently good about sloppy technique?
And Stan says the job of a newspaper is to imagine
a readership worth talking to. No, Stan, you're wrong.
The job of newpaper is to print what it considers
worthwhile, period.
When it starts considering the readership, it starts
thinking of what the people will read, then starts
catering to that want rather than printing what it feels is
worthwhile.
It's the start of the road downhill, Stan. We trust
ourselves more than we do you. If we didn't, this paper
would never get on the street. And that's a fact.
Editor: Michael Finlay
News Paul Knox
City   Nate Smith
Managing    Moshe Curtis
Photo    Bruce Stout
Wire   Irene Wasilewski
Sports Jim Maddin
Senior John Twigg
Ass't News    Maurice Bridge
Page Friday Fred Cawsey
Norbert Ruebsaat
"Tuesday's paper Is always a
reflection of Monday morning and of
dinner at Franco's," muttered Curtis In
deathless prose.
Brian Mc Watters gave spelling
lessons to Christine Krawczyk, while
John Andersen threw a temper
tantrum because he only got two
bylines. Jim Davies made his presence
known, but Murray Kennedy was little
seen.
Shane McCune was a good boy all
day.
Lesley Mlnot and Dave Keillor took
part in sundry forms of debauchery, as
did Nick Orchard and Bernard Bischoff
(weird crowd on Mondays). Ginny Gait
and Sandy Kass took notes on the
entire proceedings until Robin Burgess,
Fran McGrath and Urve Torva rode off
hurriedly into the sunset. (No, I don't
know what that's supposed to mean
either.)
Steve Millard, Tony Gallagher, Ryk
Nyland, Dick Button and Scott
McCloy threatened to take back the
gold-plated jock straop they gave
Twigg last Christmas.
John Frizell, the ghost of photogs
past, haunted the darkroom to the
excitement of Dirk Visser, Dave Enns
and Dominic Yip.' (Weird crowd in
there any day of the week.)
-CUyj:
EDITORIAL
I have here the names...'
See the above cartoon? That's not necessarily
the way it is, but at the same time the idea is
perfectly legitimate.
Actually, we have ultimate faith in the
commission to gather all the available evidence and
to deliver an honest report to the government.
Indeed, the commission has gone to great lengths to
do just that.
But unfortunately it is not the commission or
the federal government that is running the show
right now. These are amorphous organizations; we
do not deal with them.
The organization calling the shots is the
police-the city police and the RCMP. The police
who bust the head, not the government. The police
make the decision on how hard to hit the dope
culture, not the commission.
And when we consider how the police operate,
it is not surprising that some people may question
the legitimacy of the commission.
We have seen how cops go underground, foster
friendships, eat people's food, sleep in their beds
and smoke their dope and then turn around and
bust them.
We have seen how cops plant dope on people in
order to make a bust.
We have seen how cops entice, plead with and
bully people to sell them dope and then arrest them
for trafficking.
And then we are supposed to believe that this
commission—which was struck by the same
government that employs the RCMP—is really out
to produce an honest report. For some people, it's a
little hard to swallow.
And on top of all this, there is the prestigious
Narcotics Addiction Foundation (prestigious
because of the word "foundation") and the
never-ending stream of reports it releases to fill the
pages of the downtown papers.
The fact that these reports are at the very least
misleading if not outright lies casts some doubt on
the entire case of the "responsible" citizens who are
against the killer weed, marihooney.
The foundation still subscribes to the
marihooney-heroin progression idea-that should
give some idea of where their heads are at and the
validity of their research.
And so hetween the fascist tactics of the police
and the distortions of the foundation, our faith in
the commission might be shaken.
But we will wait for the results of the report.
We will wait in peace-providing we're not busted in
the meantime by the narks lurking around the
commission hearings.
LETTERS TO THE  EDITOR
Black truth
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
Allow me space in your paper
to protest strongly against an
article appearing in the Sun of
Oct. 20, and in your paper of the
same week.
My protest is directed against
Carey Linde. Mr. Linde stated
that Black people were moving
towards violence. I do not know
who has sent Mr. Linde to speak
for Black people. Apparently Mr.
Linde does not know and cannot
know Black people. If he does
speak for any people of Afro
origin, then I assume these must
be the "Old Negroes."
Mr. Linde is not familiar with
the "New Black." Mr. Linde, as I
am a Black student at this
institution, I know that you do
not speak for me. You remind me
of the old philanthropic leaders
like Wilkins, Bunche, etc.
I would like to ask you to stop
trying to articulate our feelings.
You do not belong to our
experience. You do not share the
same historical dilemna as Black
people.
People like you Linde are the
ones we hold in contempt. Get
the hell out of our seat.
Let us be our own mouthpiece.
If you and your colleagues are
interested in our role in this
(your)society, come and ask us.
We are men, Black men. We are
quite capable of expressing our
own consciousness.
You speak of social injustice to
Blacks. What the hell do you
know of social injustice towards
us Black people? Have you been
with us, hungry, in the ghettos of
your white world? . Have you
walked with us on your
sidewalks? Have you died a
thousand deaths with us in the
gutters of your cities? Have you?
The truth is that the Black man
needs no advice from you. We
neither need your love nor your
hate, your pity nor your
justification. We want to be
neither your friend nor your
enemy. We only ask that you stop
speaking for us. Stop being our
spokesman among your peers.
Only we, through our
experience here in North America,
are able to represent ourselves
before any conventions,
committees, or what have you.
The bridge between you and I,
Mr. Linde, spans a river that is
dark and deep. And as a Black
student at this university. I have
waded across many such rivers.
Thank you.
STEVE McFIELD
arts 3
War
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
I was most disappointed by the
coverage alloted by your edition of
last Tuesday to the opening of a
lecture series on the war in
Vietnam. I fear that in your quest
for the pornography you
apparently feel you need to sell
The Ubyssey on campus you may
have lost your sense of what is
really important in a university.
What you managed to obscure
in your article of last Tuesday was
the fact that Professor Willmott is
not only an anthropolgist, but a
specialist in Southeast Asia. He
teaches the basic course on
history, geography, and politics
of Southeast Asia for the
Department of Asian Studies.
Furthermore, this is the fourth
time he has given this special
course. I attended it when it was
given as a night course for the
extension department, and I
would not be writing to you if I
had not found it exceptionally
useful and enlightening. Professor
Willmott also happens to be one
of the most popular teachers on
campus.
THOMAS PERRY Jr.
science 2 Tuesday, November 4,  1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
P^-^^V*^* J*3?- ■*; P>"> * ■
?®K: :
A difference of opinion
Sound system made it
like religious ritual'
By MICHAEL QUIGLEY
The Donavan concert at the Coliseum
Saturday night was the most enjoyable pop
event I've ever attended in Vancouver.
After having suffered for sometime the
acoustical horror of attending rock and other
concerts in local auditoriums such as the
Agrodome, Coliseum, and Kerrisdale Arena, it
was truly amazing to hear (and that means
really hear) the sound system Saturday night.
Some stroke of genius must have descended
upon the Deyong Crew.
The concert on one hand had the feeling
of a religious ritual. Sparklers burned in the
audience at Donovan's entrance (which were
quickly put out at the request of the Coliseum
Blue Meanies), and people trouped up to the
front before the performance to throw
flowers on stage along with some other
goodies. (Someone came out and said, "Like
the flowers are groovy, but somebody might
slip on the sticky candies.")
There was also the usual pop concert
fashion parade, comparable to the Queen
Elizabeth Theatre at intermission, with quite a
few people dressing up to out-dress the others.
The only real signs of ugliness were in the
few loud bands on the exit doors, indicating
restlessness on the part of those outside, a few
hysterical screams during the show, and the
previously-mentioned Blue Meanies who were
extraordinarily efficient in getting people to douse
their cigarettes. The crowd itself was incredibly
quiet, perhaps because of the mesmerizing presence
of Donovan on stage.
It was a completely relaxed performance, one
which allowed flautist Paul Horn to share part of
the second half of the show, improvising and
weaving melodic lines around Donovan's chords and
lyrics, one which had the audience singing along
quietly to help Donovan prove that "silence is in
love with music."
It was such a good show that I didn't even mind
when Donovan made the peace sign several times
during the concert: For once it seemed, like an artist
meant it.
D
o
it
a
v
a
'You could only hear
voices & shuffling feet'
By SEYMOUR JACOBSEN
What's that Charlie? You say you went to
the Donovan concert at the Pacific Coliseum
Saturday night.
You paid $4 a seat, but for all you know
that tiny figure at the other end of the
building might have been one of the ushers.
You were seated near the concourse and
were entertained by the sound of voices and
shuffling feet behind you. Not that it
mattered, because even in moments of relative
silence the famous Coliseum acoustics
prevented you from deciphering the
murmurings from the stage.
So what else is new? It is a known fact
that  the Coliseum is totally inadequate for
concerts. It lacks both the acoustics and the
atmosphere that would allow the audience to
become involved in a performance.
Not that there aren't a few good seats in
the house, but they are usually reserved for
music critics and friends of the promoters.
PNE officials protest that they built the
Coliseum for hockey, not concerts.
Absolutely true, but they haven't been
noticeably hesitant when promoters wave the
rent money.
The promoters sob that they would love
to put the concerts in smaller, more congenial
places, but are faced with the performers'
exorbitant fees. (Soft violins as the promoter cries
on the bank teller's shoulder and wipes his eyes with
the sleeve ofhis $300 suit.)
Meanwhile, most of the performers are quite
happy to ignore little things like artistic integrity,
take their money and run to the next sumptuous
barn.
Lovely vicious circle that; a game in which
everyone but the public wins; a game that will
continue until the paying customer (not a
notoriously bright species) finally realizes he is
being gouged.
Perhaps when Donovan starts playing to 15,000
empty seats the Coliseum will be returned to its
rightful tenants: the Vanouver Canucks and
Ringling Brothers' circus.
Hot Poop
UBC MUSIC DEPT.
Music of Ives, Jenkins and Mozart performed
by  Vancouver's own top-notch Baroque Strings.
Tomorrow at noon in Mus. Bldg. FREE!!!
PLAYHOUSE THEATRE CO.
The Show-Off by George Kelly previews this
Wednesday evening.
MORE MUSIC DEPT.
Faculty viola recital of music by Honegger,
Marquis, and Bach. Thursday noon in Mus. Bldg.
FREE!!!
GUESS WHAT?
UBC Symphonic Band plays in Old Auditorium
this Friday at noon and 8:00 p.m. Music by Mozart,
Kabalevsky, and Dello Joio. FREE!!!
SPECIAL EVENTS
Present (in co-operation with the French
Department) Troupe des Jeunes Comediens, a group
of young actors formerly with the National
Theatre School. This Friday at noon in the
SUBallroom. FREE!!!
SUB FILMS PRESENTS:
\\
HOUR OF THE
WOLF
ff
directed by INGMAR BERGMAN
starring MAX VON SYDOW
LIV ULLMAN
Nov. 6,7, 8, 9,
Thurs.-! 2:30 Fri.-7:00, 9:30 Sat-8:00, Sun.-7:00
Visit Our New Varsity Branch
4517 W. 10th Ave.-(1 blk. from UBC Gates)
@ffrbonk's
Bowntown Brentwood Park Royal
10% Special UBC Discount-Students & Faculty
torn northcott
guest artist with the
symphony
meredith davies conducts
november ll
(that's holiday tuesday at 8:30p.m.)
a new -world concert
torn northcott performing his own
composition X. god created woman.."
the symphony does dvorak's
new world symphony
queen elizabeth theatre I
tickets now at the Vancouver ticket
centre or charge at any eaton's store
$1,$2,$3. reservations 683~3255 Page 6
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 4, 1969
KNOW NEWS
iX  Promotes a W. C. Fieldian Approach
To Life.
1x Champions creative spelling.
# etc.
-iX At your news stand.
NEW YORK
COSTUME SALON
RENTALS
WHITE DINNER JACKETS
TUXEDOS, DARK SUITS, TAILS
COLORED  JACKETS
SPECIAL  STUDENT  RATES
224-0034     4397 W. 10»h
ff
ATTENTION — Students of English 100
U.B.C. FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE PRESENTS
THE  CRUCIBLE
by Arthur Miller
(Gripping Drama of Salem Witchcraft Trials)
NOVEMBER 7-15
DIRECTED BY STANLEY WEESE
STUDENT TICKETS - $1.00 (available for all performances)
"^
SPECIAL STUDENT PERFORMANCES
^
Monday, Nov. 10, 7:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 13, 12:30 p.m, Matinee
Tickets:      The Frederic Wood Theatre     Room 207
SUPPORT YOUR CAMPUS THEATRE
The Mutual Life
ASSURANCE COMPANY OF CANADA
offers
CAREER
OPPORTUNITIES
In Sales Management
Company representatives will be visiting your campus on
Thurs. & Friday, Nov. 6-7, 1969
See your Placement Officer for interview arrangements and further details
l
Bill 163:
By ROBERT ISSENMAN and PETER STARR
(Robert Issenman graduated from Harvard University,
in the department of government. He is presently at the
Universite de Montreal, Faculty of Law. He wrote his thesis
on the Ligue pour I'Integration Scolaire.
Peter Starr is presently at the Universite de Montreal in
the Department of Sociology. He is editor of the
well-known Montreal underground newspaper, Uncensored
Version, and was formerly co-chairman of the Provincial
Association of Secondary Students.
They are covering the opposition to Bill 63 for
Canadian University Press and the McGill Daily.)
Turmoil rocked the entire province of Quebec this past
week, over the issue of "language of education."
Strikes have paralysed most of the large French
universities in the province. Junior colleges throughout
Quebec have been hit by massive class boycotts while
numerous high schools are shut down entirely.
"The attempt by the government to
grant 'freedom of choice in education'
under Bill 63 . . . appears to have created
a common front between workers and
student."  ,	
10,000 students staged a spectacular non-violent march
on the Montreal headquarters of the ruling Union Nationale
party on Tuesday. This followed a frenzied teach-in which
jammed the entire Universite de Montreal sports arena.
Other demonstrations, against targets such as the Montreal
City Hall occurred throughout the week.
Momentum was building up rapidly for a massive
confrontation before the Parliament Building in Quebec on
Friday. By keeping the earlier demonstrations peaceful,
leaders hoped to amass the general support for the Friday
action to the tune of 500,000 demonstrators.
The "week of protest" was sparked by the provincial
government's attempt to introduce a bill-Bill 63-enabling
both English Canadians and "New Canadians" to choose
freely between English- and French-language education for
their children.
The "language of education" issue has been building up
over the last two years in Quebec, initially ignited by an
educational crisis in the Montreal Suburb of St. Leonard.
The freedom of Italian residents to choose English
language schooling lay at the base of that conflict. In May
1968, a newly-elected school commission decided to
abolish all English language public schools in the
community over a period of six years. Children of "English
origin" were to be bussed out of St. Leonard for their
education.
The English and Italian residents of the community
reacted violently to this sudden liquidation of their
"fundamental rights." They refused to submit to the
imposition of French language schools and established their
own classes in local homes.
Spearheading the  drive  to abolish English language
schooling
l'lntegri
"unilingui
province.
Whife
provoked,
the imagii
and studei
The
almost
immediate
flow off
lower Fre
minority i
The l
an overw
finance ar
great emc
in the^Ei
schools a
French iai
Ultra
language
Canadian
The
erupted ii
English a
McGilf-
English-sp
Thei
dominatic
Quebec
universiti
Loyola—v
Montreal,
sorely in:
facilities.
Unifil
another F
broke oul
communi
"U
of th*
for the
nation
Thej
read the
unilingual
leaders wi
Rayn
free on ba
The,
intensify
when Can
to the citj
Howe
40,000 protest
By ROBERT ISSENMAN and PETER STARR
QUEBEC CITY (CUP) - Approximately
40,000 demonstrators, self-policed and
peaceful, massed in front of the Quebec
National Assembly Buildings Friday at the
culmination of four days protest against the
provincal government's Bill 63.
But their protest was overshadowed by
violence which broke out after the
demonstration dissolved, when a hard core of
4,000 militants charged police guarding the
Assembly Buildings and rampaged through the
provicial capitol.
Hundreds of demonstrators were held
overnight by the Quebec provincial police
after Friday's demonstration. Forty-eight
persons faced magistrates Saturday on charges
of disturbing the peace.
Hundred of others were treated for
injuries, mostly tear gas asphyxiation, though
at least one youth was severely injured when
thrown through a plate glass window by
police.
And there was more than one instance of
police brutality: several professional
journalists reported police roughing up
demonstrators in detention cells before
witnesses were cleared from the vicinity.
Canadian University Press reporter Peter"
Starr watched in the basement of the National
Assembly as plainclothesmen kicked a
prisoner down a flight of stairs. Starr was later
struck with riot clubs as he tried to produce
his press pass in anothi
Provincial aut
Parliament Buildings i
approximately 300 pi
with the demonstrate
1,300 provincial polio
during the evening pro
Relations betwec
police remained frien
the mood of the crov
the events of later
foreshadowed.
An unidentified
Molotov cocktail into
protestors pushed a p
feet of the student
moments it appe;
overcome the marshal
chanting "pas de violei
Unilingualist lead
one of the chief orgs
Bill   63,   scrambled
beseeched the demoi
from the assembly bui
"You   are   not
Parliament Buildings
shouted. "Those of y
civil war today come
and carbines and 156:
Lemieux prevails
retreated.
The march organi;
over    at    11    p.m. Tuesday, November 4, 1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 7
to economy
vas Raymond Lemieux. His Ligue pour
an Scolaire "attempted to carry the
it"   position   to   other   communities   in   the
ib' other St. Leonard situation has been
ie issue of French unilingualism has captured
ion of French Canadian nationalists, journalists
throughout Quebec.
ilingualists are particularly concerned that
immigrants to Quebec are assimilated
into the English language milieu. The increased
war immigration, combined with a drastically
i birthrate, is predicted to make the French a
lontreal within 10 years,
ingualists further maintain that the French are
ming majority in Quebec and should not
lglish public school system. This rationale has
rial force because the Quebec economy is run
sh_language. The unilingualists feel English
this situation and threaten to relegate the
ige to the kitchens and the churches,
'y they fear for the survival of the French
culture, and for the survival of the French
on itself.
e has fantastic emotional power and has
sprees of violence on more than one occasion.
French students clashed during Operation
"March's rally of unilingualists at
ng McGill University.
malists chose McGill as a symbol of English
f Quebec society. They vehemently object to
vernment subsidies of the English
McGill, Sir George Williams, Bishop's,
the French universities—Universite de
jrbrooke, Laval, Universite de Quebec-are
i-of funds to improve their long-neglected
lists turned out in force again in September in
h-Italian confrontation at St. Leonard. Fights
veen the French and Italians and stores in the
:re ransacked.
ately, they fear for the survival
nch language and culture, and
rvival of the French Canadian
HT_	
, who were caught by surprise, panicked and
t   Act.   In   an   attempt   to   dampen   the
rvor, the government charged unilingualist
lition.
Lemieux, who led Friday's march, is only
result of charges stemming from the riot,
sphere   of  unrest  in  Montreal  was  only
the notorious riot on the night of Oct. 7,
army troops were called in to restore order
rganization, not violence, has been the most
important characteristic emerging in the tall of this year.
Since September, Raymond Lemieux has been directing a
highly successful drive to organize the students in
universities, high schools and junior colleges.
Last year the mobilization of Quebec students was
centered around internal school politics. But this year the
students are reacting to the "national" question.
According to Romeo Bouchard, an influential student
editor, "the spontaneous confrontation that emerges from
these students is moving enough to change Quebec
society."
"Strikes have paralysed most of the
large French universities in the province.
Junior colleges throughout Quebec have
been hit by massive class boycotts while
numerous high schools are shut down
entirely."
Indeed, the remarkable control demonstrated by
10,000 impassioned students on the Tuesday night
confrontation at the Union Nationale's Renaissance Club
appears to confirm their fervent dedication to the
unilingualist cause.
The attempt by the government to grant "freedom of
choice in education" under Bill 63 has dramatically
catalysed the unilingualist movement. It appears to have
created a common front between workers and students.
Overnight, the radical dream of students and workers
united in a struggle against a common enemy has come
closer to realization in Quebec than anywhere else in North
America.
The Front de Quebec Francais, formed over the last
weekend, brought together the leaders of unions,
parent-teacher organizations, nationalist societies and
student groups.
The union groups alone represent at least 500,000
workers under such giants as the Confederation of National
Trade Unions, the Conseille Syndicale Nationale, and the
Corporation des Enseignants de Quebec. Support from the
students is also extremely strong.
At Tuesday's teach-in at the Universite de Montreal,
prominent labor leader Michel Chartrand said: "Bill 63 is an
excellent bill, because it unites the French Canadian nation.
The Union Nationale party could never better serve the
French Canadian people than by what it is doing with Bill
63."
"It will create solidarity in the French Canadian
nation," he continued. "It will unite the workers. It will
unite the students and the farmers. We could never have
dreamed of an occasion like this."
Even if the Quebec government miraculously comes up
with a solution to the language of education and immigrant
issues, the struggle has only begun.
The fundamental basis of the conflict in Quebec is
economic. "Language of work" and the economic
discrepancies between English and French speaking
Quebecois will inevitably emerge as the gut issue.
language bill
on of the city,
ies ringed the
I riot police while
thesmen mingled
reserve force of
held out of sight
nonstrators and
til 9 p.m. when
in to change and
e  evening were
istrator threw a
ranks, and other
lck to within 15
dls. For several
nilitants would
were frantically
mond Lemieux,
•I opposition to
the truck and
> to keep back
to   take   the
old jalopy," he
want to start a
thousand rifles
jEJiot tonight."
the panel track
ared the protest
most    of   the
demonstrators and student marshalls left in a
cavalcade of 400 buses brought from
Montreal. But the remainder of the
demonstrators began throwing bottles and
stones at the assembly buildings.
Police responded with a barrage of tear
gas, and plainclothesmen in the crowd laid
down a 200-yard smokescreen over the
demonstrators.
Squads of police, scrambled over barriers
and cut through the demonstrators' lines,
driving the crowd away from the assembly
buildings.
After several charges and counter-charges,
the demonstrators retreated to the city
streets, where they began smashing windows
and sporadic looting. Platoons of police
bussed into the main streets of Quebec City
cand went on a rampage of their own,
roaming the streets and imposing summary
convictions on pedestrians and passers-by.
By 12:30 a.m. the demonstrators had
disappeared, and police commanders were
trying to restrain their men from terrorizing
pedestrians.
The results of the actual demonstration
are inconclusive: Bill 63 is still in second
reading in the assembly and demonstrations
will probably continue if the bill is passed.
Even the pacifists at Friday's march have
predicted violence may break out at a
confrontation already organized in Montreal
for Sunday.
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with additional competence in applied writing. Primarily,
he will conduct Reading Improvement classes but will also
be available for occasional duties in the English Department.
Minimum Academic Qualifications: A Bachelor's degree
and  specialized courses  in  reading.
A desirable background would include some Industrial,
Business   or  Technical   writing  experience.
Salary commensurate with experience within an established scale.
APPLY TO:
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B.C. Institute of Technology
3700 Willingdon Avenue
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REGULAR AND SUMMER EMPLOYMENT
GEOLOGICAL EXPLORATION — Geology, Geological Engineering
PETROLEUM ENGINEERING - Mech., Chem., Geol. Engineering
GEOPHYSICAL   EXPLORATION   —   Geophysics,   Geol.Eng.,   Physics
(Interested   in   Geophysics)
REGULAR  EMPLOYMENT
LAND —  Law,  Commerce,  Business  Administration
For further information  and  appointment
^ please contact the Placement Office
EMPLOYMENT INTERVIEWS
Our representative will be visiting the campus
November   17,  18  and   19
to interview students of the following disciplines:
Chemical Engineering, Bachelor and Master
Mechanical  Engineering,   Bachelor and Master
Electrical Engineering, Bachelor
Chemistry, Bachelor and Ph.D.
Physics, Ph.D.
Youir Placement Office will be pleased to supply you with information on job
openings for 1970 graduates and if you you are interested they will arrange
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THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 4,  1969
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So if you're in Engineering,
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We'll be on campus
November 12-14
Shell Canada Limited Tuesday,  November 4,  1969
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
SFU PSA strike is 'dead-end tor most students
The political science, sociology
and anthropology faculty strike at
Simon Fraser University has
reached a dead end as far as
students are concerned, the editor
of the SFU student newspaper,
The Peak, said Monday.
The struggle, according to Phil
DuBois, is now strictly between
the suspended professors and the
administration. The striking
faculty are apealing the decision
of the administration to suspend
them
On    Friday,    Mrs.    Kathleen
Aberle presented her case to the
'Railroad job'
From Page 3
more important than rapport with buildings and grounds."
"I have had Graeme Vance tell me brutally and crudely to get
the fuck off the stairs," he said.
Law rep Dell Valair spoke in defence of Vance. "I felt at the
outset of the forming of the concerned committee that Vance was one
of the old Brock Hall blue-blazer crowd, but now I think he is the best
man for the job of SUB manager," Valair said.
In speaking of the phone call from the management firm, Hodge
said: "They seem to view the two individuals as being at the opposite
ends ofthe scale."
"The firm seemed to feel that Boyd's concessions to students
would prevent him from being, as they said, a careful, precise,
forbidding manager," he said.
In the ensuing vote, council voted 11 to 7 with three
abstentions to retain Vance for the next two years on a monthly
contract as SUB manager.
About two hours later, Boyd entered the council meeting. He'd
been notified by phone as to what had just happened.
"I spoke to Fraser at five o'clock this evening and he told me
nothing about the fact that this matter would be discussed tonight,"
he said.
Visibly shaken, he continued: "It's really uncanny, I find it hard
to believe."
The meeting was about to adjourn when Ellison said he wished
further discussion of the issue.
But there was a motion for adjournment. When a vote was
taken, and the motion defeated, Hodge said, "I'm not going to let you
address the council, Dermot, you have had your chance."
"It is within my power to adjourn this meeting, so I am
adjourning it."
There was a great furore in the chamber with Philip Pelzman,
arts 3, shouting from the gallery, "Hodge, you are screwing up
people's lives."
Hodge yelled back: "I don't screw up anybody's life."
Said Ellison, as councillors left the meeting: "Chalk up railroad
job number eight for Hodge."
University newsmen
granted press club
The Ubyssey Press Club was created by an act of students
council Monday night. The Press Club will serve the staff of The
Ubyssey as an agency of social co-ordination and staff unity.
In a prepared statement, press club president Bruce Curtis said:
"I feel that this is what the staff have needed for a long time and I
hope that the Press Club will be able to become an affiliate of the
Press Club downtown."
The Press Club has over fifty members on its roster and expects
to begin functions as soon as possible.
Paul Knox, a known radical and press club vice-president stated:
"I am not exactly in favor of the club being solely a social
organization, however, at the first general meeting I will make sure
that the role of the club on this campus will be discussed."
^'The administrative umbrella will only be offered to the various
writers associations that are being organized," said Curtis.
Hodge to look
into CUS' death
The Canadian Union of Students is dead, and Alma Mater
Society president Fraser Hodge says he is going to Ottawa to
find out why.
Hodge, who leaves today for a conference of the
Association of Universities and Colleges in Canada, said Monday
he wants to find out what is going to happen with the remains
of CUS, financially and otherwise.
"I really don't think CUS ever did too much," Hodge said.
"The services it provided could be done cheaper ourselves. Of
course, it would probably be different with smaller schools."
"Politically, too, it was just out of touch with the needs
and wants of the students."
He said there are no immediate plans for establishing
•*. another national union of students. "People just don't feel that
there is a need for one," he said.
"When the government feels that education should be put
on a national level, then maybe a union would stand a chance.
"It's something that we can only hope for someday."
board of governors at an
hour-long hearing.
Richard Bird, Mrs. Aberle's
attorney, began by questioning
the qualifications of Richard
Lester, chairman of the board.
Bird introduced statutory
declarations by four hunger
strikers to back up his arguments.
The hunger strike was started
by 11 striking PSA students Oct.
23 to focus attention back to the
"real issues" at SFU.
The statutory declarations
were drawn up by strikers Bill
Wheeler, Leif Pederson, Denise
Mcllhargey, and Malcolm Fast.
The   declarations   questioned
Lester's ability to make an
objective decision in the case, in
view of his personal bias.
"It appears to me Mr. Lester
has already judged the eight
suspended professors, deciding
against them," says Fast in his
declaration.
The declaration goes on to
attribute comments to Lester that
are strangely critical of the
"intolerant political view points"
of the suspended faculty.
According ' to the hunger
strikers' statement, Lester implied
that the "radical faction" at SFU
has been responsible for a
politically    monolithic    PSA
department, a situation, to
Lester's mind, that provides
justification for punitive action
being taken.
After hearing the evidence
against him, Lester proposed a
recess, following which he
dismissed the charges as "not
relevant" and declared that the
board would remain constituted.
Bird requested a postponement
until Nov. 17.
In the meantime life continues
at SFU.
According to DuBois students
are going to their classes and the
strike has become an issue of the
past for most.
Now Is The Time To Play
DOUBLE or NOTHING!!
Let Evelyn Wood Double Your Reading Rate or
You Don't Pay Anything At All,
As a Matter of Fact she will TRIPLE your
Present Rate, or you don't have to Pay.
FIND OUT THE DETAILS OF THIS EXCITING NEW GAME.
Thursday, Nov. 6th
12.30 p.m.
Buchanan
— Room 202
Be the
Guest of
READING
DYNAMICS
at a
Special
One Hour
Presentation
SEE WHY HUNDREDS
OF U.B.C. STUDENTS
HAVE TAKEN THIS
AMAZING READING
IMPROVEMENT COURSE.
BILL McMICHAEL-
2nd  Year  UBC  Political  Science Student
SAYS "It's the best thing
that ever happened
to my education."
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1900 W. BROADWAY - 732-7696 Page   10
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 4,  1969
TODAY
WOMEN'S   CAUCUS
Jean Rands & Yetta Lees speak on
occupational trends for women in
Canada.   8 p.m.   at 307  W Broadway.
KARATE  CLUB
Meeting,   SUB   ballroom,   7 p.m.
UBC LIBERALS
Meeting with Pat McGeer, noon, SUB
212.
IWW
Cheap, radical literature on sale outside SUB caf Tue.-Fri.  11 a.m.-2 P.m.
SPEAKERS COMMITTEE
NLF rep. to Cuba speaks on Vietnam,
noon, SUB auditorium.
SOCRED   CLUB
Executive meeting, noon in Bu. 224.
INTER-PROFESSIONAL   EDUCATION
See   IPE   in   action,   7   p.m.   "Reach"
Center.   1144  Commercial.
'tween
classes
CHESS   CLUB
Round  No.   4  chess  tourney pairings
on  notice-board,   SUB   216.
GERMAN   CLUB
Learn  to   dance   the   polka   &   schuh-
plattler,   IH,  noon. ,
BLACK  CROSS  FOOD   CO-OP
Tues.-Fri., 11 a.m.-2 p.m. outside SUB
caf:  V**  price food.
WEDNESDAY
SPECIAL   EVENTS  COMMITTEE
Last  day for  ticket  refunds in   AMS
office  at noon.
PRE-SOCIAL  WORK  CLUB
General    meeting    and    sign-up    for
Thursday's    tour   to    Willingdon,    in
SUB  119,   at noon.
PRE-MED SOCIETY
Dr.  Murphy, Asst.  Dean of Medicine,
speaks in Westbrook 201  at noon.
PIZZA
3PATI0J
EAT IN •TAKEOUT*. DELIVERY
3261 W. Broadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. S: Sat. 3 a.m.
HONG KONG
CHINESE FOODS
Just   One   Block   from   Campus
In   The  Village
(Next   to   U.B.C.   Barber   Shop)
WE   SERVE   GOOD   CHINESE   FOOD
AT    REASONABLE    PRICES
For   Take-Out   Service   Ph.   224-6121
OPEN   TUES.  -   TO   -   SAT.
11:30  A.M.  TO  10  P.M.
SUNDAY &  MONDAY 5 TO 10 P.M.
TYPEWRITERS
SALES - SERVICE and
RENTALS
_  LOW  STUDENT  RATES  —
West Point Printers
and STATIONERS
4514 W. 10th        224-7818
2 blocks  East of UBC  Gates
.H. PRESENTS-
-,
DANCE
MON.-NOV.  10-8:30
Sonny Jackson  from   Nassau
SUB Ballroom $1.50 person
Food & Floor Show
PSYCHOLOG-Y   CLUB
Dr. David speaks on the Institute for
Retarded Children, at noon in Ang.
24.
UBC STUDENT WIVES ASSOCIATION
Monthly meting tonight at 8 p.m. at
Cecil Green Park.
SIMS
Introductory lecture on Transcendental Meditation at noon in SUB 111.
IWW
Meeting at literature table in SUB,
12:30.
CIRCLE  K CLUB
Meeting in SUB 105A at 12:30. New
members  welcome.
EXPERIMENTAL   COLLEGE
Discussion on what is wrong with our
student government, at noon in 9UB
12S.
MARKETING  CLUB
Frank  Baker  of the  Attic  at 12:30.
THUNDERBIRD MOTORCYCLE CLUB
Meeting at noon, SUB 211.
ED.   U.S.
Inner City at noon in Ed. 100.
SAILING  CLUB
General    meeting    and    discussion    at
noon in Bu.  104.
ONTOLOGICAL   SOC
"Heaven   on   earth"   at   12:30   in   Bu,
232
VARSITY    ROD   AND   GUN   CLUB
General meeting at noon in SUB 117.
ARCHEOLOGY   CLUB
Noon-hour talk in Archeologv Lab
MORATORIUM   DAY   COMMITTEE
Organizational    meeting   at   noon    in
SUB   213.
LEGAL  AID
Advisory panels  at  noon  in SUB  237
and   237A.   Friday   as  well.
DEPARTMENT   OF   MUSIC
Student   niano   recital   at   3:30   in   the
Recital  Hall   of  the  Music Bldg    Also
noon-hour concert of Baroque Strings
in the Recital Hall.
THURSDAY
CAMPUS  CAVALIERS
Meeting,  noon to 2:15   SUB 125
VIETNAM  MOBILIZATION  COMMITTEE
Inaugural    meeting.    Australians    and
New Ze**landers Against War in Vietnam.   Noon,   Bu.   204.
ENGLISH   145   LECTURES
Dr. W. E Messenger speaks on Fitzgerald's 'Tender is the Night*, noon.
Ang. 110.
FOLK  SONG   SOC
Informal   concert,   noon,   SUB   conversation   pit.
VANCOUVER   STUDENT   MOVFMENT
Colour   film.   The   Victorv   of   Chairman   Mao's   Thought    12:30.   Bu     106.
Donation.
THUNDERBIRD   WARGAMERS   CLUB
Battle    of    Rai*ev*s    Bridge,     a    civil
wargame  will  be  fought in  SUB  130.
noon to 3:30.
UBC   SPORTS   CAR   CLUB
Film-;, noon. Chem, 250.
DEPARTMENT OF  MUSIC
Viola recital, non. Music Bldg   Recital
Hall.
ED.   U.S.
Debate:   Should  there  be  Bible  Reading in our Schools? Noon. Ed   100.
SIMS
Meditation,   7:30,   Brk.   305.
FRIDAY
PRE-LIBRARIANSHIP SOCIETY
Tour of UBC cataloguing div. Meet at
card  catalogue  noon.
CLASSICS   DEPT.
Lecture,    nono:    "The    relevance    of
Thucydides" by Mary White. Bu. 100.
Everyone  welcome.
SAILING CLUB
Club party, 8:30 p.m.-l a.m.  SUB 207
& 209.  Members  and guests free.
MUSIC DEPT.
Beethoven,  Bach,  Rachmaninoff, UBC
Concert Band,  Music Bldg. Rec. Hall,
noon and UBC Aud. 8 p.m.
PERFORMING  ARTS
Les   Jeunes   Comedients   songs   and
poetry. SUB ballroom, noon. Free.
LIFE SCIENCES CLUB
Dr.   Robin   Harger   on   Pollution   and
Community   Education.   Noon.   Location  TBA.
SUNDAY
CLASSICS   CLUB
Meeting and lecture on "Defence of
Cicero" by Mary White. 8 p.m. at
Prof. McGregor's pad: 4495 W. 7th
Ave.
CLASSIFIED
Rate:s Students. Faculty & Club—3 lines. 1 day 75-t 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines 25-ts
4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, STUDENT UNION BLDG., Univ. ot B.C.,
Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
Greetings
12
TO DISCUSS A PERSONAL PROB-
lem to share your latest inspiration call MU 5-9181 during the
Sunday Line program, Sundays
9.:'0-]0 a.m., and 11:30-1:00 p.m.,
Itadio CJOR (100. Or call and see
me at the Chaplain's Office, (SUI!
237 A).   For  an  appointment   phone
266-9275.
Wanted Information
13
Lost & Found
14
l.'OIINL) KITTEN ABOUT THREE
months, Black with while paws
throat and moustache, leather collar, 2446   West 1st. i'hone 731-1997.
FOUND: PAIR OF GREEN TINT-
<(1 contact lenses in Buch. 104, two
weeks a^o, alter civil service
exam. Call 224-9013, ask for Dick
or   Walter in  Room 500 or  504.
Rides & Car Pools
15
MOBILITY' FREEDOM
$18.00 per month, including insurance. See the volume dealer in "Two
Wheel Freedom*' for details. Hi
Performance Honda, 3712 W. 10th
al   Alma.   Phone   228-9077	
RIDI4 WANTED FOR S:30s. ALSO
occasional ride home, 19th and
Maple (one block East of Arbu-
tus)   73:1-81)76   after   10   p.m.	
NEED RIDE DAILY FOR 8:30-5:30.
Near Ladner of Hwy. 17. Ph. Glen
946-4794.
Special Notices
16
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rate if you are 20 years or
over and have good driving record you may qualify. Phone Ted
Elliott,    299-9422.
WANTED TO lil'i' ... A XUM-
l>er of second-hand copies of the
text Inside Today's Home by
Faulkner.    Phone    985-7363.
SAV* I*.' OX BLANK CASETTE
(ape C-90, Ampex lifetime guarantee, $2.95 each; C-60 B.A.S.F.,
J 1.95 each. Plastic box included.
Fall or sec Peter Tim, -21-9062
or   320   Okanagan.	
(URL WANTED, WHO (lEM'IXK-
]y likes class, music to gu to
V.S.O. concerns) with grad. engineer.    Paul,    683-1754. 	
BOB DYLANS PREVIOFSLY I'N-
published Tarantula now available    F11C   Bookstore.	
DOES VON SYDOW REALLY GO
to tlte Dogs? See "Hour of the
Wolf" Nov. 6, 12:30, Nov. 7, 7:30,
9:30' No. 8 S:00. Nov. 9 7:00. S1*B
75c.	
LEARN TO SKI AT
WHISTLER MOUNTAIN
6 weeks professional ski instruction
$32 includes return bus transportation for further information
contact: Canadian Youth Hostels
Association, 1406 West Broadway,
Vancouver 9.   Tel:   738-3128.	
TRIALS OF JASON HOOVER,
Northwest C o m p a n y , Winter's
Green. Friday P. N.F. Gardens.
9:00-1:00.	
IF YOF WANT TO CONTINUE
our rap about It.B.C., S.F.I'., and
Hypos, call Ollie 266-7*181.
Travel Opportunities
17
STUDENTS INTERESTED IN
filling out a charter to Europe
leaving approximately Jan. 1,
1970, returning approximately
May 1. One-way or return. Contact, Raven Committee, School
of Architecture,   U.B.C.	
EUROPE, $275 RETURN. VAGA-
bonds  International.  922-2761
Wanted-Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1966 AUSTIN 850 VAN, EXCEL,
cond. 738-1911, 4:30-6:30 p.m.
Mon.-Fri.	
'62 VW, MECHANICALLY O.K.,
$350.00 or best offer. Phone 228-
2673,   between   11   a.m.   -   5   p.m.
'67 HONDA CONV'T SPORTS
car. Great shape, low insurance
rates. 20,000 mi. Phone - AM 3-
7327.	
195D VOLKS, GOOD CONDITION,
radio, snow tires, etc. Phone
224-7288.	
1965 PONTIAC PARISIENNE. EXC.
cond., executive driven, 8 cyl., 4
dr. sedan. Jet black, 6 near new
WW (2 studed). P.S., P.B. auto.,
38,500 miles. $1,500. Phone Harry
at 266-0703 between 6 & 7.	
'08 MUSTANG. V8. AUTOMATIC.
 Radio. Phone 732-7555 after 6 p.m.
*55 ZFPHYR ZODIAC, NEW RADIO
cheap. $100.00 (will negotiate).
Phone Art after 7:00 p.m. 224-9016.
'54 PLYMOUTH STD. 6, POWER
steering, 88 mph, seatbelts, studded snowtires, reliable, city tested
transportation. Best offer. 266-
660.7.   Basement  5025  Angus  Dr.
CLASSIC M.G. MAGNETTE ZA
newly rebuilt trans and motor,
radio, W.W.s, 4 door. Excellent
mech. condition. Driving lights.
$330  or offers.   224-6113.	
1965 VW DELUXE WITH GAS
heater, H.D. ba'ttery, W.W.'s, new
paint.     Excellent    condition.     731-
0096.	
~T)9 SIMCA, GOOD CONDITION.
Can be seen at Apt. No. 2, 3837
W.  4 th Ave.
Automobiles—Wanted
22
Automobiles—Parts
23
ONE VOLVO SHOULDER BELT
plus center anchor $15. Phone
Jake   224-6870.
Automobiles—Repairs
24
Motorcycles
25
BUSINESS SERVICES
Dance Bands
31
DIRT CHEAP ROCK BAND —
Rock Band Dirt Cheap — Hand
Cheap Dirt Rock — Any way
you   want   it.    985-5727,   Dave.
Duplicating  &  Copying
32
Miscellaneous
33
Photography
34
You is Beautiful
stay  that way.
one day  you may not be—
book  a  session  with
michael  rose
photographer   with   a   view
321-3110
Repairing—All Kinds
35
Rentals—Miscellaneous
36
Scandals
37
DIRT     CHEAP     ROCK     BAND    —
Rock   Band   Dirt   Cheap   —   Band
Cheap  Dirt Rock — Any -way  you
want   it.     985-5727.   Dave
Sewing & Alterations
38
Typewriters & Repairs
39
Typing
40
EXPERIENCED  ELECTRIC
typing.   Essays,   theses,   etc
accurate   work,    reasonable
Phone   321-2102.
HOME
Neat,
rates.
TYPIST, UNIVERSITY GRAD.
Pick-up and delivery. 30c page.
Phone  942-8144.
Typing—Cont'd
40
ACCURATE EXP. TYPING FROM
legible work. reas. rates, 738-6829
after  nine  a.m..   to  nine  p.m.	
EXPERT ELECTRIC TYPING, 35c
page (10 copy) call Mrs. Duncan
228-9587.	
TYPIST   — ELECTRIC
224-6129
 Dunbar Area	
EXPERIENCED AND RELIABLE
typist available for home typing.
Please phone 277-5640.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
51
GIRLS: EARN EXTRA SKI
money in pleasant part-time work.
Remuneration   open  for  ambitious
—987-1772	
JON'S PIZZARAMA RESTAUR-
ants requires part and full-time
wairesses. Attractive girls, 18-25.
Apply in person only, 2676 West
Broadway. Shifts available at all
four    restaurants.
Opportunity for women students
with a min. typing speed of 35
wpm    —    vacation    employment.
OFFICE ASSISTANCE
VANCOUVER   LIMITED
684-7177
Help Wanted—Male
52
JON'S PIZZARAMA RESTAUR-
ants require young men with
cars for part-time general kitchen work. Apply in person only,
2676   West    Broadway.
Male or Female
53
OPFRATE YOUR OWN " ON
campus" stationery - office supplies business. Special programs
add to your inventive sales skills.
Phone   879-046:'	
NEED MONEY? WE'LL TRAIN
you to sell and earn money?
526-6325.	
WANTED: A DOZEN AGENTS,
male or female. Knock on any
door — good reception, almost sure
■ sale, 50% commission. Up to fifty
dollars  a  day.
For interview call  685-9558
Work Wanted
54
INSTRUCTION
Instruction Wanted
61
1ST YEAR MATH TUDOR WANT-
ed in New West., Surrey area.
584-6832.
Language Instruction
61A
QUALITY   LANGUAGE  TUTORING
and
CERTIFIED    TRANSLATIONS
CONVERSA-SCHOOL    OF
LANGUAGES
1603   W.   4th   at  Fir   —  736-5401
Chargex  Cards  Accepted
Music
62
Special Classes
63
Tutoring
64
TUTORING  IN  MATH-PHYS.   FOR
undergrad   by   instructor.    (Ph.D.)
$5.00   hr.   Ph.   733-6037   eves.
FLAMENCO     GUITAR      TUITION.
Michael   Kocial,   tel.   224-7762.
FRENCH LESSONS — PARISIAN
teacher—20 yrs. of experience. Mr.
Alain Neumand (1102) 4665 W.
10th Ave. Call 224-4434 after 4
P.m.   or   weekend.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
SKI EQUIPMENT FOR SALE. 205
CM. Gold Star Epoxy Skis, Tyrol
size 11 boots, good condition $70.00.
Phone Harry at 266-0703 between 6
&  7.
Mis.   For   Sale—Cont'd
71
BIRD CALLS
Your  Student  Telephone
Directory
NOW AVAILABLE — $1.00
al Ihe Bookstore,
AMS Publications  Office
and Thunderbird Shop
10 W. TRIO AMP & TUNER, SONY
tape recorder, Wharfedale speakers. Sell whole or part. Roger 224-
5194.
H°YER GUITAR SELLING AT
$b0,00 cost new was 1100; 325-2417.
100% "DOWN" SKI JACKETS AND
Terimt (Helenca) track suits,
variety of colours and sizes. Lowest prices in town. Interested?
Come have a look in Room No. 305
War Memorial Gym. Mondays and
Thursdays    12:30-2:00    p.m.    Con-
^Sto-If?nk  Lyth in  SW  °r Phone
683-3442  eves.
KOFLACH BUCKLE SKI BOOTS
size 7 fleece lined, very fast $70
A steal Phone 985-2976.	
JUST ARRIVED! BEAUTIFULLY
embroidered Afghan coats. Sheepskin linings. Reasonably priced
Leatherbox, 2645 West 4th, The
Mews,   3257   West   Broadway.
KNESSIL WHITE STAR RSH 215;
Head competition GS, 215; Stroltz
deluxe racer boot, No. 9; Le-
trappeur Elite pro boots, No. 9%.
All in excellent condition. CaU
263-9188   after   five.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
GIRL WANTED TO SHARE FUR-
mshed room, $30 per person, TV
3913 W. 19th Ave. Good company
wanted. No dull type. Phone 224-
bG96.
ACCOMMODATION AVAILABLE
tor two male students. Close to
U.B.C.    Tel.    224-4294.
FREE BED - SITTING ROOM
bathroom en suite in lovely Soutti
Granville home for responsible
conscientious student; on bus line,
nn     kitchen    privileges.     Ph.    224-
""NEWLY COMPLETED L. H. K.
room with private bath and entrance, close to bus and shopping
25th and Macdonald. Phone 738-
5603."	
ROOM $50 WITH KITCHEN PRIV-
ilges for male students on campus.
Large study room and lounge.
Weekly linen. Bosj*d $45 if desired.
5760 Toronto Rd. or phone Ron at
224-0327.
Room & Board
82
SIGMA CHI HOUSE—LARGEST
rooms on Campus, two lounges
and dining hall. Free room cleaning service, laundry, color TV.
Come out and see us, 5725 Agronomy   Rd.,   224-5530,   evenings.
LIVE ON CAMPUS PHI KAPPA
Sigma. Colour T.V., Sauna, 5785
Agronomy  Road.   224-9684.	
EXCELLENT ROOM AND BOARD
for senior male student. Near
gates. Phone 224-4866, 4595 W. 6th
Avenue.	
SIGMA CHI HOUSE — LARGEST
room on campus; two lounges, and
dining hall. Free room* cleaning
service, laundry, color TV, good
food. Come out and see us, 5725
Agronomy,  224-5530.   Evenings.
ROOM AND BOARD AVAILABLE
at Psi Upsilon, $95 month. Call
228-9433   for   Jamie.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
FURN. SUITE, No. 12, 1396 WEST
11th Ave. Available Nov. 1. Apply
After  6   p.m.   738-7447.	
SENIOR GIRL FOR FURN. WEST
end apt., 26th floor indoor pool,
$80.  Ph.  681-7079
Unfurn. Houses  & Apts.
84 Tuesday, November 4, 1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 11
FULLBACK DAVE CORCORAN toddles through a huge hole on
his way to racking up a record 267 yards in 33 carries in
Saturday's game against Pacific University. UBC won the game1
SPOR TS
19-14. Pictured are (in dark) end Dave Rice (82) and tackle Dick
Stein (number not showing).
—dick button photo
Bird footballers power to win
It was Dave Corcoran's day
Saturday as he lead the UBC
football Thunderbirds to a 19-14
victory over Pacific University
Bears in Thunderbird Stadium.
Corcoran piled up a record 267
yards in 33 carries behind the
blocking of UBC's strong
offensive line en route to two
•touchdowns.
UBC's third touchdown came
from Roger Gregory behind the
blocking of Corcoran.
The Birds came from behind to
win their first game against college
competition since they beat the
University of Calgary 16-11 in
1967 and their first win over an
American college since Oct. 18,
1966 when they swamped
Whitman 58-12.
Pacific opened the scoring
when George Wise scored from
the one on fourth down with 2:50
left in the first quarter. The
convert was good.
UBC replied with 13:20 left in
the half as Corcoran plowed over
from the three. The convert was
unsuccessful. The Birds' second
TD came early in the third quarter
as Gregory and Corcoran ran 12
yards around right end.
Pacific's second TD came on an
interception, making the score
14-13 before Gregory plunged
over to end the scoring.
Gnup praised safety Bill
Henderson and linebacker Doug
Eaton as well as raving over
Corcoran's heroics.
The game was marred by thick
fog, poor scoreboard operation
and shoddy officiating. A total of
23 penalties for 270 yards were
called.
The win was UBC's second this
year to go with their one tie and
five losses.
The Birds play their last game
of the season Saturday against the
University of Alberta.
Runners
come 2nd
The UBC cross country track
team battled WCIAA competition
for the first time since 1965 in
Victoria Saturday and performed
extremely well.
UBC finished second only to
the tough University of
Saskatchewan club in the seven
team meet as they finished with
46 points, four behind the
winners.
The first man acorss the finish
line for UBC was Ken Hirst who
finished in fourth position with a
time of 29 minutes, 53.8 seconds.
The winner of the race was
Larry Corbett, whose University
of Victoria team had two of the
top three runners of the
competition but still finished in
third place.
Grassers
The two UBC field hockey
teams split their games over the
weekend.
The first division Thunderbirds
defeated winless India A, 4-0
while the second division Braves
lost to league leading Hawks B,
4-1.
Two goals each by forwards
Lance Carey and Antonie
Schouten pushed the Birds season
record to four wins and three
losses which leaves them in third
place, two points out of second.
RUGBY AND ICE HOCKEY
WRITEUPS WILL APPEAR IN
FRIDAY'S EDITION OF THE
UBYSSEY DUE TO LACK OF
ROOM TODAY.
Intramurals
VOC auction sr
NOON, NOV. 6 — SUB BALLROOM EXT.
EQUIPMENT TO SELL? BRING DOWN TO CLUBS LOUNGE
BY NOV. 5. INSPECTION OF SALEABLE ITEMS NOV. 3, 4
& 5, CLUBS LOUNGS AT NOONS.
Further Info    -    228-8802 or 228-3691
Women's Intramurals
• PE managers meet Tuesday noon.
• PE table tennis, prelim rounds
played Monday and Tuesday at 4:30 in
M.G.  See sched posted in MG or WG.
• PE softball, Wednesday noon,
M.G., sched in MG (women's lockers).
• Marathon walk, Thursday noon.
All participants at WG at 12:35 to start.
Maps available.
• UBC loggers club will have a
general meeting, Thursday noon in
Women's Gym.
Intramurals Schedule
BADMINTON — Please check sched
outside   Intramural   office.
CURLING—Thursday, 5 p.m.: Totem
vs. Phi Delta; OU vs. Pharmacy; Place
Vanier vs. Eng I; Aggies nl vs. Ed HI;
Eng IX vs. Eng XIII; Eng X vs. Eng
XIV.
Ski film
Warren Miller, rated by some as
the world's top ski photographer,
will be showing his first film in
Vancouver in two years tonight at
8:30 p.m. at the Queen Elizabeth
Theatre.
His film, "This is Skiing",
features Olympic champions
dipsy-doodling through powder
snow at the big U.S. resorts, plus
the latest ski techniques, racing
styles, and lift designs.
Seats are reserved, $2, and can
be bought at the Vancouver
Ticket Centre.
FOOTBALL—Quarterfinals — Tuesday,
12:30: Eng I vs. ? (field 4A) ; Law vs.
Phi Delta (field ZB). Wednesday: Beta
vs. Arts (field 4A).
—Division II — Tuesday, 12:30: Beta
m vs. Union HI (field 2A>; ZBT vs.
Phi Gamma (field 3A); Eng III vs. Beta
n (field 3B). Wednesday, 12:30: Kappa
Sigma vs. Dentistry (field 2A); Pharmacy vs. Kappa Sigma pledges (field
3A).
—Semi-finals on Nov. 5 and S. Finals
on Nov. 7.  Check Schedule.
SOCCER —Finals — Tuesday, 12:30:
Division I on field 5; Division II on
field 8.
3261 W. ^roadway   736-7788
Weekdays to 1 a.m.
Fri. & Sat. 3 a.m.
SAVE UP TO $125 FOR $1.75!
GO PLACES 2 FOR 1
INVITATION
THE STUDENT ENTERTAINMENT BOOK
ON  SALE  NOW:  SUB  INFORMATION
BOOK STORE
I.H. PRESENTS-
DANCE
MON.-NOV.  10-8:30
Sonny  Jackson  from   Nassau
SUB  Ballroom $1.50 person
Food & Floor Show
Jft You'll Find
*J£t\ bird calls
YOUR STUDENT TELEPHONE DIRECTORY
The Most Useful Book on Campus
BUY YOUR COPY TODAY - only $1.00
UBC BOOKSTORE AND
PUBLICATIONS OFFICE OR THE THUNDERBIRD SHOP IN SUB
"The Most Useful Book on Campus"
■**• —* Page  12
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 4,  1969
"EXCELLENCE  FOR  FEW'
Senators' minds made up on enrolment
By JOHN ANDERSEN
Ubyssey Senate Reporter
Limited enrolment at UBC appears to be a certainty.
This was the consensus among senators at the special
meeting of the UBC senate called Saturday morning to
discuss the report of the long-range objectives committee.
The meeting was announced by administration
president Walter Gage as being a "discussion session"
intended to familiarize senators with the various points of
the committee report.
However, most of the senators who spoke appeared
to have already made up their minds on the subject.
Several said UBC should strive for academic
excellence for a relatively few people rather than to try to
provide as many people as possible with higher education.
Sole dissenter to speak was grad student senator Stan
Persky, who called limited enrolment "a patchwork
solution to the problem of overcrowding."
"Senate should make overcrowding a public problem
rather than covering it up from them," he said.
The committee report proposes to limit enrolment to
22,000 undergraduate students and 5,500 graduate
students.
The limit will be reached in 1972 at UBC's present
rate of growth.
The report also recommends that UBC entrance
requirements be raised to 65 per cent and that enrolment
be restricted in the first two years of the faculties of arts,
science,   education, agriculture, and physical education.
The discussion was more open on whether or not
UBC should retain its present academic structure.
Two reports were presented, one the majority view of
the committee and one by the minority.
The majority (six out of eleven members) wish to
retain the present structure of faculties, departments and
schools with modifications to make the structure more
responsive to changing conditions.
The minority wishes senate to adopt a system of
federated colleges at UBC.
A system of small colleges, each consisting of 500 to
2,500 students and each with an autonomous budget
make up the scheme.
At present it is difficult to tell which of the two
schemes will eventually be adopted by senate.
Saturday's session mainly consisted of the senators
questioning minority leader Cyril Belshaw on the various
points ofhis plan.
An unknown factor could be the findings of the Perry
commission on education, the results of which the
provincial government is presently keeping secret.
The Perry report could have a drastic effect on any
decision senate makes, as student senator Ed O'Brien
pointed out.
More jollies Nov. 12 on the second floor of the old
administration building.
Come to the meetings. Funnier than ladies' wrestling.
DRUG COMMISSIONERS ponder over statements made by students concerning widespread use of drugs.
—dave enns photo
Lawyers, teachers, reporters among dope users
Sun reporters smoke dope, says Stephen Brown, a
former reporter for the Sun and the Province.
Brown was testifying before the federal commission
on the non-medical use of drugs before an overflow crowd
in SUB auditorium Friday.
Brown said close to 30 reporters on the Sun and at
least 14 on the Province staff smoke marijuana.
"The situation is almost ludicrous," he said.
He said ,'ome prosecutors in drug trials smoke grass
regularly and that he personally knows many lawyers,
teachers and social workers who turned on.
UBC law student representative Charles Kux
presented  a  survey   to   the   commission   showing  that
approximately 45 per cent of UBC law students had
smoked marijuana at least once.
Kux said the consensus of the law students was that
marijuana should be legalized and its use controlled like
alcohol.
Marijuana has never been shown to have harmful
effects, he said.
He said the jail sentence and criminal record handed a
young person caught smoking marijuana do him far more
damage than the actual smoking of the drug.
An unidentified UBC social work student said the
use of drugs in religious ceremonies should be taken into
account by the commission.
He said peyote in its natural state can legally be
brought into Canada by filing an application form with
the department of agriculture.
Several students testified anonymously before the
commission, most urging the legalization of marijuana.
The drugs laws are a farce, they said.
A law student testifying before the commission said
drugs are easily available to all sectors of society. A
commission member interrupted him asking, "if there is
so much marijuana around, could you show me where to
get some?"
The commission will present a preliminary report at
the end of the year with the final report to be given in
1971.
SUB FILMS, THE UNIVERSITY OF B.C.
AND THE FRENCH DEPARTMENT PRESENT:
-A Canadian  film   by Jean-Pierre  Lefebvre—
Introduced by Jacques Godbout, director of
the   National   Film   Board's   French   division.
SUB AUDITORIUM - THURS., NOV. 6 - 7:30
FREE English Subtitles FREE
Good Students
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average . . . and a good driving record.
Even if your grades aren't' that high you may qualify for OTHER young driver
savings. Phone us at 684-1457.
See us and cut Auto Insurnce Costs as much as 25% or more.

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