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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Nov 7, 1967

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Array MAYOR NOT STAGGERED BY STAG PHOTOS
By CHARLOTTE HAIRE
Mayor Tom Campbell Monday praised The
Jbyssey for not printing a Playboy magazine pic-
ire of a woman masturbating.
"The Ubyssey is a responsible newspaper,"
Hampbell said in an interview. "You censored yourselves by picking the best four Playboy pictures.
"You did the decent thing. Somebody out there
las good taste."
Campbell was commenting on Friday's Ubyssey,
which printed four stag movie pictures removed by
the magazine's distributor.
The censorship came last week after Campbell
asked the distributor to remove four pages of photos
accompanying an article on the history of sex in the
cinema.
Campbell   said   he  approved  of the  newspaper
"tearing strips" off him.
"The press is absolutely free to criticize the
government in any way, as long as they exercise
responsibility."
Reponsibility, said Campbell, is illustrated in
the local press and The Ubyssey.
"You don't have to be crude to be a newspaper."
If the newspapers overstep the bounds of good
taste, the courts and law of the country should deal
with it, he said.
"However, today we have very weak laws on
obscenity. They should be strengthened. But in the
meantime, anyone in a responsible postion should
do the responsible thing."
The press is free to criticize anything in Canada,
Campbell said, but it does not have the right to
subject children of a tender age to obscene literature.
He said the best-selling novel, Valley of the Dolls,
is the filthiest book around but is aimed at an adult
market. It is not obscene, because it is really part
of life.
"But you don't sell it to a 10-year-old. You don't
jar them into the realities of life. You have to be
gradual."
Campbell said the university student press should
be able to print anything it wanted because students
are adults.
"They are passed the point of being corrupted."
These students have been through years of learning,
and are becoming professionals. They should be
exposed to sex and other facets of life.
"But a ten-year-old child shouldn't."
At the end of the interview, Campbell asked for
a subscription to The Ubyssey.
l___*,-T__-t\*. _*»
— kurt hilger photo
GERRY CANNON, arts 4,  didn't  share.  Swift  justice  was
meted out Monday noon by the World University Service
vigilante committee. They will be on the prowl again today
for overseas universities.
Bookstore's in the red,
shows $10,000 deficit
The UBC bookstore went into the red last year.
The bookstore's annual report, released Monday, revealed
"gross revenue during 1966-67 of $1,800,901.
Expansion expenses resulted in a $10,000 deficit.
The five per cent rebate on student books cost the bookstore $50,000. Labor and operation costs further reduced the
revenue by $18,000.
Expansion costs of $28,000 required borrowing $10,000
from 1965-66 profits.
THSU8,
Vol. XLIX, No. 21
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY]
48 224-3916
Council puts spurs
to housing program
By STEPHEN JACKSON
Ubyssey Housing Reporter
A housing action program with sting in it
whipped to student council approval in five
minutes Monday night.
The program was outlined in a extensive
brief presented to council by Don Munton, Alma
Mater Society first vice-president.
In the brief, Munton decried the lack of concrete information on the student housing shortage and urged initiation of a statistical survey
to determine the present problems and future
direction of student housing at UBC.
Munton also recommended council request a
temporary extension to the licences of housekeeping suites in single family dwelling areas
in Vancouver.
As well, he recommended the board of governors act immediately on their policy to provide campus housing for 25 per cent of the
number of single students by 1971. This would
provide housing for 4,690 residents out of an
expected total of 18,500.
Citing   the   1964   report   Guideposts   to   Innovation,  Munton suggested the  administration
"recognize the problems and dangers of a predominantly commuter campus and expand cam-
To Page 6
See: MORE
Smoke clears library
A piece of paper was all it took to disrupt
the peace at UBC's main library Monday.
It all began at 11:30 a.m. when Sylvia
Dodd, a Simon Fraser University librarian
who was gleaning material for SFU, tried to
use a Xerox machine in the library.
The paper she used overheated and
smouldered.
The smoke triggered a sensitive alarm
and set firebells ringing throughout the building as well as at the university firehall.
So 3,000 students and library staff members evacuated the building.
Meanwhile two fire trucks and five firemen converged on the building to douse the
paper.
Evacuation of the building was complete in
eight minutes, library safety supervisor Walter
Harrington said later.
"But even as they were going out, some
people tried to push their way in," Harrington
said.
"Most students tried to go out the main
doors, which they shouldn't have. Some people
still tried to squeeze in which was plain stupidity."
Start of the trouble was traced to a UBC
librarian, identified only as Washington Irving, who adjusted the machine to a higher
than normal operating temperature for special
copying work, then forgot to reset it.
"We've had fires like this before," said
a fire department spokesman. "But this is the
first time one set off the smoke alarm."
— kurt hilger photo
SMOKE TRIGGERS LIBRARY EVACUATION
~„, -, >.y&^<%g$ ■-. ¥c wrv
~\ •.*$>. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 7, 196.
— dermis gans photo
NERVOUS STUDENT edges into UBC's latest recreation centre, a brothel, revealed Monday for first time. Boasting eight
girls, it has been operating for a month, according to
owner.
House of ill-repute
discovered at UBC
A thriving brothel has been discovered at UBC.
Located in the southeast section of campus, it was revealed
to The Ubyssey by an anonymous phone call Monday.
Mrs. Margaret Maxwell, owner, agreed to an interview only
on the condition that its exact address not be published.
"At the moment only a select few know about us," she
said. "We've only been going for a month. As the pressure of
mid-term exams increases, we may spread the word around
more."
In an interview, one of Mrs. Maxwell's girls said she was
not a student at UBC, but three of the eight girls were.
"Some of them do it to get money for fees," she said.
. She added that many girls were coming in from downtown
Vancouver in search of work.
"Mrs. Maxwell pays us very well — about $150 a week.
It's better1 than working in the city."
The house was full at the time of a Ubyssey reporter's
visit, but Mrs. Maxwell refused to say anything about her
patrons.
Acting UBC president Walter Gage didn't comment on the
situation.
ENGINEERING   GRADS
Engineering graduates in civil, electrical, mechanical and
other engineering fields are invited to consider these employment opportunities with the Public Service of Canada:
National Development Systems Design
Programs
Water Resources Studies
Design and Construction
Laboratory Research
Maintenance and Operations
Instrument Development
Telecommunications
Patent Examination
Administration
Surveys
Trade Promotion
A career with the Federal Government, the major employer
of professional engineers in Canada, features broad scope
for professional development, competitive salaries, technically trained support staff, modern equipment, three
weeks' annual vacation and promotion based on merit.
INTERVIEWS: November 14, 15, 16 and 17
Mr. G. Laatunen will be on campus to discuss engineering
careers with you on the above dates. Arrange your appointment through the Placement Office today.
City schools get
student tutors
UBC education students may soon tutor in city schools at
night.
A project, announced Monday by the education undergraduate
society, calls for evening tutoring sessions in Vancouver junior
and senior high schools.
Gary Gumley, EdUS president, said the plan would have a
dual purpose.
"It would assist city students who are having difficulty with
their work and allow education students to conduct classes without the pressure of sponsored teaching," he said.
Student teachers would experiment with classes in an informal atmosphere, hold discussion groups, and concentrate on
helping individuals.
Seminar representatives have all reacted favorably to the
proposal. (All education students have a class seminar and elect
a representative.)
Gumley said he anticipates some difficulty in persuading the
Vancouver School Board to open schools at night.
The tutoring session would at first be held in three schools
' in lower income areas, he said. If the idea proves successful, the
project would be expanded.
No news fit to print
METROPOLIS (UNS) —
Newspapermen of this bustling
city completely blew then
minds today when no news
happened.
"Zip. Blammo. Nothing. No'
even a fatal from Spuzzum,'
said one editor.
Set your sight in College
with glasses
from...
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Includes any color, insurance for one year,
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Opp. THE BAY  |lllAllk||lllJk|    New  Westminster
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saIes
MANAqEMENT
That's one  of many
exciting and  rewarding
careers in the field of
Administration with
Great-West Life.
Great-West Life
Will Be
On Campus
November 15,16,17
Arrange now to get the
full story and appointment with your Placement
Officer — and be sure
to get a copy of the
Great-West Life Careers
Booklet.
Great-West Life
ANCE    CC
G-m
ASSURANCE    COMPANY
POSITIVELY
LAST 2 DAYS
FOR LARRY KENT'S
HIGH
TUESDAY,     _NOV. 7 - 12:30 & 8:00
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 8 - 12:30 & 8:00
Admission $1.00 - Auditorium
Restricted — AMS, Faculty or Staff Cards
MUST Be Shown Tuesday, November 7, 1967
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
— kurt hilger photo
LITTLE DO THEY KNOW that I've buried 187 bones in this lake, muses Dawg, a campus hound
who feels hounded by the pressures of university life. Even the faint sounds of singing wafting through the fall air doesn't phase the true bone-collector.
Parking complaints studied
The Alma Mater Society is collecting complaints about traffic and parking on campus.
African revolutionary
discusses apartheid
A revolutionary will speak on the struggle
>f the African people against the apartheid
egime in South Africa in Brock Thursday noon.
Tsepso Tsediso Letlaka, a national executive
..ember of the Pan Africianist Congress of
\zania, is on a cross-country tour of Canada
following his recent deportation from Lesotho.
They are being accepted by the AMS traffic
and parking committee through Jim Lightfoot,
AMS co-ordinator.
"The committee is already dealing with
several problems," committee member Ralph
Stanton said Monday.
One of its aims is to end the present rising
scale of campus parking fines. Each time a
student receives a ticket, his fine is increased
by $5 up to a ceiling of $25.
Tickets should be handed out with more
discretion, Stanton said.
The first general meeting of the committee
will be held Nov. 16. UBC traffic czar Sir Ouvry
Roberts will attend.
LIKE IT OR NOT
SUB gets lanes
Whether the students like it or not, the student union
building will have bowling lanes.
Student council voted Monday night to retain the original
proposal that eight bowling lanes be built in the new student
center.
AMS president Shaun Sullivan said there was little response
to a Ubyssey suggestion that the space in the building be used
for something other than bowling lanes.
An editorial claimed public interest in bowling appears to
be decreasing, and asked students for alternate suggestions on
how to use the space.
"A swimming pool got the most votes, and this idea is
already being considered by the winter sports center," said AMS
president Shaun Sullivan.
"The other ideas were not practical for this type of building."
Sullivan said the student union building in Edmonton installed bowling lanes which have proved very successful.
A management committee administered by the Alma Mater
Society will operate the lanes from 9 a.m. to midnight seven
days a week.
In other council business, a proposal to expand the graduate
student center was criticized by council.
"The expansion of the center would be in contrast to the
community idea behind the student union building," said
Sullivto.
"We want grads and undergrads to mix as much as possible."
No action was taken on the proposal.
Also at the meeting, engineering president Lynn Spraggs
made a motion to fire Ubyssey editor Danny Stoffman.
He charged the paper with slanted news reporting. Stoffman
denied the charges.
Spraggs was supported only by agriculture president Gene
Zabawa, and the motion was defeated.
Night-owl camp dwellers
forced   to   walk   home
By MIKE FINLAY
The only way to do it is on foot.
Or, if you are lucky,  you   can hitch-hike.
These are the alternatives open to a person trying
to get on campus after midnight without a car.
Buses stop running onto campus shortly after midnight
Monday to Saturday, and 11:30 p.m. on Sunday.
This creates problems for the 2,200 students in residence, of whom only one in four has a car.
"I have received many" complaints about this," said
Fort Camp president Gordon Schneff Monday.
"If a guy goes out to a show on a Friday or Saturday
night, he has to be back by midnight or walk in from the
gates."   -
Opportunities for rides at this time are very poor, he
added.
Girls living in residence have also lodged complaints.
"It is especially hard for girls, who are more wary
of hitch-hiking late at night," said Sue Mitchell, women's
president at Fort Camp.
Housing administrator Les Rohringer said that no
complaints have been received by his department.
He suggested that students tend to stay in the camps
for recreational activities sponored there.
"However, I will ask the camp presidents to put the
question to the resident students," he said.
Rohringer said questionnaires might be circulated to
determine how many students are affected by the poor bus
service.
A spokesman for B.C. Hydro said he could not comment at this time on the feasibility of extending service
to the university.
.HAVE MOD EVER 6EEN ARRESTED) }
TO ANY REASONS/NOT T    ^
"~^ ^FI_SURE
THE QUESTIONS CONTINUES; | w&8mss^^4£#m@ii
THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services
of Pacific Student Press, of which it is founding member, and Underground
Press Syndicate. Authorized second class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 224-3916. Other
calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo. Page Friday, loc. 24; sports, loc.
23; advertising, loc. 26. Telex 04-5224.
NOVEMBER 7, 1967
Mild concern
The present student council is the worst in the
recent memory of the Alma. Mater Society.
This should be a matter of mild concern to UBC
students. But it should not be a matter of overwhelming
concern. It particularly should not be a matter of over-,
whelming concern to those interested in the need for
change in university education  and structure.
Effective student action aimed at change rarely
comes, in North American universities, from student
governments.
The examples of the Berkeley Free Speech Movement, Students for a Democratic Society throughout
the U.S., and even UBC's own ad hoc education action
committee of two years ago are clear: Action comes
from organizations built for action. Student councils,
their record proves, are built for inaction.
Nevertheless, there is still room for mild concern
about the state of student council. For students have a
right to expect at least a modicum of awareness of educational problems on the part of council.
They should expect, in 1967, a commitment by
council to the principle of student-faculty control of
universities.
They should expect, out of this awareness and com
mitment, some intelligent discussion and debate during
council meetings.
If it is not to be a motive force for action, council
should at least attempt to stimulate an awareness of
issues facing students. But such awareness has not been
created this year. Discussion in council has been superficial and based primarily on ignorance.
Clearly, something is wrong. It is evident that most
of the fault lies with the undergraduate society representatives — perhaps two or three of them excluded.
The narrowness of their interest and knowledge is
amazing. The undergrad reps on council make
the elected-at-large excutive look positively brilliant
by comparison —  a rare feat indeed.
Undergraduate societies this year have proven
themselves incapable of supplying adequate student
councillors. These societies should be removed from
council and replaced with members elected from the
campus at large.
The responsibility of the present Alma Mater Society
executive is clear — they must make council reform a
top priority. In this way the- executive can look to
their organization's future and try to salvage something
out of the disaster that is the present student council.
The uncensor
The Ubyssey would prefer not to waste precious
column inches with stag movie pictures of a middle-
aged couple having a roll in the hay.
But Friday's page five show was necessary, we felt,
as a small protest against arbitrary censorship.
We deny the legitimacy of any form of censorship.
We especially deny the legitimacy of censorship by
pressure from the office of a semi-literate mayor.
And we are pleased to announce a new Ubyssey
policy: whenever the censorious hand of Vancouver's
mayor strikes printed matter from the newstands, we will
publish the gist of what has been banned.
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Editor, The Ubyssey:
I wish to clear up a matter
of mistaken identity. In a
letter dated Nov. 2, one Marcia
Macaulay, arts 2, took it upon
herself to criticize personal
condemnation. Her ire was
roused by a letter of Oct. 26
by a Roger Shaw, arts 2. I
hardly consider myself -Victorian, so Miss Macaulay,
s-h-o-e you and your careless
condemnation.
ROBERT G. SHAW
arts 2
Likes  Laurier
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I was extremely pleased
with Mr. LaPierre's speech
Friday. The reason for this is
that he forcefully expressed
the ideas which, in an incoherent way, I have been trying
to get across and urged what,
in my own bungling way, I
have been trying to do. More
important, he made quite clear
the choice which English
speaking Canadians have vis-a
vis Quebec. They must either
put up—by working for a New
Canada that would enable the
Quebecois to participate on a
basis of mutual respect — or
shut up — and let the Quebecois go his own way.
F. J. FRIGON
Club Canadien
Seven Norwegians
Editor, The Ubyssey:
It is a pleasure for us Norwegians to see that The Ubyssey finally is trying to please
its foreign readers.
But since we are seven Norwegians among 18,000 students here at UBC, we think
it is rather cheap of you just
to offer Andy Capp in our
language. We have discussed
this and it is our opinion that
we should get at least one Norwegian page in Ubyssey weekly. As discoverer of this country and with a crowd of seven
Norwegian students we would
think of this as a reasonable
proposition.
SEVEN NORWEGIANS
Be human:
pick me up
By WARREN BELL
It's time for the annual ode
to hitch-hiking.
I have had the misfortune
this year to be forced to rely
on hitch-hiking for most
of my on and off campus transportation. Various thoughts
have sprung to my mind as I
stood soggily by the side of
the road, awaiting the charity
of one of the enlightened student body.
Thought 1: Why do people
with long hair or beards, army
surplus jackets and the rest,
who profess a belief in such
ideals as "make love not war",
drive by more often than not?
Thought 2: Why do girls,
almost without exception,
drive by with either a baleful,
surreptitious glance in my
direction, or with their eyes
directed with harsh determination on the road ahead?
Thought   3:   (the   most   frequent) !£@(£11_&i/_?!!
REAL BOND
Thought 4: Why do people,
and students in particular,
complain about the impersonality of the world and of their
own local environment, of the
difficulty of human contact, of
real communication, and then
whisk themselves off to their
roost off-campus after their
last class, ignoring great masses of people with whom they
could establish a real bond
simply by stopping and picking them up? They don't even
have to speak to them.
Thought 5: Why do people
•with empty six-passenger Par-
isiennes never stop, and drivers with Volkswagens containing two people in the front,
only two doors, and a baby
carrier, an old umbrella, a
brief-case, and 14 textbooks in
the back seat always stop?
GENEROSITY
Thought 6: Why does a girl
in a beat-up old Peugeot with
her boyfriend beside her in
the front seat at 8 p.m., drive
around the block to pick me
up, and ruin all grounds I
have for complaint by her act
of generosity?
Please, drivers, we're human
beings, too, and don't like
getting wet any more than
you do.
P.S.: Gabor Mate, regardless of what he believes in
print, has always picked up a
carload when I have seen his
well-publicized mug drive by.
PPS.: To all those who don't
stop on University Boulevard
going home because of the fear
of being rear-ended, my
humble apologies.
EDITOR: Danny Stoffman
City   Stuart Cray
News   Susan Gransby
Managing   Murray McMillan
Photo   Kurt Hilger
Associate .... Al Birnie, Kirsten Emmott
Senior  Pat Hrushowy
Sports   Mike Jessen
Wire   Charlotte Hair*
Pag* Friday  Judy Bing
Ass't. City   Boni Lee
A huge flood of Worchestershire
sauce crashed down the stairs and
into the editorial room. Steve Jackson, Hew Gwynne, Jade Eden, and
Irene Wjasilewski succeded In subduing thirty-three crocodiles who
attacked after a snap decision, as
Judy Young, Richard Baer and Mark
DeCoursey   made  yogurt.
Paul Knox, Mike Finlay, Luanne
Armstrong, Jane Kennon, Laurie
Dunbar and Judy Young polished
guillotines. Rusting in the jock shop
were Bob Banno, Mike Fitzgerald,
John Twigg, and Pio "Harrumph"
Uran.
In the darkroom were Lawrence
Woodd, Chris Blake, George Brown
and  Bob  Brown.
An emergency editorial blorg meeting at noon today has been called
to  discuss  shoelaces. uesday, November 7,  1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
LETTERS  TO  THE EDITOR
Dow
.ditor. The Ubyssey:
An open letter to the UBC
idministration:
Beginning Nov. 14 and con-
inuing through Nov. 16, Dow
Chemical Canada, Ltd., is
cheduled to interview pros-
>ective employees at the stu-
lent employment centre on this
:ampus.
Dow Chemical is the first in
i series of companies to come
o UBC this year (for recruit-
nent purposes) which are
mown to manufacture for and
;upply to the U.S. war machine
rital materials enabling it to
>erpetuate violence and death
ipon the people of Vietnam.
Dow Chemical Canada, Ltd.,
s a subsidiary company owned
iotally by its American parent.
Dow Chemical Canada, in a
arge, efficient plant in Sarnia,
_>nt., contributes to Canadian
iffluence by producing polystyrene, a sticky, jelly-like sub-
itance used in the napalm
Domt>s which U.S. planes drop
nercilessly upon Vietnamese
/illages and cities. Perhaps you
ire unaware of the amazing
;hings napalm does to the
luman body. It fries human
_lesh as you fry chicken. Its
lire is so hot it liquifies flesh,
.ausing one part of the body
literally to flow into another—
a face may become fused with
_ neck, a neck with a chest.
Its sticky jelly enfolds and
.lings to the body as molten
ava engulfs a mountainside.
The victim of this instrument of
freedom and democracy is indeed fortunate if he is killed,
for the indescribable mutilations and maimings, and sheer
physical agony suffered by the
survivor will in all probablity
render him virtually unrogniz-
able as a member of the human
species. Dow Chemical and
other Canadian industries profit from this situation, gentlemen, to the tune of $300,000-
000 per year. No money in the
history of mankind has been
so saturated with innocent
blood.
In the special referendum of
the spring of 1966, students on
this campus categorically condemned the U.S. presence in
Vietnam. We, as students, are
dismayed and angered that the
American war machine, which
depends upon companies such
as Dow to continue its indiscriminate slaughter in Vietnam,
should be given an apparent
carte blanche by this university
as it allows these companies to
recruit students on campus. We
ask you, as administrators, to
clarify your position on this important issue. What, we ask,
is administration policy regarding recruitment on campus by
companies and organizations
which are in flagrant violation
of the official Canadian government position of "neutrality"?
Repeatedly the administration has urged students to act
in a "responsible" manner on
issues involving the university
and the community at large. We
suggest, gentlemen, that the
proverlbial tables now are turned. Today students are requesting you, as administrators, to
act "responsibly", because you
are responsible and indeed will
be held responsible -by the people of Vietnam and by people
everywhere who oppose this
bloody slaughter if you fail to
actively support the struggle
against American (and by ex-
WE DON'T TRY VERY HARD!
BUT WE WILL VENTURE OUT
ON COLD RAINY NIGHTS
(Or   almost   anytime   for  that   matter)
TO DELIVER YOUR SCHOOL SUPPLIES,  SHAMPOO,  FILMS,
FLASHBULBS, SOME MORE MIXER OR EVEN PRESCRIPTIONS
• ANYWHERE  ON   CAMPUS • AT  NO  CHARGE  TO  YOU
UNIVERSITY PHARMACY
IN THE VILLAGE PHONE 224-3202
MAX DEXALL
OFFERS
10% Discount
to UBC Students
2609 Granville at 10th
A complete stock of all the popular makes
of shoes for the college student, as well as
hosiery, handbags, slippers,  rubbers  and
umbrellas.
Whatever your need in footwear you'll find it at
Dexall's. Pay them a visit — see the exciting new
styles — and ask for the 10%  discount.
Better Shoes for less
DEXALL'S - GRANVILLE AT 10TH - 738-9833
tension, Canadian) aggression in
Vietnam .
We anxiously await your
clarification of administration
policy on this issue and cordially invite you to join us in
demonstrations, either on or off
campus against Dow Chemical
Canada and its fellow profiteers.
UBC VIETNAM
COMMITTEE
Non-violent Direct Action
Vanguard
'May  I  correct?'
Editor, The Ubyssey:
References in last Friday's
paper (p. 3) to my discussion
of a proposed French-language
college at UBC contain a serious error.
Statements about the relationship of such a college to
the existing French department, and the reaction of the
French department to the idea,
were both taken out of context. In fact, the French department has never been presented with this plan.
When a more detailed plan
is developed, I am sure that
the French department will
play an active and interested
part in its consideration. In
the meantime, that department
has taken no action, and certainly has not indicated any
opposition.
Furthermore, the statement
that a French-speaking cluster
college "would give UBC a
nation-wide name for excellence   in   French   instruction"
should in no way imply that
our present French department may not have such a
well-earned reputation.
The Ubyssey's concern about
the proposed French college
has been most gratifying.
However, it can do academic
innovation at UBC no good if
your newspaper searches for
controversy where none in
fact exists.
CARL BAAR
assistant professor
dept. of political science
'May I  assure
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Please allow me to assure
your readers that when they
return in January they will
still find Tom Sawyer under
Clemens in the public catalogue of the library. (See your
article p. 3, Nov. 2.) If Mr.
Clemens were beginning his
career today and used the
name Twain on his title pages,
he would under the new rules
be entered as Twain. The new
Anglo-American rules will not
change established entries in
the catalogue, but will govern
the form of new ones.
While old cards will not be
changed, their arrangement
will be, beginning in December and culminating during
spring intersession. Students
will help determine this arrangement through the sampling of opinion now being
taken.
The purpose of the new
rules and of the new filing is
to lessen rather than increase
confusion.
J. McREE ELROD
head of catalogue division
Trend  eyed
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I wish to bring to your attention the fact that the globules which formerly occupied
spaces intrinsic to the pattern
of terminal repartee have been
allowed by certain members of
this trend towards such tendencies. Can this be so in actual fact?
SALLY COLEMAN
arts 2
COLLEGE
SHOP
BROCK EXTENSION
Representatives of
THE
International Nickel Company
OF CANADA LIMITED
Will visit the University to discuss Summer Employment
at Thompson, Manitoba with 1st, 2nd and 3rd year
students in
ENGINEERING
• MINING
• METALLURGICAL
• CHEMICAL
• ELECTRICAL
• MECHANICAL
• CIVIL
CHEMISTRY
GEOLOGY and GEOPHYSICS
COMMERCE
On November 22, 23 and 24
We invite you to arrange an interview through
The Office of Student Personnel Services
THE
International Nickel Company
OF CANADA LIMITED
THOMPSON, MANITOBA
THE VILLAGE CAFE |
Where Friends Meet & Dine
DISCOUNT ON
PIZZA TO GO
Vi Block East
of Memorial Gym
at 5778 University Blvd.
Phone 224-0640
I
I
I
I
iNVESTMENT
MANAqEMEINT
?
That's one  of many
exciting and  rewarding
careers in the field of
Administration with
Great-West Life.
Great-West Life
Will Be
On Campus
November 15, 16, 17
Arrange now to get the
full story and appointment with your Placement
Officer — and be sure
to get a copy of the
Great-West Life Careers
Booklet.
Great-West Life
ASSURANCe   COMPANY
G-m Page 6
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 7, 196!
MORE   ON   HOUSING
From Page 1
pus housing beyond the presently projected figure of 25
per cent."
These new residences, he
said, should incorporate housekeeping suites or apartments,
which would follow the trend
in student tastes and provide
flexible housing arrangements.
Suite accommodation could
be used for either single or
married, graduate or undergraduate students, as well as
young faculty members.
The amount of married student housing should also be
increased, he said. Over 3,000
married students are already
at UBC, yet only 272 new family dwelling units are being
completed in Acadia Park.
Many old huts now rented
by families will be demolished
by 1968. New construction,
Munton recommended, should
be for low rental costs.
He criticized the provincial
department of lands and resources which owns the university endowment lands, for
not planning the land's use.
Recent discussions with
housing development firms
have revealed considerable
interest in their designing and
constructing low-rental student housing, said Munton. He
recommended drawing up a
detailed plan for such development to present to Victoria.
cJata
pROCESSilNq
?
That's one  of many
exciting and rewarding
careers in the field of
Administration with
Great-West Life.
Great-West Life
Will Be
On Campus
November 15, 16, 17
Arrange now to get the
full story and appointment with your Placement
Officer — and be sure
to get a copy of the
Great-West Life Careers
Booklet.
Great-West Life
ASSURANCE    COMPANY
G-m
Finally, he recommended
the establishment of co-op
housing at UBC. The administration accepts the principle
of student-owned and operated
housing, but does not condone
having such housing on uni-
university land.
In this way, said Munton,
the board of governors retains
ultimate authority in the administration of all campus
residences. Thus, co-ops must
be built outside the university.
Munton closed his brief with
the recommendation that council approve in principle the
establishment of a co-op and
allot up to $500 to hire a residential consultant to locate
and handle the purchase of a
suitable building.
A proposal that a committee
of three faculty members and
three students be established
to examine the rules and structures of present residences was
tabled.
A FAMILIAR
SIGHT!
SKIERS . . . WHISTLER
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We talk skiing too!
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DINING ROOM
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BUY 3 PIZZAS
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7
High school dropout
dispenses information
UBC's director of information is, among
other things, a high-school dropout from Swift
Current, Sask.
He is also a 1966 MacMillan Bloedel journalism award winner and winner of several
national newspaper awards.
Arnie Myers, who says he left school at
17 because he was bored stiff, arrived at UBC
last May.
He replaces Ralph Daly, currently working for the Bank of B.C.
In an interview, Myers
said he does not consider
himself to be a public re-
lations man tout a director
of information.
His job is to make it
easy for the public to get
factual information about the
university, he said.
Also, to convey to the administration i nf o r m a t ion
about public attitude towards UBC and what
students are doing.
"So far I have encountered little difficulty
at my job."
MYERS
Myers who last worked with the Vancouver Sun as a medical reporter, has worked
for five newspapers during his career.
He believes no one can avoid becoming involved with youth and science today.
"The involvement will become increasingly
so in the future. Students are the most important part of a university and it certainly
wouldn't be a  university without them."
Before coming to UBC, Myers said he had
a Ubyssey-formed impression of the board
of governors.
"This impression has not been confirmed,"
he said. "The board is genuinely concerned
with the welfare of students.
"It is not the unfeeling monster it is made
out to toe."
Myers, who has done work in sociology,
politics and science, plans to change the format of UBC Reports.
"UBC Reports has become a mouthpiece
of the administration," Myers said. "Its focus
now is too narrow.''
Myers said the report should carry news
of student, faculty and alumni activities.
"I want it to be an accurate reflection of
campus life," Myers said.
EFFECTIVE
RAPID
READING
can help YOU
There's a long year ahead—a lot of reading must be accomplished, understood
and remembered. The Reading Dynamics method GUARANTEES to at least
triple your reading speed while retaining or increasing your present comprehension.
ENROLLMENT IN READING
DYNAMICS Will ENSURE
THE FOLLOWING
You are guaranteed a three fold increase in reading
speed
You will also acquire greater comprehension
You will enjoy our modern up-to-date class rooms
You will meet our top rated teaching staff
You will be impressed by our detail and personal
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No classes have more than 26 people
During your classes you will meet and get to know
some interesting people
Your fee is tax deductible
On graduation you receive life time membership and
without cost receive additional tuition at any
Reading Dynamics office throughout the world.
LEARN THE MOST RECENT STUDY PROCEDURES
AND RECALL SKILLS
Contact one off our
U.B.C. Campus
Representatives
PERRY SEIDELMAN
Phone 261-1809 or leave a
message in student mailbox in law building.
MIKE MENARD
Phone 266-5574
•
JIM RUST
Phone 266-0403
$wL?i  mod READING DYNAMICS DF B.C. LTD.
S02-IO7fc MELVILLE STREET. VANCOUVER 5. B.B.       PHONE 6BS-2374
ubcr. Tuesday, November 7, 1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
— lawrence woodd photo
THE KEY to the campus minibus express problem can be seen on the left. It is a Pacific National
Exhibition  tractor, which will  be gone in two days. Student officials are seeking another one.
All minibus needs is one tractor
The new student minibus express will stop
Thursday if a new tractor isn't found, Alma
Mater first vice-president Don Munton said Monday.
Munton said the administration has not
located a substitute for the Pacific National Exhibition tractor, which must be returned by
Thursday.
Original plans called for the two PNE tractors
to pull two passenger sections each during peak
UBC rush hour periods.
"If a full-time tractor is made available by
Thursday, the service could continue," Munton
said.
Regular express service will continue today
and  Wednesday   along  the  main  mall to  and
from parking lots B and C, Munton said.
Hours are from 7:30 a.m. to 9:30 a.m. and
from 3:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Munton praised engineering students who
give up classes to operate the service.
UBC remembers
Special Remembrance Day services will be
held at 10:45 a.m. Saturday in War Memorial
Gym.
Major the Very Reverend Larry Lennox,
honorary chaplain of the Duke of Connaught's
Own Regiment, will preside.
ANDY WARHOL'S
THE CHELSEA GIRLS
TOUR DE FORCE
OF TECHNICAL
AND SEXUAL
INGENUITY'
-NATIONAL OBSERVER
"ONE OF THE MOST
POWERFUL, OUTRAGEOUS,
( RELEVANT AND
NOTICEABLE MOVIES
ANYONE ANYWHERE
HAS MADE!'
'i - NEWSWEEK
SPECIAL EVENTS  PRESENTATION
Nov. 10 — 1:30 & 7:30 — UBC AUDITORIUM
NOV. 14 — 7:30
Students $1.50 — Adults $2.00
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION ON ALL SPECIAL EVENTS
LISTEN TO TERRY DAVID MULLIGAN ON CKLG—RADIO 73
SUNDAY 12-4 MONDAY-FRIDAY 9 - 12
Commerce keeps
president Peter
Commerce undergraduate society president Peter Uitdenbosch received a vote of confidence Friday after two council
members asked him to resign.
Bob Smith, first vice-president of the society, said Monday
the conflict arose from a personality clash between Uitdenbosch,
second vice-president Jack Khoury, and treasurer John Cameron.
Khoury and Cameron censured Uitdenbosch for some uncompleted business that hadn't been followed up, Smith said.
"The whole thing just got out of hand. I'm sure they didn't
mean for it to go that far."
UBC receives $3,000
for literary research
UBC has received two grants totalling $3,000 from the Leon
and Thea Koerner Foundation.
The English department received $1,500 to assist a literary
history of Canadian poetry.
The publications management committee was awarded
$1,500 to assist the publication of Canadian Literature and
Pacific Affairs journals.
FILM SOCIETY PRESENTS
TOM JONES
Thursday, Nov. 9 — Aud. — 50c
12:30, 3:30, 6:00, 8:30
ACADEMY AWARD WINNER
'BEST PICTURE'
BUY YOUR COPY TODAY
BIRD CALLS
1967-196t
uiijiiwwt* of mm mmm mm mmm tmmi
Mm
Sfc^^&QS
Publications Office, Brock Hall
or UBC Bookstore
Pre-Sale Ticket Holders Must Claim Their Books
at Publications Office. Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 7, 1967
cup...cfi^s^owi^mMBWs.. Roumw
Officialdom raps the Daily
MONTEEAL (CUP) — The principal of McGill University has charged three editors of the
McGill Daily newspaper with obscenity and
libel.
The charge came when the Friday supplement of the Daily, Flux, reprinted an article
from the May issue of the Realist.
Realist editor Paul Krassner claimed the
article contained sections from the original
manuscript of William Manchester's Death of a
President.
The article in part purports to quote Mrs.
Jacqueline Kennedy describing seeing Lyndon
Johnson sexually assault the corpse of President
Kennedy.
The assault supposedly occurred in the presidential jet in Dallas, Texas, just minutes before
Johnson was sworn in as president.
In a later issue of the Realist Krassner said
the article was a hoax.
Daily editor-in-chief Peter Allnutt, editor of
Flux, Pierre Fournier, and Flux columnist John
Fekete were called to a meeting with McGill
principal H. Rocke Robertson Saturday and
ordered to appear before a student discipline
committee today.
Robertson claimed the article contrary to
good order and imcompatible with being a student at McGill University.
Robertson has asked the students' council
to convene a special meeting so that he can
address them on the move.
Allnutt issued a statement Friday night ex
plaining the story was political, social and
literary satire and was not intended to be
believed.
He said the story should never have appeared.
"An error in judgment was made," Allnutt
said.
"The article was considered in the context
of the Realist and when it came out in the newspaper we realized that it had no place therein."
At a regular open meeting of the McGill
student society Friday a motion censuring the
Daily for reprinting the Realist article was defeated after some debate.
Laval referendum
may undo union
QUEBEC — (UNS) — Laval University student council has called a referendum asking students if they want to disband the student union.
The referendum ballot offers three choices:
• a syndicalist student union working for
its members and for a society with compulsory
fees,
• a social club or association concerned only
with the material welfare of its members,
• pure and simple abolition of the student
association.
The referendum is scheduled for early December.
Foundation aids
relationship study
MONTREAL (CUP) — The Ford Foundation Thursday
announced they will finance a $150,000 study of relations
between universities and provincial governments in Canada.
The study, to be undertaken by a three-man commission, is expected to report in a year's time.
One representative from each of the Canadian Association of University Teachers (CAUT), the Association
of Universities and Colleges of Canada (AUCC), the Canadian Union of Students (CUS), and l'Union Generale des
Etudiants du Quebec (UGEQ) will form a steering committee and will appoint the commissioners.
The commission will be mandated to:
• consider the role of universities in Canadian society,
• determine the need, nature and the extent of both
university autonomy and public control of universities, and
• recommend appropriate instruments for establishing
relations between universities and governments which do
justice to their responsibilities.
"The question is," commented Jacques St.-Pierre of
CAUT, "how much control should be exerted by government, which as the representative of society provides a
major, part of university financing, and how much autonomy
the universities must retain."
Robert Tessier, past vice-president of UGEQ and
UGEQ rep on the steering committee said the terms of
reference of the commission permitted an analytical study
of basic principles.
^
UofS finance
will undergo
revision study
SASKATOON (CUP) — Fi-
nacial control should remain
with the board of governors,
according to the student council of the Saskatoon campus
of the University of Saskatchewan.
In a united stand against
premier Ross Thatcher's recent proposal of direct government control of the university's spending, the council
said Friday financial reforms
should take place within the
present structure of the university.
"The board of governors is
an eminent body which is in
the best position to exercise
financial supervision of the
university budget and discharge responsibilities to the
legislature through the cabinet," they said.
They said the present structure was "a sufficient mechanism" to guarantee the correct use of the taxpayers'
money, while allowing the university the autonomy it needs.
The same day university and
government officials agreed
an improved system of fiscal
consultation has to be worked
out.
In a joint release, education
minister J. C. Mclsaac and
Allan Tubby, chairman of the
board of governors said: "We
are confident a completely
satisfactory solution will be
found without major legislative changes."
RESEARCH &
dEVElopMENT
?
That's one  of many
exciting and rewarding
careers in the field of
Administration with
Great-West Life.
Great-West Life
Will Be
On Campus
November 15, 16, 17
Arrange now to get the
full story and appointment with your Placement
Officer — and be sure
to get a copy of the
Great-West Life Careers
Booklet.
Great-West Life
ASSURANCE   COMPANY
Graduating students are
INVITED
to discuss new opportunities
in banking with
Bank of Montreal
on
TUES.,N0V.7
WED., NOV. 8
THURS., NOV. 9
Consult your placement
office for complete details Tuesday, November 7, 1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9
— CUP photo
SIR GEORGE WILLIAMS SIT-IN . . . furthers social change
Strike sets  climate  for changes
MONTREAL (CUP) — As a result of the Oct.
26 strike at Sir George Williams University, the
student council here took action Oct. 30 to further
the climate of social change at that school.
President Jeff Chipman announced plans to
establish a Laurentian retreat house to provide
facilities for social and intellectual interchange
between students and faculty on an informal
basis.
Explaining the move, Chipman said: "We have
accepted the philosophy of the student as an
instrument of social change."
He said the recent general strike against the
bookstore at Sir George and the administration's
acceptance of student representatives on the university senate have provided the prerequisites
for the student association's acceptance of this
concept.
"The overwhelming support given us by the
students last week indicates even more that we
are expected to continue this progressive thinking
and   subsequent  action   toward   change,"   said
Chipman.
"We have now established ourselves as leaders in the area of educational progress."
LAST 2 DAYS FOR
HIGH
Today — 12:30 & 8:00
Tomorrow Wednesday, November 8—12:30 & 8:00
ADMISSION: $1.00 AUDITORIUM
RESTRICTED: STUDENT, FACULTY OR
STAFF CARDS MUST BE SHOWN
Government cuts
hit CYC budget
OTTAWA (CUP) — Cut-backs in federal
spending will mean a reduction of Company of
Young Canadians budget from a requested $3
million to $2,400,000 for the coming fiscal year,
a company spokesman said Wednesday.
This will mean a curtailment in the company's
plan to expand field workers to between 750 and
1,000. The company now plans to aim at 400
field workers for the coming year. There are
currently 180.
Les  Chansonniers
LES CHANSONNIERS
—Claude Gauthier — Composer, Lyricist &
Performer
—Louise Forestier — Recording Artist
—Les Alexandrins — Luc & Lise Cousineau
—A French Variety Package of Outstanding
Singers
SPECIAL EVENTS - TUES., NOV. 14
BROCK LOUNGE - NOON
Thursday, Nov. 9 Brock Lounge
"APARTHEID & REVOLUTION"
TSEPO  TSEDISO  LETLAKA
PAN AFRICANIST CONGRESS
OF AZANIA (SOUTH AFRICA)
AAC 25c 12:30
Soprano
LEE LYNN
sings
Chinese & Malaysian Folk Songs
Recital Hall, Music Building
TUESDAY, 7th NOV., 12:30 P.M. - 1:30 P.M.
Admission: 50c
CO-SPONSORS: Chinese Overseas Students Association.
Malaysian  Singapore Students Association.
Twiggy s
TRUE    DISCOTHEQUE
WILL BE OPENING SOON
A PRIVATE CLUB FOR YOUNG SWINGERS
AGE LIMITS 18-35. MEMBERSHIPS $2.50 A YEAR -
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For information call 683-9076
or call in and see—795 Seymour
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Stores  in Victoria, Vancouver,  Edmonton, Calgary, Toronto,
Winnipeg, Montreal Page 10
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 7, 1967
SING FIRST PLACE.
.SOCCER BIRDS
California, here we come
How do you convince a coach that you want
to leave the moist climate of Vancouver and go
to California?
The UBC soccer Thunderbirds knew the way
as they won 5-1 over Westminster Laibs on Saturday in Thunderbird Stadium.
The win moved the Birds into sole possession
of first place in the Pacific Coast Soccer League,
a spot they had been trying to reach for three
weeks.
The all out effort by the team in beating the
Labs, with whom they shared first place until
Saturday's game, was probably influenced by the
Birds' departure for California today.
No one wanted to be left behind, so the UBC
squad came up with their best match of the
season.
Dave Kotula played a standout game for the
Birds, scoring three goals to lead his team to
victory.
UBC took control of the ball from the opening whistle and at the seven minute mark, Kotula
scored his first goal.
The Labs, taking advantage of a lapse by
the Birds, began pressing and at the 41 minute
mark Don Wilson tied the score at 1-1.
The second half began with the Birds again
not playing up to par and UBC goalie Bruce Ballam made a number of spectacular saves to keep
Westminster off the scoreboard.
Gary Thompson put the Birds ahead to stay
at the 23 minute mark and started a scoring
spree of three goals in four minutes.
Ash Valdai was in the right place to receive
a pass from the corner and deftly kick it into
the Westminster net with 26 minutes gone in
the second half to give the Birds a 3-1 lead.
One minute later Kotula scored on a penalty
kick and at the 38 minute mark he scored again
to get his hat trick.
The Birds leave tonight for San Francisco on
a one week trip during which they will play four
games.
They play San Jose on Wednesday, Hayward
State on Thursday, St. Mary's College on Saturday, and Berkeley on Monday.
Gene Ross, who has an injured thigh, will be
the only regular not making the trip.
Ian Daniels, up from the Tomahawks, played
centre half on Saturday and will replace Ross
on the California trip.
On Sunday the soccer Tomahawks bowed
4-1 to Burnaby Villa Juniors.
Grid men fly to first win
By MIKE FITZGERALD
Saturday afternoon was chilly in Calgary but the UBC
Thunderbirds looked like a hot football team.
The Birds defeated the University of Calgary Dinosaurs
16-11 and how they did it is something that assistant coach
Bill Reeske put quite well.
"We just beat them up physically," he
said. "For the first time we showed someone
we were boss."
"Everybody worked together; Tom Ellison
punted for long yardage, Kent Yaniw was
absolutely great at quarterback, Bob Main and
Fred Mjaier opened up holes big enough for a
, | truck and our entire defensive line gave hell
to their quarterback."
Calgary led 8-0 at the half on a touchdown
and a single. But UBC steadied themselves in
YANIW        the second half and marched downfield for a
major, Dave Corcoran bulling over.
Dick Stein later added  a field goal from 34 yards out.
Calgary picked up four more points before the Birds picked
themselves up, dusted themselves off, and promptly scored on
another march,  Corcoran again weaseling over.
The march was highlighted by a brilliant 46-yard run by
halfback Bemie Fandrick.
FILM SOCIETY PRESENTS
ALBERT FINNEY - SUSANNAH YORK
TOM  JONES
ACADEMY AWARD WINNER
Thursday, Nov. 9 — Aud. — 50c
12:30, 3:30, 6:00, 8:30
COLLEGE
SHOP
BROCK EXTENSION
-L-IW4.M
RENTAL & SALES
* 2,500   GARMENTS   TO
CHOOSE FROM
* Full  Dress  (Tails)
* Morning Coats
* Directors' Coats
* White and Coloured Coats
* Shirts and  Accessories
E. A. Lee Formal Wear
(Downstairs)
623 Howe 688-2481
fashion at
your door!
Leather   and   wool   jackets,
coats,   vests,    shirts,   slacks.
Suede   suit.,   ties,  purses.
Cow,   sheep,  wolf   skin  vasts.
Wedding    dresses,   dresses.
Blouses,   bathing    suits   and
jumping   suits,
All  garments  tailored for
self  measurements.
MEHMET'S TAILORS
540 Granville St. • 684-0811
In Arnold & Quigley's Shop
ON   CT
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TO  ACTO  A
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Try our delicious T-bone
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Student Meal Tickets
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CTON
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If you owned a National Equity Life Insurance Policy you would share in the action
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the basic security demanded of a Canadian life insurance policy. This new
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first of its kind in Canada.
The Equity Plan is a basic ordinary life
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dividends, but with this difference—assets
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and half the policy reserves are invested
in common stocks.
Where stock dividends and increase in
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earnings, the extra is credited to the
policyholder. It is used to buy additional
paid-up insurance and has a related benefit in increasing cash worth.
If the economy experiences a slow-down,
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The Equity Plan is an answer, over the
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Life insurance often seems like a complicated subject. It is worth a little study
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□ Tuesday, November 7, 1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 11
Spo/dA ShohlA
"I GET A KICK out of you," says Alan Todd, applied science 4, as he puts his foot into the ball
and kicks it a mighty five yards. But it was all in the name of fun during this intramural game
Monday between  two engineering  teams whi.h ended in a 6-6 tie.
UBC lawyers
for squashing
need courts
racquets
By PIO URAN
If squash is the rich man's
game then there must be few
rich men in Vancouver.
According to Bill Hamilton,
UBC squash club president, in
all of Vancouver there are
only 10 squash courts, as compared to the 20 at McGill University or the 200 in Melbourne.
(Squash, in case you didn't
know, is played in a small
room with what looks like
undersized tennis racquets and
a small rubber ball. Rules are
vaguely similar to those of
tennis).
There is a court at Cecil
Green Park at UBC, but being built to English rules it is
not the right size and therefore only good for fooling
around.
If a current proposition before the board of governors is
approved one doubles and
three singles squash courts, as
well as two handball courts
could be built beside the
Winter Sports Arena.
The UBC squash club, about
40 strong, and for some
strange reason almost totally
comprised of law students, has
to go off campus and pay city
club rates to have their tournaments.
Saturday they held a mock
tournament at the Jericho
Tennis Club to introduce new
members and to get ready for
coming tournament at the
Racquets Club.
ICE HOCKEY
The UBC ice hockey Braves
extended their winning streak
to three games when they
whitewashed the Steveston
Fishermen 18-0 Wednesday
night at Ricmond Arena.
The UBC Thunderbirds made
their ice hockey debut a winning one as they beat Coquit-
lam Lum'berkings 10-6 in a
game played Saturday in the
Winter Sports Center.
RUGBY
Don Crompton scored 11 of
the UBC rugby Thunderbirds'
14 points as they romped over
the Barbarians 14-3 to their
first league win on Saturday.
The Braves beat Ex-Gladstone 27-3 in the most surprising game of the weekend, as it
was supposed to be a close
game. Braves are still undefeated.
The   Totems    squeeked    by
Barbarians     8-6,     while     the
Tomahawks  beat   the  University of Victoria 6-3.
WRESTLING
The UBC Thunderbirds
wrestling team opened its 1967-
68 season with an impressive
victory over the Royal Roads
wrestling team, defeating them
38-10.
Dick Heiss (160 lbs.), Les Bur-
gener (177 lbs.), Wayne Cave
130 lbs), Dennie Boulton (137
lbs.), Dave Gray (152 lbs.), Paul
Degraff (167 lbs.), and Bill
Boyd (191 lbs.) wrestled to victories. Chris Nemeth (heavyweight) won his bout by forfeit.
CROSS COUNTRY
UBC finished third at the
National Cross Country
Championships at Calgary on
Saturday.
Ken French, Tom Howard,
and Dave Greening came 4th,
7th and 17th respectively at
the meet and the UBC team
finished with 26 points.
TENNIS
The UBC tennis team put
their racquets to the ball and
came up with a winning weekend.
Playing Seattle University,
UBC won 24 of the 38 matches.
It was an outstanding win
for UBC considering that all
ten members of the U.S. team
are on athletic scholarships.
VOLLEYBALL
The UBC Thunderettes volleyball team started their season off with a bang by winning
the Pacific Northwest Intercollegiate Volleyball Tournament on Saturday.
UBC came out tied with Central Washington State at the
end but won the title by having fewer points scored against
them.
FIELD HOCKEY
The UBC field hockey
Thunderbirds played poorly
but still managed to beat
Grasshoppers 2-0 on Saturday.
In other games, the Braves
lost 2-1 to Pitt Meadows, and
Tomahawks beat Hawks C,
2-0.
ALMA BOWL
HAS SPECIAL RATES
FOR U.B.C. STUDENTS
Open Bowling
Fri., Sat., Son. 1 - 6
3617 W. Broadway
Phone 738-4542
Grad ghosts haunt
basketball Birds
By BOB BANNO
Ghosts from the past continue to haunt Thunderbird basketball coach Peter iMullins.
Two, Dave Way and Ed Suderman, looked very much alive,
scoring 31 points between them as UBC Grads dropped this year's
edition of the Thunderbirds 73-70 Friday night at War Memorial
Gym.
It was the second straight year the Birds
succumbed to Grads.
The bumbling and erraticly-shooting Birds
managed to build up a 38-32 half-time lead but
could not contain the starry Way in the second
half.
One of the nation's premier forwards, the
6'4" lawyer scored eight of his 16 points in the
last quarter on a fine variety of twisting lay-
ups and long jump-shots.
Former high school sensation Suderman exhibited shooting
skill and aggressiveness he never did in his tenure under Mullins
and poured in 15 points.
High men for Birds were sixth man Dave Rice and guard
Bob Molinsky with 11 points each.
Ian Dixon and Phil (Langley added ten points each for the
losers.
Poor shooting kept the Birds from compiling an insurmountable lead over the often disorganized Grads in
the first half.
And though it appeared Grads wore the
Birds down with superior rebounding, Mullins
would not admit it.
"We got up there with them but when we
came down with the ball we would lose it", he
said.
"We simply fumbled the ball away too
often," said Mullins. "Our ball-handling was
atrocious." MOLINSKY
The Birds' next game is with powerful IGA Grocers Nov. 17-
18 at UBC.
RICE
w
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE'
SHAKESPEARE'S
xs
a dark comedy of innocence and corruption
with
Derek Ralston Peter Brockington
Barney O'Sullivan Shirley Broderick
Directed by John Brockington
Designed by Richard Kent Wilcox
November 17-25
STUDENT TICKETS $1.00
(available for most performances)
- SPECIAL STUDENT PERFORMANCES -
Monday, Nov. 20th, 7:30 p.m. — Thursday, Nov. 23rd, 12:30 p.m.
Tickets: Frederic Wood Theatre, Room 207 or 228-2678
Don't Miss This Opportunity To See One Of Shakespeare's
Rarely-Performed Masterpieces
SUPPORT YOUR CAMPUS THEATRE
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE,
4¥ Page  12
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 7, 1967
'TWEEN  CLASSES . . .
...TELLS   ALL
Debaters want  dead  pilgrims
DEBATING UNION
McGoun cup debate: Resolved, this house would rather
that Plymouth Rock had fallen on the Pilgrim fathers.
Affirmative, UVic; negative,
UBC; noon, today, Brock
lounge.
ECONOMICS SOC
Dr.  Helliwell speaks on the
Carter     Commission,     today,
noon, Ang   213.
CARIBBEAN STUDENTS
Meeting today, noon, IH.
ARCH US
William Morris week—four
day extravaganza, Nov. 7-10,
Lass. 102. Ask for calendar of
events and complimentary
chintzes.
IL CAFFE
Try your Italian, Wednesday
noon, IH 402, or Friday night
at the Italian dance in IH.
EDUCATION
ACTION CORPS
Interesting and vital group
needs intelligent and enthusiastic students to work for education in B.C. Please come to
first vice-president's office,
Wednesday, noon.
PRE LIBRARIANSHIP
Speaker  from  UBC  library
cataloguing   division,   Wednesday noon, Bu. 225.
GERMAN CLUB
Kommen sie und sprechen
sie deutsch. Heute mittag. IH
402.
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB
Dr.   Yorsh   speaks   on   hypnosis   in   medico-dental   practice, today, noon, Ang.  207.
CHORAL SOCIETY
Practice    Wednesday    at    6
p.m., Bu. 104.
CIASP
Martin Loney speaks on U.S.
influence   in   Latin   America,
today, 8 p.m., St. Marks music
room.
FINE ARTS GALLERY
Dr. Mary Morehart will discuss the Persian and Indian
miniatures currently on exhibit today, noon, fine arts
gallery.
FREDDY WOOD THEATRE
Auditions for five original
one-act plays to be performed Nov. 30 and Dec. 1 in the
theatre will be held today,
12:30 to 2:30, and Wednesday,
12:30 to 2:30, and 7 to 9 p.m.,
in room 16, Freddy Wood.
ARCHEOLOGY
Last chance to pay dues and
an illustrated lecture at meeting today, noon, Bu. 204.
CHINESE. MALAYSIAN
STUDENTS
Soprano    Lee    Lynn    sings
Chinese   and   Malaysian   folk
songs, today,  noon, music recital hall. Admission, 50 cents.
ROD  AND  GUN  CLUB
Meeting   today,  noon,   clubroom.
PRE MED SOCIETY
Dr.   Pat  McGeer,   MLA   for
NOTICE
THAT THE ANNUAL
OF THE
GENERAL MEETING
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
OF U.B.C.
will be held
TUESDAY, NOV. 7th, 7-9 P.M.
UPPER LOUNGE, I. HOUSE
• discussion  of house objectives
• election of members of the
BOARD OF  DIRECTORS
PLANT
CHEMIST
A recent male graduate, 22 to 30 years of age, with
a B.Sc. in Chemistry (preferably honours), with
courses in Bacteriology and/or Microbiology, is required for our Edmonton Brewery.
The main area of work will be in Quality Control and
Biological Analysis.
This position provides excellent opportunity for
advancement.
Full range of employee benefits. Salary commensurate with qualifications and experience.
Interested applicants are invited to submit a complete personal and employment resume to:
PERSONNEL MANAGER
MOLSON'S @£t6m Qgtetmte 3$mikd
218 Eleventh Avenue S.W., Calgary, Alberta
Breweries at VANCOUVER EDMONTON LETHBRIDGE
PRINCE ALBERT REGINA WINNIPEG
Vancouver and Pt. Grey, head
of neurological sciences speaks
Wednesday, noon. Sign up for
a field trip, through Dr. McGeer's lab, Thursday noon, at
this meeting.
U.B.C. Beauty Salon
In The Village
Hairpieces
Cleaned and Styled
Reasonable Prices
NO  APPOINTMENT   NECESSARY
Open Tues. - Sal. Tel. 028-8942
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students. Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75*. 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Rates for larger ads on request.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone.
Noncommercial Classified Ads are payable in advance.
Publications Office, BROCK HALL, UNIV. OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
Greetings
12
Lost & Found
13
A SLIDE RULE IN A BLUE CASE
in the vicinity of Hebb. Reward
offered. Please return. Phone 435-
1168.
FOUND: ANDY WARHOL'S '-CHEL-
sea Girls" in the Auditorium, Nov.
10 at 1:30 and 7:30 and Nov. 14 at
7:30.   Students   $1.50.   Adults  $2700.
POUND WALLET IN AUDITORIUM
Thurs. afternoon. Phone 988-2238
after 6:30 P.M.
AUTOMOTIVE & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
1956 CADILLAC 4-DOOR GOOD EN-
gine, trans. P.B., P.S. Radio,
W.W.'s.   $525.  Phone   291-1059.
WALKING? THEN BUY 1956 DODGE
good running order, tires, clutch.
Big V-8. $120.00. 987-3997 after 7
P.m.
59 PORSCHE GOOD CONDITION
2250 Westbrook. $1395, best offer.
224-9662.
FOUND UMBRELLA IN CAR FROM
girls who hitched a ride Oct. 31.
Phone Parsons 228-2181.	
LOST GOLD SIGNET RING BUCH-
anan Lounge Thurs. 9:00 a.m. Phone
David  263-6850.   Reward.
LOST: PEARL PENDANT NECK-
lace lost on Wednesday. Please con-
tact Elizabeth   922-4626.
LOST ONE SILVER PIERCED EAR-
ring Oct. 30 between Men's Gym and
Education    Building.    Please   phone
988-7061.
LOST: A SMALL PAIR OF BINOCU-
lars. Urgently needed for lectures.
Phone 224-9077 after 6:00 p.m.
LOST: ENGRAVED WATCH BE-
tween A—lot and Civ. Engineering
Bldg. Phone 327-4071 please. Reward.
Rides & Car Pools
14
MEMBERS WANTED FOR CAR
pool forming 25th and Granville or
vicinity.  Phone  Doug RE 3-6050.
VICTORIA! RIDE LEAVING THURS-
day noon. Room for three. Share
costs.   738-1290   between   6  and   7.
GIRLS NEED RIDE TO KELOWNA.
Thurs., Nov. 9. Share expenses. Ph.
224-9031,  Rm.   16.
RIDE TO WORK S.W. MARINE
Main, Mon. Wed. Thur. 12:20 733-
4968.  Message  731-2010, Gwyn.	
CALIFORNIA - RIDE WANTED.
Male share driving etc. leave immediately  681-2596.
RIDE NEEDED TO AND FROM
vicinity of Trail this weekend. Phone
Joan  224-3694.
1953 PONTIAC SEDAN SIX STD.,
radio, excel, cond. never raced.
$135 Norm, Rm. 186 Totem. 224-9744.
'57    FORD    FAIRLANE 500    2    DR.
hardtop V-8 automatic P.  5.  Radio.
62,000   miles,   excellent. $525.   Room
547,   224-9944.
1954 MORRIS IN GOOD RUNNING
order. Good gas mileage. Phone 224-
9794 after   6:00  for Gerry.
66 HONDA S600, GOOD SHAPE,
radio, must sell, no bull, will sacrifice,   leave  message.   325-7782.
Motorcycles
26
BULTACO LEASE TO OWN, $9
per week. No deposit required. Repairs all bikes. Open 9-9. 54th &
Victoria    Drive,   Amor,   327-9111.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
Help Wanted—Male
n
Ta
Male or Female
53
Work Wanted
Music
___*
"62
INSTRUCTION
Special Classes
63
Tutoring
64
FRENCH, ENGLISH, HISTORY,
Russian lessons given privately by
B.A.,   M.A.,   B.L.S.   736-6923.	
WANTED — EDUCATION   STUDENT
to tutor second grader.   224-4445.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
HONDA-FIAT
Motorcycles -  Cars
Generators  - Utility Units
New and  Used
SPORT  CARS
N T
O      Motors      S
R E
T      W
145 Robson H 688-1284
Copying & Duplicating
31
Miscellaneous
32
GETTING    ENGAGED:     SAVE     BE-
tween 30% and 50% on Engagement
Rings.    For   appointment   call   261-
6671  anytime.
Orchestras
33
BUSINESS SERVICES
Scandals
37
Special Notices
15
TOM JONES STARRING ALBERT
Finney in the Aud. Nov. 9, 12:30,
3:30,   6:00,   8:30.   50c.
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20 and
have a good driving history you
qualify for our good driving rates.
Phone   Ted   Elliott,   321-6442.
CALORY   CORNOR
Tuesday's    quick    Lunches
basement Ed.   Bldg.
— no crowds —
NOV.    21   ERIC   KIERANS   SPEAKS
to  you  about  Canada.
CHINESE AND MALAYSIAN FOLK
songs today noon, Recital Hall,
Music Building.   Admission  50c.
THANK   YOU!
To   all   Lan's   friends   who   comforted
her  in  her  final  illness  and  were  so
very kind.
 The Easson Family,  Chilliwack.
WE HEREBY CHALLENGE ANY
UBC couple to adopt a baby through
C.A.S.—Freedom for Adoptive Children,  1843 Robson.
TONIGHT!
ARE YOU FRACTURED? INTE-
grated? or somewhere in between?
What is the meaning of an integrated personality in our psychedelic
society?
Tonight, Tuesday, November 7th, at
8:00 P.M., Father Desmarais, S.J.,
will conduct an informal discussion
for . all university students at the
Cenacle, 3689 Selkirk. Turn east off
Granville on Matthews (3 blocks
south of 31st) continue east 3 blocks
then south on Selkirk for half block.
U.B.C. BARBER SHOP IN THE VIL-
lage — 3 barbers. Open weekdays
8:30-6 p.m. Saturday 'til 5:30.
HIGH LARRY KENT'S LATEST
movie. Nov. 7 & 8 12:30, 8:00. Adm.
$1.00. Restricted to UBC students
staff faculty.
ROWDY RAUCUS BAWDY FILM
Soc. presents Tom Jones. Aud. 12:30,
3:30,   6:00,   8:30  Thurs.  Nov.  9,  50c.
Travel Opportunities
16
Wanted—Texts
17
ANDY WARHOL'S "CHELSEA
Girls" Shocking! Unusual! Censored! Auditorium, Nov. 10, 1:30 & 7:30
and Nov. 14, 7:30. Students $1.50.
Others  $2.00.   Special events!	
GLORIA  RUMPLEFARSNIC
Renounce   The   IHJB
Socrates Lives!!
GIRL NEEDS RIDE SOUTH RE-
membrance Weekend. Will pay gas,
Or hitchiking companion. Phone
Eve.   224-6823.
THIS WEEK ONLY. "CHARTER"
brand Recording tape, regular $2.74,
i4"x900', 5" reel — Kam-Tap Sales
price $2.35 each. We also carry a
complete line of tape-recorders,
radios, etc. Call Bob Williams, 263-
9679  anytime.
NEW TWELVE STRING GUITAR
and reverb, amp. for sale. 816 W.
8th  Ave.   874-0744.
UBC TEXTS BOUGHT AND SOLD.
Busy B Books, 146 W. Hastings.
681-4931.
WURLITZER ELECTRIC PIANO
with preamp. Perfect working order.
Offers—Call  Bob.  737-4241.
TAPE RECORDER. — PHILLIPS.
Fully portable, excellent condition.
Remote control, new batteries, tapes.
Phone   Murray,   224-9662.
210       KNEISSEL      REISENSLALOM
skis.    Good    condition.    $20.    Steve
' 266-5482.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
DKE: ACTIVES LEN AND JIM
went abroad. Who is next? Brian:
Can  you  tread water?      	
SLOT MACHINE FOR SALE. COST
$2500 plus new, sell: $400. Phone
Dave   FA  1-2544.
JOHN   TURNER
Comes to UBC
this  Thursday
LARRY KENT'S HIGH LAST 2 DAYS
Nov. 7 & 8 Aud. $1.00 12:30, 8:00.
Restricted to University.	
TOM JONES STARRING ROWDY
Bawdy, Albert Finney, Thurs. Nov.
9.   12:30,   3:30,   6:00,   8:30.  Adm.   50c.
Typewriter Repairs
39
Typing
40
EXPERIENCED   TYPIST   —   B1_BC-
tric.   Phone  228-8384  or 224-6129.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING, ARDALE
Griffith Limited, 8584 Granville
Street   (70th  & Granville).   263-4530.
AT LAST! An exclusive typing service for students. 24-hour service,
elec. typewriters, 1 block from" campus. All this for only 30 cents a
page! University Typing Services —
Around the corner from World Wide
Travel — next to R.C.M.P. 2109 Allison Rd. at University Blvd. Mon. to
Fri.   9   to  5.   Phone:   228-8414.	
TYPING, ESSAYS, ETC. LOW
rates. Two drop points. (On cam-
pus   &  West  End).  Phone  683-2859.
EXPERT ELECTRIC TYPIST
Experienced eassay and thesis typist
Reasonable  Rates. TR. 4-9253.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
"GOOD   EXPERIENCED   TY PI ST
available   for   home   typing.   Please
call 277-5640".	
| ESSAY    AND    THESIS    TYPING-
_•   Electric.    Campus   Pickup.   434-9558
ROOMS ON CAMPUS FOR RENT.
Close to meals. 225-9662 (male) @
$40  mo.;  2250  Wesbrook.
MAIN FLOOR ROOM WITH KIT.
priv. for girl, at 24th & Macdonald.
Phone   733-4670.
NEAR UBC SLEEPING ROOM &
breakfast if desired. Female Student preferred.  224-3606.
Room & Board
83
ROOM AND BOARD, MALE STU-
dent, on campus. 5475 Agronomy
Road,   224-9667   after  six.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
BUY - SELL - RENT
WITH
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED

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