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The Ubyssey Oct 28, 1983

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Array UBC Archives Serial
Vol. LXVI, No. 14
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, October 28,1983
(B<5^g^t£48
228-2301
The Sun eclipses
rally coverage
By HOLLY NATHAN
The Vancouver Sun newspaper
has "unsatisfactorily" explained its
coverage of the Oct. 15 Solidarity
rally, says a UBC professor who
lodged a complaint about the news
story and photo with the B.C. press
council.
"The issue is much worse than I
imagined," said Roger Boshier,
adult education administration professor.
Boshier registered a complaint
when a story about the rally against
the Social Credit party appeared on
page A16 of the Sun's Monday edition, accompanied by a photograph
depicting a banner and supporters
of the Communist Party.
"It was perfectly clear what the
Sun was up to with this news judgement. For decades they have clearly
been on the side of big business and
big government," he said.
"I am still thinking about how
far to go with this."
In response to Boshier's complaint, the Sun sent a letter saying
the story did not receive better play
because it appeared 48 hours after
the event and it had already been
covered extensively by the electronic media.
A photograph more representative of the demonstrators did not
appear because of space constraints, the Sun claimed, adding
the editorial staff decided to use a
close-up of banner-carrying participants instead.
Boshier said he was not satisfied
with the Sun's explanation, considering it had 248 photos from
which to choose. He added the fact
that the incident was not an
"idiosyncratic judgement on the
part of one person, but a decision
made by many" made the issue
worse.
The Sun's managing editor Bruce
Larsen refused to discuss the complaint outside the forum of the
press council.
"We have sent out a letter to
Boshier. We don't know where it
goes from here," Larsen said.
If Boshier and the Sun fail to
resolve the issue, the press council
will arrange a public hearing, said
the council's executive secretary
Gordon Purver. The council
does not mediate over questions of
news judgement, he said.
"In this case, the issue lies in the
picture that was run which smeared
the rally," said Purver.
Socreds want control
The government is trying to control the content of a B.C.
newspaper for new Canadians,
charged the newspaper's editorial
board Thursday.
B.C. Cultural heritage advisor
Enrico Diano want to turn the West
Coast Reader into an "official provincial government document," the
editors said.
The two-year old newspaper,
which is published at Capilano College and distributed across the province as part of the English as a Second Language program, had its
annual grant cancelled under the
provincial restraint program.
Diano demanded the Reader run
>lossy pictures of provincial
secretary Jim Chabot, premier Bill
Bennett and himself, as well as the
Social Credit B.C. Spirit logo, said
Nick Collins, a member of the
editorial board.
"Diano told me in a conversation
he wants to be able to 'pull the
stuff he objects to and that he
would 'bring a sense of what is happening in Victoria' to the paper,"
said Collins, who is also president
of the Teachers of English as an
Additional Language association.
Diano said such measures are
necessary if the news paper is to
continue publishing, Collins said,
adding the advisor stressed it would
become a "government arm."
The monthly newspaper, which
includes more readable, rewritten
stories from the Sun and the Province, contains mainly stories about
"citizenship" and about "what new
Canadians should know about
government," said the paper's
editor Joan Acosta. "We take a
totally non-partisan position," she
said.
Collins added, "Diano complained that we didn't know from one
month to the next what our front
page was going to be. Well, he's got
to get through his head that we are a
newspaper and can't plan the
news."
The advisor would like to fund
each issue of the paper individually
after his office has approved its
contents, said Collins.
See page 2: BOARD
Asbestos closes SUB
Fifteen areas in SUB will be closed off from mid November to early
January to allow physical plant
workers to remove potentially
harmful asbestos insulation.
The contaminated areas include
the Bank of Montreal, the partyroom, stairwells, chemical and
storage rooms, said Dennis Holler,
physical plant assistant director of
design.
The asbestos is being removed
because it can cause cancer when inhaled, said Dr. Donald Farquar of
UBC's student health services.
"There's no doubt that asbestos
is bad stuff," he said.
Asbestos insulation is covered
with a protective coating that
prevents the harmful substance
from contaminating the air, he said.
But when the coating deteriorates
with age, the asbestos becomes a
health risk, he added.
The Bank of Montreal is moving
its office to the old bookstore from
Dec. 10 to Jan. 2 to allow the
asbestos to be removed, said bank
manager Stuart Clark.
"We're very happy to see it go.
"This is a great inconvenience,
but for the safety of the employees
the stuff must be removed," he
said.
The area of removal will be sealed off and air samples in SUB will
be taken to ensure no asbestos is
escaping, said Mitch Hetman, Alma
Mater Society president. He claimed there will be no health risks.
A year ago the Worker's Compensation Board pressed the university to remove the insulation from
its buildings. The project costs
$400,000, according to physical
plant director Neville Smith.
NEW FASHIONS for students who wish to be safe in SUB. On sale now in the new and convenient bookstore.
You need never worry about asbestos again. Coming soon: new fall line — acid rain gear by Sergio Valente in
chlorine green, sulphur yellow and funeral black. Be well dressed for your surroundings.
Selkirk college picket lines crossed
Selkirk college students ended
their sit-in Thursday as negotiations
between college workers and the administration resumed, but they
vowed to continue their action if
talks break down again.
About 100 college support staff
workers, members of local 26 of the
Pulp, Paper and Woodworkers of
Canada, went on strike Tuesday in
an effort to get a new contract.
Many classes were cancelled
because most instructors refused to
cross the picket lines.
The workers' contract expired
Dec. 31, 1982 and negotiations
broke down over the issues of contracting out and job security.
The union served 72 hour strike
notice Friday and about 30 students
occupied the campus' main lounge
Monday to protest the potential
disruption of classes. When the
workers went on strike the students
continued their protest in a bid to
get both sides back to the bargaining table.
The students vow to resume their
sit-in if instructors decide to honor
the picket lines, according to Barry
Mackie, vice-president of the
Selkirk student executive committee.
"The general emotion of the
students is anger because their right
to education is being threatened by
teachers who wish to honor the
picket line," he said. The majority
of students showed up for classes,
even though their instructors
didn't, he added.
As of Thursday, only 30 teachers
crossed the picket line, said college
principal Leo Perra. The college's
faculty association wilt decide today
whether or not to cross the support
staff's picket lines, he said.
The strike — which is not related
to the current dispute: between the
PPWC and the forest industry —
has caused the cancellation of
classes at the other three campuses
of Selkirk college, Nelson, Trail
and the David Thompson University Centre.
Students are concerned about
losing education time, particularly
during the mid-term season.
Some  students  on  the  income
assistance program may lose all
their forthcoming funds' if classes
are held up for a week, said a Canadian Federation of Students —
Pacific region representative on
campus at the time of the occupation. (Vocational education programs sponsored by Employment
and Immigration Canada pays
students while they attend classes,
but stop immediately if classes
cease).
The administration does not consider job security to be an issue
since the provincial government has
already passed Bill 3, which allows
public sector employees to be fired
regardless of seniority.
Main library flood hoots up
UBC's main library was in hot
water Wednesday.
A pipe in the heating system
broke at 2 p.m., sending hot water
streaming onto the circulation room
floor and pouring onto a book
storage room floor below.
The water was a half inch deep in
some places and at one point it appeared that there was no stopping
the flood.
"We're not bailing yet, but we
almost are," said one slightly perturbed librarian.
"We might have to smash the
wall out to get at the pipe," said a
physical plant worker trying to curtail the flow. "You could get a cou
ple of hundred gallons an hour
from a one inch pipe," he said.
The leak was plugged by 4 p.m.
and little was damaged, said head
librarian Douglas Mclnnes.
"We got the books and
everything on the floor on to the
dry shelves," he said.
"The books that were threatened
were in storage. They were not terribly valuable," he added.
The leak was in a part of the
library that was built in 1925, Mclnnes said. "The building really isn't
up to modern standards, certainly
not in handling the extremely
valuable library collection," he added. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 28,1983
Board fights demand
From page 1
The editorial board refused to accept Diano's demands and has tried
unsuccessfully to met with Chabot
about the issue, said Acosta, the
newspaper's only paid worker.
In a recent federal provincial
agreement, Ottawa agreed to pay
for all Canadian ESL publications,
but the provincial government is required to provide the initial funding
which is later paid back.
Federal secretary of state Serge
Joyal, the minister responsible for
the language textbook agreement,
believes the Reader qualifies for
federal funding, Colling said.
"Now we are trying to find alternative funding," said Acosta.
Alternative   funding   includes
direct federal money or increased
private donations, which have
already picked up because of the recent publicity of the issue, said Collins.
The newspaper with a readership
of just over 25,000 is published by
TEAL and is used as a teaching tool
mainly for adults learning English
as a new language.
Monday is Halloween day
at the Ubyssey;
come and see
all the staffers
in their cool costumes.
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THE    UBVSSEY
Page 3
Students scared about education
By MURIEL DRAAISMA
Some Vancouver high schoolers
are SCARED — Students Concerned About Restraint in Education —
and worried about the provincial
government's education policies.
Compulsory grade 12 exams
determining half their final marks,
the loss of teacher job security, and
their own loss of representation on
local school boards are their concerns.
The month old organization is
hammering out plans to fight the
budget legislation and decided at an
organizational meeting Wednesday
to support a general strike and
picket with teachers if it occurs.
Only 35 high school students —
mostly from University Hill and
Ideal, one of Vancouver's alternative schools — are official
members, said Coral DeShield, a
grade 11 University Hill student.
The group has contacted more
than half of Vancouver's secondary
schools and plans to drum up more
support from East Vancouver
schools.
SCARED is circulating a petition
opposing education policies. Some
300 students have signed it so far,
said Sarah Chase, also of UHill.
"We are opposed to the current
legislation being passed which will
prevent our school system from
functioning adequately," said
Chase.
SCARED supports the Solidarity
Coalition, but will probably not
join becuse it wants to be a student
group focusing primarily on education.
"We all oppose cutbacks in
education and we thought that if we
get involved in other aspects of the
budget we would look like little kids
whining," said deShield.
"We don't want to get involved
in an adult group and have people
think we're being pushed around."
Some   parents   supportive   of
Chilean students
oppose dictator
By SARAH COX
The Chilean student movement is successfully fighting the military dictatorship's attempts to control universities, the president of the Chilean
Union of Democratic students said Thursday.
Despite risking arrest, torture, and exile, students have reclaimed some
university campuses from the government and are helping to organize national stikes, Alvaro Fernandez told 15 people in Buchannan A205.
"The strength that we've managed to accumulate has forced
authorities to retreat and give us certain demands," said Fernandez, whose
speech was sponsored by the Latin American Support Committee.
Student meetings are no longer dispersed, underground newspapers
are published without government interference, and free and democratic
elections are being organized within universities, he said.
"Last year, the students even managed to force some universities to
lower their tuition."
These gains are substantial, said Fernandez, considering the brutal attack on universities immediately following the 1973 coup which
overthrew the democratically elected government of Salvador Allende.
Thirty thousand people were killed during and after the coup, 250,000
people disappeared, one million were exiled, and thousands more imprisoned and tortured, said Fernandez.
The crackdown on universities was severe, he said. Many students and
professors were exiled, and military representatives replaced dismissed
university presidents.
"They forced all student organizations to disband and replaced excellent professors with people who didn't have much training.
"There was total control over what kind of material was allowed in the
programs. Faculties like sociology and political science were eliminated.
History programs were completely transformed."
The student movement was paralyzed until 1978, when students
became concious of the need for a reconstruction of a solid national student organization.
Student protests escalated when the junta sent 50 students into internal
exile — to camps in isolated parts of Chile, Fernandez said.
The Union of Democratic Students was.officially formed in 1981, with'
the objective of restoring freedom and democracy to the universtities.
"Today, the student movement is one of the most important forces
within the popular movement." It is closely connected to a broad based
human rights organization which co-ordinates the activities of workers and
students.
This group organizes the monthly protests of marches, demonstrations, national stoppages and strikes staged over a three or four day period,
he said.
AMS misrepresents students
At least one-half of UBC's student council supports the Social
Credit government's current legislation, a packed meeting of
students interested in defeating the budget was told Wednesday.
Student council does not represent the interests of the majority of
UBC students, said Andrew Sobelewski, chair of UBC's campus
community alliance, a coalition of groups opposed to the legislation.
Council ensured the special general meeting held recently did not
reach quorum by "preventing publicity of the Solidarity rally from
coming out," Sobelewski charged.
The 30 students attending the founding meeting of UBC Students
Against the Budget decided that SAB will oppose the entire
legislative package but focus on issues mainly affecting students.
SAB also decided to operate without a hierarchy and to seek support from sympathetic elements in the AMS, campus unions and student clubs and associations.
"We are autonomous from the AMS, so our hands are free to
develop an effective pressure group on campus," said Bob Cole, arts
2.
Speakers also emphasized the urgent need to unify and mobilize
student sentiment against the budget, in light of the likelihood of a
general strike in B.C.
SCARED are card-carrying Socreds
who agree with much of the budget
legislation, deShield added. Many
adults think the NDP and the B.C.
Teachers Federation are controlling
SCARED, she said.
SCARED might join the Vancouver high school union, a city-
wide organization opposing the
proposed dramatic decrease in the
Vancouver school boards' budget
over the next three years and that 50
per cent of final marks will be determined by provincial exams.
About 60 high school students,
representing many of Vancouver's
18 secondary schools, packed a
Vancouver school board committee
meeting Monday in protest of the
planned exams. Trustees at the
education and services committee
meeting agreed to send a letter to
education minister Jack Heinrich
urging him to put less weight on the
exam results.
The students presented letters
and petitions signed by hundreds of
students from their schools, saying
STONED GOLD PANNEH waits in vain for time when students will
become delightfully radical again and not cross picket lines. He hopes to
make a clean sweep of capitalists and exploiters. Capitalists are symbolised
by fact that half of the pan which contains gold is missing. The toque is
symbolic of the cold that the heroic strikers will have to withstand in the
impending general stike. Stoic continuing despite smashed chest shows
how the opressed will continue opposing the fascist Bill even though heart
is broken by scab students.
Attacks anger staff
MONTREAL (CUP) — McGill
University secretaries have confronted administrators over an increase in reports of sexual attacks in
campus buildings.
Recently a member of a committee on safety for women charged the
administration with minimizing and
trivializing the number of sexual
assaults on campus.
McGill's public relations
newspaper, the Reporter, had listed
fewer cases of reported on-campus
sexual harassment than either the
McGill security office or the Montreal Urban Community police
statistics.
At a meeting with 30 McGill
secretaries, physical plant director
Sam Kingdon admitted the
previously released information was
"incorrect".
Kingdon said security officers
differentiate between overt sexual
harassment and what secretaries
referred to a "invasion of privacy"
— the presence of men in a
women's washroom.
Several secretaries said Kingdon
implied the washroom intrusions
were no cause for alarm and objected to his light treatmenl of the
subject. One women suggested
some men discovered in washrooms
may have been contemplating acts
of aggression.
"The relationship can not be ignored," she said. "It is a potential
sexual assault."
Professor Sam Nuomoff of the
senate subcommittee on Safety for
Women said men caught in
washrooms sometimes made explanations so "off the wall" and
"ludicrous" that there was every
reason to believe they were potentially dangerous.
Nuomoff wrote a letter to the
Reporter challenging their statistics
on the number of harassment incidents listed by the Security office
in the last four years. He charged
the Reporter and the administration
with trivializing the incidents.
"This less than accurate portrayal of the situation does not contribute to an overall sense of well
being," he wrote.
"The university is culpable as a
consequence of inadequate
action."
Kingdon tried to placate the
secretaries by outlining measures
taken to avoid further incidents, including signs in all women's
washrooms with the university
emergency phone number, approval
of funds for "direct publicity" to
all female students and staff to increase awareness.
He promised to improve lighting
in stairwells, foyers and campus
routes and to investigate the cost of
relocating washroom entrances so
they are accessible from corridors
rather than from soundproof
stairwells.
they had few objections to writing
the exams, but that they wanted
them to account for only about 25
per cent.
SCARED is also planning to protest the proposed exams by staging
a sit-in at the Vancouver school
board's general meeting Nov. 7.
Government
demoralizes
B.C. teachers and professors are
"demoralized" because their job
security now rests entirely on the
whim of the provincial government,
the president of the B.C. College-
Institute Educators Association
said Thursday.
Staff are vulnerable to censure if
their views are "too hot" for the
ministry paying their salaries, Jack
Finnbogason told a small group attending a Solidarity Coalition
forum.
"Political capture is the common
theme of the new Socred
legislation," said Finnbogason.
The passage of Bills 19, 20 and 3
— which abolishes student, staff and
faculty representation on college
boards, and allows public sector
employees to be fired regardless of
seniority or tenure — consolidate
government control over education,
he said.
Increased tuition fees and stringent requirements for student aid
are also cause for concern, he said.
"This government no longer
believes that education is a right."
Jean Swanson, Solidarity Coalition spokesperson, said the
philosophy behind this government
is not restraint but a "power shift
away from the people to the big corporations."
"Bennett wants to sell B.C. to international investors," said Swanson.
The premier wants to assure
potential businesses that they will
not be faced with "uppity" workers
demanding "excessive" union
benefits, such as equal pay for
equal work, she said.
Labor lawyer Katie Young said
the new Employment Standards
Amendment Act encourages
employers to pocket any profit
gained from bargaining.
"Seniority is no longer the basis
for lay-offs. Instead, efficiency,
knowledge and skill as determined
by the employer will decide who will
be fired, if two employees are seen
to serve the interests of the
employer equally," she said.
Hanne Jensen, former B.C.
Human Rights Commission director and UBC law professor Bill
Black also spoke at the forum.
Firing violates code
SUDBURY, Ont. (CUP) — The
firing of a woman from the Lauren-
tian University student security
force has provoked controversy
about sexism on the force.
Marlene Mcintosh said she was
fired from her job as a security officer because she was "a girl".
Head of security Richard
Lafreniere defended the move at a
student council meeting, but said
"You can call me chauvanistic if
you want."
Mcintosh brought her complaint
to student council president Ken
McNeill who introduced a motion
at the next council meeting calling
for "at least one woman" to be on
duty as security during all major
social functions.
But several councillors criticized
the motion as limiting the number
of women who could serve on the
force.
Kekana said the decision to fire
Mcintosh violated the Canadian
Charter of Rights and the Ontario
Human Rights Code. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 28, 1983
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S   2272 W. 4th Ave.     736-2118 Friday, October 28,1983
THE   UBYSSEY
Page 5
£IVIL
DISOBEDIENCE
Ciw'f disobedience is becoming a way of life to Canadians frustrated with
traditional forms of protest. Activists predict more ot same despite arrests,
By Cathy McDonald — Canadian University Press
OTTAWA — Fifteen people dressed
in black marched silently up to the
front entrance to the Lester B. Pearson
Building, home of Canada's external
affairs department.
They were expected.
It was 8:30 a.m. on an Ottawa working day, and a
contingent of 40 supporters, 30 journalists and 150
city police stood by.
They were waiting for what promised to be a unique protest. Members of the Anti-Intervention Action Committee planned to speak out against
Canada's support of brutal dictatorships in Central
America.
But the committee didn't have a protest permit and
there weren't going to be speakers to explain how
Canada, the fifth largest investor in the Third World,
poured 80 per cent of that investment into Latin
America. Most of those regimes use torture and terror to maintain power.
Police weren't sure what to expect, but they knew
it was civil disobedience. Original protest plans included an occupation of the front entrance, so police
swarmed the area, prepared to lay trespass charges.
As the time for the protest grew nearer, the defense
of the Lester B. Pearson Building grew more
elaborate. Mysterious silhouetted figures appeared
on the building's roof, and disappeared again. Marked and unmarked cars rolled into the nearby parking
lot, and paddy wagons arrived, unloading steel
crowd barriers, placing them across the front entrance and in the lobby.
Then out came the riot gear. Brandishing riot
sticks and donning motor cycle helmets, the police
took up positions next to the coffee machine at the
front entrance, about 25 feet from the sidewalk
where reporters huddled in anticipation, pumping
each other for information on the event.
The protest was two hours late. Scouts for the
committee surveyed the police preparations and participants planned their approach and checked their
own communications network.
Weeks of planning and practice had gone into this
action. Peacekeepers with flourescent signs told cars
to slow down at different places along the road.
Walkie talkies were used for ongoing communication. A first aid kit was handy and hospitals were
alerted of the possibility of injury.
The committee was prepared for all possible outcomes of confrontation with the police.
Finally, the procession reached the front of the
building. One cop turned to another and said: "Why
don't they do that in Moscow where they came
from?" One protestor poured a vial of his own blood
on the Lester B. Pearson sign. He was arrested.
Another woman poured the blood of other group
members over dolls displayed on a coffin. Someone
shouted, "In this building the external affairs department makes decisions every day which result in the
murder of children."
The protestors sat down on Sussex Drive, blocking traffic for 10 to 15 minutes. One by one police
dragged the non-resisting protestors off the street
and into police cars, where they were arrested for
public mischief and whisked away.
There were no violent confrontations while the
throng of local and national news media recorded the
event. In less than an hour, the event was finished,
and that evening words and images described what
took place to the rest of the country.
Most of the protestors had participated in civil
disobenience before with the larger coalition, the
Alliance for Non-Violent Action, composed of mostly Ontario-based peace groups. Last year on Remem
brance Day, Alliance members blockaded the road
leading to Litton Industries, of Toronto, makers of
the cruise missile guidance system. Groups in the
Alliance are committed to educating and organizing
for non-violent "direct action" demonstrations,
where activists are often arrested for protesting symbols of oppression and militarism in society.
Civil disobedience is likely to increase in the future
as activists such as these who were arrested in Ottawa
grow frustrated with traditional forms of protest.
Though they had to spend an afternoon in jail and
must appear in court April 2 and 3 to face public
mischief charges, they say they are willing to do it
again.
"What we're talking about," said Peter Dundas
shortly after he was released, "is a civil disobedient
lifestyle."
WOMEN...resisting militarism
Women rally against Boeing
By SUE McILROY
Almost 2,000 women gathered in
Kent, Wash, on Monday for a day
of protest outside the Boeing
Aerospace Company, where the air-
launched cruise missile-is assembled.
The demonstration, which was
organized by the Puget Sound
Women's Peace Camp, culminated
in a mass encirclement of the plant.
Women linked arms and formed a
chain stretching one-quarter of the
way around the plant's perimeter.
Plant workers who were changing
shifts ignored the demonstrators.
Many turned their heads away and
refused to look at the women while
others waved and made peace signs
in support.
The protest began before dawn
when 60 women formed a candle-lit
circle to voice the reasons for their
actions.
Fear of the arms race persuaded
many to attend, and others expressed their hopes of ending the arms
race and of using most effectively
their power as women.
Paper cranes we're then passed
out to the plant workers as they arrived for work. The paper crane is a
symbol of world peace which was
first adopted by the Hibakushas —
the Hiroshima survivors.
A rally with music, poetry,
speeches and street theatre followed
the first action.
Janet MacLeod, a local native
woman, spoke about her long involvement in native rights and in
the peace movement.
"Many years ago my uncle told
me that a time would come when
women would begin to feel the
threat of a danger facing the world
and they would begin to take action," MacLeod said. "It is your
courage in being here today that
will encourage other women to start
working for peace and justice."
Is Rodgiges, a woman from a
local Phillipines support group,
spoke about the problems faced by
women in the Phillipines, and
Maryamu Eltayeb spoke about
South   African   women.   Human
rights violations in both of these
countries make it harder for
women's voices to be heard.
A group of women from the five
month old peace camp performed
an amusing skit about a "Missile
America Contest." Contestants included Trident, the cruise and the
neutron bomb. The camp has up to
30 permanent residents and hundreds of other people have visited
or are doing support work.
Five women from the camp are
currently facing charges of criminal
trespass and criminal impersonation. The women entered the Boeing plant Sept. 27 with forged identification and managed to talk to
the workers for an hour before they
were arrested.
"People have the right and the
obligation to stop nuclear
weapons," said Leslie Redtree, one
of the women charged with entering
the plant, just like in Nazi Germany people had the right and
obligation to stop working on the
ovens that killed all the people." Page 6
THE   UBYSSEY
Friday, October 28,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
THIS HAti IS:
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EJAAl MCRiCAm LAupiuG lAl GrtZNAPA
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Letters
General strike!
Bill Bennett in his televised address a week ago
tried to diffuse the possibility of a general strike. But
if the layoffs of 1,600 government workers without
regard to seniority goes ahead as planned, escalating
job action may make that strike a reality.
And UBC students will be faced with a difficult
choice — whether or not to cross a picket line. The
choice will be difficult because many students, particularly during mid-term season, are worried about
their marks. Many will feel they cannot afford to lose
any class time and will justify crossing the line by
remembering that they have paid hard earned money
to go to school.
Take the case of Selkirk college students for example. Concerned about losing class time, some decided to occupy the campus' main lounge in an effort to
bring the striking union and the college administration back to the bargaining table.
But others, about 75 per cent of the student
population, decided to cross the line and show up for
class.
Their reaction is typical. Students, who are in a
better situation than most people, often are too
preoccupied with their intellectual pursuit or too far
removed from everyday life to think about the concerns of workers.
Many students are just too selfish to worry about
or even to imagine the loss of job security, a loss
many workers in B.C. are facing. Others are simply
ignorant and don't realize the importance of the
strike as a weapon against management, big
business and the government.
. The students at Selkirk are probably a little of all of
the above. Insensitive, selfish or ignorant, they are
failing to realize the support staff's demands are valid
and are just as crucial as their classes, if not more.
Their refusal to respect picket lines is probably
foreshadowing what is to come at UBC. If government employees picket UBC's gates on Nov. 1, and if
the Alma Mater Society's recent special general
meeting is any indication, UBC students will probably merrily and without any thought cross the line.
But before this happens, students should think of
what some high school students on the West side
are doing. Calling their group SCARED — Students
Concerned About Restraint in Education — they
have decided to support a general strike and to
picket with their teachers if they stage sympathy
strikes with government workers.
UBC students should take note. Instead of worrying about missing a midterm or two, or losing a week
of class time, they should think about what it would
be like to be one of 1,600 government workers soon
to be fired.
Losing a bit of class time is not quite the same as
losing a job.
Grenadian democracy was unique
By ALAR OLLJUM
"A shining star / is hope for little
children / to leap and touch /from
earth to sky / over this sordid world
/ world / world / the shining moon
/ is blood / blood / blood / that
runs through this hand / thin in the
sand / thick in this land." (by the
Grenadian poet, Desmond Richard
Wiltshire)
I was brutally awoken by the invasion of Grenada by U.S. Marines
Tuesday morning. For the next few
hours I was in a state of shock and
bewilderment. How could the most
powerful state in the hemisphere
dare invade the tiniest state of the
hemisphere?
My answer came quickly.
Without television cameras and
without reporters Reagan thinks he
can commit any atrocity, any blatant violation of international law.
At noon Tuesday I had recovered
somewhat from my initial shock.
Now I could uncover my anger as I
listened to U.S. secretary of state
Schultz read out a litany of lies and
half-truths as he tried to justify the
invasion to the amnesiac press corps
of Washington.
To save precious American lives?
Then why had the parents and
chancellor of the medical students
pleaded with Reagan not to invade?
Why had U.S. diplomatic officials
refused to deal with the Grenadian
government's repeated requests for
help in facilitating the peaceful
evacuation of Americans who
wanted to leave? Once the U.S. did
invade, why did they not stop their
aggression once they had secured
the safety of the medical students
and taken over Grenada's airports?
Or was it to "restore democratic
institutions" as the U.S. government and leaders of its Caribbean
client states would have us believe?
Which democratic institutions?
Could it be that Ronald Reagan
simply wanted to restore the New
Jewel Movement and its courageous
program of participatory
democracy to power in Grenada?
But had not the Revolutionary
Military Council said that was exactly what it intended to do within
ten to fourteen days? Did not the
Council lift its curfew the day
before the invasion when it made
this promise?
(freestyle)
Of course the U.S. has no intention of restoring the participatory
democracy developed in Grenada
since 1979. The "democratic institutions" Reagan favours for
Grenada will be based on the
"Westminster hypocricy" of UFO
buff Sir Eric Gairy. Economic
mismanagement, governmental
secrecy and a plethora of secret
police trained by Chilean fascists
constituted the grotesque caricature
of parliamentary democracy
developed by Sir Gairy.
Rigged elections, state terrorism
and economic and social deterioration was what precipitated the New
Jewel Movement to overthrow the
"buffoon of the commonwealth"
and initiate a series of reforms in
Grenadian society. Free and accessible health care, education and
other social services became
available. Grassroots democracy
grew stronger daily as more people
became literate and participated in
"parish" and "zonal" councils.
I visited Grenada in February and
March this year. I witnessed the incredible sight of how Grenada's annual budget policies were decided
upon. Over 1,000 delegates attended a national conference on the
budget. In workshops the delegates
carefully analyzed the proposals put
forth by the Finance ministry, and
freely gave their criticisms and suggestions for amendments.
Grenada was never in any danger
of becoming a marxist-leninist dictatorship. The Grenadian experiment was revolutionary, to be sure,
but it in no way physically threatened the security of neighbouring
Caribbean states. The only threat
Grenada presented was that of a
good example. It was a model of
Caribbean development which an
increasingly significant number of
Caribbeans could understand and
envy.
In 1982 Grenada's economy grew
by 5.5 per cent, making it the fastest
growing economy in the western
hemisphere. In comparison, the
economy of Barbados was a
shambles. The ultra-conservative
government of Barbados presided
over an economy which experienced
a 5 per cent negative growth in
See page 11. REVOLUTION
Amnesty refuses to grade torture and abuse
I'd like to respond to the article which appeared in the Ubyssey on Oct. 21 (Amnesty
cages mock prisoners). I must first thank the
staff of The Ubyssey for their interest in
covering the Amnesty International cage to
publicize the plight of imprisoned human
rights activists highlighted during Prisoners
of Conscience week. There are however two.
major inaccuracies that I'd like to clear up.
Dr. Michael Wallace did most gratefully
consent to be a mock prisoner on our behalf,
but statements attributed to him cannot be
interpreted as Amnesty policy. Specifically he
is quoted as follows: "The governments of
Guatemala, El Salvador and Iran are
especially prone to removing democratic
rights," he said.
"Especially prone" in this context implies
a ranking or blacklisting of governments on
human rights abuses which Amnesty International does not or cannot do. Sitting on a
fence? Not so. Not only does repression in
various countries prevent the free flow of information about human rights abuses, but
the techniques of repression and their impact
vary widely.
How would Amnesty grade the violations
of human rights that fall within our mandate? One point for each prisoner of conscience, two points for unfair or tardy trials,
three points for torture, four points for executions? Such a scheme is obviously ludicrous
and would be of little use were it reasonable
to implement. Instead of attempting to draw
comparisons, Amnesty concentrates on try
ing to end the specific violations of human
rights in each case.
The second point deals with the question
of effectiveness of Amnesty International.
On both the referred to Urgent Action Network and the Prisoners of the Month Campaigns, either improved prison conditions or
the actual release of the prisoner in question
has ensued in roughly 50 per cent of the time.
Factors surrounding human rights abuses
on the international scene are too numerous
and far too complex to deduce a direct cause
and effect relationship between the actions of
Amnesty International and a quantifiable
result.
To pick a number and claim a success rate
is overly simplistic and in error. Amnesty has
helped   to   increase   public   awareness
throughout the world about political imprisonment, torture and the death penalty.
Although Amnesty does not claim credit for
the release of prisoners, many former
prisoners have said that it was international
pressure that secured their freedom or saved
their lives.
People interested in joining the appeal for
the release of men and women detained in
violation of their rights might consider
Amnesty International as an avenue for their
concerns. At UBC we're in SUB 230 D. You
can find us there 11:30 to 1:30 p.m. on
weekdays.
Rob Stephenson
grad studies
Amnesty International UBC
Long standing complaints won't be heard by board
Labour Minister Bob Mc-
Clelland's recent decision to appoint Boards of Inquiries to hear a
number of long-standing human
rights complaints has resulted in
considerable media attention and
some confusion.
Some background information
might be helpful in clarifying the
issues.
Firstly, while it is commendable
that the Minister has taken action in
these cases, it should be known that
many of these cases had been sitting
on the Minister's desk for months.
In 1982 there were 51 unresolved
cases referred to the Minister for action. Some of these are only now
being referred to a Board of Inquiry. I find this delay questionable, coming from the Cabinet
Minister who has been making the
claim that "justice delayed is justice
denied".
My second concern is that the impression has been created that these
referrals are due to the new Human
Rights legislation. Nothing could be
further from the truth. The
recently-appointed boards are mandated under the existing legislation.
The Human Rights Branch and
Commission have been eliminated
but unless and until the proposed
Human Rights Act (Bill 27) is approved by the legislature, the present legislation is still the law.
In fact there are now nearly 500
human rights cases sitting in.limbo,
because the Human Rights Officers
who had been dealing with these
complaints were locked out of their
offices and fired. These are cases
that were in various stages of completion when the new Legislation
was introduced. This does not include new complaints that would
ordinarily come into the Human
Rights Branch offices if they were
fully   staffed.   Since   the   Branch
received more than 10,000 inquiries
about possible human rights violations in 1982, we must assume that
there are now many alleged human
rights violations going unreported.
Finally,  there  is  the  very real
threat of deterioration of human
rights protection in B.C. once the
new legislation is passed. The narrow mandate given to the Human
Rights Council under the new Act
will make it very difficult for victims of discrimination to get action
on a complaint.
I do not believe that a five-person
politically-appointed Council will
even begin to fill the gap left by the
now-disbanded Human Rights
Commission and Branch.
What is required is the enshrine-
ment of Human Rights, totally free
from political interference, in the
same way that the Auditor-General
and the Ombudsman's offices are
protected from political pressures.
We need to ensure that those charged with enforcing and advancing
human rights report directly to the
legislature, not a cabinet minister.
Only then will the problems of inequality and discrimination begin tc
be addressed without interference
from the government of the day.
Colin Gablemann.
North Island MLA
Fallacies shown in abortion debate,
science should define personhood
Marjorie Maguire's address in
The Ubyssey (Catholic speaks out,
Oct. 25) was hardly worth carrying,
even in summary form. But since
you did carry it, I shall point out
just a few of the fallacies in the
position she advocates. First there is
the distinction between being "pro-
choice and "pro-abortion". The
same distinction is often made in
the case of pornography. However,
this distinction does not mitigate
the consequences for the victims of
either abortion or porn.
Maguire's key statement, around
which revolves her whole address
which I heard her deliver in Regina,
is that " .-. . personhood begins
when the woman in whose womb
the pregnancy exists consents to the
pregnancy and resolves to bring the
fetal life to birth." From this view it
must follow that a woman who rejects her pregnancy throughout the
nine months will deny her fetus personhood right through birth. On
the other hand, the child who is accepted right at conception must
begin personhood right away.
Then what about the woman who
launches her child into personhood
by the subjective act of acceptance
and then changes her mind? Does
this reversal in attitude mean that
her child ceases to be a person?
Surely it is illogical to base someone's personhood on someone
else's feeling. And if acceptance
constitutes personhood before
birth, why should it not do so after
birth? In fact, personhood is intrinsic to one's nature and must be
determined by scientific, objective
criteria; personality is affected by
one's interrelationships.
Then there is Maguire's claim
that the Catholic church's stand on
abortion is a fairly recent one. In
her address she concentrated only
on the pre-scientific views of fetal
development which Catholic
theologians in past centuries inherited from their surroundings.
But mistaken views of fetal
development do not necessarily imply approval of abortion. Is the
categorical and unqualified condemnation of abortion which appears  already in the  Didache,  a
Sloppy writers
Your writers are getting sloppy
again. In the Oct. 25 issue, I never
said that "tuition fees could increase by as much as 50 per cent
next year." I said that I had been
told by one of our student Board of
Governor reps that there had been
discussions of fee increases of as
high as 40 or 50 per cent.
In another story in the same
issue, you said that I said that
"UBC student could lose credit for
the academic year if a general strike
occurs." That may make an interesting sensational lead for your
story, but I don't know where you
dreamed that up. What I said is that
we should ensure that credit for the
academic year is not jeopardized
due to a strike.
If you insist on editorializing, it
would be much appreciated if you
do not attribute these directly to
real persons. There are some critical
issues arising in the near future, and
we would all hope that you attempt
to cover these in the most conscientious manner as possible.
Lisa Hebert
AMS external affairs coordinator
Church document of the first century, a recent stand? Moreover,
Church sanctions against abortion
at any stage were already laid down
as early as the Council of Elvira
(305) and of Ancyra (314).
Finally, since abortion carries the
sentence of automatic excommunication from the Catholic
Church, surely the word
"Catholic" is devoid of all meaning
when predicted of Marjorie
Maguire and her group.
Lawrence Abello
physics grad studies
'Where were we all?'
It was really nice to see all the older people out at the Refuse the Cruise
march and rally on Saturday. It is very heartening to know that many
parents and grandparents feel strongly enough about this issue to learn
something about it and publically associate themselves with the growing
protest movement. All the marchers were seriously concerned and seeing
the numbers of grey haired people was impressive.
But, there seemed to be more older people than young people. These
were not just "left over 60's protestors" but people the age of our parents
and grandparents. It really seems odd that so many protestors were older
because this territory just naturally belongs to youth. Where were we all?
Where were the students from UBC? The march even took place in our end
of town but hardly any UBC students were there.
You've heard it before and you'll hear it again. Our participation is not
just requested it's required in the Refuse the Cruise movement. Our birthright, the future, is being threatened. Why whould we continually put up
with greater and greater threats? Why should we sit around while older
people, with less time to lose, do our protesting for us? This is our issue, we
have to react.
Maybe you are someone who hasn't been active because you feel like you
"don't know enough" to do anything. Take heart. There are lots of opportunities to learn. Read Tween Classes to find out what activities Students
for Peace and Mutual Disarmament are doing. Amoung other things, this
term they are sponsoring a series of educational seminars at the grad centre
on Thursday evenings.
We have to stop letting other people do our work for us and we have to
get over feeling we are too powerless to act. For the love of life, speak up
and don't let yourself be bullied.
Isobel McDonald
nursing 2
Student unaffected by Socred budget
wishes Solidarity would simply go away
For some time now the Solidarity
Coalition has been talking about
rights — human rights, democratic
rights, labour rights, and of particular relevance to students, educational rights. But the actions of the
Social Credit government have not,
and will not, affect my right to an
education. I doubt they will have a
negative affect on anybody's right
to an education.
It seems apparent that educational opportunities have continued
to increase in British Columbia —
the enrolment at UBC, at least, is
substantially greater than last year.
The actions of the government will
only serve to restrict the type of
education one receives; this will
the justified result of more
realistically stringent academic requirements for entrance to post-
secondary institutions and for
financial aid.
The Solidarity Coalition, Operation Solidarity, and associated
unions are, however, threatening to
take action that will severely limit,
or in fact eliminate every student's
access to education. Any job or
protest action that results in the
disruption or cancellation of classes
at the universities, colleges, or
within the public school system will
be an outrageous and unjustified
violation of rights. I am outraged
and disgusted by the hypocrisy of
these groups that seem intent on attacking a right they claim to protect. Rob Marsh,
arts 2
THE UBYSSEY
October 28,1983
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Fridays throughout
the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University
of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff
and are not necessarily those of the university administration
or the AMS. Member, Canadian University Press. The
Ubyssey's editorial office is SUB 241k. Editorial department,
228-2301/2305. Advertising 228-3977/3978.
One concert caused grave rifts among the usual happy Ubyssey staff. Neil Lucente had
Peter Berlin steal the words right out of his mouth at the news conference. Muriel Draaisma
was still recovering from an exhausting search for stories in the depths of her fouton. Chris
Wong yelled "to hell with poverty!" Victor Wong abstained from smoking todav- Holly
Nathan worked industriously. Doug Schmidt looked to the sun a lot. Sarah Cox was thinking
of changing jobs to the less demanding city desk. Stephen Wisenthal got wet in the main
libraryrSue Mcllroy encirled Puget Sound. Elena Miller painted a movie black. Sarah Millln
killed another enrolment story. Justin Wyatt skipped the news conference. Alar Ollum refused to be quoted. Gordon Clark assisted. Robbie Robertson and Robert Beynon were in and
out of the office all day. Mary Jewell wrote and Charlie Fidelman braved the sisters. Diane
was in such a rush she forgot to tell us her lest name.
UUUtU>'xU 1
Jim knows more
In response to Linda Nichol's letter (Jim . . . Budget Knowledge,
Oct. 25), I would like to say I was
not in a hole somewhere during the
last five months, I distinctly
remember a divorcee.
The budget legislation has its
good parts and its bad parts. The
Human Rights Commission has
been reduced, but it is still accessible. If the five member B.C. Council of Human Rights, as it now
stands, finds itself buried under a
thousand "not deemed trivial"
complaints, then it would be unlikely that Victoria will not hear about
it and not do anything about it.
But, nobody wants to wait that
long.
The Rentalsman's office will be
closed, and there are people who require this service. The West End Tenants' Association and the North
Shore Tenants' Association have
shown the foresight to predict an increase for their services. This is a
solution in times of restraint to a
problem, which is more constructive than throwing a rotten pumpkin at police officers.
The budget deficit occurring at
UBC is from the difference in what
the Universities Council of B.C.
gave UBC and what UBC is planning to spend.
In engineering, and some other
businesses, there is a procedure called return on investment. This is used to determine what direction a
firm should take when faced with a
number of choices. If we, the
students, are to become politically
active, the best return of our time,
money and manpower will be informing UBC of the consequences of
its actions.
Us inquisitive types here at the.
Ubyssey (SUB 241K) just love to
hear from you, our readers. We've
tried everything: misquoting
sources, scathing cutlines under
photos, and even an occasional controversial editorial (alright, but at
least we're trying . . .). Now, as a
last resort, here's a direct invitation
from us to you: SEND US LETTERS! If it's typed on a 70 space
line and is not sexist or racist, we'll
do our best to print it. So here it is,
your chance to upgrade the quality
of the vilest rag west of Blanca.
Deadlines for letters are Monday
and Friday at 12:30.
This may sound like leaving the
rest in the cold, but, times like these
are far from over.
We know that with the zero per
cent increase in UBC's budget, we
are in the hole. Also, there is a good
possibility that later we will get
handed a shovel and told to dig
deeper.
Have we reached such apathetic
depths that we have.to join a coalition to do our dirty work for us? A
coalition which is striving to
preserve the status quo, which
might mean less than a zero per cent
increase for UBC.
Jim Davies
applied science 1
Congratulate
silent geers
I wish to congratulate Jim
Hamilton for his letter to The
Ubyssey on Oct. 18 (Geerantics
unwelcomed by Geer) concerning
some engineering students' "geery"
behaviour. It is about time some
conscientious members of the silent
majority of engineering make their
presence known instead of continuing to tolerate the geers'
misrepresentation.
The incident outside Sedgewick
was just one of the many instances
when the "geers" disgusted other
members of the community with
their obnoxious and offensive
tricks. However, the absolute majority of the engineering students,
who do not share the same insecurity complex and identity crisis suffered by a few so-called
"engineers", usually remains silent.
The notoriety of the engineering
students created by a few "geers" is
damaging to the image and reputation of the student body and, indirectly, to the engineering profession. The time has come for the rest
of us normal engineering students
to do something about this unfortunate situation.
As for the "geers", I sincerely
hope that they will resort to some
constructive means the next time
they have this strong urge for some
attention and recognition, instead
, of behaving in an irresponsible and
revolting manner. They should try
to use a little bit of common sense
and understand what reasonable
limitations are. After all, they might
become engineers one day and by
then realize who the hell they really
are.
James Tarn
engineering Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 28,1983
Pioneer meansqualityin:Receivers, Turntables, Cassette Decks,
Pioneer also leads the way with a complete range ol Car Stereos
1   1 w Friday, October 28,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
Art gallery is a bold and colorful display
By HOLLY NATHAN
The overworked and somewhat
sophomoric question, What is Art?,
is as challenging as ever under the
present exhibitions of the newly
opened Vancouver Art Gallery.
From the muted browns of a Rembrandt to the flashing neons of the
'60s, and from canvas paints to
butyrate plastic and video experiences, the Art Gallery attempts
to be both a museum and a haven
for the alternative.
But exactly what role the gallery
aspires to play in the community is
a question of consternation for
local artists who have banded
together to create the October Show
on       Hamilton   Street,   staged
simultaneously with the opening of
the Art Gallery. It is the hope of the
show's organizers that the Gallery
will give exposure to local artists,
but they are concerned the emphasis
at the gallery will be on national
and international.
However, for its inaugural exhibition the Gallery has in fact
shone the spotlight on local artists
with the biggest project ever undertaken — Vancouver Artists:
1931-83. The viewer walks up the
elegant centre staircase, and
witnesses the course of local art
through 50 years of diverse changes
and through many of the trends and
gimmicks that have occupied the art
world.
The gallery features works depicting comfortable, familiar, and
sometimes childlike pictures of
lumber mills and ferry boats, as well
as more than enough (four rooms to
be exact) of Emily Carr's dark and
internal renderings of British Columbian forests and Indian villages.
There is also the "socialist
realism" of the late 30's and early
40's showing the worker of the
vegetable patch and the local
dockyards, leaning slightly into the
future in the best style of posters
from China and the Soviet Union.
But the pulsing sight of Fisher and
Goranson's Vancouver, with the
Lions above and the feverish activity   of   progress   and   civilization
Femmes are frustrated
By NEIL LUCENTE
For a band that's only slightly
more than two years old, the
Violent Femmes have accumulated
more legends and stories than the
average dead rock star. One legend
concerns the discovery of the group
by Chrissie Hynde and the late
James Honeyman-Scott of the
Pretenders as the trio played for
dimes on a Milwaukee street corner
— they were impressed enough to
ask them to open their show later
that night.
There is also the story concerning
lead singer/songwriter Gordon
Gano being booted out of his high
school honor society for singing a
song with four letter words during
his high school awards ceremony.
Despite the stories and the wide
press attention, the Violent Femmes
are largely unknown in Canada.
Judging by the sparse audience at
SUB Wednesday night, Vancouver
is no exception. So what's all the
fuss about?
The Femmes are on the verge of
ushering in a refreshing new pop
trend and they are possibly the most
important rock group to perform at
UBC in a long time.
At the outset, the Violent Femmes maintained a chatty, intimate
rapport with the audience, but later
had the crowd slam-dancing
furiously to "Add It Up", a
brilliant musical summary of young
male frustration.
Nearly all the songs deal with
frustration, and every single one is
written by Gano.
Gano's songs deal with the traditional obsession of male rock and
roll: sexual frustration and lust.
Gano, however, deals with the problem from a different angle. He is
aware that he is merely accepting a
stereotyped role and once he does
that he cannot play the part with the
necessary conviction.
"Words that memorize/ Words
hypnotize/ words make my mouth
exercise/ words all fail the magic
prize/ nothing I can say when I'm
in your thighs."
From such acoustic nakedness,
the band manages to squeeze out an
unusual vocal and instrumental
richness underlined with Gano's
frustration and bottled-up tension.
Their phenomenal ability to move
from one extreme to another is due
mainly to their talent in combining
lifting hooks with jarring
disonance.
They have been compared to The
Velvet Underground, The Modern
Lovers and Aztec Camera, but the
Violent Femmes have something
completely different. Brian Ritchie
is quick to deny any ties with their
predecessors or contemporaries.
"We don't identify with them,
we're just doing our own thing. We
have a lot of fun and we don't care
about what people say about us."
Neither  violent or  female,  the
male trio tries its best to ignore any
type of pretension heaped on them.
"Our name has nothing to do
with sales or with our records. It's
just a name. Some people put the
name together with the songs and
say we're redefining heterosexual
roles," said Gano.
In "Gimme the car" the song
that got him thrown out of school,
Gano begs his father to give him the
car in the firm conviction that that
is all he needs to be able to seduce
women. And yet as he sings it
becomes painfully clear that his
pubescent sexually fantasies are the
problem, not their gratification.
The performing persona of Gano
cannot relate to women precisely
because he lusts after them so badly.
The Femmes' unique sound
comes from their instruments. Gano
plays an old Fender guitar, while
Victor Delorezo pounds on a snare
drum and an over turned washtub
which he calls a tranceaphone.
Brian Ritchie plays a cumbersome
acoustic mariachi bass from Mexico. And a fourth, unofficial
member of the band, Peter
Balerieri, played frenetically on saxophone.
Gano's response to fame and fortune is equally unpretentious and
loaded with Mid-Western, "aw-
shucks" modesty. "It's funny but 1
think I've developed an instinct foi
signing autographs."
below, cannot but help to make the
heart beat with a civic pride.
The gimmicks include a childish
delight in the juxtaposition of any
two images which, when seen
together, create a mild chemical
reaction. In this category comes the
tasteless image of Santa Claus
holding the severed head of a
reindeer. This kind of art makes a
statement. But it reminds one of a
joke which is not worth repeating a
second time.
The Art of the Delightful includes Gathie Falks' scattered herd
of runaway horses galloping
through a gallery room, or life-sized
musicians with their leopard-
spotted saxophones making visual
music.
But if there is a theme running
through much of recent local art, it
would have to be a certain preoccupation with violence and social
statement. From the idyllic peace of
lotusland has come a series of
disturbing rape and murder scenes,
starving third world children,
American blacks hanging from oak
trees, a Braineaters rendition of the
Gateway to Hell via the third world
war, and a blood-splattered map of
the end of the world.
The October Show on Hamilton
Street, less constrained by the
historical emphasis given by the.
Gallery, also displays a notable
number of atomic photographs,
small electric chairs, police and
guns, military planes and prisoners
holed up in caves.
These symbols of oppression
come dangerously close to the realm
of cliche where the images are too
tiresome to make an impact on a
viewer. It is not that art can not appeal to conscience, but only that
much of the art works only on that
level.
The October Show is located in a
warehouse where some artists felt
free enough to paint their works
directly upon the walls. Viewers are
invited to experience art by descending into the gloomy depths of the
basement.
Whether exhibitions such as the
October Show will remain in the
realm of "alternative art" with the
Art Gallery determining the
mainstream, has yet to be seen.
While curators of the October Show
remain skeptical, the Vancouver
Art Gallery has succeeded in exhibiting a bold, colorful art experience for art lovers of every taste.
GANO... .undersexed.
— neil lucente photo
Francis Coppola rumbles to fish out another success
By JUSTIN WYATT
Francis Ford Coppola's striking
film, Rumble Fish, covers new
ground with its innovative use of
Rumble Fish
Starring   Matt    Dillon,    Mickey
Rourke, and Dennis Hopper
Directed by Francis Coppola
Playing at the Vogue
light, camera movement and
editing. While Rumble Fish is most
assuredly an experimental film, it
remains  remarkably  accessible  to
most viewers. The result is a stunning composition — one of the best
films of 1983.
Coppola's last film was an adaption of the S. E. Hinton novel The
Outsiders. While that film was tritely conventional and dull, Rumble
Fish is an exciting experience with a
real emotional impact. Like Coppola's other experimental films,
One From the Heart, Apocalypse
Now and The Conversation, Rumble Fish doesn't depreciate. Images,
mood and emotion remain with the
viewer long after the film has ended.
Rumble Fish concentrates on
Rusty-James (Matt Dillon), and the
adoration he has for his older
brother, the Motorcycle Boy
(Mickey Rourke). Rusty-James
doesn't understand that Motorcycle
Boy is no longer the famous gang
leader of his teenage years. He is
now a thoroughly shattered
individual left color-blind and partially deaf from too many fights.
The film covers three days in the
lives of the two characters, and is
marked by a vicious fight, a street
carnival, hallucinations and visits to
a  pet  store  selling  the  infamous
rumble fish.
These tiny Siamese fighting fish
are Coppola's main metaphor. The
fish, like the youths, must be
separated. Because they will attack
each other if put together. The fish
will also attack themselves if they
see their own reflection in a glass or
mirror. Coppola builds around the
idea of these human rumble fish
and constructs a simple but powerful narrative.
Like One From the Heart, the
refined story is enhanced by
tremendous stylization and
cinematic technique. The salient
device in Rumble Fish is the use of
Stewart Copeland's percussive
score. Copeland's music integrates
industrial sounds of machinery,
traffic: and construction with his
own composition. Coppola and
editor Barry Malkin use the music
as a transitional device between
scenes. The technique works well
and adds fluidity to the film.
Copeland and Coppola also
achieve a rather remarkable feat by
combining the score with the actor's
dialogue. The actors almost sing to
the underscored music. Dillon and
company deliver their lines in
perfect tempo to the music, making
the effect theatrical but not too
distracting.
Copeland arranged themes for
each of the characters that readily
identify with their personality and
type. Perhaps the best examples of
this  technique  is  the accompani
ment to Dennis Hopper's comically
alcoholic father, or the dissonant
theme for the broken Cassandra
(Diana Scarwid).
Stephen Burum's black and white
cinematography is also outstanding. His impressionistic
camerawork is especially powerful
in the documentary-like scene after
the gang fight. Burum's refined use
of shadow and light is evidenced in
his picturesque shots of back alleys,
pool halls and open roads. Also
noteworthy is the imaginative
sound design that freely distorts the
film's soundtrack as it would be interpreted by the nearly deaf Motorcycle Boy.
Coppola has chosen a
distinguished cast of young actors.
Matt Dillon displays a macho swagger idea for the role of Rusty-
James. Dillon also shows unexpected comic skills in his scenes
with Mickey Rourke. Rourke's
quiet intensity is a perfect complement to the more extroverted
Dillon. Among the supporting
players, Diana Scarwid has two
wonderful scenes as the Motorcycle
Boy's old romantic interest, and
Tom Waits is excellent as the
disconnected pool hall owner.
Rumble Fish is a splendid film. It
can be appreciated on a purely
technical level but one can also be
entertained and moved by the
chaste story and acting. Without a
doubt Coppola's experiment has
been successful. Page 10
THE, UBYSSEY
WA&
Derry Byrne's Tunisia Jazz Band: dixieland
sounds, Oct. 29, Hot Jazz Club, 236 E. Broadway, 873-4131.
Fringe Elements/A Cast of Thousands:
two west coast electronic but animated
bands, Oct. 29, Soft Rock Cafe, 1925 W. 4th,
734-2822.
AI Wold's Jazz Quartet: the versatile
pianist/saxophonist with some of
Vancouver's coolest jazz musicians, Oct. 30,
Classical Joint, 231 Carrall, 689-0667.
October Jazz and Pop Festival:
Vancouver's topp jazz and blues artists in one
line-up, Oct. 28-29, 9:30 p.m.. The Ankor, 66
Powell.
Joni Alden: a strong soprano voice with Paul
Douglas and others backing her up in a baroque cncert, Oct. 28, 8 p.m., Vancouver
Unitarian Church, 49th and Oak.
Flying Ship: Four talented Vancouver musicians who have combined their efforts with
the result of a unique brand of music: acid-
folk, Oct. 30, Carnegie Center, Main and
Hastings, 689-0926.
Utah Phillips: a man with a golden voice that
tells of old yarns, and songs of struggle, Oct.
30, Vancouver East Cultural Centre, 1895
Venables, tickets Black Swan, Octopus, Vancouver Folk Music Festival, 879-2931.
The Schoenberg Ensemble: Musicians from
The Hague, Holland under the direction of
composer and pianist, Reinbert de Leeuw performing turn of the century works, Nov. 1, 8
p.m., UBC Recital Hall.
Parachute Club: a Torontonian group making waves on the music scene with their hit,
Rise Up, Oct. 31, Commodore Ballroom,
tickets VTC/CBO.
John McLaughlin/AI diMeola/Paxca
DeLucia: three virtuoso fusion guitarists who
have played with Chick Corea, Jan Hammer,
Jean Luc-Ponty and many others, Nov. 1,
Q.E. Theatre.
UBC Chamber Singers: with director Cortland Hultberg who did a soulful arrangement
of When I Fall In Love performed by the
Magee Vocal Spazz (There, at least I can get
one silly comment in this column that will no
longer be silly, sob, sob), Recital Hall, noon
and 8 p.m.
The Itals Roots Radics: a highly acclaimed
Jamacian vocal trio and a premier session and
touring band, Nov. 2, 8:15 p.m., The Commodore.
Mental as Anything: A up and coming band
from Australia, Nov. 3, 8 p.m.. The Commodore.
Queen Ida and the Bon Temps Zydeco
Band: Cajun music at its most energetic
state, Nov. 4, Commodore.
UpvlM.
SUBFilms (SUB Auditorium, 228-3697) Oct.
28-30: Tron, 7 and 9:30 p.m., only 7 p.m. Sun
Nov. 3-6: Victor Victoria. 7 and 9:30 p.m.
Fri. and Sat., 7 p.m. Thurs. and Sun.
Family Housing Film Festival (SUB
Auditorium, 228-5778) Oct. 29: Ichabod and
Mr. Toad, 3 p.m.
Vancouver Art Gallery Film Exhibit (Vancouver Art Gallery, 684-3014) Nov. 4: The 70's
and 80's, includes the premier of Chris
Gallaher's new film, 7:30 p.m.
Pacific Cinematheque 11155 W. Georgia,
732-6119) Oct. 28: The Discreet Charm of
The Bourgeoisie. 7.30 p.m.; The Phantom
of Liberty, 9:30 p.m.; Nov. 2: L'avventura,
7:30 p.m. Nov. 3: Towards Poetic Realism,
7:30 p.m.; Zero De Conduite and
L'atalante, 9:30 p.m. Nov. 4: The Milky
Way, 7:30 p.m.; That Obscure Object of
Desire, 9:30 p.m.
Ridge Theatre (16th and Arbutus, 738-6311)
Alfred Hitchcock Film Festival, Oct.
28-Nov. 3: Rope. 7:30 and 9:15 p.m.
Vancouver East Cinema (7th and Commercial, 253-5455) Oct. 28-30: Body Heat. 7:30
p.m.; An Officer and a Gentleman, 9:30
p.m. Oct. 31-Nov. 1: Eye of the Needle, 7:30
p.m.; Fade to Black, 9:30 p.m. Nov. 2-3:
Zazie, 7:30 p.m.; Tom Jones, 9:05 p.m.
Savoy Cinema (Main and Kingsway,
872-2124) Nov. 2-3: Rebel Without A
Cause, 7:30 p.m.; East of Eaden. 9:40 p.m.
Hollywood Theatre (3123 W. Broadway,
738-3211) Oct. 28-30: Smiles of a Summer
Night, 7:30 p.m.; L'avventura, 9:30 p.m.
Oct. 31-Nov. 6: Shane. 7:30 p.m.; Monte
Walsh, 9:45 p.m.
Friday, October 28, 1983
Filthy Rich: parody of the 1940's "film noir"
genre see in today's paper, Waterfront
Theatre, Granville Island, until Nov. 19, 2 for 1
Tues., 5:00 p.m.
Sweet Bird of Youth: not one of Tennessee
Williams' better efforts, Arts Club, Granville
Island until Nov. 19, 687-1644.
GET A FREE TACO
WITH THE PURCHASE
OF A TACO
3396 West Broadway (at Waterloo)
Open 11 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. 7 days a week
393 East 12th Avenue (at Kingsway)
Open 11 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. 7 days a week
2028 W. 41st Street, Kerrisdale
Open 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. 7 days a week
Robson Square Food Fair (Hornby & Robson)
Open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 6 days a week
(CLOSED SUNDAYS)
This coupon is good for a
FREE TACO
with the purchase of a Taco
COUPON MUST BE PRESENTED.
One offer per person.
EXPIRES NOV. 13th
Children of the Night: comic biographical
account of Bela Lugosi's last days, at the
Firehall Theatre on Cordova until Nov. 5,
Tuesdays through Sundays at 8:30 p.m.
Gone With the Mind: billed as a "comic-
surrealistic treat", opens tonight and runs until Nov. 19 at Presentation House in North Van
986-1351.
One-act Play: a new play by Leonard Mefi,
Dorothy Somerset Theatre, Friday at noon
and 8 p.m., free admission.
Theatre in Music: featuring the Cassation
Group presenting works with strong visual
and theatrical elements, Western Front, 303
E. 8th, 669-4851, Oct. 29, 8 p.m.
Ever Loving: about the lives of three war
brides, Arts Club Seymour, playing till Nov. 5.
Judy: a one-woman musical about a talented
but tragic figure, Arts Club Revue Theatre,
playing till Nov. 12.
Inter-Related Matters: political art by Burrel
Swartz, one of B.C.'s premier but unknown
artists, Oct. 28-Nov. 5, Unit/Pitt Gallery, 163
W. Pender, 681-6740.
Japanese People and Japanese Things:
photographs by Ted Scott showing the
costumes, houses, colours and textures of
Japan, Oct. 31-Nov. 20, The Asian Centre.
Burnaby Print Show Recollective: a show
documenting two decades of development in
contemporary Canadian printmaking, Burnaby Art Gallery, 6344 Gilpin, 291-9441.
Asian and European Fans: fans related to
war, marriage (same thing?, oops there's a second silly comment) and lace and feather, the
Vancouver Museum, 1100 Chestnut,
736-4431.
TODAY
PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVE CLUB
New   Mission   MP   Gerry  St.   Germain  speaks,
noon, SUB 215.
UBC DNCE CLUB
Party dances featured in first special Friday class,
noon, SUB ballroom.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Hallowe'en dance, get dressed, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m.,
International House.
STUDENT LIBERALS
Communications   and   membership   committee
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
Men's Varsity vs. Sev's Stammers, 8:30 p.m.,
War Memorial gym.
THUNDERBIRD HOCKEY
69th   Annual   Varsity-Alumni   match,   8   p.m.,
Thunderbird Arena.
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
Women's Blue-Gold game, 6:30 p.m., War
Memorial gym.
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
J. V. men vs. Capilano College in Totem Conference play, 4 p.m., War Memorial gym.
SCIENCE FICTION SOCIETY
Wild dinner, party, all night and part of the next
day, SUB 228.
UBC PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVE CLUB
Newest    MP,    Gerry    St.    Germain    speaks,
noon 1:30 p.m., SUB 215.
THEATRE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
General meeting, noon, Green Room in the basement of the Frederic Wood Theatre annex.
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
J.V. men vs. Capilano College, 6:30 p.m., War
Memorial Gym. Men's varsity vs. Meralomas,
8:30 p.m.. War Memorial Gym. Junior varsity
women vs. Capilano College, 4 p.m.. War
Memorial Gym. Women's grad game, 4 p.m..
War Memorial Gym.
NEWMAN CLUB
Halloween dance, tickets at door, $3 non-
members, S2 members,
UBYTWEEN PARTY
Outrageous and bizzare costume party extravaganza with ritualistic Gregorian chanting,
bring a fiend, 9 p.m., info at SUB 241K.
UBC SKI CLUB
Halloween party: games, prizes and free dinner,
evening, Whistler cabin.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Halloween dance, everyone welcome, $1 with
costume, $2 without, 8 p.m.. International
House upper lounge.
SATURDAY
THUNDERBIRD WOMEN'S BASKETBALL
Grad Game. 4 p.m., War Memorial gym.
THUNDERBIRD JUNIOR VARSITY
BASKETBALL
Women's Junior Varsity vs.  Capilano College,
4:00 p.m., War Memorial gym,
NEWMAN CLUB
Halloween Dance, tickets at door. $2 members,
$3 non-members, 8 p.m. to midnight, St. Marks
College.
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
Men's    varsity    vs.     Meralomas,     8:30    p.m.,
Memorial Gym.
THUNDERBIRD JUNIOR VARSITY BASKETBALL
Men's Junior Varsity vs   Capilano College, 6:30
p.m.. War Memorial gym.
SUNDAY
Underwater hockey,  practice,  all welcome,   10
p.m., UBC Aquatic Centre.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Practice, worship and teaching, 7 p.m , SUB 212
UBC CYCLING CLUB
Ride, 9 a.m., meet south side of SUB.
MONDAY
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Bible study, discussion, noon, Bock 351A,
UBC  STUDENTS   FOR   PEACE  AND  MUTUAL
DISARMAMENT
Ken Nightengale of the Livermore Action group
will    speak    on    the    Lawrence    Livermore
laboratory, noon, SUB 205.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Choir practice, 8:30 p.m., International House.
UBC CYCLING CLUB
Noon-hour ride, noon, meet north side of SUB.
TUESDAY
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Guitar and sing along session, noon-2:30 p.m.,
SUB 235.
GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
Fireside  discussion:   Dr.  A.   Freeze,  faculty of
grad studies speaking on "financial support for
graduate students," 8 p.m.,  Fireside Lounge,
Graduate Student Centre.
FIRST YEAR'S STUDENT'S COMMITTEE
General meeting, noon, Buch. B221.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
General meeting, everyone invited, noon,  SUB
125.
PRE-MEDICAL SOCIETY
Lecture on financing {MOTPt given by captain
Dennis McMahan, noon-1:30 p.m., IRC 1.
OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS
General   meeting,   12  p.m.,   Lutheran   Campus
Centre,  5885 University Boulevard,  conference
room.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Chinese painting class, 3:30-4:30 p.m., SUB 215.
WEDNESDAY
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB
General    meeting    and   ski   demonstration    by
Sigge's sports store, noon, Chem. 150
FINE ARTS
Three film showings: Sex as art, "The Miracle of
Life,"   "Pas  de   Deux,"   Angel,"   (donation  at
door), 1:30, 2:30 and 3:30 p.m., Lassare 104.
ANARCHIST CLUB
Literature Table, 11-2 p.m., SUB concourse.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Mandarin class, all levels, noon,  Asian Centre,
Chinese department lounge.
UBC SKI CLUB
General  meeting,  info,  prizes and film,   noon,
SUB 212.
UBC CYCLING CLUB
Noon-hour ride, noon, meet north side of SUB.
PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVE YOUTH CLUB
Social, 6 p.m., SUB 212.
ROCKERS COOP
Mandatory   meeting   for   all   members,   discuss
social   night   (good   news),   revise  constitution,
and   registration,   no   show,   no   membership,
noon. SUB 213
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB
General meeting, noon, Chem   150
meeting, noon, SUB 224.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders — 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional lines, 60c. Commercial - 3 lines,
1 day $4.20; additional lines, 65c. Additional days, $3.80 and 60c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications, Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C.  V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $5.00. Call 228-3977. VISA
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HALLOWEEN
OTJ2E..
MV      HOLLYBURN
Sat  Oct   2 8  83   9pm   SHARP
North Foot of Denman Street
Texas mickey draw-music CITR
Tickets 1 joo   AMS box office
JUDITH ALEXANDER
LAWYER
731-8323 or 261-8514
FAMILY LAW
Change of name       Family Property
Divorce — Separation
Custody
PERSONAL INJURY LAW
ITALIAN LESSONS: Native Italian giving
lessons in conversation and grammar.
Reasonable rates. Call Giogio, 734-8893.
85 - TYPING
11 - FOR SALE - Private
FOR  SALE:  Honda 450,   1200 km.  Asking
$1800. Days, 254-9881, Ken.
25 - INSTRUCTION
The Vancouver Institute
Free Public Lecture
Hearing And Knowing Music
with piano illustration
Prof. Edward Cone,
Princeton University
Saturday, Oct. 29 at 8:15 P.M.
Lecture Hall 2,
Woodward Building
LSAT, GMAT, MCAT preparation Call
National Testing, 738-4618. Please leave
message on tape if manager is counselling.
30 - JOBS
INSTUCTORS Required for LSAT, MCAT,
GMAT courses. Leave name and number
738-4618.
DOMINIONAUTOMOBILE ASSOCIATION
has p/t sales positions available to market
tried & proven necessary car-care service.
Comm. & bonus paid daily. Earn between
$40-60 per eve. Call Leo 688-1463 or Peter
684-1048.
35 - LOST
BAHA'I FAITH. Building a United World
Community. Formal and informal discussions on selected topics every Friday. For
more information phone 222-0261.	
SEX AS ART: 3 films: 3 showings. Miracle of
Life; Pas de Deux; Angel. Lasserre 104
Wed. Nov. 2, 12:30, 2:30, 3:30. Donations.
Ubyssey Classified
is today's
greatest bargain!
I.D. BRACELET at the Osbourne gyms on
Sunday, Oct. 16. Phone Ang 228-1722
LOST: A gold bracelet, on Tues, Oct. 18.
Great sentimental value. If found, please
call 224-3441. Reward.
40 - MESSAGES
FAMILY     COMING     TO     TOWN?
Maybe   we   can   help.   Cottage,   Bed   &
Breakfast Registry. 738-7661.
LOOK INTO THE BRIGHT SIDE!
VANCOUVER MENSA 738-2124
70 - SERVICES
"MODE COLLEGE OF BARBERING AND
STYLING". Students - $4.50 to $6.50.
M7-601 W. Broadway, 874-0633.
WORD PROCESSING: & Typing: term
papers, theses, mscpt., essays, incl.
reports (tech., equational), letters,
resumes. Bilingual. Clemy, 266-6641.
EXPERIENCED TYPIST. Essays, reports,
projects - $1.00 pr page min. Contact
Louse, after 4 p.m. 731-0594.	
EXPERT TYPING. Essays, term papers,
factums, letters, manuscripts, resumes,
theses, IBM Selectric II. Reasonable rates.
Rose, 731-9857.	
FAST, ACCURATE WORD PROCESSING.
10/hr. essays, term papers, letters, etc.
879-5108. Visa accepted.
WORD   PROCESSING   SPECIALISTS:   U
write we type theses, resumes, letters,
essays, days, evenings, weekends
736-1208.	
WORD PROCESSING (Micom). Student
rates for thesis typing, $12/hr. Equation
typing available. Phone Jeeva at 876-5333.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING. IBM Selectric,
by experienced secretary. $1.25/pg. Bing,
224-1567.
INK DRAWING for theses and papers. Professional quality, reasonable rate, by hour
or estimate. 266-8771.
YEAR ROUND EXPERT typing from legible
work, essays, theses, 738-6829, 10 a.m. - 9
p.m. King Edward bus route.
TYPEWRITING - Essays, resumes, MINIMUM NOTICE REQUIRED. Tapes
transcribed. Elite, Pica or Script. UBC
Village location. 224-6518 day or night.
99 - MISCELLANEOUS
IMAGE DESIGN, 2331 Main St., 876-5586.
15% discount for students on all reg. priced
items. Full line of drafting, engineering &
art supplies. SPECIAL Drafting Table
$139.00 Friday, October 28,1983
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
Revolution will not die
From page 6
1982. This discrepancy caused acute
embarrassment for conservative
Caribbeans who had long predicted
disaster for socialist Grenada.
Indeed, I believe it was this embarrassment and the fact that the
"virus" which Grenada represented
would indeed inspire similar
movements for social liberation
throughout the Caribbean that finally caused neighbouring states to collaborate in the U.S. invasion.
I came to love Grenada and its
people. A more humane and just
society did not exist in our
hemisphere. 1 left many good
friends there when my visit ended.
One of them, a trade union leader
called Vincent Noel, died in the
military coup last week. I fear for
the others who I know are resisting
the re-imposition of fascism and the
crushing of their beautiful experiment. Reagan may kill the revolutionaries  but  he  cannot  kill  the
Grenadian revolution. He is only
hastening the day when the Caribbean ceases to be an American lake
and finally becomes a sea of revolution.
"Suffering rips through the land
- / and plagues every man / but I
say nothing /feel the pain / of God
is strain! / and remain silent / so
silent that I can sleep / and sleep
deep to dream / oh, the sweet
dreams of revolution. / And that I
might wake / wake to change /
change to wake / the aching heart
of injustice, ' the biting / unchanging conditions / that drains
humanity. / For I tell you brethren
/ from deep within / what I say to
you / that I say unto them / the
poet / sleeps to dream / dream to
wake / and wake to change.''
DR. Wiltshire
Alar Olljum is a Ubyssey staffer
with an insight on the Grenadian
situation.
Discover a sophistication of design,
function and performance that's a
joy to behold...or our name isn't
ZENITH DATA PRODUCTS, a division of Zenith Radio Canada Ltd.
3171 Number Six Road, Richmond, British Columbia V6V 1P5
pioixie
Pioneer & Larry's
A Combo That Can't Be Beat
Hot New Models-At The Best Prices
B§£«
^
CT-10
STEREO CASSETTE DECK
• Dolby B-type noise reduction system.
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e LED level meters.
s149
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130.1 went toMwiiMir Waie MftfriMffaM.flMrilwftfreBt arse
dmnortaHeit m«tmehl«li<tf*<w<nrtii«WM4.«itth«fMMnw "
Bator* (knew tt he was panmeelna me htm twmteu the «i
cut eW the mete wMte my heart beet <r»mksty; then he wa*
put tome teste* tape stuff otv the eaer end some »*»• te ceteb
eflghtfy acMne tear.
wtth theuS* v«Bew we»* mni etttaenuwwifwietle wooden shelr tad welted. The |
Horn went, end leaked et my mote. Me arid to Ik) down end eipete the mole.
<wni»i^inwtn»moh>MnMifronotnd»vTOlltnwhti*ri«e»thellc.aidoh1yth«aoinw I
But...he hod to do the ttnenei; I felt a painltat emotion of being teem. Then he
th»WoedtndlwetonmywaytoofctaUBC.Now(heiheotHennenth«mottlt)u>t*
y////////y//^<(//////A
"i
FOR THEATRE INFORMATION
CALL 687-1515
9.
9.
2
2
EDMONTON $129
SASKATOON $ 159
TORONTO $359
OTTAWA $389
MONTREAL $399
Going   r * TRAVEL
YourWfy!**   CUTS
The travel company of CFS
TRAVEL CUTS VANCOUVER
UBC. Student Union Building
604 224-2344
2
V,
4/jY//'/////,y//.v//////A
Frequent very coarse
language. some
violence, occasional
nudity and suggestive
scenes.    B.C. Director
918 GRANVILLE
685 5434
2.15,
4 10,
6, 8,
10
<^> "THE BIG CHILL"
coronet
■ SI  GRANVILLE
685 6828
SOME  VERY  COARSE  LANGUAGE.   OCCASIONAL NUDITY AND SUGGESTIVE SCENES.
- BC   DIRECTOR
2.30, 6. 7.46. 10
umited aGmina^cr if tjnOf IB
coronet
ISI GRANVILLE
685-6828
FREQUENT   VERY   COARSE   AND
SUGGESTIVE LANGUAGE.
B.C. DIRECTOR
CORONET 2, 3.50, 5.40. 7.30, 9.30
VARSITY 7.30, 9 30
varsity
4375 WEST 10th
224 3730
(MATURE)
SOME GORY VIOLENCE.
- B.C. DIRECTOR
CAMBIE  AT  18th
876-2747
HO AT
7.30-9.30. MATINEE SUNDAY 2.
BURT
LANCASTER
M LEOPARD
dunbar
DUNBAR AT 30«h
224-7252
(general)   (IGAIIORIROO)
ENGLISH SUB TITLES. 8 P.M.
PLACIDO DOMINGO   AraANSS5ST.,5SunLM
teresa stratas ^a Traviata
(GENERA!) 7.1M.1B
broadway
707 W.  BROADWAY
874-1927
 ts**
broadway
SOME    NUDITY.    SUG
GESTIVE   SCENES  AND
VERY COARSE LANGUAGE.   - B.C. DIRECTOR
707  W.  BROADWAY
874 1927
YUKON JACK ATTACK 3
The Bear Bite.
Squeeze the juice of a
quartered lime over ice.
Throw in 1V* ounces of
Yukon Jack, top it up with
cola and you' II have trapped
the Bear Bite. Inspired in the
wild, midst the damnably
cold, this, the black sheep
of Canadian liquors, is
Yukon Jack.
\Ukon
Jack
The Black Sheep of Canadian Liquors.
Concocted with fine Canadian Whisky.
For more Yukon Jack recipes write: MORE YUKON JACK RECIPES, Box 2710, Postal Station "U," Toronto, Ontario M8Z 5P1. Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, October 28, 1983
Filthy Rich is melodramatic film-noir
By ELENA MILLER
So there you are, taking slugs
from a bottle while trying to finish
the novel you've been writing for
the past 15 years. You're alone in
your scum hole of an office-cum-
sleeping room, when in walks this
beautiful high-class woman. And
instantly you say to yourself, "My
name is Tyrone Power, and her
name is Anne Scott, and we're both
in the middle of some kind of
parody take-off of the 1940's film
noir genre."
Filthy Rich
By George Walker
Directed by Pam Hawthorn
Playing   at   the   Waterfront   until
Nov. 19
You're a well-trained private-eye
and you start looking around for
evidence. And it's everywhere —
the neon light flashing on and off
outside the window, the saxophone
wailing in the background and the
clothes you and the beautiful
woman are wearing. But the fact is
you're dirt poor and she's filthy
rich.
So why has the playwright
George Walker put you here in the
first place? And why has he left you
with so little to cover yourself?
You're loaded to the gills with atmosphere and dialogue straight out
of a Raymond Chandler novel, and
you've even got a number of snappy
one-liners. But what about plot,
and character?
Alright, so the plot is supposed to
be convoluted and incomprehensible, just like those film noir plots
always are. And the characters are
supposed   to   be  parodies  of the
cliche characters in hard-boiled
detective stories. But why watch
this parody play when you can see
the real thing on the tube almost
HOLLYWOOD
3123 West Broadway
738-3211
Week of Oct. 24-30
Michelangelo Antonioni's
L'AVVENTURA
9:30
Ingmar Bergman's Classic
SMILES OF
A SUMMER
NIGHT
7:30
CLIP THIS AD FOR
ONE FREE ADULT
ADMISSION
When accompanied by one
paid adult admission.
NURSING WEEK 83
Oct. 31 -
Nov. 4
|M
O
N
T
U
E
|W
E
D
T
H
U
F
R
I
HEALTH FAIR SUB Concourse 10-4
'Check out your body from head to toe"
PIT NITE Come dressed as your
favourite health professional!
Door proceeds to Muscular Dystrophy
BOWLING TOURNEY SUB Bowling Alley
7-11 p.m. All faculties. Teams of 5. Prizes.
T-CUP Football Game SUB Field
Nursing vs Home Ec 12:30
FUN RUN      12:30 noon - from SUB
DANCE with "David Raven"
7:30-12:30 SUB Ballroom - Tickets $5
HERE'S TO YOUR HEALTH!
any night of the week at midnight?
There are, however, a number of
reasons for seeing Filthy Rich. If
you're a real film noir buff, you'll
probably appreciate the subtleties
of the dialogue. Much of Walker's
dialogue seems unnecessarily
drawn-out and tedious, but he is.
probably attempting to parody the
dialogue in films such as The Big
Sleep or The Maltese Falcon.
Another reason for seeing this
play is to enjoy the energetic performances by members of the Actors'
Co-op. Tom McBeath and David
Marr must be applauded, especially
for milking to the utmost their
respective roles as Tyrone Power,
the boozy, cynical private-eye, and
Jamie, his naive assistant. The rest
of the cast provided loyal support
and where the script is threadbare,
the actors admirably retain the audience's interest.
Filthy Rich is full melodramatic
acting, much needed to maintain a
reasonable level of activity onstage.
Walker's script contains humorous,
clever ideas, but also tedious verbosity. The actors, however, overcome this as much as they can, aided by the excellent atmospheric set
and lighting design of Douglas
Welch. Pam Hawthorn's light-
handed directing works well, except
the pace lags occasionally.
FREDERIC
WOOD
THEATRE
University of British Columbia
presents . . .
LOVE'S LABOR'S LOST
By Wm. Shakespeare
Directed by Arne Zaslove
NOVEMBER 11 - 19
(Previews - Nov. 9 & 10)
Curtain: 8:00 pm
Thursday Matinee/November 17 — 12:30 pm
Student Tickets — $4.50
Previews — All Seats $4.00
STUDENT SEASON TICKETS — 3 Plays for $9
BOX OFFICE    *    FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
Support Your Campus Theatre
Room 207
VgORD/s0
Maritta's
Coffees and Teas
3737 W. 10th Ave.
Zdp  XX.      1/2 block from Alma      s^/    ^^
B*ST BEANS \^N
INTRODUCTORY
SPECIAL
™**«      INTRODUC
^^e* SPECI
*&>» $99
... it's unbelievable but true!
.,...,....,„ -\1K() l\ITRV\n<)V\[   INC ,...„,,.
AGES IS AN E.CELLEMT DEA
MEMBERSHIP & BONUSES
Membership through October 31, 1981 % 135,00
Membership through March 31, 1984
Court Pass - 10 Complimentary Courts $ 10.00
(Valid on Weekends Only)
\lkO* MASTER Racquetball Racquet S 21.99
Racquetball Sports Eag $ 35.99
Deluxe Racquet Cover $ 7.99
100 % Cotton Head Band $ 2.90
100 * Cotton Wrist Band $ 3,19
TOTAL VALUE      $ 250.15
$    7",00
$  in.oo
$    21.00
$    35.00
$ 170.98
BUT YOU PAY ONLY-' $159    $99*
Air   Omitli.M-itd   ^cqutTbdl l
148 W.6th. AVE       PH. 879-3577
¥?
c/6limis
T*»2
from
3 to 4
r.*r,vroFH(. $2.50
iper rvrnmi
•■■ut:r. \ t 'inn $1.25
<(>,■■ /•'■'■'"O
Honey, don't
forget bread,
milk and the
Kinko's Copies.
Copies
O
Binding Service
Fine Papers and
Envelopes
Passport Photos
kinko's copies
5706 University Boulevard
Vancouver, B.C.
V6T 1K6
BAH.
I uo ds^ Of p&> Jftpey ^*Q P& -rt*VI
?%4> \H/esr4w. Am/HE
Akc at 1ICO Elmbncfr toy. Pichnxftd
proudly presents
JOHN
McLAUGHLAN
PACO
DeLUCIA
with special guest
STEVE MORSE
AI
DiMEOLA
Q.E.
THEATRE
Tuesday
NOV. 1,8 P.M.
Tickets: At all VTC/CBO
Outlets, Infocentres in major
malls, All Lower Mainland
Eaton's & Woodward's, AMS
Tickets, at UBC. Charge it:
687-4444 info.: 687-18)8. Produced by John Bauer Concerts.

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