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The Ubyssey Oct 11, 2011

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 A buffalo is an animal SINCE 1918
October 11,20111 vol. XXVIII iss. XI
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Last March, the Saudi military helped crush the      ^_fc45
Bahrain uprising. A UBC grad witnessed it all.          MbM_w
BOOKSTORE
HOSTEL
BLUES
UBC's commuter student hostel isn't as
inviting as you'd think
P12 21 Page 2110.11.2011
What's on
This week, may we suggest...
UNA General Meeting: 5pm @ the Old Barn Community Centre
For all of you policyphiles interested in hearing the goings-on with our
non-student neighbours in the UNA. come check out their general meeting. Some food will be provided, but it's not as good as what's provided at
AMS Council meetings.
FARM»
UBC Farm Market: 11:30am @
UBC Bookstore
Pick up some delicious organic
produce, herbs and flowers outside the UBC Bookstore. Or UBC
Central. Whatever it's called now.
UBC Tennis Centre grand opening: 2pm
Check out the grand opening of the UBC Tennis Centre.
"Festivities" are promised, as well
as the possibility of trying out
neweguipment.
Love Lies Bleeding Ballet: 8pm
@ Queen Elizabeth Theatre
It's a ballet featuring the music of
Sir Elton John. Like The Lion King.
without the lions and the whole
"African safari" thing.
PROTEST »
Occupy Vancouver: 10am @
Vancouver Art Gallery
Feel like protesting? Don't know
what you want to protest? Well,
you're in the right place! Taking
a page from Occupy Wall Street,
Occupy Vancouver will be focused on anything and nothing.
~-.yS
Got an event you'd like to see on this page? Send your event
and your best pitch to printeditor@ubyssey.ca.
THEUBYSSEY
October 11,2011, Volume XXXIII, Issue XI
EDITORIAL
Coordinating Editor
Justin McElroy
03ordinating@u bysseyca
Managing Editor, Print
Jonny Wakefield
onnteditor@ubyssey.ca
Managing Editor, Web
Arshy Mann
webeditor@ubysseyca
News Editors
Kalyeena Makortoff
& Micki Cowan
news@u bysseyca
Art Director
Geoff Lister
a rt@u bysseyca
Culture Editor   4
Ginny Monaco
culture@u bysseyca
Senior Culture Writers
Taylor Loren &
Will Johnson   1
tloren@ubysseyca
wjohnson@u bysseyca
Sports Editor
Drake Fenton
sports@u bysseyca
Features Editor
Brian Piatt
featu res@u bysseyca
Copy Editor
Karina Palmitesta
copy@ubysseyca
Video Editor
David Marino
video@ubysseyca
Senior Web Writer
Andrew Bates
abates@ubysseyca
Graphics Assistant
Indiana Joel
ijoel@u bysseyca
Webmaster
Jeff Blake
webmaster@u bysseyca
BUSINESS
Business Manager
Fernie Pereira
business@ubysseyca
Ad Sales
Ben Chen
advertising@ubysseyca
STAFF
Andrew Hood, Bryce
Warnes, Catherine Guan,
David Elop, Jon Chiang, Josh
Curran, Will McDonald, Tara
Martellaro, Virginie Menard,
tt MacDonald, Anr
CONTACT
Business Office: Room 23 Print Advertising:
Editorial Office: Room 24 604.822.1654
Student Union Building
6138 Student Union Blvd
Vancouver, BCV6T1Z1
tel: 604.822.2301
web: www.ubyssey.ca
feedback@ubyssey.ca
Business Office:
604.822.6681
advertising@ubys-
sey.ca
LEGAL
The Ubyssey Is the official student newspaper ofthe University of
British Columbia. It is published every Monday and Thursday by The
Jbyssey Publications Society. We
are an autonomous democratically
"un student organization, and all students are encouraged to participate.
Editorials are chcsen and written
oy the Ubyssey staff. They are the
expressed opinion of the staff, and
do not necessarily reflect the views
of The Ubyssey Publications Society
or the University of British Columbia. All editorial content appearing
n The Ubyssey is the property of
The Ubyssey Publications Society.
Stories opinions, photographs and
artwork contained herein cannot be
reproduced without the expressed,
written permission of The Ubyssey
Publications Society.
The Ubyssey is afounding member of Canadian University Press
(CUP) and adheres to CUPs guiding principles.
Letters to the editor must be under 300 w(       ■ ■  ■ ■  ■ iludeyour
phone number, student number anc
signature (notfor publication) as wel
asyouryear and faculty with all submissions. ID will be checked wher
submissions are dropped off at the
editorial office of The Ubyssey. otherwise verification will be done by
phone. The Ubyssey reserves the
right to edit submissions for length
and clarity. All letters must be received by 12 noon the day before
intended publication. Letters received after this point will be published in the following issue unless
there is an urgent time restriction
or other matter deemed relevant
bythe Ubyssey staff.
It is agreed by all persons placing display or classified advertising
that if the Ubyssey Publications Society fails to publish an advertisement
or if an error in the ad occurs the liability of the I IPS will not be greater
than the prOe paid for the ad. The
UPS shall not be responsible for
slight changes or typographical errors that do not lessen the value or
the impact of the ad
Our Campus
One on one with
the people who
make UBC
KAI JACOBSON/THE UBYSSEY
Thomas Byers and Erica Frank were recently elected to the University Neighbourhood Association's board of directors.
Frank & Beyer elected to UNA
Thomas Peters
Contributor
Two weeks ago, the University
Neighbourhoods Association
(UNA) held its election for their
board of directors. The UNA is
an organization that governs the
residential neighborhood of UBC
Vancouver, much like a city council would for a small town. As UBC
does not have a municipal government, the UNA is the predominant
lobbying body for residents on
campus. Landscaping, parking,
noise violations and pet issues are
among the more common issues
the board generally deals with;
however, they also deal with issues
of community development, utilities and student collaboration.
Thomas Beyer
Amongthe newly elected directors is Thomas Beyer. "I ran
because I heard a lot of people felt
that they were not being represented properly," he said. Beyer's
goals seem to reach far beyond
Sudoku by Krazydad
his job description as a director.
Improvement in rapid transit to
UBC is among his top goals during
his term. "I would love to work
with the students...to really accelerate the voice and the demand
for...some sort of train system,"
said Beyer.
Another main goal while serving the UNA is to get the residents' voice formally recognized.
"Students might say, 'Hey, I don't
want you to build condos on the
bus loop,' but [UBC] might decide
[to do it] anyways. Students certainly have a voice but they don't
have to listen to the voice," he said.
But Beyer believes that residents
are receiving similar treatment.
"I want more formal recognition that those voices, especially of
residents who paid good money for
their condos, get recognized."
Erica Frank
UBC faculty member Erica Frank
will be returningto serve on the
UNA board this year. Frank has
been on the board of directors for
the past four years and has been
elected for her third two-year
term.
Erica first moved to UBC from
Atlanta six years ago, accepting a position as a Tier I Canada
Research Chair in the School
of Preventative Medicine and
Population Health.
The decision to be a part ofthe
UNA was not a difficult one for
Frank. "I love being immersed in
the community," said Frank.
She said she has a significant
focus in sustainability and has
served as the sustainability chair
for the UNA. Over the next two
years—her last eligible term—she
plans to support the UBC "living
lab" initiative for experimentation
with community-building. While
she said she is thrilled to be in a
place that supports these principles, she admits she has "been
chastised by people for frankness"
on issues of sustainability.
"I would like to be remembered
as a co-creator of a bright, green
campus," said Frank. ^
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9 2011 KrazyDad.com News»
Editors: Kalyeena Makortoff & Micki Cowan
10.11.201113
GRADSTUDENTS»
Graduate Student Society re-evaluating membership with AMS
Tanner Bokor
Contributor
The Graduate Student Society (GSS)
of UBC is undergoing a strategic
review of their membership with the
AMS.
Accordingto GSS President
Andrew Patterson, the AMS, as a
predominantly undergraduate body,
is not representing and adequately
addressingthe needs of graduate
students. "Graduate students are by
far the minority voice, which opens
serious questions about how well
they are represented through these
forums," said Patterson.
The issue of financial and positional review has arisen roughly every
three years since 2000.
"Do grad students have unique issues? Yes. Can the AMS do better at
working with the GSS? Yes...Do I believe they should be an autonomous
figure? No," said AMS President
Jeremy McElroy.
McElroy said that while the GSS
has seven seats open for graduate
representation on AMS Council,
only six positions are filled.
Proportionally, graduate students
make up one ofthe largest voting
bodies ofthe AMS.
"The GSS could swing any vote
they want with seven seats, so their
argument is slightly self-defeating,"
McElroy said.
Graduate students are also able to
run for executive positions and can
join any AMS committee. Former
AMS President Bijan Ahmadian was
himself a graduate student.
When asked about the implications
of a GSS pull-out, McElroy stated, "I
personally believe it would be detrimental to both organizations to pull
out." Patterson remains "very confident" that the GSS will choose to stay
with the AMS.
An issue that spurred the GSS
membership re-evaluation was the
AMS's unwillingness to become a full
member ofthe Canadian Association
of Student Associations (CASA), a national organization of student unions
that lobbies the federal government
on post-secondary issues. The AMS is
currently an associate member ofthe
organization.
While Patterson said that CASA
is the best avenue to express GSS
concerns on a federal lobbying
level, AMS Council has rejected full
membership.
"Irrespective of what happens,
together we represent the voice and
needs of students on campus...even
more so if we are able to work out a
better division of labour than we have
now," said Patterson, u
BOOKSTORE»
UBC Bookstore faces financial woes
Micki Cowan
News Editor
After a seven per cent loss in sales
since lastyear, the UBC Bookstore is
saying it's no longer good enough to
sell just books.
"The Bookstore is under tremendous pressure because the book
market is experiencing a double digit
decline across North America," said
Pierre Ouilliet, UBC VP Finance.
"The UBC Bookstore is doing
better than most...partly because we
are focusing on affordability by offering cheaper used books and rental
options, and partly because we are
selling more computers, clothing
and gifts."
Debbie Harvie, the Bookstore's
managing director, said there are
plans to integrate a convenience
store and an outdoor coffee shop
patio to increase revenues.
Already, the university has included retail from Bed, Bath & Beyond
and Tom's Shoes, and launched
a book sales website that generated a million dollars in revenue in
September.
The university understands the
competition. At the September 20
Board of Governors (BoG) committee meeting, President Stephen
Toope said, "It's about how to attract
as many people as possible to spend
money at the Bookstore rather than
Amazon or Chapters."
However, Harvie said that the
Bookstore doesn't lose money until
they have to pay a dividend to the
university—a requirement of all
UBC ancillaries. Last year, they paid
$800,000, accordingto Harvie.
Tirtha Dhar, an assistant professor of marketing at the Sauder
School of Business, said that the
Bookstore will need to adapt if it
News briefs
Times Higher Education
university rankings lifts UBC
10 22nd
UBC's ranking jumped to 22nd place
from 30th along with several other
Canadian universities on the Times
Higher Education World University
rankings.
The rankings account for disciplines
ranging from arts and humanities to
sciences, as well as indicators such
as research, teaching and international education. Other Canadian
universities that have moved closer
to the top include U of T and McGill,
while some, including SFU. slipped
down the list.
UBC was ranked number one
in North America for internationa
education.
The UBC Bookstore has brought in an array of products to keep itself afloat
wants to stay afloat and agreed with
Harvie's expansion initiatives.
"The landscape is changing for
college bookstores and they need to
change so that they can compete in
the market.
"The idea that they don't want to
just sell books is a good idea. In another five or ten years there won't be
books in the classroom."
Bring in the machines
Placing U-Pass dispensing machines in the Bookstore is another
opportunity to increase sales.
Students visit the Bookstore once
a month to pick up their U-Pass,
rather than just once or twice per
year to pick up course materials.
UBC prof develops natural gas
diesel engine
UBC professor Phil Hill was awarded
the 2011 Encana Principal Award for
his discovery of high-pressure direct
injection technology, which allows
diesel engines to cut smog-forming
emissions by 27 per cent.
The award, valued at $100,000,
was given by the Ernest C. Manning
Awards Foundation. Hill's technology was first conceived in the 1980s
at UBC's department of mechanica
engineering.
"As a university particularly concerned with sustainability and environmental issues. UBC is proud of this
recognition of Professor Hill's work."
said UBC President Stephen Toope in
response to the award.
The new U-Pass machines are
in the Bookstore exclusively and
Harvie said there just weren't other
viable options elsewhere at the time.
At the September BoG committee meeting, Harvie said that the
dispensing machines did fit plans to
increase customer frequency.
"Secretly, as a retailer, I was
delighted. We will be tracking
sales because if we can add even
one chocolate bar to those coming
through, it'll be good."
UBC Central: "more than just a
bookstore"
Retail expansion plans have hit
some roadblocks. Earlier this
summer, the Bookstore faced a
UBC sponsors Billion Dollar
Green Challenge
UBC. alongside 33 other institutions
such as Harvard and Stanford, has
committed $65 million towards the
Billion Dollar Green Challenge, an
initiative that hopes to create $1
billion in total investments towards
energy efficiency upgrades.
The Billion Dollar Green
Challenge launches publicly on
October 11 at the Association for
the Advancement of Sustainability
in Higher Education conference in
Pittsburgh.
With more than 2500 participants, the conference is the largest
gathering to date on higher education sustainability.
JESSICA LI/THE UBYSSEY
backlash against plans to rename
the store "UBC Central."
Harvie said the name change
was a strategic move to try and
position themselves as a place that
offers many services and products
aside from books alone. But UBC
professor Kim Snowden started a
petition against the name change
in July.
"It's important to have something that's recognizable as a
symbol, as the libraries are...
for intellectual conversation and
community."
But Harvie defended the name
change proposal, saying it's her
job to make sure the Bookstore
continues to thrive and support the
university. tH
International Council for
Science elects first Canadian
president
George McBean is the first Canadian
elected to be president of the
International Council for Science.
McBean received his PhD in physics
from UBC and is currently a geography and political science professor at the University of Western
Ontario. McBean has recieved both
the Order of Ontario and Order of
Canada.
Founded in 1931. the Internationa
Council for Science is a non-governmental group dedicated to international cooperation to advance
science. McBean will replace current
president Yuan Tseh Lee in October
2014. •a
COOKING»
UBC chefs win gold
medal at culinary
competition
VIARC ANDRE GE5SAROL/THE UBYSSEY
Scott MacDonald
Contributor
Every year, a competition is
held by the Canadian College
and University Food Service
Association (CCUFSA) for chefs
working at post-secondary
schools around the country.
This year, the CCUFSA Culinary
Competition was held in St John's,
Newfoundland and, once again,
Team UBC won the gold medal for
their meal.
"We have entered this competition four times and every time
we've walked away with the gold,"
said executive chef Piyush Sahay,
who is head ofthe UBC Food
Services Team and has been working at UBC for over eight years. The
team is comprised of Sahay, Sage
Bistro chef Andy Chan, pastry chef
Copin Sastrawidjaya and Kevin
Dueck as catering support.
Four teams enter the CCUFSA
Culinary Competition, where they
create a theme-based appetizer,
main dish and dessert to serve
to the 150-200 delegates at the
conference.
"The theme was kind of like
'Canada Day on the Prairies,'"
said Sahay. Their winning dishes
included pickerel for the appetizer,
buffalo for the main and chocolate
with mixed fruit for dessert.
Sahay said the team had to be
aware of a number of criteria. "Is it
pretty enough, is it functional, is it
somethingthat can be easily eaten?
Those kind of things are what they
take into observation. After that
the biggest thing is taste," said
Sahay.
Additionally, judges look at how
unique and interesting the dishes
are, and how well they bring together unusual flavours.
When Sahay and his team aren't
winning competitions, you can find
them overseeing meals made at
both the Vanier and Totem cafeterias. 13 41 News 110.11.2011
ANIMAL RESEARCH >
STOP UBC Animal Research expands across Canada
Arshy Mann
Managing Editor, Web
A UBC activist group is taking their
campaign to end animal experimentation national.
STOP UBC Animal Research
(STOP), an animal rights group that
started at the University of British
Columbia's Vancouver campus, has
begun working with other groups
with similar goals at institutions
across Canada.
"We started out concerned about
the animals at UBC, and the more
we learned about this issue, the
more...[we felt] there was an urgent
need to reform the way that animal
research is done in Canada," said
STOP spokesperson Brian Vincent.
In the long term, STOP hopes
for an end to animal testing across
Canada; in the short term, they
advocate for more transparency in
the animal testing that is currently
practiced.
For the past year, STOP has
brought attention to animal experimentation at UBC, receiving coverage from both local and national media, as well as public responses from
UBC President Stephen Toope. Their
campaigns resulted in UBC sparing
the lives of seven endangered sea
turtles and four rhesus monkeys, all
of which were slated for death.
Earlier this year, STOP joined
dozens of other organizations to
create the Canadian Coalition
Against Animal Research and
Experimentation, which included a
number of nascent groups targeting
institutions such as the University
of Toronto, Dalhousie University,
the University of Alberta, York
University and the University of
Victoria.
"We realized that there were little
pockets of concerned citizens across
Canada who were concerned about
animal research going on in their
communities, but they felt helpless,"
said Vincent. "We're talking about
sometimes two or three people."
The group's first action was to
send a letter to the Canadian Council
of Animal Care (CCAC), an organization which oversees animal
research in Canada. The letter asked
the CCAC to phase out animal testing, but in the meantime, to institute
American-style reforms to make animal experimentation more transparent in Canada.
However, the CCAC responded by
arguing that Canada's animal testing
laws are stringent and that animal
testing in research has been declining since 1975, despite a three-fold
federal funding increase for research
in that same time period.
"This provides long-term evidence
for the effectiveness ofthe CCAC
system of oversight, which has operated in the majority ofthe Canadian
scientific community during the
same time period, for the past three
decades," wrote Clement Gauthier,
the executive director of CCAC.
STOPmoveseast
Vincent has already begun work-
ingwith some ofthe groups at other
universities.
"We will be providing training
STOP UBC's activism has inspired a number
for people across the country from
STOP UBC Animal Research, so I'll
betravelingto places [and] probably the first place is Toronto. I've
already done two Skype training sessions with them, because they're the
most active and up and running."
Paul York, the coordinator of
STOP U of T Animal Research, said
that despite the fact that his group
has been around for three years,
they changed their name when
they saw how successful Vincent's
group was. They used to be called
Stop Animal Experimentation at the
University of Toronto.
"Because ofthe work of Brian and
others there, we decided to use the
MICHAELTHIBAULOTHE UBYSSEY
of similar groups to spring up across Canada
same name and even the same logo,"
he said.
York, however, said that his group
has a different style of activism than
the UBC branch.
"The mood is a little bit different
in Toronto than it is in Vancouver. I
don't know if people are a little more
conservative here or something,
[but] it's very hard to organize demonstrations," he said.
"So we're pursuing the educational route. That's not to say we're
against the colourful stuff. I think
that what Brian is doing is great and
I think that it's fantastic. But honestly at this point our group doesn't
have the momentum to do that."
York went on to say that his group
has spent a good portion ofthe year
setting up informational tables on
campus outside of research facilities,
as well as organizing lectures on
the moral and scientific arguments
against animal research.
Despite their smaller size, STOP
U of T has had more luck in one area
than its UBC counterpart has.
York said that his group successfully filed a Freedom of Information
request with the university regard-
ingthe testingthat's done at U of
T, for which they actually received
information, something UBC has
never given up.
"Normally they black out things
like that, but we're very lucky that
we got this report, and it indicates
what the species are and how they're
used," he said.
York said that they found that
over 200 experiments were done in
the top two levels of invasiveness.
"And this was on pretty much
every kind of species. Hummingbird,
monkey, newt, rat, mice, you name
it."
Accordingto Vincent, when they
filed a similar request at UBC, they
got back a 70 page document, 60
pages of which were completely
redacted.
Besides the successful request,
STOP U of T Animal Research has
yet to receive any sort of official response from the university.
"We call it a wall of silence. They
won't engage with us. The only
way they'll ever engage with us is
if there's actually press," he said.
"They don't want to talk to us." tH
amS Insider weekly   ( «
student society     a weekly look at what's new at your student society Jr
a weekly look at what's new at your student society
www.ams.ubc.ca
Keep up to date with the AMS
Facebook:
UBC Alma Mater Society
Twitter:
AMSExecutive
Connect yourself to
the best opportunities!
Ssssgas
October 77-
concours;,„am-_-3p;;
^casing * «* "inter ™ ^S-*-—
Are you a student, faculty, or staff member
at UBC with an innovative project idea?
innovative projects
fund
You can get up to $5,000 towards your project.
Apply online at ams.ubc.ca before October 28th!
Having financial difficulties? Apply by October 28th
for full UPass, New SUB, and AMS fee subsidy.
AMS
FINANCIAL
HARDSHIP
SUBSIDN/
PPLCAT
uvWD»psUB»vWpuc««       ^
f
More info at ams.ubc.ca Cnltnre»
10.11.201115
Editor: Ginny Monaco
VIDEOMATICA»
UBC hopes to acquire now-orphaned video collection
Videomatica closure leaves some 35,000 rare and out of print films without a home
Ginny Monaco
Culture Editor
For Brian Bosworth, "it's almost
like there's been a death in the
family."
Bosworth and his business partner Graham Peat own Videomatica,
the 3000 square foot film haven at
1855 West 4th Avenue. For 28 years,
Videomatica has brought Vancouver
the best selection of foreign, classic
and lesser-known films, many of
which are out of print. Facing a decline in sales and ever-climbing rent
prices, the store has been forced to
close its doors for good.
Since its opening, Videomatica
has been the go-to place for obscure
and hard-to-find titles. "Way back
in 1983, the films we wanted to see
weren't available in video stores in
Vancouver," said Bosworth.
Once they had the idea for the
store, the duo "begged, borrowed
and stole money and bought the
best 400 movies we could buy."
Over the years, those 400 original films turned into a 35,000 plus
piece collection, catering to a wide
range of demographics and tastes.
A few years ago, Bosworth and
Peat noted a definite downturn in
sales and rentals that persisted and
worsened. There is little doubt that
the internet has had much to do
with that trend. The ease of accessing online downloads has created
"the expectation...in the public
that everything is available or that
everything should be available
and it should be near free," said
Bosworth.
"I suspect the whole notion of
going out to buy or rent a DVD is
probably close to dead already,"
mused Martin Kinch, a UBC
creative writing instructor who
teaches an introductory screenplay course. "Rentals, at a place
VIFF Reviews
Target
Scott MacDonald
StaffWriter
A science fiction film about a group
of rich, eccentric people seeking
permanent youth, Target had real
promise. Set in the near future, the
film follows the group's journey
to the "target"—an enormous hole
with concentrated cosmic radiation
that is rumoured to cause eternal
youth—and the curious events that
take place after they reach it.
The plot has real promise, but
the movie itself falls far short of
the mark. It is a gruellingly long
movie—over two and a half hours—
and after the first 45 minutes, it
degrades into a series of graphic
sexual encounters between various
members ofthe group.
This is presumably to convey the
passion that one experiences when
given eternal youth, but it takes
away from what was an initially interesting plot and leaves the viewer
hoping for the movie to end.
Towards the end ofthe film, the
plot becomes so convoluted and
nonsensical that it is impossible to
follow. What could have been a phenomenal film should have been put
in the hands of a better director and
a better crew of writers.
However, the film isn't entirely
terrible. It is partially redeemed by
the stunning futuristic landscapes
ALEKSANDAR/FLICKR
The fate of Videomatica's iconic Hitchcock sign is another contentious issue
like Videomatica, probably mean
there are films for us to look at, to
study, to enjoy that are not likely to
be available as video downloads, or
legal video downloads," he said.
Technological advances also
endangers the number of films
available on a particular medium.
"Less and less attention gets paid
to the smaller, more independent
film," said Kinch. "Each time we
move from one way of accessing
film to another, the actual library
decreases."
Videomatica is hardly the first
video store to call it quits in recent
and the portrayal of technology in
this time.
Flying Fish
Sebastian Yoh Chern
Contributor
The scenic landscapes of Sri Lanka
provide a breathtaking backdrop to
a strenuous practice in patience.
Flying Fish is director Sanjeewa
Pushpakumara's first feature film,
and it shows. Pushpakumara uses
dialogue sparingly, relying on images to tell the story, which consists
of three individual plots that share
themes of sexual and socio-political
tension.
Dialogue is minimal and used
out of necessity, and the plot suffers
because of it. The three plotlines
run parallel, intersecting at various
points. Scenes jump between telling
the stories of a family dealing with
extortion, an unplanned teenage
pregnancy and a newly widowed,
sexually deprived mother and her
son.
It's difficult to determine which
story is being told and to distinguish
which character belongs to which
plot line. Without a narrative pull,
the characters and their stories are
often lost amongst each other and
the film is hard to follow.
Characters fornicate amongst
ruins and vibrant foliage, and the
months, and it will hardly be the
last. In February, "for lease" signs
appeared in the windows of Main
Street's Happy Bats Cinema, accompanied by a note from the owners assuring customers that this
was not the end ofthe store, just a
relocation.
Just over a month later, the owners updated the Happy Bats website
with the message, "So, we really
are closed. And that's it." They gave
a final thank you to their customers, saying, "We will miss you. Keep
supporting independent video stores
and businesses as long as you can.
They really are what make a neighbourhood what it is."
For Bosworth, Videomatica is a
relic of a bygone era in Kitsalano.
"It's becoming more like Robson
Street. Clothing stores, diaper shops
and yoga shops.
"We're actually thinking of opening up a shop called Yogamatica,"
he joked.
With commercial rents along
West 4th reaching as much as $50
per square foot, it's increasingly difficult for independent businesses to
stay profitable. "Within three blocks
of our store there's tons of rental vacancies for commercial space," said
Bosworth. The 30 per cent rent increase Videomatica was facing was
"not feasible" for the owners, said
Bosworth, but "there were many
straws on this camel's back."
Though they expected the store
to be closed by the end of summer,
the Videomatica owners have yet
to set an official date. "It's sooner
rather than later," said Bosworth.
The fate ofthe collection is their
biggest concern right now. "It's our
little baby that we built... Everyone
wants to keep it together as a collection, but nobody has the money."
Bosworth and Peat are currently in
negotiations with post-secondary
institutions—UBC included—to facilitate a purchase ofthe collection.
"The exciting thing is that the
institutions we're talking to, they
don't want to just aquire it and stick
it away," said Bosworth. "They're
interested in...preserving those elements that can't be replicated. They
want to preserve it and save it for
future generations."
UBC has yet to release an official
statement regardingthis issue,
but Jerry Wasserman, head ofthe
department of theatre and film,
said in an email, "The Videomatica
negotiations are at a delicate point
Despite problems with the script, Flying Fish is a beautiful thing to look at
grime ofthe city contrasts the
dynamic colours of Sri Lankan life.
However, the length and banality of
some scenes grows tiresome as the
film progresses.
Ultimately, Pushpakumara shows
promise as a writer-director—but
Flying Fish leaves the audience
with the sense that there is a much
greater story to be told. The racial
tension between the Tamil and
Sinhalese is intriguing but barely
grazed, and many ofthe characters
feel under-developed.
Fortunately, what Flying Fish
lacks in plot, it makes up for in
beautiful cinematography—and it
has plenty of that.
Bone Wind Fire
Rhys Edwards
Contributor
Bone Wind Fire is a short Canadian
documentary about three famous
female Modernist painters: Georgia
O'Keefe, Frida Kahlo and Emily
Carr.
This is actually the clearest thing
that can be said about the film, as
it is otherwise difficult to ascertain
right now. We're hoping to be able to
make a...public statement sometime
next week."
For Kinch, having the
Videomatica collection available
to UBC students would be a great
resource. "To go back and have the
knowledge of where that comes
from is really, really helpful in terms
ofyour ability to write a film," he
said.
"Any time you get your hands on
a film you haven't seen before, it's
a plus. You may well see something
that inspires you. You may well see
something you think is absolute
crap, but that's not bad either."
To help facilitate the purchase
process, Videomatica has launched a
donation campaign whereby people
can select and save individual titles
from the collection. The response to
the campaign has been overwhelmingly positive. "Itgives people away
to help, which is what they want
to do," said Bosworth. "It's like
when there is a death in the family,
somebody brings a casserole over. It
makes them feel better."
The current leader in number
of titles saved is UBC astronomy
professor Jaymie Matthews. The 20
films he has chosen to save reflect
his love of science fiction, a genre
that fed his burgeoning love of astronomy and astrophysics growing
up. "When200i:A Space Odyssey
came out, I was 10 years old and I
just was totally swept up with that...
films like that had a big inspirational role for me," he said.
The Videomatica website has a
list of current donors, each of whom
list a reason for their choice to save
a particular title. For Matthews,
the donation is a "thank you" to the
store and its staff. He added, "We
are, in some sense, helping to preserve that element of Vancouver's
passion for film." 13
what audiences are supposed to
take from it. The pastiche of generic
landscapes, strewn with elementary re-enactments and zoom-ins
on some ofthe artists' more famous
works, imply a sentimental examination ofthe qualities that supposedly unite these brilliant artists.
They certainly are similar in
some respects; each was a strong,
independent woman who was
criticized for her modernity before
eventually achieving eminent artistic importance.
However, the short narrative
oversteps itself by bracketingthe
women together. Though Carr and
Keefe did share a profound interest
in nature, they had wildly different
methodologies; meanwhile, Kahlo
had little affiliation with naturalism altogether. Yet the film avoids
discussing the qualities that so profoundly differentiated these women
in the first place.
More problematically, by linking
the artists in such a simplistic way,
the film inadvertently undermines
their real significance. By casting
them under the heading "strong
woman artist," the audience is left
only with an abstract, essentialistic
account of their lives.
This characterization unfortunately reinforces an understanding
ofthe artists based on their sex,
rather than the ramifications of
their work. 13 61 Features 110.11.2011
•   •   I
Abi
spring
in Bahrain
MAHMOOD AL-YOUSIF/ FLICKR
Last March, the government of a key US ally brutally put down
a pro-democratic revolt. Fatima Al-Samak, a recent UBC grad,
was stationed there as a reporter.
By Fatima Al-Samak
When I walked across the stage in the
Chan Centre to receive my degree
in May of 2010,1 never could have
imagined that I would soon be standing in the
middle ofthe Pearl Roundabout in Bahrain, in
front of a crowd of revolutionaries, talking to
a camera which broadcasted my words to millions of viewers around the world.
But in a strange series of events that now
feel more like a dream, I found myself working
as a news correspondent from Manama in the
peak ofthe Arab Spring and in one of its most
controversial revolutions.
On February 14, Bahrainis went to the
streets demanding pro-democratic political
and social reforms. When the regime responded with gunfire and killed several citizens,
the demands escalated and the demonstrators
called for regime change. A month later, troops
from Saudi Arabia entered the country to assist
Bahrain in crushing the uprising.
The protest came on the heels of uprisings in Tunisa and Egypt that had successfully overthrown dictators who had been in
power for decades. The Bahraini revolutionaries explicitly invoked these protests as their
inspiration.
In Egypt, Tahrir Square was the focal point
ofthe protests. In Bahrain, protesters rallied
around the Pearl Roundabout, a traffic circle
with a huge monument in the centre. The
monument had six curved sails reaching up to
the sky and hoisting a pearl in the middle. In
March the monument was demolished by the
government, the sails left lying shattered on
the ground.
And I was there to witness it all.
When I graduated, I thought I was goingto
be headingfor a job in a cubicle somewhere,
like a character from The Office. Well, it was in
an office where my journey to Bahrain started,
so I wasn't too far off.
"Don't kill me while rm sleeping-."
In January 2011,1 was visiting my family and
friends in Kuwait when I was given the opportunity to meet Hussain Jamal, a prominent
Kuwaiti journalist, who agreed to train me and
possibly even hire me as a reporter. It was a
great opportunity.
A month later, I was sitting in his office
when a colleague sat down to have tea. As I
was looking at the different pictures on his
desk, Jamal turned to me and said, "Would you
like to go?"
"To where?" I asked, taken by surprise.
"To Bahrain. They're looking for a correspondent." He was referring to the Al-Iraqia
Satellite Channel, a news network from Iraq.
I couldn't hide my excitement, but I asked
anyway: "Am I ready?"
His answer wasn't very reassuring, but it
was decisive: "Sure, why not?" And with these
words, I was on a plane the next day goingto
Bahrain.
When I arrived on February 28, there were
few journalists who were allowed into the
country. The government was not giving visas
to freelancers and only a carefully selected
number of networks were given permission to
report from Bahrain. Al-Iraqia wasn't one of
those networks, so I entered the country on
the basis of visiting my aunt.
The Pearl Roundabout was a fascination
to me even before I landed in Bahrain. It was
built in 1982. The six sails were meant to represent the countries in the Gulf Cooperation
Council: Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, the
United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia. The
pearl symbolized the unity between the countries, and commemorated Bahrain's long history of pearl fishing.
FATIMA AL-SAMAKATHE UBYSSEY
The writer stands in front of the Pearl Roundabout, the
focal point ofthe Febuary uprising in Bahrain.
The Roundabout was the meeting place of
the protesters. They had set up a large stage
and filled the area with hundreds of tents in
which people camped out until their demands were met. I walked alongside doctors,
lawyers, teachers, human rights activists, religious clerks, famous athletes, students, politicians, artists, journalists and just ordinary
Bahraini people.
When the revolution started on February 14,
Bahrainis from all over the country came out
to the Roundabout to make a statement about
the regime's failure to protect and represent
its citizens. The world witnessed the regime's
brutality on February 17, when tanks and soldiers attacked the Roundabout at 3am without
giving any warning or allowingthe protesters
to leave the area. Many were injured, and four
people were killed that night.
One of those four, Ali Al-Moemin, was
an accomplished engineering student in the
University of Bahrain. I interviewed his father,
and he told me that Ali's last Facebook status
was, "My life is a sacrifice to my country."
He left to help the injured protesters in the
Roundabout, and never returned home.
I later saw a picture of a man who slept in
the Roundabout after the protesters regained
control over it. He slept while holding up a sign
that said, "Don't kill me while I'm sleeping,
please wake me up first." Bahraini humour is
one thing I loved about Bahrainis. Even during
the most difficult situations, they still found
time for humour and embraced life whether it
was bitter or sweet.
On February 19, Bahrainis came back to the
Roundabout, where tanks were positioned.
Seeingthe persistence ofthe people, the king
ordered the Bahraini army, filled with mercenaries from Sunni countries all over the
Middle East, to retreat and allow the protesters to regain control ofthe Roundabout.
An unjust kingdom
For over 200 years, Bahrain has been a Shia
majority country governed by a Sunni minority. About 70 per cent of Bahrain's population of
525,000 is Shia, but it is run by the Al-Khalifas,
a Sunni monarchy.
Ten years ago, a "National Action Charter"
was proposed by the Emir of Bahrain, Hamad
bin Isa Al-Khalifa. The referendum promised various democratic reforms if Bahrainis
accepted him as a king. At the time, the offer
seemed too good to refuse, and Bahrainis
passed the referendum with 98.4 per cent in
favour. The prince became a king, a parliament
was put in place and Bahrainis celebrated.
Tne date was February 14,2001, which is
why protesters picked that date a decade later.
Before long, Bahrainis became aware of
the tricks the cunning new king was trying to
pull. He started encouraging Sunni immigration to Bahrain and thousands flooded into the
country from countries such as Jordan, India,
Bengal, Syria and Pakistan. By some estimates,
60,000 Sunnis have been offered citizenship in
the past decade. The king was tryingto skew
the demographics of Bahrain so that Shias no
longer constituted a majority.
Shias with university degrees now take
work as security guards or truck drivers. I
know a man who holds a master's degree and
is working at a gas station. This isn't a general
economic problem that affects all Bahrainis
equally; the problem is that less-qualified
Sunni foreigners tooktheir jobs.
Yet this revolution was not a sectarian one;
Sunnis were protesting as well. I still remember the video of a young Bahraini who walked
up to a tank on February 17 and yelled, "My
mother is Sunni and my father is Shia. I want
freedom."
Another problem was Bahrain's limited dec-
moracy Elected members ofthe lower house
only hold restricted powers. The upper house,
which is appointed by the royal family, has absolute power over the lower house. In addition,
the king appoints all ministers and his brother,
Shaikh Khalifa, has been the prime minister of
Bahrain since 1971—even longer than Ghaddafi
was in power in Libya.
Bahrainis also wanted the release of all
political prisoners who were falsely accused
of violent crimes they did not commit. These
prisoners numbered in the hundreds even
before the revolution began, and have since
skyrocketed.
The violence escalates
When the revolution began, it seemed that it
might succeed without bloodshed. But slowly
the Bahraini regime escalated its response to
the protesters.
First, they attacked protesters with tear gas.
Then they used rubber bullets. When both
failed, they resorted to using their police cars
to run over protesters and even opened gunfire. Yet Bahraini protesters remained peaceful
and didn't abandon the revolution.
On March 11, US Defence Secretary Robert
Gates arrived to meet with the king. Bahrain
is home to the US navy's fifth fleet, and is also
home to thousands of British expatriates.
Some people in our office were hopeful.
They thought that the US supported democracy for Bahrain and was now askingthe
royal family to step down. Others were less
optimistic.
At one point we covered a demonstration
outside the US embassy in Manama. A group of
representatives came out to meet the demonstrations. I approached one of them and asked
her what the US's policy towards Bahrain
was. "The US is a close ally to the Kingdom of
Bahrain and its royal family and we would like
to cherish this friendship. And we also support
the will ofthe people and respect their right
to self-determination and their freedom of
expression."
When I pointed out that this seemed like a
contradiction since the people are calling for
the royal family to step down and the royal
family responded by opening fire on the protesters, she repeated tlie above sentence—as if
I didn't hear it the first time.
The day after the visit by Secretary Gates,
the state television network announced that Hn/ff j^H
Blr'l
H'jufl Sports»
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10.11.201118
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Men's soccer
UBC defeated crosstown rival
Trinity Western University 1-0
on Friday night. The lone goal of
the night came when midfielder
Sean Haley headed in a Tyson
Keam free kick at the 13 minute
mark. The competition between
the top two teams in the Canada
West (CW) proved fierce as six
total cards were handed out. and
UBC head coach Mike Mosher
was ejected from the game for
disputing a carding.
Women's soccer
UBC had two clean sheets
this weekend, defeating the
University of Fraser Valley 3-0
on Friday night and defeating
the University of Victoria 1-0
Saturday night. UBC striker
Janine Frazao continued her
scoring tear, notching her eigth
goal of the season Saturday. She
now leads the CW in scoring.
Women's basketball
The 'Birds had their first
exhibition game of the season,
defeating the Mount Royal
University Cougars 67-46 on
Thursday night. UBC outmuscled
and outplayed Mount Royal
the entire night. Fourth-year
forward Leigh Stansfield led UBC
in scoring with a career-high 16
points. The Cougars did little to
help their cause by shooting a
horrendous 1-18 from beyond the
3 point line.
To read full game recaps and
view highlights, visit www.
ubyssey.ca/sports.
GLOhh LIS  tHJ I HL UBYSSLY
UBC's Max Grassi flies through the air after taking a shot in Saturday's 4-3 victory over the University of Calgary. UBC lost 5-4 in a shootout Friday night
Hockey team proving the critics wrong
Snapshots
Alison
Man
This year, the UBC Thunderbirds
men's hockey team was voted to finish last in a pre-season coach's poll.
This is especially disconcerting
considering that the Canada West
conference, instead of sending its
top four teams to the playoffs as it
has the past two years, will revert to
sending its top six this season. UBC
is, in every sense, the odd man out.
"The players know [about the
poll]. It's all overthe Internet," said
UBC head coach Milan Dragicevic.
"That's not a big deal for us, it just
gives us motivation. Because we are
young, we have to go out and prove
our worth and earn respect from the
other teams."
UBC's road to respect began this
weekend with a season-opening
double header against the Calgary
Dinos at Doug Mitchell Arena. On
Friday, it was the Dinos who found
an extra offensive push as they eked
out a 5-4 shootout victory over the
Thunderbirds and their struggling
special teams play.
The next night, however, Calgary
was slowed down bythe strong
goaltending of Jordan White and
a re-energized UBC squad. On the
back of two power play tallies, the
Thunderbirds rode to a 4-3 win and
grabbed three out of a possible four
points from the Dinos this weekend.
The difference in games was one of
structure and consistency; where
UBC lacked organization Friday
night, they refocused and stuck to
their assignments for a full 60 minutes on Saturday.
"We had a little success on Friday,
we had more success on Saturday,"
said Dragicevic. "It's easy for the
guys to buy in when they see success
and results. Each guy has a role and
each guy is told that role. Our guys
paid attention to details tonight:
getting pucks off the glass, blocking
shots and good goaltending."
This year, it's clear that UBC
won't be able to rely solely on the
offence of Justin McCrae (10-13-23)
and Max Grassi (8-12-20)-theirtop
two point earners last season and
the only two UBC players to finish in
the top 20 for scoring—if they want
to improve on the previous season's
standing. UBC finished their 2010-11
campaign sixth in goals scored (76)
and fifth in goals against (101) for a
differential of-25, second to last in
the conference.
But they showed signs of life in
the third period Friday night. A
simplified dump-and-chase game
plan galvanized the UBC offence for
a few chances down the wing and
scoring a beautiful goal while plummeting backwards to the ice.
Saturday's game showed a marked
improvement in terms of intelligent
execution and consistency. Carrying
over from Friday's third period, UBC
mimicked their chip-and-chase
efforts to create chances and score
goals, including a sharp wrist shot
in the slot by Jordan Inglis and a
nifty curl and drag move by Scott
Wasden to put the Thunderbirds up
2-1 and 3-1, respectively. Other goals
came from Cole Wilson, who went
high glove on Jacob DeSerres to put
UBC up ahead 1-0, and McCrae, who
potted the fourth 'Birds goal in a
scramble in front.
If it's too early to judge just how
the season will unravel offensively,
<AI JACOBSON/THE UBYSSEY
JBC scored four goals each game this weekend. Last season they averaged 2.8 goals per game.
three goals in under three minutes,
even if they failed to score shortly
after on a five on three power play
that would have put the game out of
reach. New recruit Michael Wilgosh
was particularly noticeable, creating
UBC has a right to feel confident in
net. The first of a two-goalie tandem,
Steven Stanford played well for the
Thunderbirds Friday night—especially in overtime—despite givingup
four goals in the game, two of which
were tipped and one which was
sent through heavy traffic. On the
other hand, White was dominant on
Saturday, stopping 30 out of 33 shots
and making a nandful of timely saves
when his team was getting badly
outshot in the first.
It's expected that White and
Stanford will alternate netminding
duties throughout the season, which
is a change from the year before,
considering White played every
game for the Thunderbirds and led
the conference in minutes logged.
But as evidenced by the weekend,
the problems for UBC aren't expected to be in goal; the larger question mark lies on the other side ofthe
rink. If offence was such a struggle
last year, might the pattern hold true
for this season's roster? Eight goals
in two games is an encouraging
statistic, but will mean little if the
Thunderbirds can't match that offensive pace on a consistent basis.
Yet, already, UBC's gritty team
identity seems more definite and
cohesive than last season's. Perhaps
the new recruits are injecting life
into an old system—or perhaps that
well-tested system has worked just
fine, and all it needed was the proper
players to buy into it.
Perhaps there are changes on the
horizon.
"We wanted to bring in guys that
were leaders on their hockey teams,"
said Dragicevic. "They're hungry,
they've bought in to what we're doing, and it shows on the ice. They're
watchingthe older guys practice
and how they prepare, and I think it
makes a big difference."
UBC hasn't made the playoffs
since 2008-09. In their case, seven
isn't a lucky number, nor one that
predestines their conference seeding; it's an incentive. If the majority ofthe other teams expect them
to sputter and fail, well, that's their
opinion. The Thunderbirds plan to
take that motivation and run with
it. •a io.ii.2oii I Games 19
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25- Extremely tender
32-Fleet
33- Distribute cards
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35-Type of gun
36- Inexpensive
38- Atlantic mackerel
39- Convert into leather
40-Oz creator
41-Somewhat
42- Comprehensible
46- Obtain, slangily
47-Adjutant
48- Sound of a bagpipe
51-Located
53- Singer Torme
56-Think about
59- Greek temple
60- Pulitzer winner James
61-Paris end
62- Epic narrative poem
63- Roseanne, once
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7-3:00
8- Commedia dell'
9-News letters
10- Dry red table wine
11-Detest
12- Zeno's home
13-Fishing gear
18- It may be happy
19- Trivial objection
23-Whirl
24- Quickly, quickly
25-Old Nick
26-Flip over
27- Accumulation of fluids
28- PBS benefactor
29-Model
30- Piece of poetry
31- "The Time Machine'' race
32-Queue after Q
36- Dramatic troupe
37- Humble dwelling
38- Raise to third power
40- Edible European flatfish
41- Libyan chief of state since
1969
43-Exit
44-Jaw
45-Mon!
48- Cosecant's reciprocal
49-Sack starter
50- Langston Hughes poem
51- Nintendo rival
52- Bakery worker
53- Prefix for small
54-Pinza of "South Pacific"
55-For fear that
57-Testarea
58- Cover
(CUP) - Puzzles provided by BestCrosswords.com. Used with permission.
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B Editor- Rrian Piatt
10.11.20111 IQ
UBC Bookstore, 20 years later
VIRGINIE MENAROTHE UBYSSEY
The Last Word
Parting shots and snap judgments on today's issues
Stop getting distracted by "Vive
leGSSlibrer
The Graduate Student Society
(GSS) is again threatening to leave
the AMS—sorry, to do a "strategic
review of their membership." The
spectre ofthe GSS separating has
been raised at least four times in
the past ten years. We're getting a
little tired of this game.
Instead of spending so much
time deliberating whether or not
to leave, the GSS should try doing
what members of a diverse legislative body are supposed to do: lobby
other AMS councillors behind the
scenes and work together as a bloc
to try to swing votes in aGSS-
favoured way. If the GSS wanted to
exert their power more effectively
within the AMS, they could do so
by getting organized ahead of time.
But we've never seen the GSS do
this, including during the apparently all-important debate over
whether the AMS should take out
full membership in the Canadian
Alliance of Student Associations. In
lieu of actual lobbying, the GSS representatives just told AMS Council
that they may need to separate if
full membership wasn't taken out.
We admit that the "do it our way
or we'll leave!" approach is successful in getting extra favours thrown
your way, as Quebec has shown
at the federal level for the past
two decades. But it's lazy, and it's
not goingto gain you any favours
among other constituencies. And
just like Quebec, the GSS would
actually be much less influential by
going their own way. Stop adopting the temper tantrum tactics of
separatists, and focus on getting
yourself politically organized
within the AMS.
Victoria chickens out on
freedom of information
The provincial government recently introduced Bill 3, a bill that
will make various amendments to
the Freedom of Information and
Protection of Privacy Act (FIPPA).
The amendments are based on
recommendations proposed
by a special committee ofthe
legislature. However, as lawyer
Eileen Vanderburgh has pointed
out, the special committee's recommendation that corporations
controlled by public bodies should
be included under FIPPA was not
included in Bill 3.
As a feature we ran last month
explained, both UBC and SFU
have been waging court battles
to prevent corporations they own
from being subject to freedom of
information requests. We don't
know whether the universities put
pressure on the government to not
include that recommendation in
Bill 3, but we'd be surprised if they
didn't. After digging themselves
in legally, the last thing they want
is for politicians to make all that
work irrelevant.
At any rate, it looks like we are
goingto have to wait for years of
court cases and appeals until we
have a final answer on this issue.
That's disappointing.
New UBC ranking means global
focus will continue
Get used to hearing the number
22, because it's UBC's ranking in
the Times Higher Education World
University Rankings. It's the highest ranking the university has ever
achieved in a fancy global list like
this, so they're understandably
pleased.
That being said, there are multiple lists like this that come out
everyyear, and UBC still ranks
between 30 and 60 in most of
them. And a fixation on rankings
has doomed many schools to chase
metrics that will give them a rankings bump (and greater publicity)
rather than the immediate needs
of current students.
One thing to take note of in this
ranking, though: UBC ranked first
in North America for international
engagement, mostly because UBC
has been making that a priority
for the last two decades. It's an
acknowledgement ofthe work the
university has done in engaging
the rest of the world over the last
20 years. And it's a sign that it will
continue to be a priority going
forward.
UNA director discovers that
universities are noisy places
Two weeks ago, Thomas Beyer was
elected to the board of directors
ofthe University Neighbourhoods
Association (UNA). Ordinarily, we
wouldn't comment on the internal
affairs ofthe group that represents
the non-student population on
campus, but Beyer's election campaign caught our attention.
For the past two months, Beyer
has been railing against the lack of
an enforceable noise bylaw. He's
upset about the amount of noise on
campus late at night and believes
that the bylaw the UNA discussed
last year should be passed. He also
feels, based on recent comments,
that he lives in something less than
a democracy—to which we say:
well, duh.
In any event, his election brings
up an interesting showdown: will
the UNA attempt to control noise
on campus? And when the inevitable happens, and the law proves
unenforceable, what will the UNA's
reaction be?
Jokes about job prospects for
Arts students aside-.
Ifyou're one of UBC's 12,000
Arts students and you wandered
through the Careers Days booths
last week, you probably noticed
a few things missing. While the
selection for students majoring
in business, engineering or the
sciences was abundant (they had
stands for everything from Clearly
Contacts to Potash mining agencies), the pickings were slim for
Arts students who would like to do
something other than just head to
grad school. This felt more like an
advertising fair for large corporations than an opportunity for
students to explore post-graduation
options.
If it's goingto be a meaningful
event for the whole student body,
Careers Days should give us a lot
more variation than what we saw
this year. If this was representative
ofthe life we can expect as successful graduates of UBC, it's pretty
damn depressing. 13
How the Bookstore's
purpose went astray
Editors
Notebook
Justin
ILi     McElroy
The problem the UBC Bookstore
is facing is the same problem any
bookstore faces in North America.
It's convenient and cheaper to get
books from just about anywhere
other than a giant store with long
lines and high overhead. Add in a
tech-savvy and cost-conscious demographic, and it spells doom.
The Bookstore knows this all too
well. That's why they've drastically
increased their computer department. And put themselves in a
place where they're the exclusive
distributor of U-Passes. And tried to
change the name ofthe Bookstore
to something more, ahem, central to
the UBC experience. They are losing
book revenue and trying to adjust.
But the reason a university bookstore exists is not, fundamentally, to
make money.
Stop laughing.
The reason a university bookstore
exists is to ensure that students can
have access to the information they
need to pass their classes in the
most efficient manner possible.
Please, stop sniggering. I have a
point here.
See, if the Bookstore were connected to UBC's larger thinking
and philosophy, more closely connected to the Centre for Learning,
Teaching and Technology, it would
be on the forefront of connecting students to digital resources.
Students could, for example, line up
at kiosks to purchase cheap paperless versions of custom coursepacks.
There would be many other such
innovations, thought up by people
smarter than me.
But the Bookstore has instead
been made an ancillary service, the
same as on-campus housing, food,
parking, athletics and recreation.
An ancillary is a self-sustaining
department that must contribute a
certain amount of money back to the
university, called a dividend.
Operating as an ancillary means
the Bookstore is constrained by its
need to make money. So the "solution" to declining book sales has
resulted in more space devoted to
computers and retail options, while
the real solution is one UBC is unable to make. The university can't
directly interfere with an ancillary's
business operations without a great
deal of headache, so the Bookstore is
kept at arm's length.
Ancillaries have created a situation where many ofthe ways UBC
interacts with students are supervised by people who operate virtual
monopolies and care first about
their bottom line, rather than the
key goals ofthe university. This
is why, despite the best efforts of
Student Services and a host of other
well-meaning departments, some
see UBC as a bunch of money-leeching cheapskates.
When UBC was under the threat
of constant budget cuts from a social
credit government in the mid-80s,
converting non-academic departments to ancillaries made sense.
They were forced to sink or swim on
their own merits. And while trying
to put that genie back in the bottle
is probably inadvisable at this point,
a little more oversight may not be
a bad thing. What's best for the
Bookstore may not be what's best for
UBC. It's time for the university to
realize this. 13
Toope on Access
Copyright: "The opposite
of good faith negotiations"
Letters
I do not misunderstand Access
Copyright's position, as Ms. Cavan
suggests in her recent letter to The
Ubyssey on September 29,2011.
Under the previous photocopying license with Access Copyright,
the universities paid a fee of $3.38/
student plus per-page fees based on
the actual amount of copying undertaken under the agreement.
Access Copyright is now seeking
atariffthatwillcost$45/student
with no per-page fee. The universities have sought to link the fee they
pay to the actual amount of material that they copy under the tariff
(i.e. that they haven't already paid
for under another licence). Access
Copyright has remained unyielding
in its quest to charge a flat fee without regard to what the universities
are already paying to rights-holders
through other channels and without
regard to the actual volume of copying at the university.
Access Copyright did not provide
the universities with a meaningful proposal to begin with and then
ended the negotiation before it
effectively started by seeking the
imposition of a mandatory tariff.
The tariff, if approved, would result
in a 1300 per cent increase in the
per student cost and would force
universities to open their secure
communications networks records
and systems to Access Copyright
to enable them to monitor faculty
members, staff, and students. Access
Copyright's approach has been the
opposite of good faith negotiations.
—Stephen J. Toope
UBC President and Vice Chancellor
Send your letters to
feedback@ubyssey.ca Scene»
Pictures and words on your university experience
09.29.20111 11
STEVE JOBS »
The insufferable Apple groupies
Jobs was no stranger to the unsavoury corporate practices decried by his devotees
Editor's
Notebook
Brian
Piatt
"Are you serious?"
That was my reaction late
Wednesday afternoon when editors
in the office started buzzing about
how we had to make a last-minute
change to the paper to pay tribute
to Steve Jobs, the just-deceased
multi-billionaire former CEO of
one ofthe most profitable corporations in the world. Apple's only
current competitors on the stock
market are oil companies like
Exxon Mobil.
We put it to a vote, and my side
lost.
"You're just being a contrarian!"
one of our editors literally yelled
at me. He then went on to check
Twitter on his iPhone, surf the web
on one ofthe ten Apple computers in the Ubyssey office, and later
watch a movie on the personal Mac
he has in his bedroom. He'd shit in
an iToilet, if it existed.
To be clear, I don't have any
special antipathy toward Jobs. I
think Apple products are pretty
cool, though I've never owned
one—mostly because ofthe price
tag. I also recognize that Apple has
revolutionized many aspects of
computers and gadgets. I also think
Apple products look neat. I also
think they work well.
But whoopty-doo. The world
is full of brilliant innovators, and
though it's fine to pay tribute to
their lives when they pass on, it's
creepy and weird for a student
newspaper to get all misty-eyed
over a very aggressive and successful businessman. Ifyou haven't
seen it, our editorial comic in
Thursday's issue was a Mac computer shedding tears.
As Andrew Potter has sharply
pointed out, Jobs was the most
successful brand marketer of our
generation. All the progressive,
"authentic," creative class anti-
conformist types go nuts for Apple,
even though Apple is the most
conformist tech company out there.
Ifyou have one Apple product,
you better start buying them all,
because no other product is going
to work with it. Did I mention how
expensive Apple products are?
Don't bother asking about Jobs'
or Apple's philanthropic contributions: they don't exist. Apple's use
of patents against its competitors is
a massive drain on open competition and innovation. Want to design
an app for an Apple product? Only
if Apple employees review and approve it. Does somebody suspect
you have an Apple prototype phone
in your house? Apple security
guards will show up at your door
and raid the place. No seriously,
they will actually do that.
And again, I don't single out Jobs
for these things. He has done what
you have to do in order to accumulate a net worth of $8.3 billion. But
look at what gets said about other
Fans of Steve Jobs leave tributes outside an Apple store in Manhattan
comments I've seen on Twitter and
Facebook streams in the wake of
Jobs' death:
WATT MCDERMOTT/ FLICKR
enormously wealthy corporations
and then look at what those same
people will say about Apple and
Jobs. If this isn't a double standard,
I don't know what is.
Enough with the Apple fetishism. Stop fawning over Jobs as if
he were some sort of revolutionary
artist; he was a very smart and cunning businessman, possibly even a
genius in that regard. Salute him
for that, and then move on.
Oh, one last thing. I suppose
some of you will accuse me of setting up and knocking down a straw
man, so here's a sampling ofthe
"i love my mac and each time i turn
on my mac from now on i will think
ofthe creator of Apple."
"The future seemed less intimidating when Steve Jobs was around."
"Imagine a Steve Jobs in the auto
industry, in health care, in energy,
even in government. We would
have a different country."
"I don't know what to say yet, so
I'm just going to wear a black turtleneck and jeans tomorrow."
"Tonight I am ashamed to be
a Windows user. Remember
Steve Jobs and his civilizational
contributions."
"Look at your ipod, ipad, iphone,
mac. Now imagine life without
them. RIP Steve Jobs."
"Our era's Ford, Disney, Einstein." Hostel stats
>>J

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