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The Ubyssey Jan 8, 1980

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 Referendum a
number fumble
By GEOF WHEELWRIGHT
UBC student hacks are playing
the numbers gme with the Alma
Mater Society constitution and
students are coming up losers.
And like many established
gambling games, when the hacks
play numbers they play big, dirty
and for keeps. The events surrounding the recent successful
AMS constitution referendum
couldn't have been a more classic
crap shoot if it had been played in
Vegas.
Unfortunately the game was
played with the students of UBC,
who found that the rules for Let's
Change the Constitution changed
in mid-play, and the odds seemed
to have been fixed by the house.
Analysis
AMS hacksters told their
patrons that the house would need
a 15 per cent quorum and a two-
thirds yes vote to win the constitution game, but AMS croupier and
president Brian Short suddenly
found that rule unconstitutional
even as students were casting their
ballots.
As it was becoming clear that 10
per cent was the quorum number
to beat there were suddenly
rumblings from the hackasino
suggesting that perhaps 10 per
cent was quorum after all. Short
says now in hindsight, "It was
fairly obvious to me, it was 10."
When the results were in, the
players could easily see why the
house found it convenient to
notice their mistake. Slightly more
than 13 per cent of the student
population has voted, and 85 per
cent of them had voted yes; a victory at 10 per cent, but a stinging
defeat at 15 per cent quorum.
Although a lawyer's opinion
now accompanies the results of
the referendum, the players in this
game (the students) may want to
know why its organizers (the
hacks) did not make the rules and
the quorum clear to everyone
before the referendum.
Not only did the hacks play big
numbers in this political gamble,
but it also looks like they played
dirty. Forces opposed to the new
constitution say they might have
reacted differently in counselling
their supporters to abstain from
voting if a 10 per cent quorum had
been clear from the start of the
game.
No matter what the gains of the
new constitution are, it is clear
that the quorum confusion was
not the only tactic used in this dirty numbers game. Even before the
referendum was held there was a
raging controversy about the
methods used to get students to
sign a petition calling for the
referendum.
Students were shown
"highlights" of the constitutional
changes and asked to support it on
the basis of these selected excerpts
chosen by pro-referendum lobbyists. The questionable petition
was quickly passed along to
students court and almost overnight a vertible clone of that petition appeared with apparently the
correct number of signatures (600)
and was used as the basis for the
recent referendum call.
Plans for the referendum eventually got underway only after yet
another political battle about the
petition's validity, but the delay
proved even more disastrous.
Here's where the numbers game
gets really dirty.
Not only was the referendum
scheduled such that some faculties
had little or no chance to vote, but
electioneering was uncovered outside at least one polling booth.
The yes or no votes at the questionable poll in the Woodward
building were immediately discounted, but Short and other pro-
referendum hacks hoped the 88 invalidated votes could be counted
towards quorum. That dirty trick
was thwarted by the legal opinion
obtained by the AMS one week
after the vote.
Student representatives in the
law and education buildings also
complained that planning for the
referendum was so rushed their
faculties were not given an adequate chance to vote. Voting
statistics would seem to bear those
charges out as only 47 law and 74
education students cast their
ballots. Most other faculty polls
had considerably greater voter
participation.
One point for the house.
But the most important factor
in this political gambling game
was the importance of the stakes
and the lengths to which the
organizers of this referendum
would go to pass it. It is obvious
that the political hacks responsible
for railroading, sneaking and
shoving their way to winning the
referendum game will use their
new power in the same way setting
an ominous precedent for the
future of student politics a UBC.
This kind of low-brow electioneering brings back the
abhorent memory of the
Sihotagate poster scandal three
years ago and the serious election
irregularities two years ago.
Incidents such as these seriously
damage the credibility of student
representation not only in the eyes
of students, but also in the view of
those who purport to listen to student concerns.
The numbers games belong in
Vegas, not at UBC. Student
credibility must not be gambled
with and those who refuse to learn
that lesson may find themselves
cashing in their chips during the
upcoming board of governors
elections and more ironically,
after the new AMS executive at-
large elections.
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THE
"^^^^P^iliSP
Vol. LXII, No. 36
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, January 8,1980
228-2301
Students might lose vote
Many UBC students could find
themselves standing empty-handed
outside polling stations Feb. 18.
Harold Morris, returning officer
for Vancouver-Quadra, the riding
which takes jn UBC, said Monday
he is concerned, that many students
have moved since the May federal
election and will find themselves
left off the voter's list.
Morris said special arrangements
are being made to ensure students
have an opportunity to register,
since the Conservative government
decided not to hold voter enumeration.
Because the May 22 list forms the
basis for the preliminary voter's list,
anyone who has moved or reached
voting age since that time must
register themselves, Morris said.
The Quadra returning office will
establish a special revising office in
Walter Gage residence to enumerate
students, but the office will only be
open from Jan. 25 to Feb. 4 from
10 to 11 a.m.  and 7 to 10 p.m.
Morris said the revising office
and heavy media advertising will
provide all students with ampled
opportunity to be enumerated. "If
anyone doesn't learn from that,
there is nothing we can do to help
them," he said.
But UBC NDP club president
Bob Staley said he is not convinced
all students will be reached and is
planning to assist in voter registration by distributing enumeration
cards and establishing a voter advice booth in SUB.
"I think it (student registration)
will be a problem. A lot of students
were enumerated in the last election, but the people who have just
turned 18 and who live in residences
will be affected," he said.
Campus Progressive Conservative party Bill Embrey said his
club will help in student registration
office could probably handle the
problem.
And Morris said anyone not on
the voter's list and wishing to vote
can contact the returning office by
calling 266-1394.
Prof chides Hydro for 'propaganda'
By STEVE McCLURE
A UBC professor is taking B.C. Hydro to
task for distributing pro-federalist petitions
with Hydro bills.
Phil Resnick is threatening to sue Hydro for
printing and' distributing petitions with the
November-December Hydro bill calling for a
united Canada. The petition was written by
People to People, a pro-federalist group, and
urges British Columbians to support the federalist cause in the upcoming referendum debate.
Resnick said he objects to Hydro ratepayers
footing  the   bill   for   political   propaganda.
— ross bumett photo
MASOCHISTIC STUDENT plays professors' primitive version pin-the-tail-on-the-donkey as finger searches for
revealing mark at ass bottom of class. But wracked with failure and doomed to years of Ds, frustrated pair finally
jumped off crumbling Wreck beach cliffs, in symbolic student suicidal gesture to torment guilt-ridden conscience
of tyrannical teaching faculty.
NDP leaders sparkle in spectacle
but stayed closer to the issues in the
upcoming Feb. 18 election,
touching on all the NDP's platform
planks. At the top of the list was the
Conservative government's record.
"(Canadians) are tired of politicians who say one thing before elections and another thing afterwards," said Broadbent.
He pointed to Conservative promises of fair treatment for women,
lower interest rates and an energy
policy for Canada — promises
Broadbent charged that Clark has
not delivered.
"Joe Clark has spent the last
seven months simply treading
water," he said. "He's taken a step
back toward the '30s."
And Broadbent offered an NDP
future as an alternative to a Liberal
past and a Conservative present, ending his speech with the NDP's current slogan: "We should sell Joe
Clark and keep PetroCanada."
Johnson basked in the light of the
two prominent NDP leaders, joined
by a number of already-nominated
B.C. candidates. He made light of
newspaper headline references to
his last attempt to win the Vancouver Centre seat for the NDP.
"The Province had a headline
saying 'Veteran Campaigner Takes
On Liberals' while the Sun had a
headline saying 'Two-Time Loser
Runs Again.' "
Johnson confidently predicted a
major upset for the NDP in his riding, saying a shift of only five voters
at each poll would do the trick.
An overflow crowd of enthusiastic NDP supporters were
treated to a star-studded spectacular Monday night featuring federal leader Ed Broadbent and provincial leader Dave Barrett.
The two celebrities were brought
into town to lend their support to
Ron Johnson's nomination in Vancouver Centre, a key riding for the
New Democrats. Johnson accepted
a unanimous mandate from the 187
.voting members to contest the
riding for a fourth time, facing exactly the same opposition as in his
May, 1979 bid.
Barrett's humorous remarks were
by far the most colorful of the evening. "Fabien Roy is not coming to
B.C.," he said, referring to the differences between federal and provincial   branches  of  the   Liberal,
Conservative and Social Credit parties.
He continued by ridiculing Pierre
Trudeau and Joe Clark's television
appearances. "I've been watching
Joe Clark on television because I'm
a masochist," he said. "I've been
watching Pierre Trudeau on television because I like watching
history."
Barrett then switched to serious
criticism, pointing out that the Conservative government's tough
budget would be unnecessary if they
collected taxes owed the federal
government by major corporations,
wiping out the national deficit.
"I'm sick and tired of seeing you
bite the bullet while they're sipping
tea in the burned-out Rideau
Club."
Broadbent's comments were drier
Hydro chairman Robert Bonner authorized
the spending of $8,500 for the printing of the
petition, he said.
"I've got no objection to these groups expressing their opinions but I do object to them
masquerading as non-partisan and non-political. It shows how far the federalist forces are
prepared to go to promote their cause."
Resnick said he is not ready to personally sue
B.C. Hydro over the matter, but deducted $1
from his last Hydro bill as a protest against
public funding of the petition.
He suggested concerned lawyers or political
groups take Hydro to court over the issue.
"Perhaps a committee of some kind could be
struck to investigate the affair," he said.
Resnick added the petition was part of a
nation-wide campaign to use' public funds to
support the federalist option.
"People to People gets money from federal
government, from Wintario and the B.C. lotteries fund. This in itself is a questionable use
of public funds." Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 8, 1980
Silly party wins
Twelve UBC students recently
nominated for 17 senate positions
faced no competition.
And they're now in by acclamation.
By the Dec. 21, 1979, nomination
deadline, only seven students had
submitted their names, with five
more running as senator at-large.
All were elected, including senator
at-large Chris Niwinski, applied
science 4, who is in for the second
consecutive year.
"I think it's a better thing,"
newly-elected senator at-large
Shirley Waters said of the acclamations. "A lot of people use a senate
position to sit on SRA (student
representative assembly), but this
way, you get just those who want to
sit on senate."
Waters, who is also running
against four others as student board
of governors member, said the acclamations will not prevent new
senators from being slack or actively motivated, depending on their
personality. She said she personally
expects no problem in combining a
senate and possible board position.
Combining a student board and
senate position is advantageous'
because the representative is better
informed, said Alma Mater Society
president Brian Short. He said he
thinks Waters will be competent in
both positions if she is elected on
the board.
Short blamed the loss of student
senator nominees on the lack of
advertising and awareness and called it a "fluke drop."
NORRES
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"I don't even recall having no
senator at-large elections in the last
four years," he said. "I'd always
rather see an election so candidates
can get it clear why they are running."
There are still no nominations for
senators in commerce and business
administration, forestry and
medicine. Short said he expects
nominations will re-open for these
positions before the first senate
meeting Jan. 16.
The senators who won by acclamation are: Joe Fitzpatrick applied science 3; Jeffrey Holm, applied science 3; Marily MacPherson, arts 3; Richard Wilczek, dentistry 3; Frank Lee, education 4;
Linda Stewart, Law 2; and, Martin
Braun, science 3.
The new senators at-large, by acclamation, are Waters, Niwinski,
Ian Bakshi, applied science 3; Marty Lund, social work 3; and Alida
Mooren, arts 3.
Peter Fryer and Richard Szeliski
are running for one student senator
position in graduate studies and
Randy Sigardson and Cedric
Thompson are vying for the pharmaceutical sciences senator position.
Nominees for board of governors
are: Anthony Dickinson, applied
science 4; Valgeet Johl, arts 2; John
Rellizzon, applied science 3; Bob
Staley, arts 3 and Waters.
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
6882481
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presentation of this ad. Offer expires April S, 1980.
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5736 UNIVERSITY BLVD.
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.DROP IN OR CALL 228-1471.
FILM EVENT
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HARLAN COUNTY,
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TUESDAY, JANUARY 8, 12:45
Law Building, Room 101
SENIOR STUDENTS - FACULTY OF
ARTS/EDUCATION
Interested in part-time study-related work experience
January-April 1980?
INTERNSHIPS
are available in:
Business Finance Museums
Commercial Display Personnel Training
Educ/Sociological Research       Social Work
Journalism Tutoring/ESL
OFFICE OF CO-OPERATIVE EDUCATION/INTERNSHIPS
ROOM 213, BROCK HALL
Telephone: 228-3449 or 228-6271
SPEAKEASY
UBC's Information
and Crisis Centre's
TRAINING SESSION
for volunteers for 1980
January 11 and 12
Apply to Speakeasy, SUB Main Mall
Mon.-Fri. 11:30-11:30, Sat. 5:30-8:30
THE MINISTRY OF HUMAN RESOURCES
IN VANCOUVER
IS LOOKING FOR A
VOLUNTEER
to provide recreational outings for a young male adult
with neurological problems.
His interests are Science, Mechanics, Chess, Fishing and
Nature Studies.
This is an interesting and challenging assignment for a student   in   the   fields   of   Nutrition,   Genetics,   Neurology,
Psychology — or ?
For   information    please   call    MARNIE    RADER    at
430-3411, or JEAN NICHOLLS at 733-8111.
Wednesday
PHOENIX JAZZERS
Thursday
WESTSIDE FEETWARMERS
Friday
ST. VALENTINES MASSACRE
Saturday
DIXIELAND EXPRESS
Members $2.00 - Guests *3,00
TUES/WEBVTHURS — FREE for Members' (
LIVE-NEW ORLEANS JAIZ    ' |
36 E. Broadway — 873-4131
_    YEARLY MEMBERSHIPS - S3 00
U.B.G. DEPARTMENT
OF STUDENT HOUSING
INVITES APPLICATIONS FOR
RESIDENCE ADVISORS FOR 1980-1981
These positions are open only to single men and
women. Successful applicants will be required to
live in the residences. Application forms and
detailed job descriptions are available at the
Ponderosa Housing Office and at the Front Desk of
each residence area: Totem Park, Place Vanier and
W. H. Gage.
Applications will be accepted from January 7th to
January 18th, 1980, at the Front Desks of the
Residences or at the Ponderosa Housing Office.
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there's no Jiff e like it.
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If you've got what it takes, we'll pay
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PILOTS operate communications,
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NAVIGATORS work with
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And because you'll be trained for
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to show us leadership qualities as
well. Think you've got what it takes?
Ask us about you and start your
flight path to success.
WRZ7
The
Canadian
Armed
Forces
Commanding Officer
Canadian Forces Recruiting Centre
547 Seymour Street
Vancouver, B.C. V6B 3H6 Tuesday, January 8,1980
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
CUP smiles on national magazine
By TOM HAWTHORN
TORONTO — A new national
magazine, providing an alternative
look at issues in a full-color glossy
format, will appear on Canadian
campuses this fall.
The magazine, as yet unnamed,
was accepted here by delegates attending the 42nd annual Canadian
University Press conference. CUP,
a national cooperative of more than
60 student newspapers, adopted the
magazine after years of consideration.
"It will provide a totally different
perspective that's been totally lacking in the Canadian commercial
media," said CUP national bureau
chief Bill Tieleman.
"It will be the strongest alternative voice in all the Canadian
media, where student papers in the
past have given the strongest voice
to topics the commercial media ignores."
The first issue of the magazine
will appear with student newspapers
in September. Published from Toronto offices, the magazine will contain issues-oriented features and a
section of relevant news briefs.
Delegates speaking in favor of
the proposal called it an opportunity to provide an alternative media
voice while putting CUP on solid financial ground.
Calling for a magazine not
"namby-pamby. and wishy-washy
like Maclean's," as one CUP employee phrased it, delegates voted to
accept advertising boycotts of firms
who invest in repressive regimes,
oppress workers, discriminate or
advocate violence against workers.
The list of boycotted advertisers
will be published with a brief explanation of each boycott.
Delegates also accepted a new
10-year contract with Youthstream,
SFU 18 get
support in
court case
Students and trade unionists will
stage a demonstration at the Burnaby courthouse today to protest
the possible conviction of 18
picketers arrested at a Simon Fraser
University picket line last spring.
Although recent snowfalls may
hamper demonstrator turnout,
organizers are pleading for a large
show of strength to prevent a court,
conviction they charge will set an
anti-labor precedent in Canadian
law.
"I hope there will be a fair
representation of students, labor
and others concerned with the right
to strike," said organizer Joan
Meister. She said if the picketers are
convicted of obstructing a highway,
it will have serious consequences for
the location of future picket lines in
any labor dispute.
The courts will decide today
whether or not a picket line set up
last spring at the entrance road to
SFU constituted obstruction of a
highway. The RCMP clashed with
picketers and arrested 18 of them
on charges of obstructing the police
and the highway. One protestor has
already been convicted, although
that decision is under appeal.
Meister said the SFU 18 open
defense committee has also collected 7,000 signatures on a protest
petition to provincial attorney
general Alan Williams and has
garnered the support of the B.C.
NDP, the B.C. Federation of Labor
and the B.C. Federation of
Students.
If the courts docide against the
SFU 18 today, the committee will
send a protest delegation to
Williams on Jan. 14.
the national student newspaper advertising network.
In other business, the conference
plenary narrowly voted to oust the
Grad Post, a member paper accused
of lacking staff democracy, one of
the conditions necessary for membership in the organization.
CUP's statement of principles requires that the staff of all member
papers determine the editorial content of the paper. Delegates accepted a membership commission
report that the students' union controlled the contents of the University of Toronto graduate students'
paper.
The students' union also had the
authority to discipline staff members and a unionized employee,
which also contravenes CUP's
statement of principles.
The vote to expel the Grad Post,
which required a two-thirds majority, passed by a 29-12 margin.
After the expulsion, delegates
gave the Grad Post's staff an emotional three-minute standing ovation, with delegates calling on them
to  form an independent student
paper.
The plenary also supported a motion recognizing Quebec's right to
self-determination.
And the traditional New Year's
levee was attended by some delegates to inform lieutenant-governor
Pauline McGibbon of their displeasure with recently announced
hikes in Ontario tuition fees.
A special plenary was called when
representatives of the Chevron, a
non-student newspaper expelled
from CUP last year, asked to be
granted observer status. They were
denied access to plenary meetings,
technical sessions and issues workshops by an overwhelming vote.
The Chevron was evicted from
CUP for physically intimidating
staff members who would not
follow the paper's editorial line,
adopted from the Communist Party
of Canada (Marxist-Leninist).
Students at the University of Water
loo, where the Chevron formerly
published, decided in a referendum
last year that the paper would cease
to be a recognized student publication.
Two Winnipeg student newspaper editors were elected to CUP's
national office. Mike Betagus of the
Projector from Red River College
was elected president, while Mike
McEvoy of the Uniter will serve as
vice-president and features writer.
Quebec bureau chief Cathy Smith
was elected national bureau chief.
SAC hacks move to hit paper
Some student hacks think a student administrative commission
vote to put The Ubyssey's annual
subsidy to referendum is a thoughtless and nearsighted move.
The full results of a Dec. 10 motion recommending the student representative assembly put the paper's
budget to a vote were not considered, Valgeet Johl, Alma Mater Soci
ety external affairs officer charged
Monday.
"It seems there wasn't much
thought given to the consequences
of such a motion," she said.
"We (the SRA) are always ranting and raving about how we'd like
to offer more services but this
would uproot one of the most basic
services on this campus," she added.
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— rou bumett photo
GLIBI ALA gumma. Whaspoo gitchi canpur raliwalla. Ixben deli wahwah lemmings. Killi kamba. Buchanan.
Oompal beni kissyati assy. Markamarka mucha. Vali-vali umm ummgood. Fo to too borinn forr kuttlin.
Ubyssey co-editor Heather Conn
said SAC was nearsighted and
thoughtless in its move.
"Their (SAC's) behind-closed-
doors approach and lack of discussion on the issue clearly reeks of irresponsible politics. They gave no
consideration to the far-reaching effects of a campus-wide referendum," she said.
"SAC has no mandate to make
such a drastic decision."
Johl added if the referendum
gives The Ubyssey a subsidy but
fails to get quorum the paper will
receive no money.
But according to SAC secretary
Diane Campbell the structure of
The Ubyssey will have to be looked
at if the students vote against the
referendum.
"Maybe we should ask the students what they think. If they say yes
— great; if they say no then something should be examined," she
said.
But an examination of the paper
implies a move to stronger editorial
control by outside bodies, said
Johl.
"You're getting into the whole
thing of editorial control and that
brings up bad feelings and defeats
the. purpose of a student paper,"
she said.
And SRA arts representative Bob
Staley said the recommendation will
probably be ignored because of its
intent.
Strike call
empties PVI
classrooms
Classes at the Pacific Vocational
Institute were suspended yesterday
as about 200 instructors set up
picket lines at the school's three
campuses.
The instructors, members of local
57 of the B.C. Government
Employees Union, walked out in
response to changes they say the
management made to a contract
tentatively agreed to in November.
That agreement was reached after a
four day strike by the union.
But the contract was not signed
by either party and a union
spokesman said the union never saw
the final agreement. BCGEU
spokesman Robbie Robertson said
the management's changes affect
holiday and retirement clauses.
The institute yesterday afternoon
asked the B.C. labor relations
board to make a ruling on the
dispute, but at press time the board
was still meeting.
Sources say the instructors will
not return to work until the changes
are taken out and each page of the
agreement has been approved by
both parties. PVI principal Henry
Justensen was unavailable for comment yesterday.
The student union executive held
an emergency meeting last night to
decide whether to remain neutral in
the dispute, which is keeping 3,000
students from their classes. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 8, 1980
Ballotbox blues
"Come out, come out, wherever you are" is a popular cry these
days.
In seeking enumeration for the upcoming federal election,
students shouldn't put up with hide and go seek tactics. The Conservative government decided not to hold voter enumeration, and
in doing so, ignored a significant bloc of voters — us. We're
students — the ones who live in residences and aren't registered,
who've recently reached voting age but aren't listed, and who
move around a lot and consequently are left off the voter's list.
If we're going to play games, let's get the rules straight and play
it right. We all rate a vote and should be damned sure we get one.
Keep your eyes and ears open and make sure you gain recognition.
Call the returning officer near UBC at 266-1394, or make sure your
name is listed in your area.
Damn Hydro
B.C. Hydro chairman Robert Bonner's actions in authorizing the
printing and distributing of a political petition are in direct conflict
with the non-partisan nature »f a Crown corporation. If Hydro is
allowed to distribute pro-federalist petitions in their monthly bills,
who knows what other Crown corporations may try and get away
with.
Imagine Air Canada inserting "Fly with Joe Clark" bumper
stickers in their airline tickets or PetroCan including proposals for
constitutional reform in their annual report.
Bonner's attempt to get away with political domination of a
public utility and Crown corporation is just as absurd, and just as
serious. Hydro ratepayers pay their bills for receiving gas and electricity, not for being told what they should think about the controversial issue of sovereignty-association.
THE UBYSSEY
January 8, 1980
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the
AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices is
in room 241K of the Student Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301; Advertising, 228-3977.
Co-Editors: Heather Conn and Tom Hawthorn
The decade ended at Ubyssey with a rendition of each staffer's sounds of the '70s. Geof and Julie
Wheelwright belted out We Are Family while Steve McClure sang a medley of hits off Mushroom
records. Elton John was big, with Bill Tieleman crooning Goodbye Yellow Brick Road and Heather
Conn warbling the words of Honky Chateau. Ross Burnett picked Kodachrome, Peter Menyasz came
down with Saturday Night Fever and barely stayed alive and Glen Sanford was a Mongoloid, happier
than you or me. Tom Hawthorn did it My Way but it was a Long Way There for Curtis Long. Bruce
Baugh bellowed out Disco Duck and Gary Brookfield sang Money. Bob Trowsdale was playing a requested Who Are You and Kathy Ford remembered The Way We Were. That only left Verne
McDonald, who stopped singing in late '69 and missed a completely forgettable musical decade and
Kevin Finnegan, who couldn't hold a tune. And speaking of forgettable, Page Friday has a meeting today at noon (12:30 Poofta time!.
He was a megalomaniac monarch wholcst everything to
a shifty-eyed loon with Neanderthal politics
MOHAMMED REZA PAHLAVI
The SHAH
ji
also starring
occasional visits by
color by
HOW IN PANAMA/
and
UfiM
\ as Ik
\ berserk
berserk mullah
""» feting CHASF Ml M a**,* PiCGS M
ray?
Fed up with feds
By JAMES BURDON
Many British Columbians now
find themselves caught up in the
federal election. Following party
lines or playing the role of the independent critic, these people are now
in heated debate over the issues of
this event. Some are even involved
in campaigning, while about 100 are
running for office. However, not
one of them realizes that the result
of this election will bring little if any
change for the better. For no matter
which party forms the next government, British Columbia will continue to suffer at the hands of the
federal government.
perspectives
Past Canadian governments, recent and Victorian, Liberal and
Conservative, have done nothing
but harm the economy. Both of the
major parties have proven themselves opposed to the development
of high technology here. Both are
opposed to it, because they fear for
the industrial monopoly of Ontario
and Quebec. As the federal government is in fact little more than the
government of Quebec and Ontario
then it is only natural that it looks
after that area's interests.
One need only look at the case of
the Pisces submersible. For the past
decade, Liberal and Conservative
governments have tried their best to
discourage this enterprise by denying it funds. Now they are out to
sink it for good by interfering with
its sales to the USSR. Their official
reason for this odious action is that
the submersible would represent a
military threat to the North Atlantic
Treaty Organization if the Soviets
were to have one.
Such an excuse is totally ludicrous since this research vehicle has
no offensive or defensive^ capabilities. Any military knowledge that
they could gain out of the Pisces
would be very indirect and probably
far easier to attain through programs that don't use the submersible.
If the Canadian government
wishes to be consistent in their concerns over security then they should
also end all sales of farm machinery
to the Warsaw Pact nations. After
all, this equipment-(primarily made
in Ontario and Quebec) is being used to strengthen the East European
economies so that they can afford
to make even more missiles to target
against NATO.
No doubt if the Pisces was made
in Toronto things would be very
different. Many millions of dollars
were poured into the De Havilland
corporation of Montreal in order to
make it commercially viable. Yet
neither of the last two governments
gave a cent to Trident Aircraft of
Sidney, even though it only needs a
$5 million loan.
A federal government would prefer to see skilled workers and technicians driven out of British Columbia by unemployment rather than
allowing a high technology industry
to take root here. Ottawa just finds
it more profitable to have us remain
a resource-colonial land bridge to
the Pacific.
Thus the Liberals and the Conservatives have spoken with their
records. The NDP by their proposed "industrial strategy" appears to
be even worse, for they intend to
continue to centre manufacturing in
Quebec and Ontario under the banner of Canadian nationalism. What
latitude we now have in economic
matters would be lost, since the
eastern industries would be able to
gorge upon our resources without
outside competition. Thus, an NDP
government would merely increase
the power that Ontario and Quebec
now wield over us.
The present condition  can improve only if Ottawa's influence declines. Perhaps the most effective
way  in which this could happen
See page 7: B.C.
James Burdon is a UBC second-
year science student. Tuesday, January 8, 1980
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Bringing real world to UBC poses no threat
I came away from the Nov. 28
symposium on the forthcoming
commercial research and development park" feeling that too many of
the park critics had used vague or
slightly desperate arguments and
that their valid points had not been
sufficiently down to earth to be persuasive or useful. It doesn't get the
job done if student input into the
park is restricted to a few individuals who would like to turn the
clock back.
The concerns expressed regarding
1) pollution control and 2) the
rights of UBC students both to first
priority status and to maintenance
of present standards of services
were serious and must be met by the
park's designers.
In my experience, however, the
only pollution which is unlikely to
be adequately controlled in the initial design will be the dumping of
chemical wastes down laboratory
sinks. This is a major problem in re
search and teaching labs right on
campus since it involves individual
conscientious effort. The new development must be equipped with
an easy-to-use, properly enforced
disposal system.
It is a shame to see people wasting their anti-pollution voice on a
nonmanufacturing installation such
as this when its actual contribution
to the abuse of our environment is
negligible compared to the air and
water effluent pouring right now
from industrial sites around False
Creek and the Fraser River.
Who knows, perhaps an antipollution equipment firm will do its
research at UBC.
In response to the second point, I
do not see the park undermining or
significantly changing the quality of
education and services for UBC
students, especially if companies
are required to pay commercial
rates for library and computer use,
as was indicated at the forum by
Don Larson. In physical terms, the
park will be small compared to the
educational campus. I do think a
close watch should be kept however, to avoid problems in this area.
I had to agree with the spirit of
Kenny's philosophy behind the
park. He said that the research park
would bring a piece of the real
world to UBC and put us in step
with the constantly evolving technologies of the current world.
UBC is currently a very isolated
campus, far from the centre of
things. Physically it is far away
from the social and commercial
centre of town, and in many faculties it exudes an ivory tower atmosphere in excess of some
American Ivy League universities. I
believe that UBC could do a better
job preparing the average student
for his/her eventual entry into regular society. The R&D park will
not only put on campus people integrally involved with our society,
'UBCpark needs diligent zoo keepers9
I have often argued that the
amazing nuclear weapons systems
we earthlings are collectively developing represent the "highest"
achievement of human intelligence
but probably the lowest manifestation of wisdom.
I have somewhat the same view
towards the proposal for the
58-acre scientific and technological
zoo — oops — park. It seems to me
the results of the proposed asylum
— oops — park will largely be
"more of the same": exploitive hu-
Iranian students rule O.K.!
Too often in our disparate world
is the intent of written work completely misinterpreted. The university community is no exception in
this regard. Is it not the fool who
distinguishes himself in the
academe by speaking without thinking, or in another form of the same
faux pas, criticizing without understanding?
By failing to understand the realities of a situation let us not disassociate ourselves too hastily from
our brethren students in Iran. One
may not be in total agreement with
the cause for which the Iranian
students stand for, but nevertheless
admire the courage and determination of their efforts.
'Don'tpraise me'
I wish to correct an impression
given in your Nov. 22 article about
the recommendations made by the
science faculty review committee.
The article states that I am "claiming victory in my recent fight to improve academic counselling and
course and teacher evaluations."
This is utter rubbish.
My only contribution to the
review process wa.s a hastily
prepared and poorly presented brief
given on behalf of the science
undergraduate society of which I
was president at the time.
I would like to also point out that
the committee talked to many
students, faculty members and administrators as well as SUS
representatives. That the committee
did make some recommendations
which should please many science
students, is due to the committee's
ability to digest information from
all these different sources and from
this to make some logical conclusions. It is not because of anything I
might have said.
If implemented, many of the
recommendations will provide a
better learning experience for most
science students. On that basis, one
might argue that this is a "victory"
for students — but please, please,
don't call it my victory. I played
but a very small and insignificant
part in the whole process.
Anne Gardnei
I hardly doubt that Iranian students' associations have withdrawn
their money, as our own association
has attempted, from banks which
maintain policies contrary to their
cause. But no matter how many letters to the editor Iranian students
might write to their university papers, or the number of unanimous
declarations the student associations of Iranian universities may
have already made, until the most
recent actions their cause has gone
unnoticed. Our own student politicians might very well learn a lesson
in effectiveness and cease performing their current forms of student
protest.
I am sure if one takes the time to
reflect that our counterparts'in Iran
have been sacrificing essay deadlines and are prepared to pursue
their cause for justice even into the
Christmas examination period, the
only possible reaction would be one
of awe and amazement.
Theodore Baracos
arts 4
man assaults on natural resources
and phenomena, increased species
elimination, increased environmental ecological damage, increased
production of irrelevant consumer
self-destructing knick-knack devices, existential pointlessness.
The mission for our "universe city" should not be to support a discovery park but rather to become a
RE-discovery garden. A New Eden
where for every dollar expended on
scientific and industrial technology
a matching "time-energy quotient"
would be applied to the arts and
humanities. To do otherwise
means, to me, simply more of the
same — giving increased impetus to
the momentum of our (unnecessary) collective demise.
We need to learn how to share
our fragile global eco-system as
world citizens, how to laugh at ourselves, how to become as children
again, how to expand our spirit/vision/mind rather than narrow it
through overspecialization,
measurements and controls.
Dare I risk suggesting an authoritative text which might help to clarify the entire issue? Oh heck yes:
Theodor Roszak's Person/ Planets,
with the provocative subtitle: "the
creative disintegration of industrial
society."
Herb Gilbert
fine arts department
CONCORDIA
UNIVERSITY       ^
GRADUATE FELLOWSHIPS
Applications for graduate fellowships are invited
from candidates intending to study full-time in a
graduate program leading to a master's or doctoral
degree at Concordia University. Academic merit,
broadly interpreted, is the prime consideration in
granting of awards. Financial need is not taken
into account.
APPLICATION DEADLINE: February 1,1980
ANNOUNCEMENT OF WINNERS: April 1, 1980
COMMENCEMENT OF TENURE: September 1, 1980
These awards are valued at up to $7000 a year,
plus basic tuition, and may in some cases be
renewed for up to three years.
Additional information and application forms are
available from the:
Graduate Studies Office
Concordia University
1455 de Maisonneuve Blvd. W.
Montreal, Quebec    H3G 1M8
Tel: (514) 879-7314
but it will make more community
members aware of us, thus reducing
the abhorred apathy.
I think that an R & D park has a
place on campus and will probably
be a stimulating place for graduate
students in need of concrete goals
and inspiration. We must not be
blind to abuses by the park's
administration, meted out in the
name of sound economics. But we
key
this
must apply pressure to select
points if we are to influence
body at all.
I support the concept of the park
because I do not think it will affect
in any way those students who wish
to ignore it, and I think it should
prove valuable to those students
who don't.
Gary T. Spence
science 4
Grandad lets off gas
CUTE LITTLE FART ... is no nameless tyke
Regarding the front page photo in your Nov. 20 issue — cute, of
course; little, sure; but that's no fart, you farts, that's my grandson.
Not nameless, either!
J. W. Faulkner
Hanlsport, N.S.
Get on the bus, leave driving to us
As of yesterday, buses are now
available to transport students from
the B lots to central campus. This
service will begin at 8:10 a.m. and
there will be a bus leaving the B lots
every four minutes through to 9:30
a.m. Monday through Friday. The
buses will drop passengers at two
locations on campus, Main Mall
and University Boulevard and in
front of the Bookstore. These buses
will be clearly marked "Special"
and will be free of charge.
This is an experiment to see how
many people use the service and
whether it serves their needs. I realize that an earlier start would have
been better however this is the only
time that buses are available.
Al Hutchinson
traffic and security director
THECANADIAN MINERAL INDUSTRY
EDUCATION FOUNDATION
offers
UNDQWRADUATE SCHOLARSHIPS
in
MINING or MINERAL ENGINEERING and
EXTRACTIVE or PROCESS METALLURGICAL ENGINEERING
$1,600-9 months
to students wishing to enter the first or subsequent professional
year of a degree course in Mining or Mineral Engineering
and Extractive or Process Metallurgical Engineering.
For applications contact:
The Secretary,
Canadian Mineral Industry Education Foundation.
P.O. Box 45. Commerce Court West. Toronto, Ont.
or
The Dean of Engineering
Applied Science
CLOSING DATE FEBRUARY29.  1980. Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 8,1980
Hot flashes
They won't be
feoffor than ihl*
Stop right now. Don't think
about it, don't even read the rest of
this hot flash. Go right now to the
Law building, down at the end of
East Mall, the concrete one that
looks like a barricade to keep the
poor people out.
There, right at noon today (see? I
told you there wasn't much time),
in room 101 the Law Students Association is showing the award-
winning Harlan County, U.S.A.,
one of the must-see films from back
in the 1970s.
The film describes the Kentucky
coal strike of a few years back and
is remarkable because it is one of
the few films directed by a woman
ween classes
TODAY
UBC SCIENCE FICTION SOCIETY
General meeting on strategy for the decade,
noon, SUB 113.
LSA FILM COMMITTEE
Film: Harlan Country, U.S.A., noon. Law
101.
MY JONG KUNG FU CLUB
Practice, 8:30 to 10:30 p.m., SUB ballroom.
WUSC
General meeting, noon, Buch. 215.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
General meeting, noon, SUB 130.
COALITION FOR A SAFE CAMPUS
Regular meeting, 1:30 p.m., SUB 130.
WEDNESDAY
POTTERY CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 251.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CENTRE
Father Donald Nielson speaks about Cardinal
Newman, noon, SUB 211.
TM PROGRAM
Group meditation and videotape, noon, Buch.
217.
THURSDAY
STUDENT LIBERALS
General meeting to discuss election, noon, SUB
213.
NDP CLUB
Special pre-election meeting, noon, SUB 119.
MY JONG KUNG FU CLUB
Practice, 8:30 to 10:30 p.m., SUB party room.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Lesbian drop-in. 1:30 p.m., SUB 130.
EAST INDIAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
Organizational   meeting,    noon.    International
House main floor.
GAY PEOPLE
General meeting, noon, SUB 212.
FRIDAY
SINGLE PARENTS ON CAMPUS
A speaker from West End single parents will talk
about their group, noon. Brock 223.
UBC BALLET CLUB
Classes resume and fees are due, all week, SUB
party room.
to win an academy award. One of
the great documentaries.
Help the Rhino*
ride fe Ubyssfo
Save the Rhinos.
These poor ugly creatures think
they have a chance to subvert our
democratic system through their
barely hidden pseudo-destructive
anarchistic tendencies. The scum.
Anyways, two of these rhinos
want to be fed. Badly. And the
two, "Wazz" Menyasz and "John
A." McDonald, just happen to be
Ubyssey staffers tired of deadlines
and alcohol as opposed to campaigning and other hallucinogenic
things.
Please send donations c/o room
241K and your tax receipts will be
sent to your address if we're allowed to do that. We think.
CASABLANCA
WEDNESDAY, JAN. 9
8:00 P.M.
THURSDAY, JAN. 10
12:30 P.M.
SUB AUD $1.00
THURSDAY, 7:00
FRI, SAT, SUN 7:00, 9:30
$1.00 SUB AUD
BANISH the back-to-school BLAHS
(for an hour or so)
Snacks, beverages and good company will be served in
The Women Students Lounge,
Brock Hall 223
fmi
^'vy,sv^L
Wednesday, January 9, 1980,
12 Noon to 2 pm
This is a Start the New Decade event for the
Brown Bag lunch group; all "returning' women
students are welcome to join us.
For Cappucino...Expresso...Sandwiches...Cointreau Cake
Carrot Cake...Cafe Latte...Satads...Croissants...Danish...
HotChocolate...Pate...Cheesecake...Muffins...Brioche...
Bagels...Rum Cake...Hot Milk...Strudel...Quiche...Cider...
and for a Colombian
experience come to...
2134 WESTERN PARKWAY
"IN THE VILLAGE"
DAILY    8-Midnight
WEEKENDS   11-Midnight
ewnis
espresso bar
HAIRWORLD
2620 SASAMAT (WlOth AVE.& SASAMAT
224-4912
224-1862
MUSIC/UBC
PRESENTS
WEDNESDAY: NOON-HOUR CONCERT
12:30 p.m. Recital Hall
Paul Hillier, Baritone; Stephen Stubbs, lute. Music of: the Renaissance and
Baroque
FRIDAY: FACULTY RECITAL
8:00 p.m. Recital Hall
Kathleen Rudolph, flute assisted by Melinda Coffey, piano, John Rudolph,
percussion, Tony Phillipps, percussion. Musk of: Martinu, Gaubert, Farber-
man and Gordell
INTERNATIONAL
HOCKEY
UBC THUNDERBIRDS
vs
CZECHOZLAVAKIA JUNIORS
Monday, January 14,
8:00 p.m.
Tickets - Athletic Office 228-2503
HOCKEY
THUNDERBIRD STYLE
UBC vs ALBERTA
FRI. & SAT. JAN. 11-12-8:00 P.M.
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
STUDENTS FREE ADMISSION
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES; Camptta - 3 Hnea, 1 day 4LS8; additional lines 38c.
CommweM - S Una*. 1 day tiMfe additional tinea
50c. AddMopat days tt-76 and 46c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and an payable in advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publication* Office, Room341, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V$TfW5
10 — For Sale — Commercial
WORLD'S LARGEST CEDAR? Super-
natural Windy Bay Posters — $2.00 —
Gift Shop — Museum of Anthropology
— Help support South Moresby
Wilderness Preservation.
FLOWER POWER HONEY here again. Stop
along University Blvd., get your supply today. 263-7080.
HOCKEY SPECIAL. Twelve or more
polyester jerseys, $10.95; nylon mesh,
$12.95. Price includes numbering. CCM.
Super Tacks, $159.50. Name brand sticks
from $4.95 up. 3615 West Broadway,
733-1612.
11 — For Sale — Private
40 — Messages
DO YOU LIKE TO TRAVEL BUT CAN'T
AFFORD THE AIRFARE? Well then visit
MANHATTAN this weekend in SUB
Theatre. Only costs a buck.
HUMPHREY BOGART, INGRID BERGMAN in CASABLANCA. This WEDNESDAY at 8:00 p.m. and THURSDAY at
12:30 p.m. in SUB Theatre for only $1.00.
65 — Scandals
70 — Services
15 — Found
20 — Housing
ROOMMATE NEEDED TO SHARE 2-bedroom suite 10 min. from Campus. Prefer
non-smoker, male or female $156 plus cable
and telephone. 738-5766.
DISCOVER FOR YOURSELF
Exams are fun!
Assignments enjoyable!
ADVANCED READING
TECHNIQUES
a one day course
For information Brochure call
266-6119
25 — Instruction
80 — Tutoring
30 - Jobs
JOBS!
Lake Tahoe, California!
Little exp. Fantastic Tips. Pay.
$1600-$3800. Summer. Thousands
needed. Casino's, Restaurants, Ranches. Cruisers, Rafting, etc. send
$4.95 for application/info/referrals.
LAKEWORLD 141. Box 60129. Sacto.
CA. 95860 U.S.A.
85 — Typing
ADRIEN'S STENO SERVICE. Manuscripts,
term papers, theses, reports, reasonable
rates. Electric typewriter. Call 987-3569 any
time.
TYPING IBM SELECTRIC CORRECTOR.
7 years experience with university papers,
theses,    equational,    technical,    etc.
874-6364.	
TYPING 80c per page. Fast and accurate.
Experienced typist. Phone Gordon,
873-8032.
CAMPUS REPS WANTED. Earn extra
money by introducing the GRAD CREDIKIT
SERVICE to your fellow graduating
students. No ACTUAL SELLING; NO
INVENTORIES; supply kit provided; excellent remuneration. Contact: H. Hoff,
Grad Credikit Services, Phone (416)
481-5637, or write 516 Eglinton Ave. East,
Toronto, Ont. M4P 1N6.
TYPING. Essays, theses, manuscripts,
including technical, equational, reports, letters, resumes. Fast accurate. Bilingual.
Clemy 324-9414
YEAR   ROUND  expert  essay and
typing from legible work. Phone 738-6829
from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. ' Tuesday, January 8,1980
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Security tighter
after DOA melee
Security at future Alma Mater
Society concerts will be tighter due
to an incident at a December punk
concert, an AMS spokeswoman
said Monday.
One or two professional security
guards will be hired at some upcoming concerts to work backstage and
supervise, said concerts committee
chairwoman Meral Aydin.
"It's standard procedure in most
places," she said.
Aydin said the Dec. 7 incident
was "an accident" and no further
action was necessary.
The DOA concert erupted when
several members of the audience
were thrown forcibly from the stage
OPTIC
ZONE
Student Discounts
ARBUTUS VILLAGE
733-1722
LSAT
^3  LSAT • MCAT • GRE
GRE PSYCH • GRE BIO
GMAT • DAT • OCAT • PCAT
VAT • MAT • SAT
NATL MED BDS
ECFMG • FLEX • VQE
NDB • NPB I • NLE
^tuVR^-HIMPMN
EDUCATIONAL CENTER
Test Preparation Specialists
Since 1938
for information. Please CaU:
mb (206) 523-7617 ^n
WoveH't tfa, *%eand
FOR NEW S USED
BOOKS
THOUSANDS OF
• TEXTBOOKS
• PAPBtBACXS
• REVIEW MOTES
* MONARCH NOTES
it SCHAUMS OUTLINES
* COLES NOTES
* LARGEST SELECTION OF
REVIEW NOTES IN B.C.
• WE TRADE USED
POCKETB0OKS
CASH PAID FOR TEXTS, ETC.
BETTER BUY BOOKS
4393 W. 10th Ave.
ROYAL
BANK
the helpful bank
University Area
Branch
DON ROUTLEY
Manager
10th at Sasamat
228-1141
after drummer Chuck Biscuits cursed the crowd, calling them "fucking
wimps" and challenging them to get
up on stage.
According to several witnesses,
about 25 people answered the challenge with no opposition from the
engineering undergraduate society
security personnel. The curtains in
the SUB ballroom were damaged in
the melee.
Aydin said the concerts committee would continue to hire engineers
for concert security.
"The AMS has been very understanding," she said. "We have no
plans for changing the basic structure for security."
DOA GUITARIST . . .a randy rampage in SUB
lllllllllll!
'B.C. aims
must reign'
From Page 4
would be if there were a long series
of minority governments. If governments were to fall every few
months then they would be less able
to inflict more harm upon us. This
situation, when combined with a
strong government in Victoria,
would then allow us to reverse some
of the damage.
However, it is beyond the power
of British Columbians to do all of
this, since it is Quebec and Ontario
that elect Canadian governments.
So we must concentrate on creating
a strong government in Victoria
which is willing to defend our interests. Therefore, the only use that we
can make out of the Feb. 18 election
is to show our disapproval of all
federal parties.
lllllllllll
lllllllllllllllllllllll
Careers
lllllllllll
Hill
lllllllllllllilll
nee
•kterhouse&COo
CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS
SUMMER
EMPLOYMENT
Third-year Commerce Accounting Option or First-
Year Licentiate in accounting students who are interested in summer employment with the Vancouver Office of Price Waterhouse & Co.: Please
mail copy of your U.C.P.A. form or personal
resume and most recent transcript of marks to:
Personnel Manager,
1075 West Georgia Street,
Vancouver, B.C.
V6E 3G1
CAREER CHOICES
A WORKSHOP FOR
WOMEN STUDENTS
Series II: Intermediate Stages
Five weekly sessions will help you:
(1) Re-assess your skills and interests
(2) Evaluate your career priorities
(3) Develop effective resumes
(4) Learn exploratory interview strategies
(5) Sharpen your job interview skills
DATES:
January 15-February 19, 1980
(Tuesdays)
TIME:
12:30-2:30 p.m.
PLACE:
363 Brock Hall
Register at the Women Students' Office,
Room 203 Brock Hall, by Friday,
January llth, 1980. Hurry! Registration
is limited.
Illllll
CAREER CHOICES
A WORKSHOP FOR
WOMEN STUDENTS
Series I: Beginning Stages
Five weekly sessions will help you:
(1) Assess where you are now in your life
(2) Clarify your values and interests
(3) Identify your work skills
(4) Apply this knowledge toward defining a career
direction
(5) Introduce resume writing and exploratory interview skills
DATES:
January 17-February 14, 1980
(Thursdays)
TIME:
12:30-2:00 p.m.
PLACE:
304 Brock Hall
Register at the Women Students' Office,
Room 203 Brock Hall, by Friday,
January llth, 1980. Hurry! Registration
is limited.
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT
GARDNER, McDONALD & CO. is looking
for third-year accounting option or first-year
licentiate in accounting students who are
interested in summer employment with our
Vancouver office.
Please mail your personal resume (UCPA
Form is suitable) and most recent transcript
to Mr. R. B. Mac Lise at:
Gardner. McDonald S Co.
Chartered Accountants
P.O. Box49154. 595 Burrard St Vancouver. BC V7X 1K4
Montreal. Toronto, Calgary, Edmonton, Prince George, Vancouver Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 8, 1980
Soviets next
for Nationals
— kevin finnegan photo
EXUBERANT ENTRANTS in Ubyssey "Find the goalie" contest fall over each other in rush to uncover unfortunate soul attempting to get the puck out of there. Canadian Olympic team, in white, did better job of finding
where goalie wasn't, scoring eight goals to beat combined UBC-Saskatchewan side. 'Birds take on Alberta at
winter sports centre this weekend.
'Birds chase besf in b'ball
The UBC Thunderbirds ice
hockey team is not the team to beat
the Russians. The Canadian national team might be.
The national squad scored four
early goals and coasted to an 8-3
win over the Thunderbirds Saturday before 2,200 fans at Thunderbird arena, but the jury is still out
on them.
CANADA WEST UNIVERSITY
ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION
Men's ice hockey standings
GP     W    L     Pts.
Alberta Bears 13 10 3 20
Calgary D'saurs 13 10 3 20
UBC'Birds       15       8     7     16
Sask. Huskies    15        6     9      12
"I think they have a very good
chance at the bronze (in the Olympics)," said Thunderbird coach
Bert Halliwell, but he added they
might have problems on defence.
The Olympic squad received solid
performances from both former
Thunderbirds on its roster in defeating a UBC team bolstered by
five players from the University of
Saskatchewan. Winger Doug Buchanan had two assists and goalie Ron
Patterson played a strong game in
the nets, stopping 25 shots.
Halliwell said Patterson was having
some difficulty adjusting to the
European style of play.
"He has trouble against the
Europeans because he challenges
them. They like to pass the puck
around rather than shoot right
away," said Halliwell.
While the national team is off to
Japan and then Lake Placid, the
Thunderbirds face the second half
of their Canada West league schedule, and Halliwell is optimistic.
"Some of our young guys have
gotten game experience now," he
said. "But we've got to keep the
puck out of our net. We're averaging about six goals a game but our
goals against average is over five."
"The whole team has to work on
our defensive responsibilities."
The 'Birds remained in third
place in Canada West after splitting
a pair of games with Saskatchewan
last week. Thursday the Huskies
dropped UBC 10-5, while on Friday
the 'Birds rebounded to win 8-3.
The Thunderbirds will meet the
University of Alberta Golden Bears
Friday and Saturday night at the
winter sports centre, and Monday
will play the Czechoslovakian
under-19 team. Game time each
night is 8 p.m.
Admission to the Alberta games
is free with a student card, while
tickets to the Czech game are $3.
The UBC-Canada game will be
televised in the Pit tonight at 7:30
p.m.
When an also-ran plays the best
teams in the country, it just tries to
keep the score respectable.
How much more respectable can
the Thunderbird basketball team
get?
The 'Birds were picked to go nowhere this year, but over the Christmas break they twice took the second-ranked team in the country to
overtime and came close to knocking off a powerful Simon Fraser
University squad.
UBC opened its holiday season at
the University pf Victoria tournament in early December and shocked second-ranked University of
Winnipeg Wesmen, going to overtime before losing 94-92. The 'Birds
played the last quarter of that game
without centre Bob Forsyth, who
had fouled out.
The Thunderbirds lost the second
game of the tourney to fourth-
ranked University of Calgary Dinosaurs, and just before Christmas
dropped two games to Lewis and
Clark University of Portland. But
-by the Wesmen tourney in late December, UBC was back on form.
In the first game of the tournament the 'Birds again extended
Winnipeg to overtime before losing
83-79. After a 70-57 loss to St.
Francis Xavier University, UBC
registered its only win over the holidays, downing the University of
Waterloo 79-70.
On Saturday the 'Birds raised a
few more eyebrows, shutting down
the highly rated Simon Fraser offence for most of the game before
losing 77-72. Canadian national
team member Jay Triano was the
only Clan player to score consistently against the 'Birds.
The Thunderbirds return to
league play this weekend when they
travel to Edmonton for a pair of
games against the University of Alberta Golden Bears. The following
weekend they meet the top-ranked
team in the country, the University
of Victoria Vikings, at War
Memorial Gym.
The Thunderettes meet Western
Washington State tonight at 7:30
p.m. in the gym before leaving for
the weekend league games in Edmonton.
*     *     *
UBC will be the site of this year's
Black Knight squash tournament on
Jan. 16-20. The tournament is open
to any squash player rated as a "C"
pr "D" player and all unrated players. There will be one open division
for each class, with both men and
women eligible to compete. Yellow
dot softballs will be used, and the
student entry fee is $5.
Applications are available from
the UBC athletic department in
room 208 of the gym, and entries
close Friday.
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 21
Men's basketball
UBC 69 Lewis and Clark 77
Men's ice hockey
UBC 3 Kamloops 4
SATURDAY, DEC. 22
Men's basketball
UBC 66 Lewis and Clark 73
Men's ice hockey
UBC 7 Kamloops 6
THURSDAY, DEC. 27
Men's basketball
Wesmen tourney
UBC 79-Winnipeg 83 o.t.
FRIDAY, OEC. 28
Men's basketball
Wesmen tourney
UBC 57 St. F.X. 70
SATURDAY. DEC. 29
Men's basketball
Wesmen tourney
UBC 79 Waterloo 70
THURSDAY
Men's ice hockey
UBC 5 Saskatchewan 10
FRIDAY
Men's ice hockey
UBC 8 Saskatchewan 3
SATURDAY
Men's ice hockey
UBC 3 Canada 8
Men's basketball
Buchanan Cup
UBC 72 Simon Hraser 77
•»*.
MAKING HOCKEY HISTORY, net gets two minute penalty for delay of
game after refusing to line up onside. While in penalty box, goon goal
climbed into stands to brawl with score clock and zamboni, sending latter
— kevin finnegan photo
to hospital with snow overdose. Display disgusted all present except
goalie, who recorded easiest shutout ever. Net was fined $200 and
suspended for three games.

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