UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Nov 25, 1980

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0126605.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0126605.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0126605-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0126605-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0126605-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0126605-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0126605-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0126605-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0126605-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0126605.ris

Full Text

Array r
w**&~
Vol. LXIII, No. 32
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, November 26,1960
—arte oggoctson photo
AUTO MOVER, seen here in experimental trials on Gage towers last summer, has been approved by administration and it is hoped it will solve campus parking problems by plucking pavement perambulators to be placed in
penthouse parking lots on various buildings. Though currently able to lift only white Volkswagens, specialized
skyhook will be adapted to beetles of a defferent color soon. Instead of arriving at class from B lot by bus,
students will arrive from penthouse parking by parachute. Isn't progress peachy?
Big surplus
shocks AMS
By NANCY CAMPBELL
Although the final audited statements are not completed, the Alma
Mater Society is expecting a surplus
of approximately $200,000 for the
1979-80 operating year.
The amount of the surplus has
surprised some council and AMS
executives though some surplus was
anticipated.
"You could tell a big surplus was
coming as early as April this year,"
AMS external affairs coordinator
Allan Soltis said Monday. "At that
point the external affairs committee
had spent $1,500 although $7,000
had been budgeted."
But according to AMS finance director Len Clarke's Nov. 19 report,
most of the surplus can be accounted for through excess revenue.
Examples of excess revenue include:
• $25,000 from an increase in
student enrolment for the 79/80
academic year,
• $25,000 from the games room
annex and pinball machines,
• $25,000 from SUB rentals to
outside groups,
• $88,000 from investment income,
• $40,000 from Pit and Coffee
House operation.
Some of the excess revenue was
offset by losses in the area of administration, publications and sick
leave accrual.
The audited statement is two
months overdue, but is expected by
the end of the calendar year, said
AMS administration director Craig
Brooks.
There has been no discussion at
an official level about the surplus,
Soltis said. "We're waiting for the
final report," he said.
"It's pretty hard to make plans
when you don't know how much
the surplus will be," Brooks said.
Soltis would like to see the funds
See page 2: SURPLUS
Clubs, societies
to pay for crimes
After breaking the law for more
than seven years, the Alma Mater
Society has paid the provincial
government an undisclosed amount
of money for back taxes.
"What this means is that undergrad societies must start paying four
per cent sales tax on all their goods
they sell, and buy their merchandise
tax exempt," said AMS administration director Craig Brooks.
The AMS executive had been told
during the summer by an auditor
from the provincial sales tax department that sales tax must be collected at the last point of sale.
The clubs and undergraduate societies had been buying their merchandise and paid the sales tax,
when applicable, before resale to
their members. Sales tax was not
charged to the members.
The problem arose when the provincial government redefined the
last point of sale for sales tax purposes, Brooks said.
"The AMS was assessed for back
taxes for the past three years, but
we were lucky, they could have
done it for the past seven," Brooks
said.
To save time and inconvenience,
the AMS paid the assessment for all
the clubs.
"The biggest problem with all
this is telling the treasurers — all
150 of them," Brooks said. "We
have to stop the clubs going out and
buying stuff with sales tax and get
them to use a sales tax exemption
number."
The new policy adds another step
in the bureaucracy, he added.
Deposit forms have been redesigned to include a separate sales
tax account, which will allow sales
tax to be remitted to the government once a month.
The AMS will be very careful in
the future to keep its accounts
straight, Brooks said. "I think we
can expect them (the government)
to come back once a year to check
up on us," he said.
The AMS persuaded the government to not charge sales tax twice
on beer sales for the next year at
least. The sales tax department was
requesting that groups buying beer
from the Pit pay sales tax on each
case, and then tax individual bottle
sales.
jHiMijaisse?-?M:<;:«
& ^Smmmm^-iu.
sSSSte
'Organize and fight/ Nader tells students
By JULIE WHEELWRIGHT
Ralph Nader squinted, turned his head
slowly to the left, to the right like a puzzled
bird. "I'm trying to see where it's made,"
Nader said of the constantly malfunctioning
microphone. "Oh no, it's made in the U.S."
The incident symbolized Nader's work as
America's foremost consumer advocate who
took on the U.S. auto manufacturers in his
1965 book, Unsafe At Any Speed. Speaking
in SUB ballroom on Friday Nader discussed
consumer advocacy and the Public Interest
Research Group.
"There are millions of people who know
about abuses, fraud, corruption but look the
other way. But students are different, they
are free of chains," said Nader.
He added students can investigate consumer abuses because they do not have to
fear losing their livelihood. A PIRG is one
channel for students to uncover abuses and
allow students to use their knowledge in the
community, he said.
Students involved in American PIRGs
have uncovered corrupt insurance schemes,
opposed nuclear development, investigated
abuses of pensioners, and made the standardized testing industry more accountable to students, he said.
"You can live a double life. You can improve your education and learn citizenship
skills as well."
He added student involvement has grown
tremendously since the 1950s, when as a student at Princeton, the supreme act of rebellion was not wearing white buck shoes.
"It was impossible to get any kind of organizing, people were given the circus, the pubs,
we didn't have a student government worthy
of the name."
The 1960s followed and students became
"downright uppity," as they showed Americans the injustice of the Vietnam war, he
said.
"If it hadn't been for the students sensitizing millions of people we might have been
involved in a land war with China." He added the PIRG was started in Oregon during
this period and now has more than one
million student members in 22 states.
Nader said one of Canada's liabilities for
consumer advocates is its court system that
cannot be used as effectively as the American
system. "Also, you have an official secrets
act and we have a public information act."
Nader gave an example of a group of Halifax students, wanting information on inspections in Canadian meat packing plants, had
to write to Washington after Ottawa declared
the information prohibited under the official
secrets act.
"They (the students) held a press conference and told people, 'if you want information from Ottawa, go to Washington.' "
Compared to other parts of North America he said B.C. is a "virtual paradise.
You've got an area twice the size of California that hasn't been subject to California-
zation."
He added the major struggle of this century will be the energy issue. "The first battle
is the oil issue. This may seem a little remote
to you as students but you have to look at
yourself and say we're students but we're also
citizens."
In an earlier press conference Nader said
with the election of Ronald Reagan as president-elect, "we're in for a rather serious four
years."
He added Reagan will uphold his promise
to make nuclear energy a high priority and
the Nuclear Regulatory Commission will
have to grant more nuclear licenses.
Reagan will be forced to ask Congress to
subsidize nuclear plants and go back on his
promise to cut government expenditures, he
said.
NADER ... no corporate puppet
"The election of Ronald Reagan is the
combined election of Du Pont, General
Motors and Exxon. Reagan is an extraordinarily ignorant man by the way."
During a speech on the campaign trail Reagan stated that trees cause pollution, Nader
said. "This comment he made that trees
cause most of the pollution . . . that wasn't a
mistake, this man is so isolated from the environment that he can make a statement like
that."
"He hasn't been in Hollywood for nothing." Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 25,1980
BCSF to fight the system
NARAMATA (CUP) — The
B.C. Students Federation will be
asking its members to contribute to
an expanded war chest to combat
the provincial government's "assault on education."
A series of referenda will be held
on member campuses next year to
finance the hiring of two more employees at a time of annual tuition
fee increases and a steady erosion of
university and college services.
"This expansion will give students the resources to fight for an
accessible education system in
B.C., federation executive officer
Steve Shallhorn said at the end of a
weekend conference in this Okanagan community. "Education is under attack and we have to mount a
fight back."
The 40 delegates approved a plan
which would raise the $1 per student annual levy to $3.50, a figure
comparable  to   that   charged  by
other provincial student organizations. The extra funds will be used
to hire a researcher and a field-
worker to work with the executive
officer. About 27,000 B.C. students
belong to the federation.
In other business, delegates decided to proceed with a province-
wide campaign to spotlight the lack
of childcare facilities available to
students.
Shallhorn told delegates that the
federation would be pressing education, human resources, finance and
health ministry officials for discussion prior to a Feb. 12 "day of action."
Delegates also created a prospective membership category, designed to draw non-members like
UBC and the University of Victoria
into the organization. The fee under
the new category would be 35 cents
annually per student on campus.
Surplus pondered
From page 1
go towards an on-campus housing
registry and a new student service
organization.
"We're looking at providing
more subsidized services," he added. The ticket centre and the print
shop are two areas which could be
expanded, he said.
Soltis said he is looking for suggestions for using the surplus.
"Undergraduate societies and
reps will have to come up with ideas
for services for students on campus
to make sure the funds are used
properly," he said.
"Everyone's open for suggestions right now."
Clarke could not be reached for
comment on the surplus.
Despite a $40,000 surplus over
the projected profit of $30,000, Pit
prices for beer were increased from
$1 to $1.15 in September.
And although publications were
$18,000 over budget, The Ubyssey's
subsidy was reduced by $10,000 this
year.
WE'VE GOT
Great Christmas
Gifts
At Low, Low Prices to fit every
Students Budget
Come in and see our
NEW SELECTION OF
QUALITY SPORTS
TRANSFERS
Original Vivid Color Sports Scenes of
SKIING
SAILING
WINDSURFING
SOCCER
GYMNASTICS
AND MANY OTHERS
We can put them on your
choice of
T-SHIRT
(Short or Long Sleeved)
BASEBALL SHIRT or
TURTLENECK
WE ALSO DO
Custom Lettering £r Numbering
X-COUNTRY SKI RENTALS
Skis — Boots — Poles — Package
$8.00 DAY- $15 WEEKEND
Quality Equipment
NOW OPEN SATURDAYS
Cash, Charges-Visa & Cheques
LOWER MALL SUB
^mmMmmmmmmmmmmM%m^^^^   "Across from the Pit"
Surs, wa admit we've keen pussyfooting around, not realty dksctly stating ha fact tnat polWco-econornic systems sra crumbling fast, maas suicide and
destructive violence are on the way and you can't oat • plumber for a decent price anywhere. But only you know and I know (there's a song in there
somewhere) that things ■mooing to be different around hare. Yes, sir, everyone's going to have to shape up fast. First, the advertising office will be firebomb-
ed for selling ads that just don't fit so ws have to fill thee* little gray boxes. Then Len Clarke's toy computer. After that - well, let's just say studying in Main
Isn't going to be as healthy as usual this December. No mow Mr. Nice Socialists. No mora journalistic ethics. Famine starts with the head and the empty bowl
holds flaming roeee, so get ready, Freddy.
CUSO
Information
Night
Thursday,
November 27th/80
7:30 p.m.
Upper Lounge,
International House
CUSO Returned Volunteers
from Papua, New Guinea will
show  slides  they  took  in
P.N.G., and talk about their
CUSO postings.
Recruitment information will
be available.
Further information —
Donna, 228-4886
"MEN'S INTRAMURAL
YULETIDE INTER-BASKETBALL
tt
TOURNEY
COME WATCH THE EXCITEMENT IN
THIS ANNUAL CHRISTMAS CLASSIC!
PLACE: WAR MEMORIAL GYM
GAME TIMES:  All  day  commencing
Wed., Nov. 26th through Monday, Dec.
1st.
FINALS: Mon., Dec. 1st, 12:30 Noon
in the War Memorial Gym.
SEE YOU THERE!!
Nowyotfre
talkin'taste. Tuesday, November 25,1980
THE   U BYSSEY
Page 3
Lawyers slam new Liberal 'rights'
By BILL TIELEMAN
/. The Canadian Charter of
Rights and Freedoms guarantees
the rights and freedoms set out in it
subject only to such reasonable limits as are generally accepted in a free
and democratic society with a parliamentary system of government.
— CONSTITUTION ACT
"I haven't found a lawyer yet
who thinks it's worth the paper it's
printed on."
Waving a copy of the proposed
Canadian Charter of Rights and
Freedoms before an audience of law
students, Vancouver lawyer Art
Pape attacked the document the
federal Liberal government hopes
the British parliament will enshrine
within a new Canadian constitution.
"I think we've reached a new
low, an all time low, with this,"
Pape said Friday. "It says it is to
give the people some rights, but that
just isn't true."
Pape and Burnaby MP Svend
Robinson, speaking to about 100
people in Law 101, lambasted the
Liberals for both the content of the
new constitutional package and the
methods by which it is being
brought to Canada.
Pape said the charter of rights is
meaningless because of the stipulation in the first section that the
guarantees set out in it are "subject
only to such reasonable Limits as are
generally accepted in a free and
democratic society. . .'" He said
that past violations of human rights
in Canada, such as the internment
without charge of hundreds during
the 1970 October Crisis through the
use of the War Measures Act,
would in no way be impossible in
the future because of any guarantees in the charter.
And Pape said many people do
not recognize the importance of the
new constitution or that it has been
drafted to meet the political aims of
the government.
"Who drafted this document?
Where are the instructions to those
who drafted it?" Pape asked. "We
have to face the question of what
are the political objectives of this
document."
Robinson, who broke ranks with
New push starts
against tuition
By GLEN SANFORD
Student council received the first
minutes of the standing committee
for tuition fees and financial aid
Wednesday night.
The committee has already taken
several steps toward fighting future
tuition fee increases and investigat-
Council Briefs
ing the adequacy of current student
bursaries.
The committee will send letters to
each member of UBC's board of
governors to prompt them to act
against the current indexing policy
where students must pay 10 per cent
of the university's operating budget.
To publicize the fight against fee
indexing, the committee selected
council science representative Nigel
Brownlow to debate the debating
society on the issue at noon Wednesday in the SUB auditorium.
Committee member Brad Stock
will submit a presentation on student bursaries to the board at its
next meeting Tuesday, Dec. 2.
The committee also decided to try
and hold a speaker's forum some
time in January with Pat McGeer.
The committee will also try to get
the two candidates for chancellorship, Stan Persky and incumbent
Jack Clyne, to attend a forum on
tuition fees.
The committee set out as its objectives:
• to eliminate the indexing of
tuition fees,
• to examine the availability and
amount of student bursaries, to increase the amount and availability
of student loans, and to review and
make recommendations on the financial awards office policies,
• to liaise with other student
committees from B.C. universities
and colleges to work together on a
presentation to UBC's board,
• to investigate what other universities across Canada are doing
regarding tuition fee increases and
financial aid,
• and to promote students'
awareness of the issues involved in
the committee's objectives.
Council formed the committee in
response to the 13 per cent tuition
fee increase passed by the board at
its November meeting. Student
politicians said they did not have
enough time to prepare an adequate
battle against the hikes, and it is
hoped the standing committee will
prepare students for next year's
fight.
The committee meets every
Thursday at 5:45 p.m. in SUB 260,
and new members are welcome. The
committee was just formed Nov. 5,
and has already attracted seven
members.
»     »     *
Council accepted the minutes of
the programs committee, and acknowledged that two motions of
protest were carried by the committee.
The programs committee strongly objected to the placement of
monies into its speakers' budget for
the women's committee.
"We feel this sets a bad precedent
of allowing a council committee to
exert financial control over another
organization's functions. We feel it
is a violation of an independent
group's rights to force them to seek
council's permission (through programs) to bring in a speaker," read
the minutes.
Programs also objected to Association of Student Council conference monies and organizing responsibilities being placed under the
direction of special events. The
committee felt special events is designed to organize cultural and entertainment events, not such things
as the highly political AOSC conference.
The minutes called for an ad hoc
committee in conjunction with external affairs to organize such
events.
(Although council accepted the
minutes, it is under no obligation to
react to the protests or recommendations.)
*     ♦     •
The Alma Mater Society building
committee recommended council
accept the two proposals for SUB
renovations which call for:
• the ceiling to be removed from
the SUB main foyer so natural sunlight will fill the foyer from a glass
roof on the second floor,
• a mall for club offices and
commercial shops be built onto the
SUB basement between SUB and
the Aquatic Centre.
AMS president Bruce Armstrong, chair of the committee, also
recommended the proposals be put
to referendum for students to approve the expenditure of $1.1 million on the renovations..
the federal NDP caucus by voting
against the constitutional package
despite a deal worked out between
NDP leader Ed Broadbent and
prime minister Pierre Trudeau that
saw NDP support traded for guarantees of provincial resources
rights, tdld the audience that the
Liberal party had succeeded in obfuscating the public on the constitutional issue.
"If you people don't know
what's going on with the parliamentary process, I don't think
many people do," Robinson said.
The Burnaby MP, who graduated
from UBC's law school four years
ago and was one of the first student
representatives on the UBC board
of governors, stated at the beginning of the session that he was
speaking only as an individual because of his disagreement with his
party's caucus. But Robinson, a
member of the joint Senate-House
of Commons committee studying
the constitution, later appeared to
be presenting the party's views
when he said NDP support was not
unconditional.
PAPE . . . 'charter meaningless'
"We may very well have to take a
second look at our support for the
substance of the constitution," he
said.
Robinson went on, in a lengthy
speech that cut short a planned
question period, to attack the charter for its failure to protect the
rights of native people, women and
minority groups in Canada.
"We've had too many cases of
the majority tyrannizing the minority in this country," he said, referring to the internment of Japanese-
Canadians in the Second World
War and to the use of the War Measures Act in 1970.
Robinson said the proposed charter is so deficient in guaranteeing
human rights that Canada could be
investigated by the United Nations
for violating UN agreements giving
such guarantees.
Pape concluded by arguing that
politicians have usurped the political rights of citizens by not allowing
them input into the creation of a
new constitution. He said the constitutional package has to be "very
fundamentally dumped" and a new
one developed by the Canadian
people.
Pape said an organizing meeting
calling for a democratic constituent
assembly to draft a constitution is
being held Dec. 4 at 7:30 p.m. in
room L-3 in the library of the Britannia community centre, 1661
Napier.
sjpP*19'*"q)£?JSSr'
i ltt QWOJfl
Jjpyi.sj^
— neomi yamamoto photo
INCANDESCENT MENAGE A TROIS nicely frames newly redecorated Ladner clock tower. Triad of enlightening beings was heard to bemoan lack of good taste currently in vogue on campus and remained passive and pensive in face of exhibition of extreme tackiness. Youngest bulb of the three, Thomas Alva, exploded upon being
upstaged by erection of automotive specimen and is currently recovering back 'ohm in Watts where his paternal il-
luminati works as a conductor, paying family's way by collecting a Faraday.
MLA slams Socred housing aid
The provincial government is not
living up to its responsibility to help
provide adequate housing for the
people of B.C., a New Democratic
MLA charged Friday.
NDP housing critic Colin
Gablemann, MLA for North
Island, told 25 people in SUB 211 at
noon Friday that the election of
Mike Harcourt to the Vancouver
mayor's chair shows that people put
housing ahead of "civic
monuments" on their list of
priorities.
"Harcourt may be able to draw
up enough public support to make
the provincial government change
its mind about housing funding
allocation, but I'm not optimistic,"
Gablemann said.
Rather than depend on the
private sector to initiate housing
development, the provincial
government should put tax money
into housing so that mortgages will
be cheaper," he said.
Gablemann said public housing is
needed particularly by seniors and
the handicapped but added he was
not in favor of public housing
"across the board."
"I think we should put massive
amounts of money into cooperative housing," he said.
Gablemann added the Social
Credit party's lack of concern
about B.C. housing needs extended
to universities. "The Socreds say
that it is not their responsibility to
provide housing on campus but that
it is the responsibility of the universities. We in the NDP think that
the best route to go is to provide
subsidized mortgage money to the
universities," Gablemann said.
Gablemann said these funds
could be allocated through the
Universities Council of B.C. Page 4
THE    U BYSS EY
Tuesday, November 25,1960
Surprise!
There's a study in irony to be found here somewhere.
As early as April the Alma Mater Society executive knew a surplus was
coming at the end of the 1979-80 fiscal year. And if Len Clarke knows his
job as finance director as well as students are led to believe, he must have
known it would be a sizeable one.
After all, $200,000 is nothing to sneeze at, even for the AMS executive.
But despite all this, the AMS executive proceeded to chop club budgets
with a vigor never before seen. One budget was slashed by over $7,000,
many others by hundreds of dollars.
And the "anticipated" surplus for this year was $134.
All this would be highly amusing if it were not for the fact that the AMS
executive seem prepared to ignore the financial restraint of the past
towards its members and go ahead with new projects, new services and
new buildings.
While clubs are left strapped for cash, students are told a $1.5 million
building project is the best thing to hit UBC since real food in the
cafeterias. While speakers and programs are cut back, the AMS maintains
an investment fund so sizeable it can return an extra $80,000 over an expected profit.
While the AMS withdraws from the Association of Student Councils,
which costs nothing to join, students are told the windfall surplus can now
be put to good use by setting up a new organization to duplicate services
already offered, at far greater cost.
While over a million students participate in the Public Interest Research
groups in North America and work towards changing the faults of our
society, the AMS can find only $170 in its pocket to partially pay Ralph
Nader to come to UBC and tell students how to "get uppity" about injustice and hazards.
While students slowly starve to death from the inadequate student aid
plan, the AMS spends what little money it says it has on inadequate computers, black ink bookkeeping, plush office furniture, retreats, unnecessary
renovations and God knows what else.
What is needed is an executive with a moral, and not a corporate, sense
of responsibility. An executive that initiates a bursary program with surplus
funds. An executive that helps clubs and societies, not hinders them with
financial restraint. An executive that doesn't launch grandiose building
schemes so it can use up the excess money.
Two hundred thousand dollars comes as a surprise for a surplus when
we've been told there was but $134 to spare. It's up to the students to
make sure what the AMS executive does with it isn't a mistake. It may
even be used to solve some past ones.             	
THE UBYSSE
November 26,1980
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays snd Fridays throughout ths university year by the Alma Matsr
Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are thoss of ths staff and not of the AMS or
the university administration. Msmbsr, Canadian University Press. The Ubysssy publishes Pegs
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in room 241K of the
Student Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301; Advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Verne McDonald
"Sometjmeee snake is just a snake, you know," proclaimed Vame McDonald-O'Fraud to the essambled weerers of the green. GlenO' Senford end Steve 0'
McClure were not eo sure.
"Why in name of aH that's holy did the good Saint Pet rid Eire of the noxious reptiles, then?" they chimed. "They were more then snakes, they were instruments of the devil and the AMS," agreed Nancy O'Cempbell end Bin OTnlmen.
"Why do you have to bring the AMS end phaHic symbols into everything?" whined sly young thing Julie 0*Wheehvright. "You mean you've never played
snekes and ladders?" muttered the Dirty Chorus of Mark O'Attisha, Kent O'Weaterberg and Jo-Anna O'Falkiner es Scott O'McDoneld, BiH O'Richardson snd
Eric O'Eggertson playfully fed SUB "food" to a boa constrictor. Evan O'Mclntyre and Oave 0"Wong refused to be involved in the pathetic masthead
shenanigane-until Naomi O'Yamamoto ran in with a shiHeiagh to tell everyone about tha marvellous green color in the paper today.
nrw., r icata^rowBM
JL6 o usr*s
We're surrounded by ultimate conspiracies
The conspiracies in Page Friday
revealed little more than a sliver in
the tree of life. Now it can be told
that there is an ultimate ultimate
conspiracy.
Our lives are totally controlled by
aliens from a point in time well beyond our imagination. They have
the capability of going to any time
zone to influence future events.
How do they do it? Well next
time you lose a book or get sidetracked on something, that lost time
was purposely designed so that you
would not be in a certain place at a
certain time. For example, you may
avoid accidents or running into par
ticular people due to these time
delays.
Or it may be designed so that you
actually hit a car that ran a red
light, or meet a person you haven't
seen in a long time. But what is the
purpose of this? Why were we
created only to suffer and die?
We are actually part of an inter-
galactic communications network
with McDonald's golden arches as
receiving/transmitting stations. Our
movements on the earth which appear to us as random occurrences,
are really an organized message.
For example, the pyramids were
built as part of a message to Kare-
dor from his wife (both from the
planet Trafalmador). The message
could be translated as "Will you be
late for supper again?"
Building the great wall of China
was his reply, "Sorry, I will be a bit
late." The First World War was
really "My spaceship broke down
again." The Kennedy conspiracy
meant "Can you bring home a loaf
of bread from Xoren" and so on.
Other events on earth are parts of
other messages. Where is all this
leading to?
We are all part of a massive
breeding program (controlled by
Trafalmadorians, of course) to pro
vide the Milky Way's contender for
an intergalactic ping pong tournament. (We lose the galaxy 11-8 in
the semi-finals.)
A conspiracy? You bet. They also
breed a ping pong ball they can control.
Kilgore Trout
lingo 3
/ (blush) confess
Yes, this is the last one
Mr. Preinsperger's Sept. 25 Perspective comments on Christianity
were interesting. I could sympathize
with these convictions, having been
an atheist and UBC student at one
time.
However, God in His mercy
brought me to Christ in a personal
way after much struggling and conviction by His Spirit. Amidst my
protests as an atheist, His hand was
firmly upon me: I now study for the
ministry with His grace and guidance.
The Sept. 25 article needs additional research: some suppositions
and statements are questionable. A
study of the Bible (in particular, the
New Testament Gospels) and a
deeper perusal of Christian apologetics is in order. I am concerned
that some of the conclusions in the
article were drawn without sufficient information at the author's disposal.
I would appreciate the opportunity to discuss with.the author or any
other professing atheists, these matters; please feel free to call or write.
My address is:
Mike Mooney
c/o Northwest Baptist
Theological Seminary
3358 S.E. Marine Dr.
Vancouver, B.C.
V5S 3W3 (433-9967)
Thank you.
Mike Mooney
While anyone with two neurons
to rub together would have to agree
that the description of the women's
committee as a "reactionary, defensive, self-righteous, socialist-
feminist propaganda distributor"
(especially since it is so carefully
and logically developed from the
heinous treatment Mr. Andrews
received, and other closely related
issues) is as "impartial" (his word)
as one could hope for, I would still
have to say that he lets them off
much too lightly.
Unfortunately, I cannot claim to
be "the least sexist person I know"
(though my Mummy once told me I
had the cutest eyes in the whole
wide world); in fact, (I blush to confess it) I actually talk to women oc-
Smith's 'Utopia' not the TAs
r
Help!
When are you going to do
another Beatles theme issue?
Your last one was the greatest
thing since My Bonnie Lies Over
the Ocean.
David Morton
Members of the university community who are interested in the
progress of the contract negotiations between UBC and the teaching assistants' union may have been
confused by the misleading comments attributed to Dr. Robert
Smith (UBC associate vice-president) in The Ubyssey Nov. 20.
Dr. Smith thinks the union is expecting to "get Utopia" in its first
contract, which only demonstrates
that his concept of Utopia is somewhat stunted — assuming, that is,
that he regards as Utopian such demands as the definition of sexual
harassment as a grievable offence,
the establishment of a training program for TAs, or the payment of
medical insurance premiums by the
employer.
All of these demands, and others
which have been rejected by UBC,
have been won by TA unions at
other Canadian universities. Our
employer need look only as far as
the Simon Fraser TA contract for
an example of a sexual harassment
article, or the Regina agreement for
an example of union shop.
Rickawhat?
The science undergraduate society wishes to pledge one dollar per
mile to the Rickathon to be held on
Nov. 29.
In addition, SUS hereby issues a
challenge to all other societies and
clubs on campus to match the
pledge.
Tom Chang
science undergraduate society
There are many more issues remaining outstanding than the two
cited by Dr. Smith, since the employer and the union rejected each
other's package proposals at the
conclusion of the most recent mediation session.
A key to the administration's reluctance to come to a reasonable
agreement is found in Dr. Smith's
curious assertion, "I hope we've
been accurate in assessing what TAs
want." The university's paternalistic assumption that it knows what
TAs want was proved false when
the TA Union was certified.
How many TAs have the university's negotiators talked to? When
will the university finally get the
message?
The Steering Committee
CUPE 2278
casionally, when I don't even have
to..
And when I did so recently about
Mr. Andrews' letter, I was told that
not only do they not nurse the
seething irrational hatred toward
those fun-loving guys who bring
you the Lady Godiva ride, but that
they aren't actually against the
gears themselves or men in general,
just against sexist ideas and the
mistreatment of women. Far out,
eh?
Look, if we can't keep harassing
the women's committee with non-
issues like this one, not only will
they have the time and effort for
programmes to help distressed
women, but also they'll be able to
continue programmes to interest
and help all women — and maybe
even lure some weak-minded men
into them!
Don't take it lying down, Jamie.
David Ingham
reeding and riting 10
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Especially those who type their
letters, triple-spaced, on a 70 space
typewriter line, because these are
the people who are most likely to
see their letters printed sometime
before next Durin's Day eve.
Pen names will be used when the
writer's real name is also included
for our information in the letter and
when valid reasons for anonymity
are given.
Although an effort is made to
publish all letters received, The
Ubyssey reserves the right to edit
letters for reasons of brevity, legality and taste.
Neatness counts. Tuesday, November 25,1960
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Mass in action against Klan/Nazi terror
Angry students and faculty joined supporters of the Trotskyist
League Friday to protest the acquittal of the Klan/Nazi killers who
shot down five anti-Klan demonstrators last November in Greensboro, North Carolina.
The all white jury's verdict gives
the fascists a license to kill. In the
first political rally held at UBC in
years, the demonstrators demanded
the jailing of the killer
Klansmen/Nazis, dropping the
charges against the Greensboro
anti-fascist demonstrators, the right
of armed self-defence against racists
and fascist terror, mass labor/minority action to smash Klan/Nazi
terror, and the jailing of the Toronto cops who killed Albert Johnson.
Some ostensibly revolutionary
groups, like the Workers Communist Party and In Struggle!, call
for "ban the Klan," but the bourgeois state legislates eigainst "extremists," these left groups could
well be the first victims.
Harry Rankin goes even farther.
He wants the Klan to come to city
hall "to explain what they are
about!" This is ludicrous. The Klan
is "about" genocide: its victims are
racial minorities, gays, Jews, trade
unionists and leftists.
The recent cross burnings in Red
Let us remember
On Wednesday, Dec. 10 at 11 a.m., Amnesty UBC will hold a short
public vigil to mark Human Rights Day. The event will be held on the grass
hill at the southwest corner of SUB (across from Hebb theatre). All
students and faculty and university employees are welcome.
For 15 minutes there will be a remembrance of the forgotten prisoners:
people imprisoned solely for their non-violent beliefs; people tortured; and
people killed. The first step to the victory of the torturers is the loss of our
memories: a prisoner is gaoled for 10,20, 30 years — who will remember?
Amnesty International remembers. And so must we all.
Please spare 15 minutes on Dec. 10. Please attend the vigil.
Horacio de la Cueva
president, Amnesty UBC
Jubilant about Jack
I would like to express my extreme jubilation concerning the
results of the Vancouver civic election. One of the most pleasing
aspects of the election results was
the defeat of "King Jack" and a
few of his merry men.
I would also like to take this opportunity to congratulate the Vancouver electorate for finally electing
a responsible and community minded civic government.
Mike Harcourt, along with incumbent Harry Rankin and
newcomers Bruce Eriksen and
Bruce Yorke should provide Vancouver  with   a  civic  government
committed to solving Vancouver's
most pressing problems: namely
low-cost housing, an efficient light
transit transportation network, and
the long awaited implementation of
the ward system.
As the Vancouver people know,
"King Jack" promised all these yet
failed to deliver on any one of
them, instead concentrating on his
pet projects and grandiose schemes
to assure reelection.
Well, Jack, where were the
20,000 votes when you needed
them?
Mario Giardini
political science 3
TWENTY-FIVE VOLUNTEERS
ARE NEEDED TO COMPLETE A STUDY
OF THE SIDE-EFFECTS OF A NEW
BIRTH CONTROL PILL.
The pill contains less of the female hormone
estrogen than some current low-dose contraceptive pills. The pill has been used in humans and effectively prevents pregnancy.
Volunteers will be asked to keep a diary of any side-
effects and a blood sample will be taken every six
months.
Contact:
Dr. Robin Percival-Smith,
Student Health Service
228-7011
Deer, Alta. and London, Ont., the
lynchings, the night riding, and the
Greensboro massacre are what the
fascists are all about. The TL is vehemently opposed to giving the fascists a platform at city hall or anywhere else to promulgate their racist
filth.
The Albania-lovers of the Communist Party of Canada/Marxist-
Leninists at least oppose "free
speech for fascists." But their inevitably class-collaborationist People's Front Against Racist and Fascist Violence and their call on the
bourgeois state to drive the Klan
out of Canada are equally incapable
of destroying the fascist menace.
Neither reliance on the bourgeois
state nor Canadian nationalist
"people's fronts" can smash
Klan/Nazi terror. The only way to
crush the fascists in the egg is
through massive labor/minority
mobilizations that bring out the
vast social power of the organized
working class.
Just days after the greensboro
killings the Klan threatened to
march through downtown Detroit.
The SL and militant auto workers
organized a demonstration on the
proposed site of the Klan march,
and 500 auto workers, blacks and
socialists made sure that the Klan
would not ride in Motor City. On
Friday, Nov. 28 at 12:30 in SUB
207/209 the Trotskyist League will
be showing a videotape of this important demonstration that points
the way forward for militants who
want to sweep the fascists from the
streets.
M. McPherson
Trotskyist league
Interested in
Small Business?
COLLEGE
PRO PAINTERS
. . . will be on campus to explain the College Pro
franchise system.
DATE: Wednesday, Nov. 26
TIME: 12:30 p.m.
PLACE: Henry Angus 426
. . . Remember, no experience in painting is required, just ambition and management skills.
. . . College Pro requires no money up front.
. . . We have openings across Western Canada.
. . . Apply at the Canada Employment Centre.
|X>-rWE a«^
s-#^|
Ak   p(.Ovi..C£ or -Jf
^'WfCOCVJ^
Legislative Internship Programme
Office of the Speaker
Parliament Buildings, Victoria, B.C.
INFORMATION MEETING
University of British Columbia
November 28,1980 —12:30-1:30 p.m. SUB Room 205
Competition for the 1982 Legislative Internship Programme is now open.
WHAT'S INVOLVED:
Working with Members of the Legislature, doing research and assisting with matters administrative, legislative, political (constituency concerns) — providing first
hand experience of the political and policy process for the intern. During the internship there will be regular seminars on provincial givernment and politics conducted by faculty from the three universities, as well as an opportunity to work in
a government ministry.
WHO:
Majors  or  Honours  graduates  in  Political  Science,   History,   Geography,
Economics or Sociology from the University of British Columbia, Simon Fraser
University and the University of Victoria.
HOW MANY:
A maximum of 10 Legislative Internships.
DURATION:
January 1st — may 31st, 1982.
DEADLINE: FOR APPLICATIONS:
February 1st, 1981.
All interested students are cordially invited to attend the above meeting. Those
students unable to attend may obtain complete information from the participating departments on campus. Page 6
THE    U BYSSEY
Tuesday, November 25,1960
'Tween classes
TODAY
TROTSKYIST LEAGUE
Marxist literature end discussion, 11 £0 a.m. to
1:30 p.m., SUB main concourse.
STUDENT COUNCIL FOR
EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN
Film on adolescent sexuality: Teking Chencee,
noon, Scarfe 209.
CCM
Eucheriet, noon, Lutheran Campus Centre.
SLAVONIC CIRCLE
Russian conversation practise, noon, Buch.
1268.
INSTITUTE OF ASIAN RESEARCH
FHm on urban growth problems: Exploding
Cities, noon, Buch. 108.
AMS WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
General meeting, noon, SUB 130.
DEPARTMENT OF SLAVONIC STUDIES
Travel lecture series: F. Swyrips speaks on Patriotism on the Home Front — Ukreiniens in the
First World War, noon, Buch. 212.
PRE-MED SOCIETY
Dr. Rowat speaks on preventive reeesrch, noon,
IRC 1.
LSM
Dinner and diecussion on Crying the Bluee . . .
Depression snd Suicide, with comments by UBC
psychology services staffperson, 6 p.m., Lutheran Campus Csntrs.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Ls soir de petinage (skating night) et le cafe
apres, 8 p.m., Kerrisdale Arena.
WEDNESDAY
STUDENT COUNCIL FOR
EXCEPTIONAL CHILDREN
Beke sale with Christmas cakes, cookies, etc.,
fund raising, noon, Scarfe lounge.
DEBATING SOCIETY AND COMMITTEE
FOR TUITION AND FINANCIAL AID
Supermouth debate: be it reeolved that tuition
fees should not be indexed, noon, SUB
auditorium.
SFSOC
General meeting, noon, SUB 111.
STUDENT CHRISTIAN MOVEMENT
Quaker worship, noon, SUB 117.
B.C. PIRG ORGANIZING GROUP
Organizational meeting, noon. SUB 119.
UBC SAILING CLUB
General meeting end pieeenlation of a new boat
purchase alternative, noon, SUB 207/209.
CCCM
Potluck  dinner  foeowed  by  discussion  with
Gerald Hobbs. 5:30 p.m.,  Lutheran Campus
Centre.
CVC
Fourth annual equare dance end dinner, 8:30 to
midnight, SUB baeroom.
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Social night for psych students, 7 p.m., SUB
207/209.
THURSDAY
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
General  meeting,  noon.  International  House
lounge.
CCCM
Anthony Podlschi apeaka on evil and Greek
tragedy, noon, SUB 216.
GAY PEOPLE OF UBC
Rev. Dave Gunton speaks on the Tallaheaee Trek
— gey liberation vs. ths Ku Klux Klan, noon,
SUB 207/209.
ISMAILI STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
General meeting and film: There is no God but
God. noon. SUB 117.
AGUS
Jsmee Hewitt, B.C. minister of egriculture, and
Sig Peterson, deputy minister, speek, noon,
MacMillan 180.
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Peter Seudfeidt speaks, noon, Henry Angus 104.
WOMEN'S STUDIES PROGRAM
Kirsken Drotner, University of Aarhus, Denmark,
spesks on the history of childhood, liberation or
repression, noon, Buch. 202.
WUSC
Paul Purrit, Oxfam representative In South
Africa, speaka on liberation movements in South
Africa today, noon, Buch. 202.
TA UNION
Annual general meeting, noon, Grad Centre garden room.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Public meeting, noon. SUB 212A.
CUSO
Information aaaeion on Papua, New Guinee, with
sMs show by returned volunteers, 7:30 p.m.. International Houae upper lounge.
TOASTMASTER8
Roast, 7:30 p.m., MecMWen 278.
FRIDAY
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
General  meeting,  noon.  International  House
lounge.
CCCM
Bible study, noon, Luthsran Campua Centre.
GAY PEOPLE OF UBC
Planning meeting, noon, SUB 118.
TROTSKYIST LEAGUE
Video showing of Detroit: 600 rsHy to stop the
Klan, noon, SUB 207/209.
HISPANIC STUDIES
Illustrated lecture by L. Woodward, University of
St. Andrews, Scotland, on dissident pointers of
Imperial Spein: Velezquez snd Ei Greco, noon,
Buch. 203.
UBC SKI CLUB
Deadline for registration for mid-term ski trip to
Snowbird snd Arte, Utah, SUB 210.
INTERNATIONAL AGRICULTURAL STUDENTS
ASSOCIATION OF THE AMERICAS
Campus-wide dance, tickets available at faculty
of agriculture or AMS box office, 7:30 to 12:30
p.m., SUB ballroom.
SUNDAY
OAY PEOPLE OF UBC
Open volleyball game, 2:X p.m., Osborne Centre gym B west.
Should ants
wear pants?
Should your tuition fees be indexed?
Yes. Tuition should be indexed to
the rate of growth of Parti Rhinoceros members in the House of
Commons. But that is not the only
suggestion going around.
Your tuition could be tied to the
consumer price index, or the university budget or any other number
that increases annually. It could be
tied to a campus patrol truck and
dragged around SUB parking lot.
Should your tuition fees be indexed? Find out, when the student
financial aid committee debates
with the debating society Wednesday noon in SUB auditorium.
Aggie fringe
No less a personage than the provincial minister of agriculture, Jim
Hewitt, will speak to assembled aggies Thursday at noon in McMillan
Hot flashes
160. Included in the minister's
retinue and also speaking will be
deputy minister Sig Peterson.
Funny how these high-ranking
Socreds always speak out on the fr-
inges of campus, usually
somewhere out near B lot. And
they don't even tell us what the/re
going to be speaking about.
eef high
Friday is your last change to
register for the UBC ski club's gala
mid-term expedition to Snowbird
and Alta, Utah.
Incidentally, this year's mid-term
break is set for Feb. 14 to Feb. 21.
Sounds pretty decadent, leaving
here Valentine's day and spending a
week in some over-furnished
pleasure dome south of the border.
You can get more information at
the UBC ski club office in SUB 210.
The ski club is proving to be one of
the campus' more popular extracurricular activities (besides writing for
The Ubyssey, of course) so you'd
THIS WEEK A T HILLEL
Tues., Nov. 25 and Wed., Nov. 26
11:30 a.m. — 2:00 p.m.
SHEFA LUNCH
Thursday, Nov. 27, 11:30 a.m. — 2:30 p.m.
JERUSALEM: City of Peace
- Habitat display all day in S.U.B.
— Speakers: Kamal Abdul Malik
tian student's experience in Israel"
— Israeli dancing and falafel lunch
'An Egyp-
best get your reservations in early if
you want to take advantage of this
one in a lifetime offer.
By the way, "alta" means "high"
in Spanish (and Italian). Go figure.
Think right
Here's a unique opportunity to
purge yourself of all non-correct
and anti-consumerist thinking.
Yes folks, thanks to the recent
visitation of the man who blew the
whistle on the Corvair, Ralph
Nader, there will be a meeting soon
Wednesday for those interested in
setting up a local version of Nader's
public interest research groups
(PIRG). The meeting place is SUB
119, which is a room that has no
dangerous asbestos insulation, no
slippery linoleum tiles, very well-
behaved fluorescent lights . . .
IS CANCELLED!
INSTEAD,
SUBFILMS PRESENTS
"Kramer
vs.
Kramer"
WINNER OF
5 ACADEMY
AWARDS
INCLUDING
BEST
PICTURE
Thurs., 7:00
Fri., Sat., 7:00 & 9:30
Sun., 7:00 8- 9:30
EXTRA SHOW
$1.00 SUB Aud.
♦
GET
THE
FAST
HOCKEY
SKATES
\
MICRON
MASTER
MICRON
M-1
$59.95
$79.95
"THE BEST
SKATE SHARPENING
ON THE
WEST SIDE"
3771 W. 10th at Alma
224-3536
♦
♦
♦
♦
Something to help
keep hair unsquare.
It's RK Body Process. A professional product from RK that helps
weak, limp hair shape up to the latest look.
RK Body Process is a great styling aid for problem hair. It
supplies permanent body and shape by restructuring the hair's
molecular bonds.
RK takes care of the science, we take care of the application.
You enjoy the benefits. Let us
help keep your hair in style
with RK Body Process and the
full line of professional RK
products. Make an appointment today.
Appointment Service
731-4191
3644 W. 4th at Alma
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines. 36c.
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $3.30; additional lines
60c. Additional days $3.00 and 46c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:00 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room241, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
5 — Coming Events
60 - Rides
"AGRICULTURE
XMAS HOEDOWN"
Nov. 28, 7:30-12:30 p.m.
Sub Ball Room U.B.C.
Features - Rmmmm & Egg Nog
- Door Prizes
- Added Band Attraction
- Santa Claus
Tickets AG Lounga, AMS Ticktt Office
DRIVER WANTED TO SHARE DRIVING
to Prince George. Leaving a.m. Dec. 18th
Call Susan 321-4013.
66 — Scandals
PEOPLE ARE STARVING - what to do?
Soylent Green W/Charlton Heston SUB
AUD. Friday Nov. 28 $1.00
10 — For Sale — Commercial
10,003 BEARS can't be wrongl Honey and
honey comb—nature's best. Half-way_
along University Blvd. Watch for signs. Ex-"
cellent quality at farmer prices.
11 - For Sale — Private
SONY STR-V6 RECEIVER, $600.00, Klipsch
Cornwall Speakers, $1300.00 Pair, Package
price $1700.00 o.b.o. Call 224-0974
LINED WET-SUIT, 4-piece: $100. Kawasaki
Dv, guage, overhauled: $70. Spiro Ablj:
$100. Depth guage $20 o.b.o. 736-9064.
B-FLAT WOODEN CLARINET, exec, cond.,
slim profile case, $130.00 o.b.o. Room 668
224-9072
PORTABLE SMITH CORONA electric typewriter good condition $200 327-3516
LARGE FINISHED DESK good condition
$80 327-3516.
70 — Services
80 — Tutoring
86 — Typing
ESSAYS. THESES. MANUSCRIPTS, including technical equational, reports, letters, resumes. Fast, accurate, bilingual.
Clemy 266-6641.
20 — Housing
FEMALE PREFERRED TO SHARE large 2Br
apt. $186 & utilities. Available immed. call
after 6 pm 266-8918
WARM BASEMENT ROOM Jan. 1. Cooking facilities near 10th Ave gates. Reduced
rent for cleaning/childcare few hours weekly. Non-smoker preferred. 224-6787.
TYPING PLUS. Peter 731-9752.
FAST, EFFICIENT TYPING near campus.
266-5053.
EXPERT  TYPING.   Essays, term  papers,
factums   $0.85.   Theses, manuscripts,
letters,   resumes  $0.86 +. Fast  accurate
typing. 266-7710.
TYPING SERVICE for theses, correspondence, etc. Any field. French also available.
IBM Selectric. Call 736-4042.
TYPING. $.80 per page. Fast and accurate. Experienced typist. Phone Gordon
873-8032.
TERMPAPERS. ESSAYS, REPORTS, etc.,
edited,   polished,   and  typed.   Published
author.   Reasonable   rates.   685-9535,
734-2778.
90 - Wanted
30 — Jobs
ART MAJORS EARN MONEY in spare
time. We need illustrators for our fiction
and non-fiction publications. NW. Publ.,
P.O. Box 632, San Marcos, CA. 92069.
HAVE A FLIGHT to Toronto for Dec. 18th
Would like to exchange for a later flight.
Call Dave at 327-0626 after 8:00 p.m.
99 — Miscellaneous Tuesday, November 25,1980
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
'Bird wins
start season
By SCOTT McDONALD
The Thunderbird basketball team
opened up its Canada West season
on a strong note by defeating the
University of Alberta Golden Bears
during two weekend games played
in War Memorial gym.
Before 500 fans Friday night
the 'Birds played with conviction
when they defeated the Bears 80-58.
Saturday, before a slightly larger
crowd of 800 it was much the same
thing with a final score of 83-65.
Coach Peter Mullins said after
Saturday's game he was pleased
with the performance of his team.
He said the defence played particularly well. This is supported by
statistics which show the 'Birds
forced the Bears to turn over the
ball 32 times on Friday night and 30
times on Saturday.
According to Mullins it was not
just the number of times Alberta
turned over the ball that was important, but the number of times UBC
was able to score from its own
defensive play.
The 'Birdmen also turned over
the ball (23 times Friday and 27
times Saturday) but the Bears did
not capitalize on these mistakes the
way that UBC took advantage of
Alberta's turnovers.
The main beneficiary of the Bear
miscues was 'Bird guard Kim
O'Leary, who was the top scorer
both nights with 18 and 28 points
respectively.
O'Leary was typical of the UBC
defence which Mullins said was extremely aggressive.
One area that UBC has improved
since preseason is its shooting.
They shot 48 and 46 percent from
the floor on the weekend and
Mullins feels their inconsistency in
shooting seems to have solved itself.
"Alberta, on the other hand did
not play that well." Mullins said.
This could be a slight understatement was the game on Friday was
five minutes old before the Bears
scored their first points.
The other 'Bird high scorer was
Bob Forsyth, who contributed 16
points on Friday night and 14
Saturday.
The 'Birds next league action is
on November 28 and 29 in Victoria,
when they meet the University of
Victoria Vikings. The Vikings are
also 2 and 0 in league play and are
the current national champions.
The womens basketball team also
travels to Victoria this weekend.
After dropping their first four
games in league action the
Thunderettes will be facing an even
tougher test in Victoria. The Vikettes are also the current national
champions and have only lost one
game in the last two years.
The Alberta Pandas beat the
Thunderettes 73-55 Friday and
58-48 Saturday. Kathy Bultitude
lead the UBC women with 13 and
18 points respectively.
Puck luck goes
to Dinosaurs
The Thunderbirds hockey team
came up empty at the Max Bell
Arena in Calgary last weekend, losing both games to the University of
Calgary Dinosaurs.
In the first game Friday evening
the Birds lost 5-4 to the Dinos in a
close match. Coach Bert Halliwell
said, "We came close to winning
that game, it could have gone either
way." Rob Jones led the scoring for
UBC with three goals and an assist.
On Saturday night the 'Birds
were soundly defeated by the
Dinosaurs 7-3. UBC was never really in the match and the Dinosaurs
capitalized by scoring two short
handed goals and two power play
goals. Halliwell bluntly stated, "We
were right out of it on Saturday."
Although UBC lost the game, the
'Birds power play continued to
show its effectiveness when they
scored all three of their goals with U
of C players in the penalty box.
The hot line of Jim McLaughlin,
Frank Gorring and Rob Jones continued to produce for Halliwell, accounting for six of the seven goals
scored by the 'Birds on the
weekend.
The Birds travel to Saskatoon to
take on the University of Saskatchewan Huskies in two games this
weekend. "They're (the Huskies) as
good as Alberta," Halliwell said
and he believes it will be tough to
beat the Huskies in their own
building.
('Bird droppings)
Following a tough weekend of
competition in Lethbridge the
Thunderbird men's volleyball team
is in fourth place in the Canada
West University Athletic Association league.
UBC finished behind teams from
the Universities of Calgary, Saskatchewan and Alberta in the first of
four cumulative point tournaments
designed to determine the Canada
West champions.
The 'Birds won matches against
both the University of Victoria and
the University of Lethbridge.
UBC's Dan Watts played some outstanding volleyball, particularly
against Lethbridge.
The next of the Canada West
tournaments will be on the weekend
of Jan. 23 here at UBC.
The volleyball Thunderettes came
close to finishing on top but lost to
the University of Saskatchewan in
the women's section of the Canada
West  tournament  held  in  Lethbridge last weekend.
The Thunderettes defeated teams
from the Universities, of Lethbridge, Alberta, Victoria and Calgary before losing to Saskatchewan,
last year's national champions.
•     *     •
UBC wrestlers had a chance to
fight against world class wrestlers
from Japan when they competed in
the Calgary Olympic Tournament
this weekend. The Japanese Olympic team dominated the tournament
which included teams from the Universities of Calgary, Alberta and
Saskatchewan as well as wrestling
clubs from Simon Fraser University
and Calgary.
Wayne Yeastings of UBC came
second in the 118-pound category.
Martin Gleave, who excelled for
UBC in their last tournament, ended up third in the 142-pound category. 'Birds Avtar Dhillan and Rob
Jones both finished fourth in their
respective divisions.
TAKE THATI you multi-fingered swine, shouts demented dueller to extraterrestrial defending its human rights.
Delayed replay of UBC fencing club at Silver Stein Tilt Invitational fencing tournament shows what has happened
to Seattle foil fighter that UBC lunatic lunger Patric Tom is gracefully skewering after installation of nuclear Trident submarines. Popular sport helps reduce mutated digits, cure is being sought for face disfigurement cleverly
disguised by mask.
WESTERN MBA
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
THE UNIVERSITY OF WESTERN ONTARIO
LONDON, ONTARIO, CANADA N6A 3K7
Professor Blair Little
Chairman, MBA Program
Will Be On Campus
Thursday, November 27, 1980
From 3 p.m. until 4:30 p.m.
Room 211, Ponderosa Annex F
Student Counselling And Resource Centre
TO DISCUSS THE WESTERN MBA PROGRAM
Anyone interested in discussing the Western MBA Program
is invited to attend. Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 25,1980
I    1
, v
f*jv.iettafsfm!f^t/^m/m wtpftagg -.:*■,£.
Fear the fluorescent
Cover-up Lowdown IVa^S^
By EVAN MclNTYRE
It's easy to be calmed by the urban poetry of a few distant lights
poking luminous white fingers from
random office building windows
late at night. These trace lights, as
well as the ones humming overhead
during the day, are all fluorescent
tubes. Just try to find a newly constructed building, or even an older
renovated one, which is not chiefly
lit by incandescent rather than
fluorescent light.
The reasons why fluorescent illumination is so widespread are obvious. They are more efficient at
generating some types of visible
light than ordinary light bulbs with
far less energy wasted as heat.
They tend to last longer than the
cheapest incandescent bulbs although their radiant power decreases steadily with regular use.
Everyone has experienced the annoying behavior of dying fluorescent tubes. How annoying their
lingering death is — as if anyone is
really fooled by their erratic spasms
of diseased light.
There is something suspicious in
their shunning the more noble and
austere death every incandescent
bulb embraces.
Perhaps these and other symptoms suggest that a closer look at
modern man's favorite fixture and
its alarming proliferation is needed.
The first danger of fluorescent
tubes involves the typically negligent way most of them are disposed. Protruding from trash bins or
laid in full view along back alleys,
these burned out rods frequently
end up as mock weapons parried by
would-be Darth Vaders, drunks, or
children. A compound, usually of
barium, lines the inside of the mercury vapor filled tubes. Any cuts
from the jagged edge of a broken
tube are often infected by powdery
traces of barium sulphide and will
not heal properly without treatment.
Other evidence indicates more
sinister dangers arising from daily
exposure to fluorescent light. Some
people tend to feel more apathetic
and experience difficulty in concentrating under the tube.
Reflexes and other muscle responses tend to be slower in people
under the tube as well. The reason
for this probably stems from the irregular emission spectrum of fiuor-
CAMPUS
BICYCLES
IN THE VILLAGE
Bicycles for all the
family this Christmas
Children's as low as
$105.00
224-0611
APPOINTMENT SERVICE
731-4191
3644 West 4th Avenue
At Alma
escent light. Neither incandescent
nor ordinary fluorescent tubes duplicate the natural spectrum of sunlight faithfully, although incandescent light bulbs emit many more
wavelengths within and beyond the
visible spectrum than do fluores-
cents.
The possibility of reducing the
short term effects of 'cool white'
tubes on people's nervous systems
by using plant-grow tubes designed
to more accurately duplicate sunlight has not yet been tried. The
closest cannabis cultivator's best
friend gives off a pinkish light and
costs anywhere from three to five
times the price of ordinary tubes.
Aside from the pink and the
price, is there a more heinous reason why so little artificial light resembles natural sunlight? Are the
modern illumination moguls deliberately eroding 21st century mental
health with their cheap and plentiful
tubes?
An ominous volume of initially
stifled evidence is leaking from governmental bureaucracies. The
warning of the long term effects of
the ghastly rod, hitherto hushed, is
becoming more urgent every day.
Researchers in Palo Alto, California, conclude that working eight
or more hours a day under fluorescent tubes may lead to persistent
glandular abnormalities. Laboratory
rodents developed halitosis, erupt
ive flatulence and vestigial growth
of tissue from their underbellies
when subjected to daily fluorescent
lighting.
Behavioral study groups in Rugby, North Dakota and Reykjavik,
Iceland have uncovered the bizarre
effects of prolonged fluorescent illumination of chimpanzees, anacondas and Emperor penguins. The
penguins developed chronic cirrhosis of the armpit and demonstrated a persistent proclivity for goose-
stepping after two years of treatment while the anacondas thrashed
about restlessly until mollified by
such country and western standards as Barbara Mandrell and Conway Twitty, both played at half
speed.
The chimps took up distributing
Mormon literature, tapdancing and
counterespionage when subjected
to 12 hours of fluorescent light daily
along with weekly screenings of
Sunday morning evangelism and
frequent infusions of prune juice
laced with Laetrile and saccharine.
Students as well as the general
public can no longer afford to be
oblivious to the threat of the pearly
cylinders. The revelation of the
truth about fluorescent lighting is a
good way to combat student
apathy; it requires a widespread effort to educate the public about the
peril they face.
M.I.T. CANCELLED AN EXPERIMENT CONCERNING
THE BENEFITS OF SUPPLEMENTING GASOLINE WITH
WOOP ALCOHOL TO IMPROVE MILEAGE ANP CUT
POLLUTION IN AUTOS, AFTER EXXON (WHO OPPOSEP
THE EXPERIMENT) PONATEP   $500,000  TO  M.I.T.
SOURCE ■■ ZNS- I2-I-75
^jMMJSLm.
4 \)&&wmrgt£--tMZ
M.I.T. ANP OIL/AUTO OFFICIALS CLAIM THE
INCIDENTS WERE COINCIDENTAL, THOW3H
REPRESENTATIVES OF £>IL % AVID COMPANIES
HAVB TESTIFIED A6AINST THE USE OF /vIETH-
AN0L-6AS BLENDS AT L53ISLAT1VE HEARIN6S.
souRce: ec-iEwce, \-to-it
•A We'd Like To Meet You
So for a limited time we're offering these
yd    specials that mean big savings for you.
Stop in at any of these 3 locations:
#^ * 41st and McDonald
* 41st at Collingwood
* Kingsway and Salsbury
FREE
We'll Check Your
Anti-Freeze Freel
Save 10%
ATLAS BATTERIES
10% OFF reg. price
Save 20%
ICE SCRAPERS
SNOW BRUSHES
^'«^*Kl3si*»%*'i*£#vl-.?'Wi6*^^
Save
Save 10%
BOOSTER CABLES
10% OFF reg. price
Windshield Washer 20-10
A *-**!
BARS LEAK
For that Leaky Radiator reg. $1.55
Prices
Effective
While
Stock.
Lasts!
Prices
in effect
Nov. 25 to
Dec. 9, 1980

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0126605/manifest

Comment

Related Items