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The Ubyssey Oct 4, 1966

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Array Vol. XLVIII, No. 8
THE UBYSSEY
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1966
224-3916
harvey photo
TENT CITY TURNS ghost town as canvas dwellers trooped to classes Monday. More than
50 students spent Sunday night in main mall tents, and tent-in organizers say demonstration may continue all week.
ONCE A MONTH
Macdonald opens door
UBC president John Macdonald has announced a new
once a month open door
policy for students.
Macdonald told a small
crowd at his annual welcoming address Friday he will
be available one day a
month in his office.
No appointment will be
necessary but Macdonald
said visitors should restrict
themselves to important
matters.
The president outlined
other measures for improved student - administration
contact:
• Gordon Selman, executive assistant to the president will be regularly
available to the AMS council.
• A student liaison committee led by Macdonald will
meet with AMS council several times a year.
• A committee of students
and librarians will continue
to work on problems of student orientation, library use,
and library facilities.
• A new housing committee will be set up to deal
with all residence accommodation.
• An elected student com-
mitee will study food services, book store, and traffic
and parking.
"Now these are concrete
ways in which we will try
to overcome the problem of
bigness," Macdonald said.
Turning to housing, he
said 25 per cent of all single
students will live in good
quality housing by. 1970.
He claimed there will be
4960 units, compared to 2800
units available now.
"Our  plans   call   for   de
molition of all the hut accommodation in Fort and
Acadia Camps and replacement with new housing," he
said.
"I am confident that we
can complete the necessary
financial arrangements and
make an announcement this
fall of the timetable for the
whole program."
Macdonald criticized UBC's
financial support.
"The program of this university, particularly in respect to its financial support still falls far short of
most of the great universities
on this continent."
He said special financing
may put projects out of
order of priority as the administration sees them.
"But if one receives funds
for a library, one should use
those funds for the capital
objective."
Macdonald said if students
want to sit on the senate and
board of governors they will
have to convince faculty,
alumni, the senate, and the
B.C. government.
"I think it is likely that
these groups will feel that
experience and more free
time than the student has are
necessary to qualify for
membership in these two
bodies."
Referring to unrest on
campuses, Macdonald said if
it is directed constructively,
ti is desirable.
"It can be destructive if
its origins are not understood, if it is based on misinformation, or if it generates hostility," Macdonald
said.
He named frustration with
the liberal education as one
great source of student unrest.
Asked if he supported present student housing movement, Macdonald said he
was in favor of anything
good in housing.
But he refused to give
vocal support to the present
AMS housing petition.
The  president  was  then
asked if he was afraid of
unrest at UBC.
"There is unrest in all
society and UBC is not exempt," he said.
Macdonald denied he fears
Berkeley at UBC.
Car cavalcade carries
petition   to   city   hall
Students who want better housing can tell it to city
hall today.
A car cavalcade to Vanceuver city hall, Cambie and
West Twelfth, starts at 1 p.m. today from Brock Hall.
Everyone with AMS cards will be official delegates,
AMS vice-president Charlie Boylan said.
Boylan, AMS president Peter Braund, treasurer
Lome Hudson and law president John Truman will meet
with city council.
They will present student petitions calling for a
three-year relaxation in zoning laws in Point Grey.
'Build  em
yourself/
AMS told
By   TOM  MORRIS
UBC students should set up their own housing corporation, says Vancouver alderman and MLA-elect Bob Williams.
Williams spoke to 900 students on main mall Monday
at a panel discussion on UBC's housing problem.
Williams said a corporation to build student accommodation would be owned and directed by students.
"The land and loans are
available and it is your job to
take advantage of them," he
said.
PRESS GOVERNMENT
He called on students to
press the provincial government for use of the UBC endowment lands.
Williams endorsed an AMS
plan to open more Point Grey
houses to students.
"Get the city to allow two
family dwellings in Point Grey
with basic standards," Williams said.
Ray Larsen, AMS housing
co-ordinator, said the administration is concerned with
quantity and not quality of
housing.
"Human activities in present
residences are restricted," he
said.
QUALITY NOT QUANTITY
"There are 2,800 of these
sub-standard, sterile units on
campus now."
"Residences should be
financed as part of an academic
plan and not as ancillary enterprises," Larsen said.
He called for a student committee which would work out
a minimal standard for housing.
Two people would be hired
by the students as housing in-
spectators for on and off-campus
housing.
"These two would inspect
quality and discrimination and
prices in housing," Larsen
said.
He said the AMS is now
studying cost and location of
new housing on campus and
will submit plans to the board
of governors soon.
At  the  rally, housing  czar
Malcolm McGregor said there
is housing if the students want
it.
CO-ORDINATOR NOT BUSY
"I can give housing to eight
students right now," he said.
McGregor later said he had
room for 30 more students
in Acadia.
"I doubt if any student is
without a toed. I believe the
student housing co-ordinators
are not as busy as they could
be.
"UBC is aware of the problem   and   is   now  negotiating
RAY LARSEN
. . . sterile units
with    Ottawa    for    finances,"
McGregor said.
AMS president Peter Braund
said main mall's tent-in may
continue a few days.
(Continued on Page 3)
SEE; TENTS Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October  4,   1966
Burns not as virile
as Scot myth claims
—derrek webb  photo
"JUST SQUEEZE TIGHT and we'll have you out of here in no time," says similing blood-
taker in UBC armory. Bleeding volunteer consoles himself with thoughts of free Food Services coffee to replenish his body fluids.
THEOLOGIAN SAYS
Gods obit pathetic
A U.S. theologian Monday
labelled the death of God
movement pathetic and dishonest.
Dr. George Forell, director
of the University of Iowa
school of religion, told 200
persons in Brock lounge that
even the phrase God is dead is
literal nonsense.
"You can deny there is a
God," he said. "But to say God
is dead is the same as saying
there was once an immortal
God who has now died."
He said the atheist theologian seeks the shelter of the
Christian community because
he is not ready for the "cold
cruel world of atheism."
This is dishonest and pathetic, he said.
Forell said if the death of
God movement is an attempt
to contradict the God of the
childish imagination as an adequate expression of Christian
faith, "the observation is trivial and not theologically
serious."
"The entire sacramental
theology of the Christian
church is an eloquent denial
of the geographical localization of God," he said.
Forell also blasted what he
called the "naive optimism"
caused by technological and
social advances.
ATTENTION SKIERS -
EATON'S SKI CHALET
Requires Temporary Sales Personnel
This is an excellent opportunity for expert skiers with
a vast knowledge of ski equipment to earn worthwhile
commissions through part-time employment.
One male — one female required November through
December, after classes, weekends and the holiday
season.
EATON'S   PERSONNEL   REPRESENTATIVE   will   be   on
campus Thursday,  October 6,   1:30-4   p.m.   Apply   in
person at the University Placement Office.
"My most recent readings
do not convince me that this
mood of optimism is all that
persuasive," he said.
He said the real issue facing
the church is not the death of
God but the death of man.
The reputation of Robert
by   Scotsmen   everywhere.
"The Burns cult bears the
marks of a pseudo-religion,"
Thohias Crawford, visiting
English professor from the
University of Auckland said
Monday.
"It has high priests and organizers, minor female dieties,
LSD cult
examined
in lectures
LSD will come to UBC — if
students are interested.
UBC extension department
is offering an eight-lecture
course titled Brain, Drugs, and
Behaviour starting Oct. 17 at
Vancouver Public Library.
But extension department
official Sol Kort said if students express interest, the
eight lectures will be brought
to the campus.
Topics in the downtown
course include evolution of the
mind, psychedelics and psychiatry and significance of
artificially induced religious
experiences.
Students can register for
half-price, $6, at 8 p.m. opening night.
r
I
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Your Local CHEVRON DEALER     .
Ted Dash Rob Quesnel
NEW LOCATION AT 16th & DUNBAR
On your way to class — Get some Gas
Lubrication   &  Service   Specialists
Standard Oil Products
Car Washing
OPEN 7 A.M. - 11  P.M.
WE TAKE BETTER CARE OF YOUR CAR
SQUASH CLUB MEETING
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BUC. 203
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ALL INTERESTED PLEASE COME
OPTICAL DEPT.
Bring your optical prescription
to us and save!
9.95
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Glasses   Single vision  from
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(ANY COLOUR)
NOW 2 LOCATIONS DOWNTOWN ONLY
677 Granville, opposite The Bay Phone 681-6174
1 Hour Free Parking at Rite Park
New  Westminster
675 Columbia, Opposite Army and Navy
Phone LA 1-0751
Burns is a myth propagated
venerated   relics,   and   even
sacred meals."
Crawford exposed the Burns
legend of a dreamy rustic genius, presenting the poet as an
educated and progressive
farmer.
As for Burn's famous sex
life, the professor said that
while 44 illegitimate Burns
children had been recorded,
this was B.C. (Before Contraceptives).
He said is was doubtful that
Burns had any more sexual
prowess than the average figure of today.
Crawford discusses the songs
of Burns in an open seminar
at 3:30 today in Bu. 202.
Design it yourself.
Your very own
individually tailored
suit.  Pick from  over
250 action swatches in
silk & wool, Venetian
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Tailored to  Measure
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only  $85  &  $95
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DISTINCTIVE MEN'S STORES
4445 W. 10th
near  Sasamat
2901 W. B'dwy.
at  Mackenzie Tuesday, October 4, 1966
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
—kurt hilger photo
UBC PRESIDENT John Macdonald gave his welcoming  address  to students  Friday—well,
some of  his students  anyway.  The  president had an easy time of it, with a quiet crowd
of 300 present; a contrast to  last year's  reception   when    he   was   greeted    by   4,000
students  angry about  increased   fees.
RESIDENCES LOSE
\
Dance ban costs money'
Totem Park residence president Don Munton has protested a ban of open residence
dances.
The ban came from housing
czar Malcolm McGregor who
told Munton revenue lost by
the closure would be compensated for by a $5 to $8 a year
levy of all students in residence.
. McGregor's manifesto means
dances held in any residence
this year will be restricted to
residence members and their
guests.
Munton jumped all over the
decision claiming students are
paying too much already and
dances are a painless way to
make money.
"I can tell you now that a
lot of projects will be dropped
unless we have the large budget we had last year," he said.
"In staging these open
dances we can allow residence
students to attend at a much
reduced charge."
McGregor said he ordered
ban because residences are for
residents, there is trouble at
open dances and money is not
a good reason to hold a dance.
AMS  passes  motion
to appoint SUB boss
The unbuilt student union  building will soon have a
manager.
The Alma Mater Society
Monday night approved a motion to hire David Cooper,
presently business manager at
the University of Alberta at
Edmonton.
"Mr. Cooper has five years
of experience with the Canadian Union of Students and I
feel that he is a very important
man for us to hire," said AMS
treasurer and SUB chairman
Lome Hudson.
Several councillors asked
Hudson how much salary the
SUB manager was to receive.
"We would not like to have
this figure published," said
Hudson.
"Other universities would
immediately try to hire him
away. Student unioni-buildings
are a going thing right now
and Cooper has all the qualifications.
"We   cannot   afford   to   let
other   universities   offer   our
. manager a higher salary.
"If you publish this figure,
you could be costing the stu
dents $5,000," Hudson told
The Ubyssey.
Hudson refused to state publicly what salary is to be paid,
but said he will privately tell
any student who asks him.
Hudson also presented the
first draft of the AMS budget
for this year. Total revenues
for the year are estimated at
$856,910. Expenditures will be
an estimated $834,725, leaving
a margin of $22,185.
"Maybe money isn't a good
reason for a dance but it's the
only way we will get the
necessary money for our projects," Munton said.
Dorm formals, newspapers
for every floor, paintings and
furniture for the residences,
sports equipment, speakers, a
PA system, and $300 given to
Dean Gage for two bursaries
were just a few of the things
done with the money, he said.
Munton said there wouldn't
be as many students attending
the closed dances and therefore not as many dances would
be staged this year.
"These dances give residents
a chance to meet students not
living in the dorms," said
Munton.
McGregor said Thursday in
an interview: "If the residences
are having financial problems
they should come to us and we
will give them all the help we
can."
Munton said he doubted
housing could provide him
with the kind of money needed for the extensive program
carried out last year.
"I know the students in
Totem are behind me 100 per
cent on this issue and I can
speak for the students in the
other residences as well."
Globulin goblet is gone
but blood drive flows on
It's bleeding time at UBC — Globulin Goblet
or not.
The goblet, a trophy awarded to the faculty with
the highest percentage of blood donors, was last seen
by the foresters.
Forestry — the 1965 winners — did not hand over
the cup to last year's winners, agriculture.
Meanwhile, the semi-annual Red Cross blood drive
continues in the armory until Friday.
Red Cross nurses will bottle blood from 9:30 a.m.
to 4:30 p.m. each day.
Blair counters
food criticism
UBC food services director Ruth Blair Thursday whipped up stiff opposition to student criticism of poor food at
high prices.
She said in an interview that
UBC prices are rock bottom
compared with food prices in
other parts of the city.
"How can they make claims
when they know nothing of
our expenses," she said.
Three Ubyssey reporters recently sold 50 cheese sandwiches for 10 cents each during a Brock noon hour rush.
Food services cheese sandwiches sell for 20 cents.
Miss Blair said all the food
services' overhead expenses,
including power, maintenance,
labor and telephone, come
from a 44 per cent profit.
"The price increases this
year are due to the increased
cost of staple items such as
milk, hamburger and flour,"
she said.
"Labor costs have increased
7 per cent," she said.
"We buy no processed food,"
said Miss Blair. "Coffee is
freshly ground twice a week.
Most is percolated, some is
silex."
Miss Blair said student
claims that food in one cafeteria was superior to another
are sheer nonsense.
"The Ponderosa prepares
food for all the cafeterias, including the graduate centre,
where they say the food is
better."
Miss Blair said it would be
unrealistic to open the cafeterias until midnight, as suggested in a Ubyssey editorial.
"It would mean the hiring
of new people and more expenses, and students wouldn't
want prices to go up again."
"How many people come to
the cafeteria at midnight?" she
added.
Miss Blair admitted complaints about residence bag
lunches may be justified.
"The wrappings that we use
are not air-tight, and the sandwiches dry out," she said.
"The clear wrapping is
much better, but we only have
it at Ponderosa. It is difficult
to use, and must be imported
from the States."
"We have two of the finest
dining rooms  anywhere,"  she
RUTH BLAIR
. . rock bottom prices'
said. "The older ones will be
replaced presently."
"We are disturbed by all
this bad publicity. It's just not
fair," she said. "Students are
impossible to please.
"They probably will not appreciate the really fine service
and fair prices until after they
graduate."
TENTS
(Continued from Page 1)
About 100 students slept in
13 tents Sunday to dramatize
the housing crisis.
"We've had our attention
from the press and public,"
Braund said. "Now we have to
get through to the legislators.
Monday night 65 Lower Mall
students staged a sing-in first
at the tent-in and then moved
to the AMS offices.
The group crowded into the
narrow confines of the office
and sang: "We got McGregor in
our hands", "We've got Macdonald in our hands", "We've
got Bennett in our hands" and
"We've got the whole world in
our hands".
AMS president Peter Braund
told the sing-in participants five
thousand signatures had ibeen
collected on the student petitions and more were to come.
Western Canada's Largest
Rambler Dealer
Hugh Rider Ltd.
CORDIALLY INVITES
THE STAFF AND THE STUDENTS OF U.B.C.
TO THE SHOWING
OF THE ALL NEW  1967 RAMBLERS
THIS IS YOUR  RAMBLER  DEALER
Hugh Rider Ltd.
RE 6-0481
3485 W. Broadway THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
the editor's and not of the AMS or the university. Member, Canadian
University Press. Founding member, Pacific Student Press. Authorized
second class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of
postage in cash.
The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review;
and Focus, a weekly news magazine of world university affairs. Prop.,
Ubyssey News Service (UNS).
City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo. Page
Friday, loc. 24; Focus, sports, loc. 23; advertising, loc. 26. Night calls,
731-7019.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
OCTOBER 4, 1966
He who can, does. He who cannot, teaches.
—Bernard Shaw
Committees...
Several years of student agitation for a voice in the
university's operation must have reached president John
Macdonald, for he has responded in the best administrative fashion by announcing students will be allowed
to sit on certain university advisory boards.
Although Macdonald's gesture is not born of conviction but rather in fear of radical action if student
leaders are not placated, students can use these advisory
committees to good advantage.
The residence, library, bookstore, food services,
parking and academic quality committees do not in
themselves carry any power; they only recommend to
the powers that control the university.
But able students on these committees can stand
strongly for programs that students feel are necessary,
can use the committees to gain information about the
operations of the university, and can act loudly, strongly
and positively if student ideas are not implemented by
those who rule.
... and the fallacy
There is a fallacy inherent in the idea of committees
to make the university operate better; a flaw which
became a sweeping gulf Friday when a group of students cornered president Macdonald after his welcoming
address.
Students criticized Macdonald and the university
for a wide range of things. Most of the criticisms were
both rude and founded on lack of knowledge and lack
of  experience.
Macdonald responded belligerently, and demanded
concrete proposals as solutions in lieu of bickering and
criticism.
But his committees with students sitting on them
are designed to turn the bickering into useful wheel
grease, to stop student squeaking and make the present
machine operate better.
The students who were rude to and critical of
Macdonald aren't looking for ways to make the machine
work better, and that's why none could offer him
concrete solutions.
They were seeking ways to find new kinds of
machines, in the belief that universities are places to
tear down old structures and ideas and search for new
and better ones.
An administrative and teaching system ordained by
legislative act in 1908 is not necessarily good, nor is it
necessarily bad.
But it is time for re-examination of the entire
structure, since its essence has not changed since 1908.
And that complete re-examination, using all the
tools of scholarly research and analysis, is what students
were asking Friday, and what students will continue to
ask for.
The need for such a sweeping re-examination is
the reason Macdonald's gestures to students have been
interpreted as tokenism, for they are designed only to
make the university swing along in its old groove.
That need for re-examination is what students
tried to communicate to president Macdonald, and failed.
Bonny Lee, Jack Enderby,  Nor-
EDITOR: John Kelsey man   Gidney.   Angel  Ottho,   Bryce
Howard,   Linda  Holden,   Lin  Tse-
Managing Richard Blair    hsu,   Maria Giardini,  Tom  Morris,
Newt       _    -     Carol Wilton    R°n Simmer, Jill Green and Archy
_■_•«                       "      " n__.u ct^fm....    Goodwin    sleely    eyed    the    days
City — Danny Stoffman    ebentSf   and   tmea* the   new   col.
Photo Powell Hargrave umbs.   Al  Donald  gave  guidenave
Page Friday Claudia Gwinn nnd   coyncil   squad   is  Val  Zuker,
Features Rosemary  Hyman Kris   Emmott   ande   Hrush.   Staff
.,_„ _,_ii_ _        ■» i_ meeting Thursday noon in the of-
Asst News _ Pat Hrushowy, Anne Balf fice    at  whlch   time  lollipops  will
Att't Photo Dennit Gant    go to all bright-eyed arrivals.
s/'ir's- .//■
Tent-in, not paint-in, you dolt
LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
Medical director explains plan
Editor, The Ubyssey:
I wish to correct some inaccuracies and misunderstandings that may arise from
your article on Page 18 of the
September 30th issue.
1. All Canadian provinces
have hospital insurance. However, only Saskatchewan,
Manitoba and Ontario residents have premiums to pay
or they are not covered. Students from these provinces
should be sure their premiums are paid. Students from
other provinces should contact their provincial hospital
insurance authorities to make
certain they are insured while
they are out of their home
province.
2. The article gave the impression that the university
health and accident plan was
open mainly to non-Canadian
students, or to Canadian students only if they were not
covered by provincial insurance plans. In actual fact, the
plan is open to any student
who wishes to purchase it.
3. The rates for the plan
are $20 a year (single student)
and $48 a year (married student).
We fear the change in ruling in hospital insurance will
work a hardship on some students and it is regretted that
the decision to change was
not made prior to registration.
However, all students can buy
some form of protection and
should do so. Please feel free
to contact the Health Service
for information.
ARCHIE M. JOHNSON, M.D.
Director,
University Health Service.
He was a she
Editor, The Ubyssey:
We would like to remind
you that there is more than
i one classification for the clubs
day booth award.
The Pre-Medical Society
won a first prize for their
booth in the 12'xl8' booth
classification.
We are willing to overlook
this    discrepancy    but    we
thought we should bring this
to your attention.
Also, "he", in your picture,
was a "she".
Also, if you look at your
bottom picture you'll see
that we are the Pre-Medical
Society rather than the Medical Society.
Executive, Pre-Med. Soc.
Sensationalism
Editor, The Ubyssey:
With many students still on
waiting lists for residence-
accommodation, the immediate need for additional student housing is indisputable.
The Alma Society has presented a sound plan for an
interim answer to this need:
a request for temporary relaxation of Point Grey zoning regulations.
The  journalistic  policy of
The Ubyssey, however, is to
be censored for its handling
of this need. It is thoroughly
misleading for the student
newspaper to plead the cause
of "inhuman residence regulations—which forbid, among
other things, normal sexual
activity among students"
under the same headline as
a report on AMS efforts to relieve the housing shortage.
The picture and statement
in the September 29th issue
of The Ubyssey is hardly likely to inspire Point Grey homeowners to open either their
hearts or their doors to homeless students.
When is The Ubyssey going
to learn that it seriously damages legitimate student causes
by its proccupation with sensationalism?
A. L. CAMPBELL
Grad Studies
BY GABOR MATE
Take
with
a
rea
Airplane glue is out, whipping cream is in.
We got the word from our
addict pal, Actually Josephine,
(his friends call him Wolfgang
For Short, but his name is
Actually Josephine) while we
were sitting in our room sniffing glue, as we usually do
Monday mornings.
"You are way out of it,"
said Actually J. "You are just
not where it's at. Get with it
man."
He then explained that only
unhip teenie boppers sniff glue
any more. "It's very uncool to
be a gluehead. It is cool to be
a creamhead."
Whipping cream in spray
cans, Actually J. told us, is
compressed by laughing gas.
If one sets the can upside
down for days and then, still
upside down, sprays into his
mouth, one will get a head full
of laughing gas.
Thus I walked into my phil-
trip
dy-whip
osophy class shaking with
laughter, whipping cream all
over my face.
"Hiya, prof-foaby!" I yelled.
"Howdahell is dat old snafa-
bitch Plato today.?
I wiped some cream off.
"Here, prof-balby, have some
cream. Ahhahha. Blow your
mind!" I screamed. "Take a
trip with Ready-whip."
Prof-ibaby looked at me suspiciously. He walked over and
licked some cream off my face.
"Yumm," he observed, licking
some more.
"Hey," he yelled. What a
gas!" He began singing.
"Blow, blow, blow your
mind
Gently down the cream ..."
He was convulsed with
laughter. "Take a trip with
Ready-whip!" he screamed,
writhing on the floor. "Today
we are discussing dat old sna-
fabitch Plato." Tuesday, October 4,  1966
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
SECOND VICE  ELECTION
THURSDAY
Four  would-be  PROs  vie  for  council  slot
AMS elections for second
vice-president will be held
Thursday. AMS members may
vote at any of 18 campus ballot boxes.
The second vice-president is
the AMS public relations officer. These four statements are
from the four candidates for
the office; their grammar has
not been corrected.
BLACK
The two major issues presently before student council,
namely SUB and the housing
shortage, are being beaten to
death by people voicing myriad opinions. All of us realize
that these problems demand
immediate action: my platform
will differ little from those of
my opponents.
What is more important to
the student body is whether I
am better qualified for the
post of second vice-president
than are my fellow candidates.
The job is one mainly concerned with public relations.
The elected student must have
good speaking and organizational abilities. He must be
able to act as a buffer and
sounding board for the clubs
and groups on campus.
Liaison, public relations, and
committee work are fields in
which I have had a great deal
of experience. 1 urge you to
consider the requirements of
this position and vote David
Black.
— DAVID BLACK
MITCHELL
The second vice-president is
the public relations officer of
AMS. Last year I was assistant
AMS-PRO. I believe that the
most serious problem facing
the university is the serious
shortage of housing. We must
undertake a program to expose
this problem to the community and pressure the government for action now.
A good start can be made
by leading a press tour
through the present sub-standard facilities. Other things I
want to see done:
• Student academic reform
commission — to pressure for
academic improvements and
publish anti-calendars.
• Broaden the base of student council by putting the
CUS chairman and UCC president on council immediately.
For ideas—experience mark
1 beside Mitchell on the preferential ballot.
— KEITH MITCHELL
TATE
I'm asking students to support me and vote for student
power.
Students must forget partisan politics and petty bickering in dealing with the administration and provincial government.
This is why two natural
political enemies such as arts
president Don Wise (memlber
Progressive Conservative
party)   and   AMS  first   vice-
'm
y       hopeful/
j- A/\uirr-*7
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
STUDENT-ALUMNI COMMITTEE
Students interested in serving on this Committee
are to see Mr. Hollick-Kenyon, Alumni Director,
Brock 252.
NOTICE RE: ELECTION:
All candidates meetingl in Brock Lounge on Wednesday, October 5th, at 12:30 noon. Seconders and their
candidates for thea position of Second Vice-President
will be speaking.
NOTICE OF POLL - 2nd VICE PRES.
Advance Polls — Wednesday, Oct. 5
Brock South — 10:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
Residences —> 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Regular Polls — Thursday, Oct. 6 — 10:00 a.m. to 4 p.m.
1. Brock North
2. Brock South
3. Buchanan 1
4. (Buchanan 2
5. Bus Stop
6. Cafeteria
7. College Library
8. Education
9. Engineering
10. Henry Angus
11. Library
12. Physics
13. Ponderosa
14. Wesbrook
Special polls will be held at the Vancouver General Hospital and the B.C. Vocational School.
president Charlie Boylan
(Communist) have both given
their support to me in this
election.
The tight reactionary clique
which controls student council must be broken so that your
council will be representative
in practice.
We must present a united
front on a continuing basis to
effect persistent pressure on
the administration in such areas
as housing and course curriculum.
Give  me   a  mandate   that
shows   you   want   a   student
council which is representative
and leads, not follows or must
be bypassed.
Thank you.
— CAROLYN TATE
WIESER
My platform has three steps.
I will press for:
1. A show-down between the
AMS and the Board of Governors concerning the immediacy
of the housing problem.
2. The AMS president hav
ing at least an ex-officio position on the board of governors.
In this position he would give
a first-hand account of the
housing shortage.
3. The completion of SUB.
Housing and SUB are two different issues. I believe both
problems can be resolved. Delay of SUB will only cost the
student more money. We have
to face facts the money voted
for SUB cannot be used for
anything but SUB.
— BOB WIESER
Clinton's"
BEST OF THE WOOL KNITWEAR MARKET
*_. FALL 1966
1. Pure wool jumbo bulky pullovers — 12
shades to choose from. Newest of jades,
<\    rubies  and   heathertones  by Wolsey  and
Byford   of   Britain.    $22.95    and    $29.95
2. Pure wool jumbo knit in heather blue,
heather olive and grey. Byford's Pride at
$35
3. Waffle knit extra heavy bulky in heather
blue, heather blue, heather olive and grey.
Byford of Britain at $35
4. Just arrived turtle neck jumbo bulkies
with an extra high turtle neck styling specially priced at $14.95 by Shelby in black
and ruby.
5. Jack Nicklaus cardigans in Alpaca  by
Shelby. Colours in black, beige, emerald,
ruby and brass. Alpaca — the lightweight
navy, powder, green mist, canary yellow,
knit built for comfort with easy fitting body
Byford of Britain. $22.95 and $29.95
pullover style $21.95.
!  -.
(5)
MANY OTHER STYLES
JANTZEN, SHELBY, WOLSEY, AMD
EUROPEAN IMPORTS
V-neck pullovers-flat knits, bulkies, shetlands
from $13.95 to $39.95.
V-neck sleeveless pullovers   —   lambs wools,
alpacas and double knits from $7.95 to $14.95
Clinton's
fTlEnS WEAR
Clothing for Campus and Dress-up Occasions
742 Granville St. MU 1-5625 Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 4,  1966
Arts undergrads drag
fund drive total down
All UBC faculties except
arts improved on last year's
shows during Wednesday's
United Appeal drive.
Students canvassing the
5,000-member arts faculty collected $28.62 during the three-
hour morning blitz.
This total was exceeded by
every other faculty except
nursing, pharmacy and physical education.
The total donated by UBC
students was $1,217.19. Contributions of individual faculties were: agriculture, $43.00;
architecture, $29.54; arts,
$28.62; commerce, $156.94;
education, $76.83; engineers,
$156.94; forestry, $97.10; home
economics, $123.24; law, results not yet in; medical rehabilitation, $32.07; medicine,
$47.41 (first and second years
only); music, $75.29; nursing,
$23.00; physiscal education,
$16.60; pharmacy, $19.28; and
science, $282.66.
Each faculty was responsible
for assigning canvassers for its
own students. Peter Colbeck,
commerce 3, was co-ordinator
for the drive.
This year the faculty with
the highest per capita donaftbn
will receive a trophy donated
by Vancouver Sun executive
John Lecky.
"We had a goal of 15 cents
per   student,"   said    Colbeck,
Co-ordinator  named
for education finance
OTTAWA CUP)—The federal government has appointed a special consultant responsible for financial assistance
to higher education.
Hon. Judy LaMarsh, secretary of state, Tuesday (Sept.
27) announced the appointment of Robin Ross, 49, registrar and senate secretary at the
University of Toronto, to the
new post.
Ross will act both as a
consultant and as a co-ordinator in higher education finance, Miss LaMarsh explained
in making  the announcement.
His initial assignment will
be to bring together within
the   federal   government   the
Classical Guitar
Instruction  in  Technique
and  Repertoire
W. Parker, 682-1096 or 874-3547
Studio   at  2695   W.   Broadway
RE   3-4032
SCM presents
The Bishop of
Polynesia
Right Rev. J. C. Vockler
Tuesday, Oct. 4th
Buch. 202
Noon
JOBS    ABROAD    GUARANTEED
views of the departments concerned with financial aid for
higher education.
In addition, the administration of the general per capita
grants program and the student loan plan are toeing transferred to the secretary of state
from the department of finance.
"but it looks as if we have
about half that much. We are
disappointed in this showing,
especially that of arts. Don
Wise, arts undergrad society
president, arranged for only
two canvassers for over 5,000
students."
Buffy s posters missing
but shell be here tonight
Folk singer Buffy Sainte-Marie is still headed for
UBC, even though posters advertising her performance
tonight have been disappearing.
Special Events chairman Brian Plummer said Monday 25 of 30 cardboard placards wtih Buffy's photo have
been removed from bulletin boards.
Also missing is a banner originally placed in front
of Brock Hall.
SPECIAL      EVENTS
presents
£ainte-tilarie
MEM. GYM - 8 PM
Advance Tickets
for Reserved Seats
At A.M.S. Office
ENGLAND
BRUSSELS: The Int'l Student
Information Service, non-profit, today announced that 1.000 GUARANTEED JOBS ABROAD are
available to young people 17-1/2
to 40. Year-Round and Summer.
The new 34 page JOBS ABROAD
magazine is packed with on-the-
spot-photos, stories and information about your JOB ABROAD.
Applications are enclosed.
TRAVEL - FUN - PAY - CULTURE
LANGUAGE.
For your copy, send $ 1.00,
AIRMAIL, to: ISIS, 133, Rue
Hotel des Monnales, Brussels, 6,
Belgium.
This is the world of AIR CANADA. The planes.
The people. The places. Exciting! Isn't it time you took a trip?
Al R CANADA
SERVING CANADA • U.SA • BERMUDA • BAHAMAS • CARIBBEAN • IRELAND • ENGLAND • SCOTLAND • FRANCE • GERMANY • SWITZERLAND and AUSTRIA
A & liJhcwdddjd^dmxJtA did.
4576 West 10th Avenue CA 4-3262
Get your tickets here - 1  Block from UBC Gates
FOR STUDY OR PLEASURE
Eook through . . .
World-Wide  International Travel
5700 University Blvd. (In the Village)
Call Miss Robyn Marshall, Mgr., 224-4391 Tuesday, October 4, 1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
THUNDERBIRDS LOSE
Misplays cool
Hawaii holiday
The UBC football Thunder-birds are home after a sobering trip to Honolulu over the weekend.
The Birds lost 27-6 Saturday to the University of
Hawaii Rainbows, proving that football is indeed a game of
mistakes.
intramurals
Swimmers
dive in
Today's intramural softball
schedule: Delta Upsilon vs. engineering 5, forestry vs. Psi
Upsilon.
The intramural swim meet
gets under way today at noon,
with men's heats being run at
Memorial Gym pool.
Badminton singles began
Monday night and will continue Wednesday night at
Memorial Gym. About 50 competitors are taking part.
Jayvi
fees
get a win
in prison
The UBC Junior Varsity football team went
outside Saturday to defeat
Monroe State Reformatory 21-14 in an exhibition
game at Monroe, Wash.
UBC's strong running
around the ends repeatedly picked up long yardage.
Sweeps were especially
effective in third-down,
long-yardage situations.
Halfback Terry Zweng
scored two touchdowns
for UBC, while fullback
Don Walden rushed for 80
yards to lead the Jayvee
offence.
It was the Jayvees' first
win against two loses.
Monroe State's attack
was weaker this year than
last when the Jayvees
downed them 22-14: an
inmate who played quarterback for the reformatory team was paroled
Juring the winter.
And UBC mistakes lost this
one.
Two UBC offensive miscues
gave Hawaii possession of the
ball deep in Bird territory, and
both times the Rainbows
scored touchdowns.
INTERCEPTION .
Meanwhile, a pair of defensive lapses by UBC gave the
home team its other two
majors.
Hawaii scored twice in the
first half after they ran an
intercepted pass back to the
UBC 15 and recovered a blocked punt on the UBC 20.
The half time score was 13-0
for Hawaii.
GIBBONS SCORES
The Birds finally made it to
paydirt when quarterback Dick
Gibbons carried on a keeper
from the seven to end a 52-
yard drive.
The convert attempt by Glen
Brandt was unsuccessful.
The final score in the game
came on another long pass and
run play when Zenker hit Ben
Ronquillo for a 63 yard score in
the last quarter.
The Birds resume their home
schedule against Portland State
College at Varsity Stadium on
Saturday, Oct. 8 at 2:00 p.m.
Penalty shot
ends game
Wright way
A penalty shot by Jamie
Wright gave the UBC Thunder
bird field hockey team a 1-0
victory Saturday over Vancouver India on Wolfson Field.
The penalty came on a play
set up by Bruce Hodgson and
Warren Bell, as the Birds
dominated play throughout the
game but couldn't follow
through with scores.
"We were in complete control of the play," said Thunderbird coach Eric Broom.
"We had several near misses on shots —• it was a little
frustrating."
FULLY
AIR CONDITIONED
■«_ Cfje Mian. &tU
Swiss Specialty Restaurant
722 Richards at Georgia
Excellent Service in 14th Century
Decor
5:30 p.m. to Midnight
Reservations: MU 3-8810
2 min. from Queen Elizabeth Theatre
SWISS CHEESE FONDUE -
BEEF FONDUE BOURGUIGNONNE
Ballam, Carter lead way
to UBC soccer victory
By HANK PAKASAAR
Sterling performances by
goalie Bruce Ballam and centre forward Kirby Carter led
the UBC soccer Thunderbirds
to a 4-1 victory Saturday and
kept them in first place in the
Pacific Coast League.
Ballam was at his acrobatic
best as he thwarted all but
one shot by the St. Andrew's
forwards.
And Carter supplied what
coach Joe Johnson calls "his
finishing touch" to help UBC
explode for two goals in each
half.
While Ballam held St. Andrew's off at the UBC end of
the field, Carter scored two
goals and assisted on another.
"Carter made the difference
in our offensive play." Johnson said.
With Carter sidelined by a
throat infection last week.
UBC tied Vancouver Firefighters 0-0.
But 200 fans at Saturday's
game saw a different story.
Harvey Thom opened Thunderbird scoring at 19 minutes
Rugger men
lose three
The UBC rugby Thunderbirds lost 14-11 to a tough
Vancouver Georgians aggregation in an exhibition game
Saturday.
UBC's Braves dropped their
first B.C. League contest to
West Vancouver 16-8, while
the third-team Teepees lost
20-11 to West Van's second
squad.
of the first half by booting in
a rebound from a penalty kick
by Ash Valdai.
Six minutes later Carter
scored his first goal on a fine
individual effort, and UBC
took a 2-0 lead off the field
at halftime.
The Birds extended their
margin to 3-0 30 minutes into
the second half, with Valdai
heading in Carter's shot.
The ubiquitous Carter scored UBC's last goal himself at
the 80-minute mark.
St. Andrew's Bill Watson
countered with a goal a minute later, slipping a screened
shot past Ballam.
UBC now has five points for
two wins and a tie in PCSL
play. The Birds take on Burnaby Villa, whom they have
beaten once already, Wednesday at 8 p.m. at Callister Park.
ATTEND A DEMONSTRATION  OF
"Effective
Reading
rr
* Effective Reading is the ability to vary both your reading rate and technique according to the style, purpose,
importance and difficulty of the material being read.
READING DYNAMICS is a reading improvement course—designed to teach you to
read more effectively. We will teach you to become more flexible in your ability
to recall and comprehend what you have read.
Any student following our directions, who, after completing the minimum class
and study requirements, does not at least TRIPLE his reading efficiency as
measured by our beginning and ending tests, will  be entitled to a  refund.
HERE ARE SOME RESULTS ACHIEVED BY MEMBERS OF OUR LAST GRADUATING
CLASS IN VANCOUVER: ("Comp." designates comprehension)
Name
Occupation
Reading
Speed
Start
Comp.
Start
Reading
Speed
Finish
Comp.
Finish
Rupert Urquhart
Van. Magistrates
Court
365 WPM
65%
1804 WPM
79%
Walter Marsh
Freelance   actor
207 WPM
75%
2092 WPM
86%
Morag Machlachlan
School Teacher
369 WPM
70%
1318 WPM
87%
Sister Marguerite
Dumont
Fred Robinson
Head  Nurse-Mt.
St. Joseph's
School Teacher
241   WPM
Hosp.
300 WPM
55%
65%
1150 WPM
1338 WPM
80%
90%
Richard Ogmundson
Student-                 675 WPM
University of Victoria
80%
2830 WPM
80%
Valerie Tearoe
Student
262 WPM
65%
2323 WPM
71%
Barbara   Leckie
257 WPM
73%
1013 WPM
77%
Kathleen Simons
Travel Rep.
C.P.A.
360 WPM
80%
3166 WPM
90%
For further information, attend one of our demonstrations, or call   us at the
number noted below.
Free demonstrations by graduate students of Reading Dynamics as follows:
VANCOUVER - GEORGIA HOTEL
,MONDAY, OCTOBER 3rd, 8 P.M.-Queen Anne Room
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6th, 8 P.M.-York Room
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 7th, 5 P.M. & 8 P.M.-The Ballroom
EVELYN WOOD
READING DYNAMICS .J^£(
OF BC LTD -
SUITE 210   549 HOWE STREET
VANCOUVER 1 BC    685-2374 THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October  4,   1966
'TWEEN CLASSES
Buffy swings tonight
SPECIAL EVENTS
Cree folk singer Buffy Sainte
Marie sings tonight in Memorial Gym at 8 p.m. Tickets $1.50
at AMS or at the door.
DESERET CLUB
Sociologist Joe Happy speaks
at meeting, noon Wednesday in
Bu. 220.
LUTHERAN STUDENTS
Gamma Delta meeting Wednesday noon, Angus 204. Pastor  Treit  speaks   on   Playboy
Philosophy.
UN CLUB
Wednesday   listen    to   Ker-
ensky. General meeting Friday
noon Bu. 202.
ONTOLOGY CLUB
The Art of Happiness discussed by Leroy Jensesn and
Ron Polack Wednesday noon
in Bu. 223. Everyone welcome.
VOC
Membership   meeting,   Ang.
104, Wednesday noon.
LIBRARIANSHIP
Club meeting Wednesday
noon in Bu. 225. Miss Egoff
will speak on aspects of the
library profession. Everybody
welcome.
UNIVERSITY  BAND
Practice today at 3:30 p.m.
in Music 104. Percussion needed.
CHORAL SOCIETY
First   rehearsal   Wednesday,
6 p.m., Bu. 104. All members
members attend.
PRE-LAW
First    general    meeting    of
arts    pre-law    soc.    Bu   221,
Thursday noon. Everyone welcome.
ASEI
Dean Scarfe speaks Wednesday noon, Ed. 204.
DEBATING UNION
First general meeting noon
today in Bu. 102. Progress for
novice,    middling    and    mes
sianic   debators   will   be   outlined.
DANCE  CLUB
Free    introductory    instruction noon Monday, Tuesday and
Friday in dance lounge second
floor, Brock Extension.
RADSOC
General   meeting  Thursday,
Bu.    217.    All   members   and
interested attend.
PRE-MEDICAL
Dr. Pat McGeer speaks Wednesday noon, Wesbrook 201.
SCM
Reverend J. C. Vockler, Anglican bishop o f Polynesia
speaks today at noon, Bu. 202.
VOLUNTEERS
General meeting noon today,
Bu.   204.   All   new   members
welcome.
COM. LAW SOC
The commerce law queen
candidates will serve coffee at
an informal meeting with
Prof. Davis, Wednesday noon
in Ang. 410.
PRE-DENTAL SOC
Open   meeting    Wednesday
noon,  Bu.  204.  All  interested
welcome.
MUSSOC
First general meeting Wednesday   noon   in   the  auditor-,
ium.   All   interested   students
welcome.
SPORTS CAR CLUB
Meet executive and get membership   cards   Thursday noon
in Chem. 250.
VCF
Preparatory series for group
bible discussion leadership today, Wednesday and Thursday
noon, Bu. 222A. All welcome.
SEAFORTHS
Parade   in   Armory,   today
7:30 p.m.
AUS
Lockers stll rented at noon
in BE. 359.
COMMERCE UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY PRESENTS
COMMERCE WEEK
Thursday Oct. 6 — Thursday, Oct. 13
Thurs. Oct. 6 In Henry Angus 104 at 12:30 — A panel
discussion on Options in Commerce.
Fri. Oct. 7 In Henry Angus 407 at 12:30 - Film &
speaker—"Technological Change and Management" with speaker Mr. H. Alexander,
Controller of the Canadian Imperial Bank
of Commerce
Tues. Oct. 11 At the maiin Mall at 12:30 — Inter.-year
and  Executive Broomball Game.
Wed. Oct. 12 In Biological Sciences 2000 at 12:30 —
Commerce Queen Contest.
Thurs. Oct. 13 At Graduate Student Centre from 2:30 -
4:30 Coffee Party and Debate, between
students and faculty.
RED CROSS
BL
• _•]»
+
DONOR
CLINIC
OCT. 3-7
9:30 A.M.-4:30 P.M.
UBC ARMOURIES
WUS
Carol Chertkow and members of the WUS seminar on
Turkey will speak at noon today, Bu. 205. Illustrated with
slides.
BADMINTON
Meeting  tonight  at   8:30   in
Memorial Gym. Come prepared
to   play.   New   members  welcome.
VCF
Prayer    meeting    in    St.
Andrew's   Chapel,   noon   Wednesday.
ROD AND GUN
General meeting and election of officers in Bu. 221,
noon Thursday.  All  welcome.
10% Discount on
Corsages & Wedding
Bouquets
Vogue Flower Shop
2197 W. Broadway 736-7344
CLEO: No.
SAM: French?
CLEO: M-m-m-m, no.
SAM: How about Italian?
CLEO: Definitely not.
SAM: Would you settle for American or Canadian?
CLEO: Uh-uh; no.
SAM: Maybe Irish?
CLEO: Even Hardy Amies, By-
ford's design consultant on sweaters, can't disguise you; he only
makes you look gorgeous and
virile. Let's face it. you still look
like a Viet Cong spy.
CB-2.66
this exclusive, made in England,
better stores
everywhere.
BYFORD DESIGN CONSULTANT: HARDY AMIES
Western Canada's Largest
Formal  Wear   Rentals
Tuxedos White & Blue Coats
Full   Dress Shirts   & Accessories
Morning   Coats Blue  Blazers
Directors'  Coats 10%   UBC   Discount
2500 GARMENTS TO CHOOSE  FROM
E. A. LEE Formal Wear Rentals
623   HOWE   (Downstairs)   MU   3-2457
2608  Granville   (at 10th)   4691   Kingsway  (Bby.)
RE  3-6727 (by  Sears)   HE   5-1160
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall, Ext. 26. 224-3242
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
LOST KEYS FOR OFFICE, HOME,
car. If found deposit at AMS of-
fice  for Charlie  Boylan.	
PLEASE RETURN PAPERS IN
blue wallet taken from Sedgewick
Wed. 5:30 p.m. to Circulation
Desk, Main Library or phone AM
6-8046.   No  questions  asked.	
LOST A GOLD WANTHAM WRIST
watch with silver flix-o-flex armband. Transmountain Oil Pipeline
insignia on back. Please contact
Denis Laidlaw, Room 18, Saint
Andrew's   Hall.   Phone   224-9921.
FOUND ONE FOUNTAIN PEN.
Vicinity Education Bldg. Approx.
Sept.   22nd.  Phone  266-4740.	
LOST BLACK WALLET CON-
taining student card. Please phone
Sandra after six at 738-5652.
FOUND LADIES RING IN LIBRA-
ry wash room, large stone.
Publications Office.	
FOUND BLACK PURSE AT EAST
Mall and University Blvd., Wed.
Apply Publications Office, Brook
Hall.
FOUND IN MT CAR ONE SLIDE
Rule, Sept. 28. Claim same in
Publications  Office,   Brock.
Coming Dances
12A
HEAR THE 'BIG BEAT' SOUND
of The Nocturnals and Epics. See
the crowning of the Frosh Queen
and Ugly Man! All this and more
for only $2.75 per couple. Saturday, Oct. 8, The Armouries.
Tickets: AMS, South Brock or at
door.
Special  Notices
13
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20
and have a good driving history
you quailify for our good driving
ates.   Phone  Ted Elliott,  224-6707.
STUDENT COUNCIL HAS VOTED
to discontinue Campus Life, so
we are selling 1964, 1965 and 1966
issues for only 50 cents — Publications   office   in   Brock.
SQUASH CLUB GENERAL MEET-
ing today in Buc. 203 at 12:30. All
interested please come.
THANKS!
TO everyone who came to campus
A Go-Go. Your attendance made
it the greatest dance in U.B.C.'s
history! Campus A Go-Go will return to the Armouries on Sat.,
Feb. 4th. And it will be worth
waiting for!
Transportation
14
CARPOOL NEEDED VICINITY
16th & Burrard. Can drive 1 day.
Phone 733-4620.        	
WANTED: CARPOOL RIDE FROM
West Van, location 22nd and
Marine, earliest lecture 9:30, but
don't mind going at 8:30. Phone
Sandy,   926-2254.	
RIDERS WANTED FOR 8:30's.
From area of Oak and 41st. Mornings   only,   call   Dennis,   261-7102.
RIDERS WANTED FROM CO-
quitlam for 9:30's 6 days a week
both ways. Call Al, 939-0629.	
RIDERS WANTED FOR CAR-
pool from Tsawassen contact Cliff
943-3705.
TRANSPORTATION WANTED
9:30 T.,Th, 5:30 M-F vicinity of
25th  Arbutus.  Ulrika 733-7963.
RIDERS WANTED SIMPSON-
Sears, Burnaby. Phone Marvin
HE 4-5464.
WANTED: RIDE FROM 41st and
Granville for 2 days a week. Can
drive for 2 days as well. 263-3397.
RIDE WANTED FOR TWO PEO-
ple from 45th and Boundary Rd.
Craig or Janice  433-0292.
RIDE WANTED FRANCIS AND
Heather, Richmond. Phone Sandy
277-7928.
RIDE NEEDED TO PENTICTON
on long week-end. Will share ex-
penses.   Phone   Vicky  at  263-4170.
WEST VAN CARPOOL NEEDS
driver. 25th to Taylor Way. Phone
926-2540.
PASSENGERS WANTED: TO SPO-
kane via Everett-Wenatchee Fri.
a.m. return Mon. p.m. Call Tom
922-3657 after 7 p.m.       	
RIDE WANTED 8:30 CLASSES
16th and Blasam, (Blk. 23) Phone
736-5809.
RIDE WANTED TO SAN FRAN-
cisco. Will share! Leave Fri., Oct.
7,  3 p.m.  Call 736-5291  Bruce.
MALE STUDENT NEEDS RIDE
to Calgary for Thanksgiving
weekend. Will share driving and
and  expenses.   Phone   874-9723.
^B-B-n______H_»_a__.__i
Wanted
15
I WILL PAY $10 FOR THE COM-
plete English 40 Correspondence
course.   Phone  Karen  261-7119.
WANTED SECOND-HAND BOY'S
3-speed bicycle. Will pay approx.
$25  phone Ed.  224-9667.
AUTOMOTIVE   &  MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
AUSTIN A40 — 1961, CITY TEST-
ed,   reliable,   $450.   Ph.   255-5585.
FOR SALE: 1964 TRIUMPH CON-
vert. (Spitfire). Radio. Economical & mechanically Al. A steal
at   $1150  or  offer.   Ph.   224-6857.
SACRIFICE GEM '51 CHEV in
good running condition for reliable transportation or (sob!)
parts. Would you believe $25?
Call   Al   939-0629.   Make  an   offer!
FOR SALE 1964 GREEN V.W.
deluxe. Like new radio white-
walls, vinyll, etc. Phone after
six  733-6805.
1954 CHEVROLET. IN RUNNING
order. Radio, new batery, good
tires.   $125.   Phone   Ed.   224-9667.
60 FURY V8 AUTO 2 DR. HT., 2
Spkr., radio. Body and engine
perfect condition $1,095. — 322-
5056.	
1957 PLYMOUTH. GOOD RUNN-
ing condition. $400 or best offer.
Phone Ken. 224-7230 between 5:30
and 6:30 p.m.	
Accessories & Repairs
22
FOR SALE: SET OF SNOW
chains for Mini Minor tires. See
Richard in  Ubyssey Office.	
Orchestras 35
WANTED: GIRL DRUMMER FOR
R&B group. Phone 733-0352
after 6 p.m.
BUSINESS  SERVICES
Typewriters   8.  Repairs
42
GOOD CLEAN TYPEWRITERS, $20
up. Also Typewriter repairs at
50 percent savings. Poison Typewriters, 2140 W. 4th. Phone RE
1-8322.
Typing
43
ENGINEERING AND FORESTRY
students. Summer Essays typed.
(Summer Essay Specifications
maintained) ARDALE GRIFFITHS LIMITED. 70th & Gran-
ville.   263-4530.	
THESIS ETC. TYPED ON ELEC-
tric typewriter at reasonable cost.
Call Lorna Hagen or Jean —681-.
6472.
EMPLOYMENT
Help  Wanted
51
WANTED 2 YOUNG MEN TO
contract load and unload kilns in
the evenings and at weekends.
261-6384. P. J. White Hardwoods,
8699  Hudson.
Instruction-Tutoring 64
TUTOR WANTED FOR CHEM.
200.   Phone   Karen   261-7119.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BIRD CALLS—the most useful book
on the campus. Student telephone
directory available latter part of
October. Limited Number. Order
now, only 75 cents from Phrateres
or publications office, Brock Hall.
PURE COCONUT OIL — UPPER
Tenth Barbers & Toiletries. 4574
W.   10th.	
SONY TC200 STEREO TAPE RE-
corder. Used 80 hrs. Complete
unit $200.  Ph.   876-2735.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
ROOMMATE WANTED: MODERN
apartment, good location. 16th and
Dunbar. Call Mike. 224-3856 after
7 p.m.	
LARGE ROOM FOR MALE STU-
dent. Laundry facilities. Phone
and bath to be shared with
another student. 2606 W. 33rd.
263-8428 after 6 p.m.	
WANTED GIRL TO SHARE BIG
view apt.  Kits.  Reas.  733-4557.
Room & Board
82
ROOM   AND   BOARD   FOR   MALE,
East Hastings, Ph. 254-5570, $90.00.
Furn. Houses & Apts.
83
SHARE APARTMENT AVAIL-
able at gate. For senior faculty
member.  Joel Brenner,  ext.  2265.
Unfurnish. Houses & Apts.    84
WANTED    GRAD    STUDENT    TO
share     apartment.     See     Ernest
Becker, rm. 100. Henning 228-3898

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