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The Ubyssey Mar 5, 1985

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Array — rory a. photo
SPRING BRINGS RELAXATION to this student, who almost forgot how nice dozing in the   sun is compared to doing a term paper.
Student job program more bad news
By PATTI FLATHER
The federal-provincial summer
job program for students and
youths announced last Thursday is
more bad news, the Canadian Federation of Students Pacific Region
chair said Monday.
"It's definitely a net cut in
funds," Terry Hunt said referring
to the program which promises between 15,000 and 17,000 summer
jobs throughout the province.
The federal government will give
B.C. $19.4 million from its $205
million Canada Summer Employment Program. The provincial contribution will be announced with
the new B.C. budget, probably this
month.
Hunt said the federal program,
which federal employment and immigration minister Flora MacDonald claims will provide 95,000 jobs,
appears to offer more money than
the $201 million Liberal program
last year. But this is not true because $30 million in federal money
will be loans, he said.
There were 180,000 returning students unemployed across Canada
last summer.
The federal loan program is a
takeoff on the B.C. and Ontario
capital venture programs, Hunt
said, adding one-third of the 650
Ontario participants went bankrupt. CFS tried to discover how
much money B.C. spent on capital
venture and how successful it was,
but with no response, he said.
Despite job funds in B.C. last
summer, 21,000 returning students
(18.9 per cent) and 6,000 students
not planning to go to school (21.4
per cent) had no jobs in the month
of July, according to Statistics Canada.
Last summer the federal government provided $15 million for summer jobs in B.C., none of it in
loans, while the province contributed S10 million, Hunt said.
Hunt said CFS could not know
how much B.C. will add but added
that looking at historical trends "I
would say it's going to be the same
or reduced." The Socreds cut summer job funding from $20 million
to $10 million
years, he said.
in the past three
Hunt said both governments
should be spending more money on
job creation, and on better jobs.
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXVII, No. 41
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, March 5,1985
228-2301
Washrooms being surveyed
Budget rumors fly
By CHARLIE FIDELMAN
Students and staff at UBC's
schools of architecture and
rehabilitation medicine are mobilizing to prepare for the rumored termination of their programs.
Teresa Shepard, rehabilitation
medicine 2, said faculty told
students of strong rumors that their
program is on a provincial hit list.
The rehab medicine students met
Monday in UBC's hospital to
organize action.
"We're extremely concerned"
said Shepard. "Fourth year
students are at this meeting even
though fourth year students are in
hospital placements all over Vancouver."
Steve Yeoman, architecture 3,
and also present at the meeting, said
the concern was originally prompted by an article in the Province two
weeks ago stating three faculties are
on a UBC hit list."
"What makes it more interesting
is that no retraction has appeared or
been made to the three schools."
These schools include architecture,
speech science and rehab medicine.
He added the lack of a rectrac-
tion could mean UBC's planning
process is a sham and a hit list does
exist.
Assistant rehabilitation medicine
professor Susan Lee said she heard
her faculty was on a termination list
from faculty director Dr. Tali Conine.
"Susan Lee came last Friday and
said the rumor is at such an extent
that we have to mobilize and start
to do something for ourselves" said
Alison Hoens, rehab medicine 3.
"The announcement came as a
shock. We try so hard to give a better community perspective of occupational   and   physical   therapy
because we see how much is needed
to bring someone back to their maximum potential" said Hoens.
UBC president George Pedersen
said at a Pedersen exchange that
rehab medicine is a low priority
with the provincial government.
"We do not know the status of our
program next year because we've
been asked to justify ourselves"
said Lee. Pedersen was not
available for comment.
Associate Rehab medicine professor Lila Quastel said the elimination of the faculty would be a sad
reflection on the education system.
"It seems unreasonable to consider
cutting a program whose students
have a zero per cent unemployment
she said,
also one of few listed by
See page 2: SMITH
rate
It
By CHRIS WONG
Campus patrol is keeping a number of washrooms under surveillance in an attempt to curb vandalism and to discourage men from
engaging in sexual acts.
"There's been a lot of vandalism
in these washrooms and we're keeping them under surveillance at various times," patrol supervisor Bob
Atley said Monday. "We're paying
close attention because there seems
to be a group on campus that wants
to cause damage."
Atley cited washrooms in the Buchanan B block, the Armouries and
the Physics and Chemistry annex as
problem areas.
The UBC RCMP detachment has
been notified on at least six occasions by campus patrol of men being caught engaging in sexual acts,
he said. Atley added that while no
charges were laid, patrol officers issued warnings.
He said it would be difficult to
completely eradicate use of washrooms for sexual activity. "There's
nothing much we can do about it,"
Atley said.
The Arts Undergraduate Society
lodged a complaint with the arts
dean and the RCMP in January
about the increased number of men
engaging in sexual acts in the Buchanan washroom next door to
their office on the first floor in B
block.
An AUS executive member who
requested anonymity said the society was concerned that the Buchanan washroom acquired a repu
tation as a meeting place for sexual
activities. He said he was also concerned about the vandalism related
to the acts.
Large holes were punctured in the
walls of the washroom's cubicles to
facilitate sexual contact, he said,
adding that physical plant recently
covered up the holes with large steel
sheets.
He said in discussing the matter
See page 7: AUS
Fee proposal proceeds
The proposal to impose an extra
$32 athletic fee on students is still
going before UBC's board of governors this Thursday despite Alma
Mater Society demands that the
motion be tabled.
Neil Risebrough, associate vice
president student services, said
Monday imposing the fee is
justified because students elsewhere
in Canada pay more.
If the motion passes UBC
students will pay $43.50 for
athletics, including the $7 passed by
referendum for men's and women's
sports, and the $4.50 intramural
fee.
The proposal comes after the
board cut the university contribution to athletics 10 per cent last
year, causing several varsity teams
to lose funding.
Risebrough claims participation
in athletics will increase from the
current 8,000 to 14,000 students if
there's more money. But this
January Risebrough said more
women would not participate in
varsity athletics if the university
See page 7: AMS
UBC tuition fees to skyrocket if kike passes
By ROBERT BEYNON
If UBC's board of governors passes all the
fees the administration has proposed UBC will
have ignored student comment and made UBC's
tuition fees the highest or second highest in
Canada.
The administration has asked the board to
pass a 10 per cent tuition hike, on average, a differential fee of 2.5 times, an athletics fee increase of $32 and a $12 fee on graduate students
to repay a controversial debt, at their meeting
this Thursday.
If UBC's board agrees to the tuition increases
UBC's professional schools will easily be the
most expensive in Canada. Medicine would cost
$2,000 a year at UBC while the national average
is $1,326 a year; UBC would be the most expensive medicine program in Canada.
A year of law would cost $ 1,550 per year while
the national average for law would be $1,031 per
vear  Onlv Nova Scotia's Dalhousie Univer'itv
would cost more.
Dentistry would cost $2,000 a year, like
medicine, although the national average for dentistry per year is $1,222. UBC would be the most
expensive program in Canada.
And if family. and nutritional sciences,
graduate studies, engineering, architecture and
agriculture tuitions are increased 10 per cent they
will also be the most expensive programs in
Canada. Commerce will be the second most expensive and science, education and arts will be
the third most expensive.
And if the board raises differential fees for international students \o 2.5 times regular tuition
UBC and its students will suffer from the increase, said a student who will make a presentation to the board Thursday.
Laurel Johnston, arts 4, said there are
political, social, economic and ethical reasons
why the board should not impose the higher differential fees  The differential is now 1 5 times
"Foreign students allow Canadian students to
learn more about other cultures and about
Canada," Johnston said, adding "UBC has the
smallest proportion of foreign students (on a
Canadian campus.)"
The Graduate Students Society president said
the proposed $12 fee on graduate students to
pay off the society's debt is totally unacceptable.
Phil Bennett said the size of the society debt has
never been agreed on.
The administration says it is $140,000 while
the GSS says it is $50,000, he said.
Bennett also said the administration was acting in bad faith in levying this fee when the two
sides are so close to an agreement.
Barbara Walden, arts 3, said the Fee Hike
Strike Committee is organizing a protest outside
the Old Administration building at 12:30 p.m.
Thursday Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 5, 1985
Harassment case raises heat
HALIFAX (CUP) — Unwanted
publicity of a sexual harassment
case has raised Dalhousie faculty's
fur against the university's newly
created sexual harassment grievance
committee.
The faculty took sudden interest
in the case, the first ever to be heard
by the committee, when a column in
the Jan. 25 Globe and Mail by June
Callwood identified the three parties involved. The complaint laid by
a Dalhousie staff member against a
faculty member in January 1984,
however, remains unresolved.
"We (the panel) tried to be so
careful to ensure confidentiality
that I typed the minutes from the
proceeding myself, rather than let
the secretary do it," said committee
chair David Lewis. "It was a great
shock to see it in the Globe and
Mail."
Dalhousie's faculty association is
seeking an injunction against the
proceedings of the sexual harassment grievance committee. President Sandy Young said the association had no choice but to try to stop
the hearings because the professor
involved did not know what charge
was being laid against him.
Lewis said the professor in question does know what charge he is
facing because the alleged incident
was described in detail in a letter
shown to him. In addition, the
report calling for the committee's
establishment defines sexual harassment as "sexually oriented remarks
or behaviour on the part of a person
who knows or ought to know that
such remarks or behaviour may
create a negative environment for
work or study".
After the threat of legal action,
the staff member withdrew her
charge of sexual harassment. While
some faculty members are beginning to question the need  for any
procedures, others say the problems
with this case may create difficulties
for other women wanting to lodge
sexual harassment complaints.
But    law    professor   Christine
Boyle, a member of the original advisory committee who is miffed by •
the controversy, said a formal com-
Smith denies list
From page 1
Statistic Canada as 'increase required' she added.
Quastel said the hit list rumor
stems from many sources. "The
organizing and mobilizing is a
preventative measure, if we're going to go down we'll go down
fighting," she said.
UBC vice president academic
Robert Smith denies a hit list exists.
He said the province has not been
influencing UBC priorities, adding
no final decisions on program cuts
have been made. He added UBC
still lacks a budget for next year.
Rehab medicine director Tali
Conine said she has not had the
privilege of hearing directly from
the university administration about
the faculty's status.
She learned B.C. premier Bill
Bennett met with Pedersen and that
certain departments are targeted.
mittee is needed and that the committee has made every effort to protect all parties involved in this case.
Boyle said due process allows
respondents a fair trial.
Special
Offer
20°/c
OOff
Any Hair Service
With Student
AMS Card
1071 Denman St.
688-7808
2178 W. Broadway
731-4138
Notice Of
Arts Undergraduate
Society Elections
Nominations for the following positions must be submitted to Buchanan A107 by 3:30 Friday, March 15,
1985: President, Vice-President, Treasurer, Social Coordinator, Academic Co-ordinator and five Alma Mater
Society Council Representatives.
Elections: Friday, March 22, 1985
Nomination forms and information available from
Buchanan A107.
WHERE    YOU    FIND    A
PERFECTLY   ACCEPTABLE
FAST-FOOD MEAL
TAKE ADVANTAGE OF THE
DAILY SPECIALS. SAVE LOTS
OF MONEY ON YOUR FOOD
BILLS
IN SUB LOWER LEVEL
Open daily 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
APPLICATIONS NOW AVAILABLE
for
ONE STUDENT-AT-LARGE
REPRESENTATIVE TO
AMS BUDGET COMMITTEE
1985-86
and
POSITION OF EDITOR OF
INSIDE U.B.C.
APPLICATIONS DKADLINK
4 p.m. WEDNESDAY
MARCH 13
EORMS AVAILABLE
SUB 238
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.£<.
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WAR. MEM. GYM
ROOM 203
OUTDOOR PROGRAM
SAILING-Saturday, March 2
Jericho Beach Sailing Center
CANOE TOUR-Saturday, March 9
Register by Wed., March 6,
3 p.m.
CYCLE TOUR-Saturday, March 16
Register by Wed., March 13,
3 p.m.
WINDSURFING-Sunday,   March
17.
Jericho Beach Sailing Center
Register by Wed., March 13,
3 p.m.
INTRAMURAL SPORTS
"PARTICIPATE AND END THE
SCHOOL YEAR WITH A BANG"
PHONE
228-6688
WOMEN'S TEAM
TOURNAMENTS
McNULTY RELAYS-March 7, 12,
14
Register by March 1
RED ROUGHENSORE RUGBY-
March 16, 17
Register by March 8
CO-REC PROGRAM
Recreational, fun and FREE!
DROP-IN BADMINTON
(Osborne Gyms A&B)
Tuesdays: 6:30-8:30 p.m.
Sundays: 6:00-8:00 p.m.
DROP-IN VOLLEYBALL
Thursdays: 7:30-9:30 p.m.
(WMG)
Sundays: 8:00-10:00 p.m.
(Osborne)
RACQUET SPORTS
BUCHANAN BADMINTON
GRAND PRIX
Invitational Tournament of
Champions
March 16-17
AUSTRALIAN    TENNIS   GRAND
PRIX
March 8-10
Register by March 6 — 3 p.m.
ALPINE SQUASH GRAND PRIX
Invitational Tournament of
Champions
Mach 2-3
MARCH
SUN
MON
TUE
WED
6
Reg'n ends
Australian
Grand Prix
Reg'n ends
Canoe Tour
THU
FRI
SAT
1
Reg'n ends
McNulty Team
Relays
2
Alpine Squash
Invitational
Tourney
Sailing
Jericho Beach
Alpine
^ Squash
O Invitational
Tourney
Drop-in
Volleyball
Drop-tri
Badminton
4
5
Dfop-in
Badminton
7
McNulty Team
Relays
Triathlon
Drop-in
Volleyball
Q Australian
^y Tennis
Grand Prix
Reg'n ends
Red
Roughensore
Rugby
9
Australian
Tennis
Grand Prix
Canoe Tour
4  M\  Australian
i ^J  Tennts
Grand Prix
Drop-in
Volleyball
Drop-in
Badminton
-   Drop-in
1   "Tf Badminton
A  /  Windsurfing
- Buchanan
Badminton
Invitational
11
Reg'n beqins
Storm the Wall
18
Storm ihe Wall
12
McNulty Team
Relays
Drop-in
Badminton
19
McNulty Team
Relays
13
Reg'n ends
Cycle Tour
Reg'n ends
Windsurfing
20
Storm the Wall
14
McNulty Team
Relays
Drop-in
Volleyball
21
Storm the Wall
15
Reg'n ends
Storm the Wall
22
Awards Night
Buchanan
1 mZ Badminton
•L ^jy Invitational
Tourney
Red
Roughensore
Rugby Tourney
Cycle Tour
23
Roughensore
Rugby
Drop in
Badminton
Volleyball
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SPECIAL EVENTS
TRIATHLON III
JRSDAY, MARCH 7 - 10:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.
1 mile swim, 20 mile cycle, 6 mile run
STORM THE WALL
MARCH 18-21. REGISTER MARCH 11-15
FRIDAY
AWARDS PRESENTATION '85
, MARCH 22 4:30-7:30 p.m. CECIL GREEN PARK
Awards for
ed.Regist
top teams, at
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iletes, units, administrator and referees. Cocktails and s
9-- 3 p.m. War Memorial Gym, Rm 203. EVERYONE W
lacks serv-
ELCOME!
SKI VACATIONS
WHISTLER MOUNTAIN
Any day —$29 per person
includes: lift & transportation
BLACKCOMBE MOUNTAIN
Any day—$28 per person
includes: lift & transportation
Contact    MARCIA    DOBBIN    at
228-6688 for further information.
WOMEN'S TEAM TOURNAMENTS
McNULTY RELAYS-
March 7, 12, 14
Register by March 1
RED ROUGHENSORE RUGBY-
March 16, 17
Register by March 8
JOB HIRING
Many positions available in Intramurals administration for the
1985-86 school year.
— marketing Et market research
— sports administration
—journalism
— graphics & photography
—finance
— much, much more
Honorarium available for most positions.   Go  to WMG  Room 203 for
more information. Interviews are being held in March.
Intramural
Sports        / Tuesday, March 5, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Applications at record levels
TORONTO (CUP) — A record
number of students applying for admission to Ontario universities this
fall will soon find out if the provincial government has its money
where its mouth is.
As of mid-February, 44,900
grade 13 students applied for admission to university for the
1985-86 academic year, an increase
of 1.3 per cent over last year.
Statistics compiled by the Council of Ontario Universities show
1,100 applicants were turned away
from Ontario universities in the fall
of 1983.
"Two years ago, the commitment
of the provincial government didn't
exist, so one would expect that,
with the further increases in enrolment, this commitment will be even
further eroded," says Richard
Bainis, a researcher for the Ontario
Federation of Students.
According to the Ontario government's existing policy on accessibility, every qualified student with a
grade 13 average of at least 60 per
cent is guaranteed a place in the
university system.
"It's the myth of accessibility,"
said Bainis. "It's starting to show
the holes in their promise of accessibility for a student somewhere
in the system."
The Bovey commission report on
the future of Ontario universities
suggests the government modify its
accessibility policy to ensure every
"qualified" student "a place in
some program of study in some
university   in   Ontario,   but   not
necessarily in the program or
university of first choice," and that
universities decrease overall enrolment by six per cent.
The commission also recommends that universities set their
own enrolment levels without loss
of provincial funding.
OFS predicts 6,400 students will
enter university if the recommendations are implemented.
Last year in B.C. the number of
students who entered first year
university dropped from the
previous year. The end of the B.C.
grant program is largely blamed.
Single mothers get funding
MONTREAL (CUP) — The
Quebec government will spend $5
million this year to pay tuition fees
and  expenses   for  single  mothers
who want to attend CEGEP or
university, but some say the admission criteria are too strict.
Marie-Jeanne Robin, the press
attache for Quebec's minister of
social affairs, said the program was
designed to "give a hand to women
who can't (go back to school) on
their own."
Robin said the ministry's
statistics show that after two years
on welfare, women have an 85 per
cent chance of staying there. The
program is aimed at these people,
she said.
There are 80,000 single parents
on welfare in Quebec, Robin said,
and there cannot be programs for
all of them. "It's a start," she said.
Eighty per cent of single parents are
women.
The government hopes to sponsor 5,000 women who want to
return to school over two years. The
program will pay their tuition,
books, daycare and moving costs if
the women want to study in another
Quebec city.
In the past, Quebec's loans and
bursaries policy discriminated
against single parents because they
would lose their welfare payments if
they applied  for  loans and bur-
Pender natives
angry after dig
saries. Welfare for single mothers is
now $600 a month with one child,
$634 with two.
But the program is open to only
to women who have been on
welfare for more than two years
and want to go to school full-time.
The government support lasts for
three semesters.
"For many of us, this program is
a first victory for freedom of action
for our future and that of our
parents," Marie-Therese Sevigny, a
part-time Universite de Quebec a
Montreal student and single parent,
wrote in La Presse. "But the admission criteria contain serious gaps."
"One must be on welfare for 24
consecutive months to be ad-
missable," Sevigny wrote. "This is
a useless waste of time and an exaggerated delay."
Sevigny also thinks the program
should cover the full term of study,
two-three years in CEGEP and
three-four years in university, instead of just three semesters. "How
can the benificiary of the program
continue her studies, after having
taken the taste?" Sevigny asked.
"We hope that after (three
semesters) the women will have acquired independence," Robin said.
— kevin hall photo
ON CLEAR SPRING days when the earth is in full greenery and new warmth inflames the blood, what else can a
young man do but dance, dance, dance?
BURNABY, B.C. (CUP) — B.C.
natives are angry at a group of
Simon Fraser University archeology
students who dug up and removed
40 sekeltons of native Indians which
were buried on an island off the
west coast more than 2,000 years
ago.
A member of the native group
from that region says the SFU class
did not notify the band a year in advance of the dig last summer, as is
customary. The class did not even
ask the natives if they could remove
their ancestors' remains and
associated grave goods from Pender
Island, B.C.
Gus Underwood, a councillor of
a Saanich Band member of the First
Nation   of   South   Island   Tribal
International Women's Day is
this Friday and the theme is women
"taking back the future".
The Vancouver organizing committee has planned several events
this week culminating in a march
and rally Saturday and an information day March 10. Thursday
at 8 p.m. a collection of films produced by women entitled Through
the Keyhole: 1985 are showing at
465 W. Broadway.
The committee is hosting a
women's dance Friday night at the
Italian Cultural centre, and tickets
are' available at the UBC women
students office.
The Saturday march begins at 11
a.m. at Victory Square and ends up
at the Vancouver Art Gallery. Vancouver school board chair Pauline
Weinstein will speak on women taking back the future, while representatives of Budget University and the
Peace Education Program will
discuss organizing a better education system, said committee
member Pat Davitt Monday.
Women's Day events planned
Faith Jones, a committee
member and Simon Fraser University student, said education is an.
important way for women to gain
more power.
"Provincial cutbacks hurt
women more than anyone else,"
she   said,   adding   accessibility   to
education is being reduced. She said
accessibility is very important for
women.
The Information Day will be held
from 10:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Vancouver Technical School and will
include workshops on abortion,
alcoholism,    pornography   and
militarism, rape relief, lesbianism
and prostitution, said Pat Davitt.
The Alma Mater Society
women's centre will have a
booktable next week in SUB and
has pooled funds to bring U.S.
feminist Andrea Dworkin to UBC
March 15, said club members.
I^VUfeflyttjAtfitfMMk ^MmmmWAMA-Mm ;tftfMWV4UPUMM4!4fc
UBCs Committee of Concerned Academics, is sponsoring a conference on *fffcC0ritkal Function. (*f the
University'* this weekend, while the university community waits anxiously for the next provincial budget.
The purpose of the conference, to be held Friday
night and Saturday in Woodward IRC, is "to discuss
what the underlying philosophy of the university in
Canada and in the western world has' been and ought
to be," said political science professor Philip Resnick.
B.C. universities face a critical juncture, said
Resnick, as post secondary education funding is being
cut, accessibility reduced, and university autonomy
challenged by the provincial government.
The conference "wishes to focus attention on the
larger social role which universities have to play in
society, a role which should not be conditioned by
; economic conditions o* short term utilitarian
concerns," he said. UBC president George Pedersen
wttt open the program Friday at 8 p.m., where the
Canadian Association of University Teachers president and a McGill University political philosopher will
speak in IRC 2.
Saturday morning there will be a panel discussion on
the university in the modern world. Afternoon
workshops wUl be on university financing, autonomy
and governance, community groups and the university, and corporate sponsorship.
The conference is free for students and unemployed,
and $10 for others. The Friday evening session is $5.
Council, said "I have not seen any
correspondence from SFU or the
province, and we are the ones who
have jurisdiction.
"All we knew was that the people
doing the dig were from SFU,"
Underwood said. "We were informed after the act."
Roy Carlson, head of SFU's archeology department, denied the
accusation. He said he wrote to
Dennis Alphonse, chief of the
Cowichan Band of the same Tribal
Council, at the close of the season
and told him the bones from the site
"were being housed at SFU, studied
and treated with respect."
According to one report, the
students also did not dig up the
graves in a very respectful manner.
"The project passed itself off as a
field school, but it provided very little instruction. I wondered whether
there was a lack of respect for the
material that we were digging and
that we weren't simply treasure-
hunting," said Ben Wilmoth, one
of the students on the dig.
Art Charlton, who works for the
B.C. government's heritage conservation branch, investigated the dig
and found no "gross negligence".
But he said the SFU archeologists
did not follow normal procedure of
attempting to contact the descendant band of the burial through the
B.C. Provincial Museum.
Normally, Charlton said, the
descendants decide whether to cove
and not excavate a discovered
burial, or excavate it and lend it to
the unversity for study.
David Johnstone, another student on last year's dig, said "the
site was selected for excavation
because of its imminent loss to
water erosion." Johnstone admitted that, "Some valid points have
been raised concerning the treatment and disposal of recovered
human remains. It continues to be a
touchy issue in archeology." Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 5, 1985
Real work
Youth, B.C.'s number one resource. Let's take them seriously this summer. Let's give them a realistic employment program.
Last Thursday the B.C. labor minister and the federal employment and
immigration minister announced a joint summer jobs program. The Tories
are giving B.C. $19.4 million, or nine per cent, of their summer youth employment program funds.
The Tories appear to be giving more money than the Liberals gave last
year, but don't be fooled. Thirty per cent of the funds are loans for risky
venture capital projects. The feds are giving less real funding this year.
The Socreds will announce the provincial contribution to the program in
their 1985-86 budget soon, and they will probably follow the Tory lead by
reducing employment funding in real terms. Either by reducing money
available to businesses and universities for hiring students or by increasing
the venture capital programs budget, while simultaneously reducing other
funds.
In the last three years the Socreds have reduced their summer employment budget by half, from $20 million to $10 million.
And although highly acclaimed by the Socreds, venture capital programs are not an answer to youth unemployment. One-third of Ontario's
participants went bankrupt. The fact the B.C. ministries of labor and industry and small business development will not release figures on last
year's venture capital program implies a similar or worse situation occurred
here.
The program really cannot succeed. Students are given a maximum loan
of $2,000 to create a viable business in four months and the loan must be
repaid by October. The fledgling business, unless it is merely lawn cutting,
is underfunded and short of time from its beginning.
And the program is totally useless in many Interior or Vancouver Island
areas where unemployment is highest. Are you going to start a grass cutting business in Slocan where real unemployment is 50 per cent? No, if the
Socreds are serious about youth in this province they will have to give
them more than venture capital grants and a decrease in other programs.
The unemployment problem is serious. Last summer 19 per cent of
students did not get even a part-time summer job. A problem of this enormity takes a real commitment, a monetary commitment.
The B.C. government should increase its commitment to summer employment this year. Present funding should be increased at least 200 per
cent to $30 million dollars. This additional funding should be used to increase the number of jobs and to increase the pay youths in programs receive. The present youth employment program pays the average students
$5 an hour. The average student from the Interior requires $10 an hour for
four months of steady work to pay tuition and living costs. The pay should
increase. The labor ministry should also give more publicity to existing programs so youth know about them and utilize budgeted funds. The Youth
Employment Program should be pushed especially in areas with high
unemployment.
The labor ministry should also encourage businesses to hire students
studying in fields related to them and the ministry should advertise its programs to businesses.
The provincial government should also channel extra funds into the forestry ministry which can then hire more youths to tree plant. This would
aid both our sad reforestation program and students. Funds should also be
channelled into the lands, parks and housing ministry. These funds could
be used to hire youths to upgrade provincial parks.
Youth unemployment is a big problem. It takes a big commitment. Let's
not offer our youths a risky loan this summer, let's offer them a job.
Letters
>>
"Fee hike unfair
grads bear burden
Most students are probably aware by now of the 10 per cent increase in
tuition fees that has been proposed for next year by the UBC administration.
What is not so well known is that many graduate students will carry a
disproportionate burden of this increase.
The administration has already expressed concern that dropping
enrolments will lessen the revenue generated by any such increases in tuition fees.
Apparently worried about this effect at the graduate entrance level, the
administration has proposed a 1985/86 tuition fee structure that leaves first
year graduate fees unchanged while very substantially increasing these fees
for students already enrolled in a masters or doctoral program.
If tuition fees must increase at all, then surely it is only fair that all
students bear this burden equally. Such fee increases should be implemented as a straight across the board percentage increase.
This proposed 1985/86 tuition fee schedule will be presented to the board
of governors for approval at their Mar. 7 meeting (2:00 p.m. in the Old Administration building).
The details are tabulated below. If you find these figures disturbing then
express your concerns to the administration through Neil Risebrough,
associate vice president for student services (local 5454) as soon as possible.
It is not yet too late to have this inequitable proposal modified.
Proposed 1985/86 tuition fee schedule (graduate students).
PhD program:
1st year
2nd year
3rd year
subsequent years
Masters program:
1st year
2nd year
subsequent years
Present
(84/85)
Proposed
(84/85)
Increase
(%)
$1750
1307
876
250
$1800
1300
1300
500
2.86
-0.54
48
100
$1750
876
250
$1800
1300
500
2.86
48
100
Phil Bennett
president-elect
Graduate Student Society
pipeline £,*£
Our economic
■pnsrffct TX bourunrf
*nsh'ar\ market?
News items:  Bill Bennett is planning
a natural gas pipeline to Vancouver
Island  although no obvious market exists.
^©
ANYBODY. UlTM DEtERHIMAHoK/
AWO  HARD  WORK. CRN) GO TO LNfVERSlTY
REGARJDLE5& OF TlXTtOKJ IWCREASE5
THt &«L*T   rtlOOLi ClA&s HYTH
THE UBYSSEY
March 5. 1986
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Fridays throughout the academic year by
the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are
those of the staff and are not necessarily those of the university administration or the
AMS. Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is SUB
241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2306. Advertising 228-3977/3978.
The plane cracked the gentle plane of the darkening horizon. Patti Flather eagerly awaited the arrival of the long tost trio: Emilie Douglas, Bruce Cookson, and,
of course, Robert Beynon. Rory Atlen took pictures of Chris Wong and Charlie Fidelman. Monte Stewart, as is hts tendency, wrote a sports column while loung-.
ing on the terminal furniture. Steve Janusz bought a chocolate bar and listened to his demo tape. "We're at the airport!" shouted Hui Lee ecstatically. "Hui is just
plain lost when he's out of water," observed Kevin Hall while trying to determine when the plane would land. Tuesday, March 5, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Sharp shade of White
By ELIZABETH DONOVAN
Reprinted from the
Dalhousie Gazette
Canadian University Press
Nancy White, Canadian songwriter and singer, is a
woman living on the fringe. Singing and writing about
Central America, feminist and environmental issues,
she is considered too political by conservative audiences
and yet too establishment by many in the progressive
community.
Sitting in a Halifax cafe in
January, White is relaxing after, a
morning of autographing albums at
Halifax's progressive bookstore
Red Herring. She's also recovering
from a speaking engagement at the
Nova Scotia Barristers society.
"All those three piece suits and
Tories," she wails, conceding later
that "it wasn't too bad."
White says she doesn't align
herself with one particular
ideology. Her decision not to write
mainstream material is a personal
one.
"I'm not set anywhere on the
political spectrum. I just think the
left has the best music and the nicest
people, except of course for
Stalin."
She admits working outside the
commercial music industry means
went to university, the Arts building
and student union building were not
built yet."
After performing in several
Dalhousie musicals and a short stint
in Montreal, she returned to Nova
Scotia and worked for the Dartmouth Free Press as a reporter. In
1970 White moved to Toronto,
singing in coffee houses and acting
in a series of comic revues.
White started writing topical
songs for Sunday Morning in 1976.
After two and a half years she took
a three year break because the constant pressure left her "burnt out".
White continued producing songs
and she returned to Sunday Morning in 1983. She appears on the
CBC radio show every two weeks.
White says she disagrees with
those people who think "she lives in
White ... all around bitch of the North and
voice of Liberal guilt.
less exposure and fewer contracts.
The majority of her bookings are
doing numerous benefits and
rallies.
"My profile is much higher in
Whitehorse and Ramea, Newfoundland than in Toronto."
White started her own record
company called Mouton records,
because of the difficulties she experienced getting recording contracts.
Canadian content is a strong element in many of her songs. She is
intrigued as to why Canadians do
not like themselves or anything
Canadian. She has a theory and she
likes to test it out when she gets a
chance.
"Because Canadians lack a national identity they can just pick
one since there are so many different cultures in Canada. In fact, I
went through a phase where I
wanted to be a French Canadian,
and later I went to Central
America, I took Spanish courses
and wanted to become a Central
American."
A native of Prince Edward Island
and graduate of Dalhousie University, White says she still regards the
Maritimes as her home although she
now lives in Toronto. She speaks
fondly of Halifax and of Dalhousie,
reminiscing about life in the
women's residence, Shirreff Hall.
"I did my time in Shirreff Hall —
three.years. I really liked it though,
because there was more freedom,
no cooking and cleaning. When I
the basement of the CBC." She is a
prolific writer producing several
albums and other commissioned
works. Her latest releases, What
Should I Wear To The Revolution?,
Sunday Morning Taped, and Nancy
White — Unexpected have proved
she is more versatile than her critics
give her credit for.
Many of White's lyrics and
melodies are influenced by South
Central American politics and
music.
While many artists were just
discovering Central America in the
early '80s, she had been doing
benefits for and actively promoting
the cause of the victims from those
countries since the early '70s.
She represented Canada at the
Festival of Popular song in
Managua, Nicaragua and visited
Guatamalan refugee camps in Mexico on behalf of Oxfam in February
1983.
She writes her lyrics using
newspapers as her source for
material. White claims she is no
great "political visionary" and is
surprised when people consider her
so.
"I just got a call from the
sociology department at York
University. They want me to speak
to their students about how I write
my songs. They think I have some
great vision. Sociology of Music
they want to call it. But for $500 I'll
cook something up."
White says her producer just calls
her and asks if she feels like doing a
song that week.
"My producer and I are politically on the same wavelength, so we
knock our heads together and come
up with a song."
She typically down-plays her
political ironies. Finding contradictions is a daily fascination.
"There is this shopping place
called Honest Ed's. It is the refinement of capitalism. I saw some really nice blue towels there they were
made in Marin, Cuba. Wow! I
thought what a blend of the right,
middle and left.
No one seems to escape White's
satirical musical commentary. Old
Liberals, new Tories, Princess Anne
and the Pope have been treated to
her biting sarcasm.
In her song about Trudeau's decision to resign as prime minister,
called the "Maybe, Maybe Not
Waltz", White portrays the country
as a spurned lover and Trudeau as a
heartbreaker.
White is often able to laugh at
herself as well as the political
caricatures she creates in her songs.
She refers to herself as "all around
bitch of the North" and "voice of
liberal guilt."
White reveals some of her own
insecurities in a song she wrote called "When the Wino Comes My
Way". The song deals with the contradictions in White's own personal
politics.
I'm a knee jerk liberal
I vote for the NDP
And I love to stand and picket in
front of the U.S. embassy:
And I get called progressive?
But that's not what they would
say
If they could read my mind
When the wino come my way.
THE DINER
Serving   UBC    and   West   Point   Grey
for the last 25 years.
We put our Sole in your
fish & CHIPS
English Style Home Cooked Meals
at Reasonable Prices        including
Roast Beef and Yorkshire Pudding
Open Monday to Saturday
8:00 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.
Closed Sundays h Public Holidays
For the early ones,  we start serving
breakfast from 8:00 a m
4556 W   10th Ave   - 2241912
We accept Chargex
r
CENTRE
• FREE BINDING
• FREE STAPLING
• FREE COLLATING
Eleven coin-operated
copiers still only
5«
a copy
Student Union
Building
228-4288
ATTENTION
ARTISTS
AMS ART GALLERY is now accepting applications for the 1985/86 showing year.
Applications are available in SUB Room 238
and must be submitted to the Art Gallery
J    Committee by March 30, 1985. 8
I
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Student UnionBuilding _ Granville Island
1516 Duranleau St . Van   BC  V6H 3S4
UBC   Vancouver. B C   V6T 1W5     Call toll-free
604-224-2344
1-800-972-4004
604-687-6033
THE CRITICAL FUNCTION
OF THE UNIVERSITY
A Conference Focused on the Critical Issues
Facing the University Community
Friday, March 8, 8:00-10:00 p.m. IRC 2, UBC
Saturday, March 9.10:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. IRC 1, UBC
Speakers include:
SARAH SHORTEN, President, CAUT
CHARLES TAYLOR, Political
Philosopher, McGill
Registration Fee:
$10 for the entire conference
$5 for the Friday evening session
Free For Students
Sponsored by: Committee of Concerned Academics, UBC
Rent A Mountain
Bike This Weekend
or a tent, sleeping bag, stove,  kayak, gaiter,  pannier,
roofrack,    rainsuit,    hiking    boot,    sleeping    pad,
backpack . . .
Miyata   Mountain   Bikes  in  three
sizes     for     $10.00/day     or
$19.00/weekend plus great prices       .Jsig^
on   lots  of  other  great  outdoor
stuff.
The rental shop is located in the cage
in Osborne Gym Unit 2 out near the
skating rink. It's open 1-5 p.m. Fridays.
Drop by and pick up a price list or rent
something for the weekend.
Phone 228-4244
^
lL
MARCH PERM DEAL
IK.00
5
VALUE
Bring in this coupon for $5.00 off your next
perm or bodywave. Reg. $34.95 (women)
$29.95 (men).
3621 W. 4th Ave. 733-3831 Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 5, 1985
W4&ti
TODAY
UBC ENTREPRENEURS CLUB
Video: "Starting a Business," non-members 50
cents, 12:25 p.m., Angus 226.
UBC SCIENCE FICTION SOCIETY
General elections,   nominations open  till  12:00
p.m.,   voting   12:30-3:30  p.m.,   SUB  228,  and
member's copies of Horizons can still be picked
up, SUB 228.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Practice,  all welcome,  equipment  provided,   7
p.m., Aquatic centre.
JEWISH MESSIANIC BIBLE STUDY
Discussion: Purim — story and traditions, noon,
Buch D 202.
PRE MEDICAL SOCIETY
Lecture on forensic psychiatry with Dr. Marcus,
noon, Woodward 1.
PSYCHOLOGY STUOENTS ASSOCIATION
Ticket sales for March 9 dance, noon, Kenny
2007.
UBC LAW STUDENTS
LEGAL ADVICE PROGRAM
Legal  advice   clinic,   no   appointment   needed,
noon, SUB 119.
CHINESE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Practice for variety show. 5-1 I p.m., Asian centre auditorium
INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Paul Marantz speaks on "Four More Days? The
Soviet Union after Chernenko." noon.   Buch B
221.
AMS ART GALLERY
Art education — drawing, all week,  10 am   - 4
p.m., AMS Art gallery in SUB
OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS
Recovery   program   for   compulsive   overeaters,
newcomers welcome,  noon,  Lutheran Campus
conference room.
UBC JUDO
Come learn judo, 7:30 p.m., Osborne gym.
INTERNATIONAL SOCIALISTS    UBC
Booktable, 12:00 p.m., SUB concourse.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration at noon in SUB 216 E, and 3:30-5
jazz class moved to SUB 207/209.
HISTORY STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Film night with fullsize screen:  "Gandhi," and
Fritz   Lehmann  will  lead  discussion  after,  7:30
p m., Asian centre auditorium,
WEDNESDAY
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Time    out,    newcomers    welcome,     phone
228-4638, 4:30 p.m., Gallery lounge.
VOLUNTEER CONNECTIONS
Information booth, noon, SUB concourse
UBC SPORTSCAR CLUB
Nomination meeting, 7 p.m , SU8 215
Attention all Ubyssey staffers!!
The screening for collective co-editor candidates begin at 12:30 Wednesday in SUB 241K. Staff should
show up early, at 12:00, to prepare
questions for the candidates. Please
attend the screenings so you'll
know something about who you
vote for, or against.
We'll have an important staff
meeting after the screening, at
about 1:30.
Voting takes place Wednesday,
Thursday and Friday. Dave Stod-
dart is the returning officer. Anyone
who made three or more contributions to the paper this year can
vote.
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
General meeting, noon, Kenny 2007
AMS SPEAKERS
Mike  Boon  speaks on  how to influence your
politican, noon, SUB 212,
FIRST YEAR STUDENTS COMMITTEE
Meeting, noon, SUB 212 A.
INTEGRITY IN ACTION CLUB
Bill Porter speaks on "How to enjoy your life in
spite of it all," noon, Buch B 317.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration  at  noon,  SUB 216 E,  and 5-6:30
class moved to partyroom.
VANCOUVER ADVENTURE AND
TRAVEL CLUB    UBC
Slide  presentation  on  hostelling  at  home  and
abroad,   by   Canadian   Hostelling   Association,
noon, SUB 205.
THURSDAY
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Executive     nominations    and    speeches,
newcomers welcome, noon, SUB 215.
MAKE TRACKS
TO KINK0S.
Class Readers at
low costs
to students.
5706 University Blvd.
Vancouver, B.C.
V6T1K6
(604) 222-1688
I ——— clip & Save
TUDIO
CREATIVE WRITING DEPARTMENT
Annual production of plays begins today, noon
-8 p.m., Hut M24 at West Mall and University
Blvd
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
General meeting, nominations for elections close
today, get form from current executive, noon,
SUB 125.
CUSO UBC
Education: Colonialism, 7:30 p m.. International
House upper lounge.
CHINA CONNECTIONS
Seminar on travel and study in China, registration and info at Institute of Asian Research, 7
p.m., Chinese Cultural centre, 50 East Pender,
UBC ENTREPRENEURS CLUB
General meeting, 12:20 p.m., Angus 226.
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Ticket sales for March 9 dance at grad centre,
noon, Kenny 2007.
UBC JUDO
Come play judo, 7:30 p.m., Osborne gym.
University of British Columbia
FREDERIC
WOOD . . . presents . . .
THEATRE
HAPPY END
A Musical
by Kurt Weill & Bertolt Brecht
Directed by Arne Zaslove
MARCH 8-16
(Previews — March 6 & 7)
Curtain: 8:00 p.m.
Student Tickets — $6.00
Previews/2 for the price of 1 Regular Admission
BOX OFFICE -  FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE - ROOM
Support Your Campus Theatre
207
EUROPE
We Specialize In It
—We find you the BEST AIRFARES
—Detailed BUS—TRAIN—BOAT information
—Conventions, car rental
— Large selection of cruises, scenic and culture tours
— Itinerary planning, small & large groups
—FREE TRAVEL—brochures on most European countries
*with 2 tranatlantic return flights of 1 flight & 1 tour
CALL TODAY
277-1972
EURO WORLD TRAVEL
(A Division of Westcoast Totem Tours)
GOT A PROBLEM?
NEED TO TALK?
SPEAKEASY
UBC's First
Peer Counselling Centre
Mon.-Fri.: 9:30 a.m.-9:30 p.m.
DROP IN: SUB CONCOURSE
(no appointment necessary)
or phone 228-3700, 228-3777
dft
Free Graduation Photo Session
TUDIO i
o
■5'
qp
to
0)
<
CD
This is your invitation to have a guest sitting and see a complete
selection of colour previews without cost or obligation. This offer
is valid to all 1985 UBC graduating students Phone now for an appointment, 736-7281 or 731-1412.
2111 West 16th Ave., Van., B.C.
Offer good until May 30th
cfo
UBC WINDSURFING CLUB
Lessons offered and wetsuits available, noon,
SUB 208.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration at noon, SUB 216 E, executive
meeting at 12:40 p.m., 6:30 S p.m. class moved
to ballroom, noon - 2 p.m class moved to partyroom.
UBC ANARCHIST CLUB, SOCIALIST
EDUCATION SOCIETY, LATIN AMERICA
SUPPORT COMMITTEE
Film and speakers: 'Chile - The Most Painful
Hour," Chileans talk about life after Allende,
noon, Buch A 100.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
Prime time, noon, 8rock 302.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND
MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Film: Dr. Strangelove, noon, SUB auditorium.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Conversation meeting, 1:30, international
House
FRIDAY
CREATIVE WRITING DEPARTMENT
Sideshow '85 continues, The ninth annual production of original student plays, 2:30 - 8 p.m.,
Hut M 24 at West Mall and University Blvd.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND
MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Video' "Nuclear Winter," noon, SUB 205.
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Ticket sales for March 9 dance at grad centre,
noon, Kenny 2007.
COMMITTEE OF CONCERNED ACADEMICS
Conference on "Tne Critical Function of the
University," begins today, students and
unemployed free, $5 for tonight or $10 tor both
days, 8 p.m., Woodward IRC 2.
-THE CLASSIFIEDS^
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional'
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.50 additional lines. .70c. Additional days, $4.00 and .65c.
'    i   ••''■!':! ./(/:.   ire 'uiv.tttl ■■'! ./.7i .1'" i     Dr.ni: "<■   s   7(7 30,1 rr     the
</,n  he/,".' /,./,'.•■ -   :'   >
PublicationsRoom 2b i.  SUB.  UBC.   Van. B.C.   V6T 2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $10.00   Call 228-3977.
5 - COMING EVENTS
UBC LAW REVUE '85
presents
THE ROCKY HORROR
LAW SCHOOL SHOW
March 11, 12, 13
SUB Ballroom
7:30 p.m. Tix: $3.50
11
FOR SALE - Private
'73 CHEV. NOVA, 4 dr custom, 350. light
br., p.s., p.b., engine overhaul & 4 new
ultra all-season tires. Clean, ex. cond
88,800 mi. $2500. 228-8317.
25 - INSTRUCTION
LSAT, GMAT, MCAT preparation Call
National Testing 738-4618. Please leave
message on tape if manager is counselling.
LET US PREPARE YOU FOR THE
OCTOBER 5, 1985 LSAT
on September 13, 14, 15/1985.
For information call free
LSAT/GMAT Preparation Courses,
112 800-3873742.
30 - JOBS
HELP WANTED!!
Distributors for local publication.
Highest commissions paid. 324-5936.
35
Lost
GREY CAMERA BAG with camera at
Univ. Village bus stop east, Thurs., Feb. 28
at approx. 3:30 p.m. If found please call
Susan at 224 9846 or drop it off at SUB Rm
220
40 — Messages
FIND A TUTOR
BE A TUTOR
Register at
SPEAKEASY
Mon.-Fri.
9:30 a.m.-9:30 p.m.
SUB Concourse
(Phone 228-3777)
WANT    TO    HAVE    FUN?    Be    a    vol
unteer interviewer at Volunteer Connections during 1985-86. Call 228-3811 or drop
by Rm. 200 Brock Hall.
TNT  will   turn   any  Wednesday   into  a   hot
event.
SPROUT
70 - SERVICES
YOUR DEADLINE approaches but draft
No. 47 is still not quite right? Don't despair!
Experienced editor will polish term papers,
theses, etc. Other services also available.
Contact Footnotes Information & Research
Services, 430-5751.
JOB INTERVIEWS
In today's fiercely competitive job market
there is one tragic and inescapable fact:
The Interview is all that matters. If you
win the interview, you win the job. "How
To Successfully Win Job Interviews" is
available at the Bookstore or write: Fleetwood Press, 246B - 8155 Park Road,
Richmond, B.C. V6Y 3C9 for free details.
80 - TUTORING
NEED TO IMPROVE YOUR English or review High School Math? Exper. tutor has
daytime openings. Shandon Montague,
733-3135.
ESSAY WRITING & RESEARCH counselling. Boost your efficiency. 224-1342.
85 - TYPING
DOTS WORD PROCESSING offers reason
able rates for students for term papers
essays & masters. 273-6008 eves.
UNIVERSITY TYPING Word processing
Papers, theses, resumes, letters. P-U & del
9 a.m.-11 p.m   7 days wk. 251-2064.
WORD PROCESSING (MICOM). Student
rates $14 hr. Equation typing avail. Fast
professional service. Jeeva, 876-5333.
WORDPOWER - Editing & word processing professionals. Thesis, term paper,
resume & form letter specialists. Student
rates. 3737 W   10th (at Alma). 222-2661.
WORD    PROCESSING    SPECIALIST.    U
write,   we  type,   theses,   resumes,   letters,
essays. Days, evgs/wkends. 736-1208.
EXPERT TYPING. Essays, term papers,
factums, letters, mscpts., resumes, theses.
IBM Selec. II. Reas. rates. Rose 731-9857.
YOUR WORDS professionally typed - to
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MINIMUM NOTICE: Essays & resumes
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WORD WEAVERS - Word processing,
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TYPING: Professional presentations for
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WORD PROCESSING SERVICES. Spell
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PROFESSIONAL TYPING. Math, sciences,
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TYPING: Fast accurate student rates —
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228-7301 Tuesday, March 5, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
AUS, Will opposed cameras
From page 1
with the RCMP, the possibility of
setting up surveillance cameras in
the washroom came up.
He said the AUS and arts dean
Robert Will were against installing
cameras because of the potential
damage that could be inflicted
against those involved. "1 don't
want to see anybody's career end,"
he said.
Last January, 32 men were charged with gross indecency after a
week-long police video-camera sur-
Oooops
In an article in the Feb. 8, 1985
issue of The Ubyssey (Carpenters
picketing at Acadia), some comments were erroneously attributed
to Wes Clark, UBC's assistant director personnel services. Clark was
not interviewed for the story but
was in fact (lucky Clark) outside of
the country the week of the article.
The Ubyssey apologizes profusely
— we realize it's bad enough to
have one's name in this rag when
one actually did say something profound.
The reporter responsible, preferring death by firing squad, has been
sent to B.C.'s attorney general via
special delivery.
veillance of a men's washroom in a
St. Catharines, Ont. shopping mall.
One of the men whose name was
published in two local papers committed suicide by burning himself to
death.
Constable Wayne Hanniman of
the UBC RCMP detachment, acknowledged that use of video cameras was "mentioned," but said the
RCMP never installed them and is
not considering using them in the
near future.
Hanniman said he discussed the
matter with senior Richmond
Crown counsel Cal Deedman, but
refused to comment on the nature
of their discussions.
When asked if an investigation is
taking place at UBC, Deedman
said, "I've got no comment at this
time."
Mykle Thompson, the Gays and
Lesbians Club of UBC social coordinator, said he supports any
moves on the part of campus security to put an end to sexual activity in
the washrooms.
"Something should be done to
stop it — all that should be taking
place behind closed doors," he
said.
Administration vice president finance Bruce Gellatly said he requested physical plant repair the
cubicles in Buchanan. Gellatly said
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GRADUA TE STUDENT SOCIETY
ANNUAL GENERAL
MEETING
Friday, 15 March 1985—4:30 p.m.
Graduate Student Centre Ballroom
AGENDA
• receiving the financial statements and the report of Council for 1984.
• receiving the auditor's report
• appointment of the auditor for 1985.
• a special resolution to amend the Bylaws of the Society to allow the admission of student in a predominantly post-baccalaureate program not in
the Faculty of Graduate Studies (e.g. Law, Medicine, Architecture, fifth-
year Education, etc.) as full members of the Society.
The amendments read as follows:
Amend
Bylaw 2.1(a), "All student for the being registered . . ."
to read as "All students currently registered ..."
Insert as Bylaw 2.1(b),
"All students currently registered in a predominantly post-baccalaureate program, as approved by a resolution of. Council, that have indicated by referendum an intent to become members of the Society."
Amend Bylaw 5.3(a), "Each department participating in the Faculty of
Graduate Studies shall . . ."
to read as "Each department participating in the Faculty of Graduate
Studies, or those that have been admitted under Bylaw 2.1(b), shall . . ."
• any other business
All students registered in the Faculty of Graduate
Studies are eligible to attend and vote at this general
meeting. Passage of the amendments to the Bylaws requires a 75% vote in favour of the special resolution,
with a quorum of 100.
he is not aware of a recurrence of
activity in the building since the
damage was covered up.
AMS opposes fee
From page 1
gave them more than the one-third
of men's funding they now receive.
And Risebrough now says he
wants a "university's athletic council" with student input to help
manage the fee.
AMS vice president Jonathan
Mercer said this is a new idea not
found in the original proposal.
Mercer said this may be the result of
AMS president Glenna Chestnutt's
lobbying.
Mercer said he opposes the fee
because it sets a precedent in which
the board forces students to pay for
cut programs.
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228-r-il Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, March 5, 1985
Women swimmers win crown
By HLI LEE
ST. CATHERINES, ONT. —
The UBC swimming and diving
team concluded a successful season
at the three-day Canadian In-
teruniversity Athletic Union championships by winning the women's
title and placing second overall in
the 24 university competition.
The UBC women's victory broke
the University of Toronto women's
seven year long championship string.
The UBC women were in a very
close battle with the U of T for the
championship, but with strong performances from everyone, beat the
Blue 458 to 428. Team depth was
ihe key to winning: the team consisted of 14 athletes, all of whom
contributed points. For the second
consecutive year, UBC's Jack Kelso
was named CIAU Women's Coach
of the Year.
Leading the scoring for the
T-birds was Barb McBain, who won
gold medals in the 100m and 200m
backstroke   and   the   4   x    100m
Medley Relay. McBain's time of
1:05.27 in the 100m backstroke just
missed breaking the seven-year old
**Mb.
Jack Kelso
Women's Swim Coach of Year
record of 1:05.08, held by former
T-Bird Wendy Hogg.
Other members of the winning
relay team were Brenda Jones
(breastroke), Ronda Thomasson
(butterfly) and Anne Martin
(freestyle). Martin also won a silver
medal in the 50m freestyle. Jennifer
Good, arts 1, took a bronze medal
in the 100m breastroke.
Nancy Bonham capped off an illustrious five year collegiate career
by winning both the lm and 3m diving competitions, narrowly beating
Canadian Olympian team member
Kathy Keleman of Calgary by
scores of 545.00 to 526~75~ anil
596.45 to 582.65. respectively. Both
Bonham and Melody Smeaton, a
rookie diver who placed fourth in
the lm event, recorded consistently
exceptional performances
throughout the meet.
Bonham was named the CIAU
Outstanding Diver of the Meet,
while UBC's Don Leiberman was
presented the CIAU Diving Coach
of the Year Award.
The UBC women thus finished
the season 9-0 in Canadian competition, also thrashing Simon Fraser
University, who recently won
U.S.-based National Association of
Intercollegiate Athletics championships. Other members of the '85
champion team are captain Vickie
Byman, Jill Christensen. Helen
Chow, Fiona Waddell, Ira Leroi,
Sandra Mason and Carlyle Jansen.
Assistant coach Ken Radford
played a major role in the development of these swimmers.
The men's team placed a strong
fifth in a highly competitive meet,
behind Calgary, Toronto, Laval
and Victoria. The men scored more
than enough points to enable the
Thunderbirds to place second in the
combined standings with 701
points. Toronto was first with 957
points while Calgary was third with
682 points.
Medal winners for the 'Birds
were Chris Bowie, who won the
1500m freestyle in a time of
15:25.31, and Bruce Berger, who
won a silver in the 200m backstroke
and a bronze in the 100m
backstroke. Other top point-scorers
were: Geoff Donelly in the 400m
IM, 200m 1M and 200m butterfyly;
Dave Young in the 1500m freestyle
and 400m IM: and Steve Church in
the lm and 3m diving events.
The 1985 CIAU championships
was a fast meet, with numerous
CIAU and two Canadian records
being set. UVic's Pam Rai set
CIAU records in the 800m and
100m freestyle, and was part of a
team thai set a CIAU record in the 4
x 200m Women's freestyle relay.
World record holder Mike West
of the University of Waterloo set
CIAU records in both the 100m and
200m backstroke. Calgary's Suki
Brownsdon -et a CIAU record in
the 200m breastroke.
Another Dinosaur, Tom Pon-
ting. not only set a Canadian and
CIAU record in the 200m butterfly,
but was also part of a 4 x 200m
freestyle relay that equalled the
Canadian record. He was also part
of the 4 x 100m freestyle relay that
set a CIAU record.
The University of Toronto set a
CIAU record in the 4 x 100m
women's freestyle relay.
UVic Vikings lose to terrible Bears
- :j>"'^w^"::^7^^:^:?^S^ ''    -^'?I^™SP^^?BL
Wm    CDHDTC  Jill
111  oKvJtv I o  JBf
w:
OFF AND RIDING. Faceless cyclist logs several kilometres before realizing that Intramural Triathlon actually
takes place this Thursday at noon. '•"'»■ Pho'°
The streak had to end sooner or
later. And, for the University of
Victoria Vikings basketball team,
an astounding win streak ended
much later than sooner.
Alberta Golden Bears surprised
the Vikings 71-52 to win the Canada
West championship Saturday night
in Edmonton. The Bears — who
would not have qualified for the
playoffs if they were not the tournament host — ended the Vikings'
seven year championship streak.
Mike Kornak paced Alberta with
23 points, later earning Most Valuable Player honors. Dean Peters added 16 points for the Bears, who
finished lower than UBC in league
standings this season.
Graham Taylor led UVic with 22
points while Phil Ohl contributed
12.
Despite the loss, the Vikes ad
vanced to the regional playoffs in
quest of their sixth straight national
crown. The Vancouver Island retained its fourth place national
ranking.
* * *
Jack Pomfret's prediction came
true last Saturday.
The UBC women's basketball
coach previously anticipated that
the University of Victoria Vikettes
would have little difficulty in winning the Canadian Interuniversity
Athletic Union women's basketball
championship.
The Vikettes trounced Laurentian
Vees 71-52 in the national title
match in Lennoxville, Quebec. Junior national team member Lori
Clarke led the Vikettes with 22
points while shooting 100 per cent
from the free throw line throughout
the weekend tournament.
York and Alberta triumph in gymnastic nationals
By STEVE JANUSZ
Old habits are hard to break.
York University has won another
national university's men's gymnastics title.
Led by national team members
Allan Reddon and Brad Peters, the
Yeomen easily captured a
remarkable twelfth consecutive
Canadian   Interuniversity   Athletic
Union banner last weekend at War
Memorial gym.
The two Olympians registered
top marks in four of the six events
as York piled up 164.10 points.
Calgary (160.20) took second place
followed by Saskatchewan (158.54).
"Although we were not as successful as two or three years ago,
we're definitely happy with achiev-
Tracfcsfers off
The UBC men's track and field
team will be putting its record on
the line this weekend at the University of Windsor.
The Thunderbirds, winners of the
Canada West title two weeks ago,
will be competing in the Canadian
Interuniversity Athletic Union finals. They are currently ranked
third in the nation behind Toronto
and Saskatchewan.
Canadian indoor record holder
Simon Hoogewerf is ranked number one in the 1,000 m event. However, the Olympian might not be
able to participate in the 600m race.
"Simon has an achilles tendon
problem and has trained very little
in recent weeks," UBC coach
Lionel Pugh said.
"He is a very versatile athlete but
we can't overwork him." Hoogewerf will definitely compete in his
specialty.
Dave Wilkinson is ranked fourth
in the 60m event and Bob Dalton
holds the same ranking for the
300m competition.
Trevor Charles and Boyd Mason
are also ranked fourth in the triple
jump and pole vault respectively.
Jeannie Cockroft, who set a Canada West record two weeks ago, is a
strong candidate to win the
women's high jump. Kim Berkeley,
the only other UBC woman to qualify for the nationals, will be competing in the long jump.
Bears win title
Winners never quit and quitters
never win.
The Alberta Golden Bears relied
on that motto last Saturday, coming from behind to defeat the Saskatchewan Huskies 7-4 in what proved to be the deciding game of the
Canada West hockey finals.
Alberta regrouped from a 4-1
deficit midway through the second
period to sweep the best-of-three
series in Edmonton. Friday, the
Bears edged the Huskies 2-1.
Nationally speaking, the Golden
Bears have been ranked number one
all season long. They now advance
to the Canadian Interuniversity
Athletic Union.
ing the best team score, which is
probably the most important thing,
and getting the two top places in the
all-around event," said Yeoman
coach Tom Zivic who has been
guiding the Toronto school since
1968.
Zivic indicated that the Yeomen
were not ready to relinquish their
stranglehold on the national crown.
"This championship will certainly motivate our three freshmen to
work harder for next year."
UBC, its future threatened by
budget cuts, finished fifth in the
competition.
Whereas the men's team event
went according to form, the
women's title was up for grabs.
Seven teams had realistic shots of
finishing first but when the four
events were completed, the University of Alberta claimed its second
national crown.
The trip to the victory podium,
however, was not an easy one. Only eighty-five one hundreths of a
point separated the Pandas (100.95)
from runners-up Calgary (100.70)
and UBC (100.10).
"It was so close, yet I'm very
pleased with our performance,"
said T-Bird coach Hardy Fink."
We could have finished higher but
some of our routines were getting
lower scores than what they were
normally obtaining all season. Still,
it was a good meet."
UBC's Janet Rosenfeld had an
impressive outing finishing sixth in
the all-around event. Top honors
went to 19 year old Sheri Blunden
of Calgary who tallied high marks
in the vault, beam and floor exercises.
T-Bird rookie Jennifer Dong
ranked tenth while teammate Anne
Muscat, the defending national
champion, placed twelfth.
As expected, the men's all-
around title went to York's Allan
Reddon as he successfully defended
his title by squeezing past teammate
Brad Peters 55.50 points to 55.30.
UBC's Mark Byrne registered 52.25
(points, good for eighth position.
T-Bird captain Tom Carlson finished fifteenth in the field of 36 competitors.
Rugby Thunderbirds shine in California
Traditionally, rugby tours are
pleasant, enjoyable experiences, especially when the destination is
California and your side comes
away with two wins and a draw in
its matches.
That was the scenario last week
as the UBC rugby side took its annual spring break stateside.
The first stop on the tour was
Stanford  University in  Palo Alto
Rowers southbound
After a winter respite, the UBC
rowing crews head off to Oregon
this weekend for an invitational
regatta.
where the T-Birds had to adjust to a
hard pitch and the heat, but easily
registered a 34-3 victory. Scrum half
Doug Gow and winger John Devlin
led the UBC scoring barrage with
two tries apiece.
Two days later, the Thunderbirds
ventured north to Berkeley to battle
the top-ranked university side in the
States.
Understandably, competition
became stiffer. Facing a large
Berkeley side, the T-Birds relied on
Craig Brumwell's kicking foot (6
points) to register a well-earned 9-9
tie.
"We played attractive rugby;
good enough to win but were hampered by some inept refereeing,"
UBC coach Barry Legh said. "It
was a very hard game. Props Bill
Petrovas and Iain Scholmich were
dynamic in the scrum," added the
first-year T-Bird mentor.
The Thunderbirds got back on
the winning track on the last stop of
their tour. Playing under the lights,
the visitors dumped the University
of California at Santa Barbara
29-12. The backs played well,
especially Mark Steen who tallied
13 points. The forward pack also
had a strong match providing solid
support on offensive thrusts.
"The California schools are
much improved and with their size
make formidable opponents,"
Legh said.

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