UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Sep 23, 1971

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0126599.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0126599.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0126599-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0126599-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0126599-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0126599-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0126599-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0126599-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0126599-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0126599.ris

Full Text

Array By SANtfif JCASS
Alma Mater Society council
Wednesday night approved a
motion by AMS president Steve
Garrod calling for a "non-violent
civil disobedience demonstration
at the Douglas border crossing
Friday."
The demonstration was
initiated last Friday to protest the
underground testing of a
five-megaton nuclear warhead by
the U.S. Atomic Energy
Commission at Amchitka Island in
the Aleutian chain off Alaska.
"This is the strongest possible
way we can express our
disapproval over the U.S. nuclear
warhead test," Garrod said.
Council also unanimously
approved a motion urging the
Canadian government to sever
diplomatic relations with the U.S.
until the Amchitka test is
cancelled, and authorizing the
executive to spend up to $2,000
in financing the demonstration.
In announcing final plans for
Friday's demonstration at the
Peace Arch, Garrod said "buses
have been hired by the AMS to
transport people to and from the
border, but they can only
accommodate about 80 people
each.
Garrod said he hoped to hire
10 more buses before Friday.
Each bus will cost about $70.
"People with cars are
desperately needed," he said.
He added that he hopes every
student and faculty member
driving to the demonstration will
stop at the SUB traffic circle
before leaving to pick up those
people who are unable to find
space in the buses.
Several students will be acting
as marshals at the demonstration,
directing people after they leave
their buses and cars.
The demonstration, aimed at
closing the international border to
northbound traffic, is scheduled
to begin at 2 p.m. Speakers
include Garrod, political science
professor Phil Resnick and a
spokesman from the United
Fishermen and Allied Workers
Union, which supports the AMS
move.
A co-operative child care
centre will be set up at the border
and demonstrators are asked to
aid workers for half-hour shifts
during the demonstration.
gets formal approval
Several bands will provide
musical entertainment from 3 to 5
p.m., followed by speakers
including United-Anglican campus
minister George Hermanson,
campus agitator Dick Betts, and
free-lance radical Jim Harding.
Garrod said the main group of Buses     will     transport
people will remain at the Peace
Arch demonstration, but hopes
people will disperse to block the
railway tracks along the coast and
the Pacific Highway truck crossing
a mile east.
demonstrators to and from each
location.
The border sit-in is scheduled
to end at 6 p.m., when buses will
be returning demonstrators to the
UBC campus.
THE UBYSSEY
Garrod said students should
maintain a policy of non-violent
civil disobedience if harassed by
police at the border.
"The principal tactic employed
in non-violent civil disobedience is
the sit-in, where a group of people
sit together with their arms linked
in solidarity and strength," said
Garrod.
"If approached by police,
people should allow themselves to
be dragged peacefully off the
roadway," he said.
If not arrested, Garrod said,
See page 2: PEACEFUL
®:9it I
if. j«.\i-J»*-
I fir I »t ■
jRMS»M» W'*-   %W#«f
iHf^Sti*
—david bowerman photo
THIS, says artist Larry Boyce, is art. Member of cubist school, the artist has crew filming 20 feet of ice cubes melting On concrete plaza
outside SUB. Boyce (centre, bearded, wearing white shirt and vest) got icy reaction from students who witnessed the art. Project was
funded by UBC fine arts department.
Housing squeeze forces students to queue
By LINDA HOSSIE
As many as 100 students have
been lining up nightly outside the
UBC housing office to wait for
vacancies, housing administrator
Les Rohringer said Wednesday.
There is an increase in students
applying for residence despite the
decrease in enrolment at UBC,
Rohringer said in an interview.
There has been a change in
trend. Instead of students moving
downtown and living on their
own, they are coming back to live
in residence.
Rohringer said this trend may
be due to the "new freedoms and
better activities" in the residences
or to trouble with illegal or
unsuitable apartments throughout
the city.
Rohringer also said many high
school students who toured the
residences   in   the   spring   have
decided to live in residence during
their first year.
Rohringer has been telling a
different story to the residence
maids at Place Vanier who are
fighting his proposal to cut their
working hours from eight to six
per day.
He told them at a meeting
Sept. 10 that requests for
residence rooms were lower this
year than before and that "it is
becoming harder and harder to fill
residence rooms."
He has attempted to justify
giving students work which was
formerly done by the maids by
saying that "students won't come,
back to live in residence if they
can't earn some money, and then
you'll all be out of jobs."
Because in previous years the
housing administration held
vacancies for people who didn't
show up to take them, the rental
system was changed this year.
Previously, vacancies were held
until the first three days of
lectures. This year any room that
wasn't paid for by Sept. 1 was
reassigned on a first come, first
served basis.
This  way,  there  were  fewer
Amchitka protest given priority
The human government orientation program
scheduled for Friday noon has been cancelled due
to the Amchitka protest.
The program, "Democracy and UBC", will be
held at noon Tuesday in SUB ballroom.
Alma Mater Society secretary Evert Hoogers
said the low turnout at Tuesday's discussion did not
disappoint him.
"The events during orientation week were not
meant to be crowd pleasers," Hoogers said
Wednesday.
"But we have a few things to learn about
advertising and the media."
Women involved in Opportunities for Youth
projects over the summer will discuss their projects
today at noon in the SUB ballroom.
Daycare, women's studies and an abortion and
contraception referral centre were set up during the
summer.
Two films, Salt of the Earth and Adam's Rib,
will be shown at 7:30 p.m in the SUB auditorium.
Admission is 50 cents.
students turned away at the
beginning of the term, Rohringer
said.
Rohringer said the new Walter
Gage Residence near SUB would
be open for the fall of 1972. The
new residence will absorb students
from Fort Camp, which will be
closed as a residence April 30, he
said.
The new residence has a total
capacity of 1,200 to 1,300
persons. It will be co-educational
with four apartments on each
floor of the highrise complex.
Each apartment will house six of
the same sex.
Rohringer said there will be no
set division for the number of
men and women in the residence.
People are encouraged to apply
in groups Rohringer said. "The
best way to ensure acceptance is
to apply in groups of six and take
up a whole apartment.
"The individuals will be fitted
in after the groups are accepted." Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 23, 1971
Peaceful resistance urged
From page 1
demonstrators should return to
the roadway.
"If arrested, tell the police
your name and address. That's all
you legally need to tell them."
Surrey RCMP inspector A. C.
Wilson said Wednesday his
detachment is not anticipating
any trouble, but "would not
hesitate to charge anyone if the
law is broken."
"Obstructing a port of entry is
a criminal offence," he added.
He said he did not know
exactly what action the RCMP
will take.
"That depends on the
demonstrators," he said.
Washington state chief border
patrol agent A. Hysette said
Wednesday he is aware of the
demonstration but intends to take
no action in keeping the border
open.
U.S. customs officer Dan
MacMillan said Monday it will be
"business as usual" Friday
afternoon,   regardless   of  action
taken by persons attempting to
close the international border.
He said his office has no
authorization to force the
boundary open should anyone
decide to close it.
"I think that's up to the
Pentagon," he said.
The AMS has called a
moratorium on Friday afternoon
classes.
Garrod suggested
demonstrators wear comfortable
clothes and bring food and a
cushion along.
The AMS has received strong
support from other Canadian
universities.
Okanagan College students at
Penticton have joined forces with
the Peachland local of the United
Steelworkefs of America to shut
down the border at Osoyoos.
The University of Notre Dame
at Nelson and Selkirk College at
Castlegar student societies plan to
close the border south of
Castlegar.
Students at Douglas College in
New Westminster will be travelling
south to close the border at
Sumas.
Vancouver City College and
Western Washington State College
(Bellingham) student councils
have indicated they will support
the UBC demonstration at the
Peace Arch.
The University of Victoria
Student Society announced
Monday it would hold a
demonstration at the Black Ball
and Canadian National ferry
terminals there and at the airport.
In Montreal, Loyola University
students have indicated they will
shut down border crossings near
the city, and University of
Windsor and Brock University
students have joined forces in
shutting down the
Detroit-Windsor tunnel.
The AMS has also received
support from the Vancouver and
District Labor Council, the B.C.
Federation of Labor, the New
Democratic Party Waffle
movement.- and the Young NDP.
A final schedule of events will
appear in Friday's Ubyssey.
Aldermen react to protest
By LESLEY KRUEGER
The student movement to close the border is
childish and will be fruitless, acting Vancouver
mayor Earle Adams said Wednesday.
Adams said that he, like "any civilized person",
objects to the Amchitka test.
However, he said he believes protests are more
effective when proper channels are used.
"Students are taking the law into their own
hands by organizing the demonstration," he said.
He said the action of the city council in sending
an official protest to external affairs minister
Mitchell Sharp is more important than the planned
border blockade.
He did not say why, nor did he explain why the
protest through the approved channels so far has
had no success.
Alderman Harry Rankin was also contacted by
The Ubyssey.
"Too bad the blast doesn't engulf the White
House," was his first reaction.
He said he felt the situation shows the extreme
arrogance of the United States in continuing the test
despite the opposition of the Canadian and Japanese
governments.
Rankin said he supports all non-violent
protest. In this case, however, closing the border
would be ineffective, he added.
It would only annoy people wishing to cross
the line who otherwise might support the
movement, he said.
Safeway hot grapes hit again
The Vancouver branch of the United Farm
Workers Organizing Committee will picket the
Safeway store at Broadway and Arbutus today
because it sells "hot" grapes.
An information picket line will be set up in
front of Spagnol's Queensboro Stores at 602 Ewen,
New Westminster, sometime in the next two weeks,
said Nancy Welch of the Vancouver branch.
"Spagnol's will be getting 50 carloads of wine
grapes that were picked by non-union workers,"
Welch said Monday.
"A boycott in Vancouver, which is the fourth
largest market in North America, is going to hurt
the growers."
Picketing this week follows a weekend of
picketing at five Vancouver Super-Valu stores.
A Super-Valu spokesman said Wednesday
Super-Valu's policy remains "unchanged on
non-union grapes — if they're better than union
grapes, we use them "
Welch said 15 per cent of the California grape
crop is still "hot".
"Most of the Tokay (red) grapes coming into
town are scab," Welch said. "The only way you can
be sure it is union picked is to see the union label."
Higher marks merit earlier registration
By BERTON WOODWARD
The higher your grades, the
earlier you registered.
The coveted Tuesday
registration times were given to a
quota of arts and science students
who received the highest grades
last year, registrar Jack Parnall
said Wednesday.
He said the Wednesday and
Thursday times were given to less
successful students.
"The computer had to be
programmed somehow, and we
feel that this system is fairer than
an alphabetical one," Parnall said.
"We feel that the good student is
more entitled to first choice."
He said arts freshmen were
admitted with a Grade 11 and 12
average of 60 per cent while
sciencemen needed 62 per cent
because of growth in that faculty.
He said no exceptions were made.
He said students in other
faculties did not use the better
grade-better time registration
system.
Parnall said that he is not
completely satisfied with this
system and that it is a "crying
shame" that some students could
not register in the sections they
wanted.
Parnall also said that while he
"was not disappointed" in this
year's enrolment drop, "those
responsible for the budget were".
Certain     additional     staff
appointments not already made
would be frozen for at least a
year, he said, and other general
budget cuts would be made by
faculty deans.
He said there is "no question at
all" that UBC is becoming a senior
university. He said UBC "must
restrict intake where studies are
available elsewhere."
"I think the system is better
for it," Parnall said.
LIBERATION & LEARNING
A Weekend at Cultus Lake
Oct. 1 to 3
DAVID MOLE WARD GASQUE
GEORGE SMITH, S.F.U. - OTHERS
lnformation:224-1614
or Lutheran Campus Centre
An Anglican-United Campus Ministry Event
Watch for our Wed. nite events - Oct. 6
FORESTRY PRESENTS
UNDERCUT 71
Saturday, October 2,
SUB Cafe
TICKETS SOON
FROM AMS BUSINESS OFFICE
OR FORESTERS
FORESTRY WEEK
NEXT WEEK
EVENTS AT NOON
GRAD PORTRAITS
'72 Grads Have Your Portrait Taken Now
and Avoid The Big Rush!
Choice of 6 Color Proofs — inclusive sitting
and  One  4x5  Color  Portrait
is yours FREE!
We have all Gowns, Hoods, Shirts, Ties, Blouses etc. on hand
Just come well groomed.
Now—Natural color portraits for less than
usual black and white charges!
4X5 $2.95 - 5X7 $4.95 - 8X10 $5.95
WE KEEP NEGS ON FILE FOR COMPOSITES,
YEAR BOOKS, ETC.
JUST PHONE FOR AN APPOINTMENT
PORTRAIT STUDIOS
3343 WEST BROADWAY -732-7446
VANCOUVER 8, B.C.
Your Portrait-The Most Ideal X-mas Present
at the Blood Donor Clinic
ON CAMPUS
MON - FRI (SEPT 27 - OCT 1)
9:30 - 4:30 P.M. Continuous
SUB Rooms 205, 207, 209. Thursday, September 23, 1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
U of S students demand better f
• III!
service
REGINA (CUP) - University
of Saskatchewan students are
boycotting the main cafeteria on
the Regina campus in an attempt
to get rid of the operator of the
cafeteria, Beaver Foods.
Beaver was granted a
management contract for the
cafeteria late in June by the board
of governors on the
recommendation of university
business manager Stu Mann.
Beaver had previously been
granted the food services
concession on the Saskatoon
campus of U of S.
Under the new system, the
university continues to hire the
cafeteria staff, pay for the food,
and pay the manager's salary. On
top of this, however, the
university must pay Beaver an
eight per cent management fee.
The   cafeteria   contract   was
granted to Beaver because the
company promised that it could,
because of its other food service
operations on the campuses, buy
the food at a much cheaper price
than could the university.
Despite this, food prices have
increased.
Added to this, the quality of
food, which has always been low,
has not improved.
The   supposed   saving  to   be
derived from having Beaver
operate the cafeteria is not being
passed on to the student. It is
being absorbed by the
management fee and by the
university.
The university claims that last
year the cafeteria lost about
$9,000 and that students should
not expect Saskatchewan
taxpayers to subsidize their meals.
The students disagree with the
\
I
I
BpppPrFF
. ,   nit MMfli IHH HH ■■ Wfm w^m
—david bowerman photo
DANGLING STUDENT gets transported into Buchanan building addition now under construction. Speculation on campus is that the office
tower is being built so solidly — in anticipation of onslaught from violent hippie commie student degenerates — that the only means of entry
for appointments with profs will be via crane. Students were not consulted prior to this decision being taken.
Women forced to adore male roles
By JIM JOLY
Women university students are forced to
worship the male models of student and
scholar, says Arts 1 instructor Sheilagh Day.
"There is no model for women to pursue
higher studies at the university,"she told an
audience of about 100 in the SUB ballroom
Wednesday at noon.
Day said experienced women lecturers are
turned out of jobs to make room for "young
men training for higher teaching positions."
"The male scholar, following the model,
goes through studies swiftly to teach higher
students while women teachers are exploited
and paid less to do what male scholars scorn
and don't want to do."
Day said that when male students are going
straight through studies into a job or graduate
work, women are faced, at that time in their
lives, with marriage and child-bearing.
"This is a problem for women because
there is no positive image of the part-time
student; no positive image of the part-time
teacher," she said.
She added that if a woman comes back to
university when she is over 30 years old she is
made to feel "that she is just a housewife and
not a legitimate student."
Women students, Day said, are forced to lie
to themselves in order to find a sense of
purpose that will carry through the university.
"The university says it doesn't sexually
discriminate. A female student has only to
count the number of women faculty members
to know this is a lie."
She called for "a passionate revision of the
texture of this university" to make it "an
open, light-aired place that has a real and
interesting place for such things as the
women's study course."
Day made several suggestions for improving
the situation of the woman at university.
She recommended easier transfer of credits
because women students often have to follow
their husbands in location changes.
She also said the university should make
education a more interruptable process and
should examine the present situation where a
woman with a family is expected to have the
same academic load as a man.
Day also called for an increase in day-care
facilities for student mothers.
Nurse verifies YD increase at UBC
By MIKE SASGES
The number of cases of gonorrhea on
campus are on the upswing, a Vancouver
public health nurse said Wednesday.
. "I have five or six students from UBC visit
my clinic every week," said Dianne Symonds
of the Youth Services Clinic.
And through these people who come for
treatment, the clinic finds it is contacting
other people at UBC, she told The Ubyssey.
"There has been an alarming growth rate in
gonorrhea," the 23-year-old UBC graduate
said.
More than 1,900 cases of gonorrhea have
been reported this year in B.C., she said.
Symptoms of gonorrhea in the male
usually appear a few days after intercourse as
a discharge of pus from the urinary passage.
A painful burning sensation accompanies
this during urination.
The symptoms are harder to detect in
women.
"Usually the man comes in for treatment
and then we contact the person he had
intercourse with," Symonds said.
"If a person finds he or she has VD they
should contact my clinic at 1915 West Fourth
or in the West End right away," she said.
Treatment involves taking two pills.
Symonds said male homosexuals favor the
West End clinic because a male nurse works
there.
"Gonorrhea and syphilis are very common
amongst the gays," she said.
Gonorrhea in prostitution, Symonds said,
is a lot less than is commonly believed.
"I must stress that all intercourse between
the clinic and the individual will be strictly
confidential," she said.
administration's loss estimate.
The University of
Saskatchewan follows the
accounting practice of charging all
its ancillary operations for light,
power, water and rent. These,
charges help the university mask
the real cost of cafeteria
operation. The only purpose they
serve is to show the real profit
from the cafeteria as a deficit.
The students of the Regina
campus have demanded that this
practice be stopped.
In an open letter to principal
John Archer, they also demanded
that upon termination of Beaver's
contract a management
committee be formed.
This committee would consist
of two students elected by the
student council, two faculty, two
administrators, and two members
elected from the cafeteria
employees.
This committee would set
policy, prices, and menus and hire
a manager who would be
responsible to the committee for
the day-to-day operation of the
cafeteria.
If the board of governors does
not accept these demands, the
boycott will be escalated, with the
student union asking all other
campuses who have Beaver food
in their cafeterias to hold
sympathy boycotts.
Dual rinks
to re-open
in October
The Thunderbird Winter Sports
Centre plans to take another crack
at opening its $1 million dual ice
rinks.
The two rinks have been closed
since January when cracks were
discovered in several of the
laminated wooden beams
supporting the roof.
Sports centre manager Stan
Floyd said Wednesday the rinks,
which were added to the sports
complex in 1969, are expected to
re-open in October.
Repairs will cost about
$146,000, Floyd said.
Dehumidifying units are being
installed in the arenas to remove
moisture and workmen have
erected reinforcing steelwork to
support the roof and beams.
Floyd said an expansion of
operating hours in the old skating
rink have helped alleviate the
crowding.
University permission has made
it possible for the centre to
operate around the clock if need
be, he said. Students are given top
priority in the prime times.
When the dual rinks re-open,
the centre will include three ice
rinks, one six-sheet curling rink
hand ball courts and squash
courts.
Age of chicken
Administration president
Walter Gage gets a reception and a
chicken barbeque tonight for his
50-year association with UBC.
The reception will be held at
Cecil Green park from 5:30 to
9:30 p.m and is open and free to
students, faculty and alumni.
There will also be a chicken
barbecue from 6 to 7:30 p.m and
$2 tickets are available from the
Alumni Association offices. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 23, 1971
Whaaat?
So students have been lining up recently outside
Leslie Rohringer's housing administration off ice to grab
vacancies in UBC residences.
That's strange.
Less than two weeks ago Rohringer announced to
Place Vanier maids that their work hours were being cut
to make way for part-time jobs for students.
(Naturally, the maids' wages were to be cut
correspondingly.)
Although a total of less than 30 students would
have been hired under the plan, Rohringer told the
maids that students had to get the jobs because "if they
can't pay for their rooms, we'll have to close the
residences and you'll all be out of a job."
Now Rohringer tells us that as many as 100
students have lined up outside his office each night
waiting for residence rooms.
It is clear that the residences are in no danger of
closing down due to lack of student applications or
money.
And the maids are therefore in no danger of losing
their jobs.
We'd really like to know where this leaves
Rohringer's flimsy rationale for cutting the maids' hours
and wages.
With this red herring dead, there is no excuse for
the cutbacks and no excuse for failure to act on the
maids' current demands for a better deal from housing
administration.
Momentum
Initial campus reaction to the border
demonstration indicates that thousands of students will
mass near the "Peace Arch" Friday to protest the
Amchitka nuclear test.
But to get to the border, cars, trucks and vans will
be needed for transportation, since the buses ordered by
the AMS will only carry a small number of the
demonstrators.
Some of the students will no doubt organize their
own car pools, but anyone with a free car should drive
to the loop in front of SUB between 12:30 and 1:30
p.m Friday to give other people rides to the border.
The truck crossing, east of the Douglas border
point, will be included in the shutdown. Although some
buses will go to the truck crossing, some student car
pools should also go to that area.
Meanwhile, support for the UBC student-initiated
border shutdown is growing across Canada and Quebec
and a number of labor organizations have voiced
support for the demonstration.
It is time for all of us to substitute direct action for
petitions and telegrams of protest.
Whether or not the blast takes place, the people
who come to the border Friday will know they took a
positive step in struggling against the menace of the
world's most powerful imperial nation.
THE WSSEY
SEPTEMBER 23,  1971
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the writer and not of the AMS or the university administration.
Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a
weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located
in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2301, 228-2307; Page Friday, Sports,
228-2305; advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Leslie Plommer
Pert Paul Knox said grace at the Age of Rage hotdog dinner and the hairy
blorgs got down to the serious business of stuffing their dirty faces. Sandy
Shreve and Lesley Kreuger kept proposing milk toasts until they were too
wobbly to stand and Maurice Bridge decided to tell them about Mike
Sasges' elephant fetish. Ginny Gait and Jim Joly told a couple of lousy
jokes, but Linda and Helen Hossie were the only ones who laughed. Sultry
Sandy Kass tried to show them the error of their ways but Berton
Woodward and Tricia Moore distracted her with their imitation of the
Archies. Ian Lindsay threw his digestive biscuit at Vaughn Palmer who
took his thumb out of his mouth to throw it back. Lindsay ducked but
Mike Buck didn't. He was sorry. Bernard Bischoff scoffed until Gord
Gibson oointed out that he had hotdog relish all over his face. Sue Nicols
and Lynn Pollock staged a half-time show on the table while Gary
Gruenski gurgled. Dave Bowerman and Brett Garrett were laughing too
hard to lens a hand. John Andersen and Dave Phillips jigged to the tune of
Yankee Doodle Dandy and a good time was had by all until Kathy Carney
said there'd be no more kool aid in the office unless all heads appeared at
the scene of the crime at noon today for press card mug shots. Leslie
Plommer smirked.
We bombed at Hiroshima, but we'll be a blast at Amchitka!
Letters
Protest
In the entire Ubyssey issue of
Sept. 21, which encouraged a
border protest against the
Amchitka blast, I did not see any
criticism of the underground
testing by France and Russia.
(Russia set off another N-blast
Monday.)
Furthermore, the atmospheric
testing by China was not
mentioned even once. How does
The Ubyssey feel about their
"arrogance"? Even the expressed
concern about possible radiation
leakage from Amchitka ignored
the certain gaseous radiation
pollution from the Chinese
bombs.
The possible dangers of a blast
in the unstable Aleutian area
make the Amchitka test unwise.
However, I think the border
protest will antagonize many
more people than it will sway (by
mob emotion) toward the
editorial cause.
Because of this feeling, and
because I would prefer to not see
the Amchitka blast materialize, I
will remain in my Friday chem
lab.
Carl Cramer
Science II
We do oppose nuclear testing
by France, China and the U.S.S.R.
They too are arrogant and then-
tests pose dangers to all of us.
• But the relationship between
Canada and these three countries
differs    from    the    relationship
between Canada and the U.S.
It is a matter of record that the
U.S. controls many key sectors of
the Canadian economy and
society, and as a direct
consequence, strongly influences
the Canadian government. Any
protest against the Amchitka blast
is also a protest against the
attitude of the Canadian
government on the issue of testing
the American war-machine.
Not only has the Canadian
government adopted a
hands-and-knees approach
towards Washington on the issue
of Amchitka, but it has also over
the years, actively supported
U.S.-dominated military alliances
and missile systems. And at the
very least, it has turned a blind
eye towards the supplying of war
materials to the U.S. by
companies located on Canadian
soil.
These are only a few of the
reasons why it is of supreme
importance for Canadians to take
a stand on the Amchitka blast.
Finally, it seems to us insanity
to suggest that strong, active
protest over this matter should be
suppressed for fear of
"antagonizing" people.
Surely concerned people
should not sit at home (or in their
chem labs) and talk politely about
the test without doing anything
about it.
Actions to date by the U.S.
show that it isn't particularly
concerned about antagonizing
Canadians by setting off nuclear
tests.
Seen in this light, your concern
over a forceful, peaceful
demonstration "antagonizing"
people seems close to incredible.
Hopes
Steven Langdon, writing in
September's issue of Saturday
Night, and commenting on the
University of Toronto in 1968
states:
"Education in the university
had gone sour. Huge lectures, big
bureaucracy, pressures on the
professors to publish, all had
taken the life out of higher
learning; if life had ever been
there.
"The student did feel put
down, alienated. Nothing very
creative was going on. And a great
deal uncreative — in fact damned
destructive — was happening.
Like campus recruiting by Dow
Chemical, your friendly napalm
agent. Like faculty research for
the U.S. air force and other
heavies from the Pentagon.
"Around the university was a
society where quite a few people
were getting fiercely hurt. They
were poor, or Indian, or maybe
they lived in South East Asia. The
See page 5: LETTERS Thursday, September 23, 1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters
from page 4
university wasn't just failing to
help them, it was actively engaged
on the other side."
Sound familiar? But don't feel
depressed if you made the correct
choice of a well-known university
that fits the above description. On
the horizon there is hope
everlasting. U of T struggled out
of the above label through the
efforts of both students and Pres.
Bissell of the university.
As a result the province of
Ontario made great changes:
"... a new experimental
system, with the old board and
senate done away with,
amalgamated into one streamlined
body with representation there
from everyone — janitors,
students, professors, alumni,
administration, the public."
Is this form of representation a
goal that the "human"
government is working toward?
One would hope so because UBC
is in dire need of something
better. The current system is not
-coping with the English dept.
dispute which is being dragged on
into another year.
The brave but ineffectual
inquiry run by Hoogers is being
brushed aside by Jordan et al as
if it were only a bothersome fly
trapped inside a room and if left
alone would succumb to a slow
and exhaustive death separated
from the outside world by a thin
piece of glass.
But alas, here in B.C.
everything is hiding in the past,
smothered in puritannical
orders-in-council. What hope have
we for enlightened government at
this university especially when we
have, one hell of a mess in
" Victoria?
Does our hope lie somewhere
hidden in the hearts, minds, or
filing cabinets on the second floor
of SUB? My hope is theirs, I hope.
Michael Gee
Education 5
Bikers
"Break For UBC Bikers", says
the headline in UBC Reports. I
don't want to sound ungrateful,
but I get the distinct feeling of
being had.
Last year we were promised a
cycle path on University
Boulevard. So far, what has
happened is that a few hundred of
the worst feet have been patched,
and we have been banned from
the north side. Consider the
implication: the sidewalk is only
four   feet   wide,   which  is just
barely wide enough for two
cyclists to squeek by each other.
With cyclists going both ways on
the same narrow sidewalk, it is
only a matter of time before this
results in a nasty accident,
because the same tree roots that
prevent the widening of the path
also make it unpleasant and often
hazardous to go off on to the
grass.
Furthermore, while there is a
stern sign on the north side
saying, No Bicyles Allowed, there
is no corresponding sign ordering,
asking, or even suggesting that
pedestrians stay off the south side
(and they don't).
I had one near-collision on this
path last year, involving a bike
coming the other way and a
number of pedestrians walking
abreast. Although the suggested
"scalloped effect" planned for
this area is less than satisfactory,-
it would be an improvement on
the present intolerable conditions.
At least more work on
University Boulevard is promised.
Sixteenth Avenue is totally
infuriating because nothing more
is going to be done to it. It has
been given a nice, new, smooth
coat of asphalt, making it the
ideal route for anyone coming
from the direction except for one
small detail: it is too narrow. Just
another few feet would have made
it an excellent bike path.
As it is, with the extreme edge
crumbling slightly, it is necessary
to ride so that cars have to swing
out to pass safely (some don't). If
there is traffic coming in the
opposite direction, this can be
quite dangerous.
It would not have cost much
more to make the road a little
wider at the time, but to widen it
now would cost a fortune.
Somebody wasn't thinking.
If any more money is going to
be spent in the Sixteenth Avenue
area, by the way, why not pave
the dirt road that cuts across from
Sixteenth and Blanca to the
campus? Just a little levelling
would make this a much shorter
and less hilly route than
Sixteenth.
All in all, I'm very glad to see
the unversity doing something
about cycling in the area; cycle
paths, however expensive, are still
much cheaper than roads. But, as
usual, not enough thought has
been given to the details.
The loops on the bike stands
are too small, as well.
Douglas Brent
ESCAPE
Into The
UNDERWATER WORLD
Of
SCUBA DIVING
GREG KOCHER: Underwater Sports
Private & Group Instruction
All Equipment Supplied
Phone 733-5809
NAUI & Navy Certification
6 wk. course $40 "
Next Course Starts:
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28th 7:30 Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 23, 1971
'Tween classes
TODAY
VARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Paul Stevens: "Who's   the God We
Belong To?",  12:30, SUB 207-209.
CAMPUS CRUSADE
Organizational meeting,  noon, SUB
105.
UBC MEN'S TENNIS TEAM
Your   second   last   chance.   Courts
behind Winter Sports Centre.
UBC KUNG FU CLUB
Classes     begin.     New     members
welcome. SUB ballroom, 4:30-6:30
p.m.
AIESEC
Ec and  Commie students to work
abroad. 12:30, SUB 105.
UBC KARATE CLUB
Workout. New Gym, 7:30 p.m.
UBC CHEERLEADING
Tryouts. SUB 205. 12:30 p.m.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Herman    Hesse,    3:30    p.m.    SUB
1111.
UKRAINIAN VARSITY CLUB
Annual     general     meeting,     12:30
p.m., SUB 213.
CHINESE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Get together, 12:30, SUB 211.
EMERGENCY COMMITTEE FOR
PAKISTAN RELIEF
General meeting,  noon, Buch. 102.
PARLIAMENTARY COUNCIL
General meeting, noon, SUB 113.
FRIDAY
BEER GARDEN
International   House  upper  lounge,
4-8 p.m.
CURLING CLUB
Organizational meeting,  noon, SUB
125.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Hesse, 8:30 a.m., SUB 111.
MEN'S TENNIS TEAM
Last tryouts, courts behind   Winter
Sports Centre.
SATURDAY
VARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Hike up Hollyburn Mtn., leave SUB
loop 9 a.m.
TUESDAY
PRE-MEDICAL SOCIETY
Speaker Dr. William Gibson, 12:30,
Wesbrook 201.
UCC
General meeting,  12:30, SUB clubs
lounge.
UNIV. CLUBS COMMITTEE
12:30, SUB clubs lounge (212).
Beautiful    ^^ for
clothes. . . ^^^.  beautiful
people
US CHATEAU
"Is Where It's Happening"
776 Granville 687-2701
TUXEDO
RENTAL & SALES
+ D.B. & S. B. Tuxedos
+ D. B. & S. B. White Coats
+ D. B. & S. B. Suits
+ COLORED SHIRTS
Parking at Rear
BLACK & LEE
Formal Wear Rentals
631 Howe 688-2481
Acropol
RESTAURANT
Specializing in
Greek Dishes
Mon. to Thurs.
10 a.m. to 12
Fri. and Sat.
10 a.m. to 12
Sunday 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.
FULL FACILITIES
2946 W. Broadway 733-2415
TOWN
PUMP
Offers the Best
DINING
ENTERTAINMENT
Deal in Gastown
FULL FACILITIES
7DAYSAWEEK
Dancing to the 'Now Sound' of
The Town Pumpers — Mon.
thru Sat. from 9 p.m.
Old-Time Piano from 5 p.m.
daily (4 p.m. to 10 p.m.
Sundays)
Meals: $1.50 to $3.95 max.
NO RESERVATIONS
66 WATER ST.
683-6695
GASTOWN
=0=
=o=
=o=
Jcknart
HAIRSTYLING FOR MEN
0
0
JOHN
HARALD
ART
Three   of   Vancouver's   Leading   Hairstylists  Specializing   in   modern,   long   Hairstyles   (Shags),    n
Razorcutting, Straightening & Coloring. '    u
2691 West Broadway at Stephens      For Appointments can    738-8011
□ a a o -a =a o==a	
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Campus -  3  lines,   1   day  $1.00;   3   days  $2.50
Commercial  -  3   lines,   1   day  $1.25;   additional
lines 30c; 4 days price of 3.
Classitied ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable
in advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications OBce, Room 241 S.U.B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
Dances
11
C A M P Tj S DANCE FEATURING
Sunshyne and Shylock Friday.
Sept. 24 8 to 1. $1.25 per person.
Refreshments available SUB Ball-
room and cafe.	
POLKA PARTY. FRIDAY. SEPT.
24, at Internationa] House. 8:30 -
1:00 a.m. Food and great refresh-
ments. $1.25 per person.	
WOOD IS GOOD. BUT GIRLS ARE
better; have both at Undercut '71
Sat., Oct. 2. SUB cafe.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
13
LOST: BROWN-FRAMED GIRL'S
glasses in yellow case at John
Owen Pavilion Monday morning.
If found please phone Larraine at
926-3701.
Rides & Car Pools
14
NEED RIDE FROM RICHMOND
(Vicinity Steveston Hwy. & No. 1-
3 Road preferably). Can use own
car part of time. Staff; can leave
at 4:30. 274-3303 or 228-4983.	
RIDERS WANTED FROM SOUTH
Brighouse, Richmond. Morning
classes. Non-smokers please.
Phone Sheila 274-1519.
Special Notices
15
ASTROLOGER & GRAPHOLOGIST.
Personality, aptitude and profes-
sional counselling. 738-0207.	
LORD BYNG SCHOOL RUMMAGE
Sale, 16th & Crown, Sept. 30 and
Oct. 1. 7 until 9:30 p.m.	
UBC BOWLING CLUB NEEDS
more members especially girls to
bowl in our Monday Night League.
New and low average bowlers welcome. For further information call
Walter at 228-8225.	
THE BIG GREEN MACHINE AP-
pears at Undercut '71. Sat., Oct.
2. SUB cafe.	
CANADA STUDENT LOAN NOTICE
Schedule 2 Confirmation of Enrolment must be completed and returned to the bank before 29th
October 1971 to maintain irterest
free status on your Canada Student Loan.
—Courtesy of Bank of Montreal
MUSICAL THEATRE INFORMAL
fun evening for old and new members of Mussoc Thurs. Sept. 23
at SUB. 207-209 8:30  - 1:00 a.m.
Travel Opportunities
16
STUDENTS: UNIVERSITY CHAR-
ter Calgary to London Sept. 30
$125 or best offer. Call 731-8349
anytime.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
1965 VW, excellent condition. $650.
Contact Paul at 733-5741.	
1963 FORD COUNTRY SQUIRE
$400, and 1957 Pontiac S.W. $100
o.n.o.  Phone  321-1483 after 6 p.m.
'55 VW EXCELLENT CONDITION!
Just overhauled. Very reliable.
Ready   to  drive.   Ph.   738-6003.
1964 ANGLIA DELUXE. VERY
good shape $400.00 or best offer.
Phone 224-9684 ask for room 11.
'65 MINI COUNTRYMAN REBUILT
engine, real good condition $350.
255-5613.
Auto Repairs
24
WILLING TO SAND AND MASK
your car? If so, I'll paint it for
$15, or $35 — paint supplied. Bruce
687-4013, 738-5056.
Motorcycles
25
BUSINESS SERVICES
Art Services
31
STEAMBUBBLE GRAPHICS FOR
posters at student (not mamooks
ripoff), prices; and photography
services. John or Nick at the
Steambubble, third floor Lassere>
almost anytime.
Dance Bands
33
Scandals
37
GASTOWN'S A RIOT BUT THE
Gastown Saloon's pretty cool. Tally Honks playing there next two
weeks. No entry fee, just $1.00
worth of garbage. 137 Water Street
PH.  683-9469.	
PEDAL YOUR ASS FOR $89.95?
See the Wheeler Dealer at the
Cycle Center, 2320 W. 4th. 731-5531.
Photography
35
utht Hen* and gutter
\k?       Cameras:
* NFB
Still
Photography
Contest For
Photogs
Under 25  . .
Full details at —
3010W. Broadway
736-7833
Typing
40
TEDIOUS TASKS — PROFESSION-
al typing. IBM Selectric — Days,
Evenings, Weekends. Phone Shari
at 738-8745 — Reasonable prices.
IBM SELECTRIC TYPING SER-
vice. Theses, manuscripts, essays,
etc.  Mrs.  Troche, 437-1355.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
PART TIME TYPIST REQUIRED
for   booking   agency.   Phone   688-
7274.	
SINE NOMINE SINGERS RE-
quire bass soloist for Britten's —
Rejoice in the Lamb — and Bach's
— Christ Lay in the Bonds of
Death — for October 17 concert.
Others (tenors or basses), good
readers, also appreciated. Contact
Len Lythgoe, director at 224-1602
before Monday.	
TOPLESS DANCERS REQUIRED
for private student party. Ph. 733-
6314  Gary.
Music Instruction
61
PIANO AND THEORY INSTRUC-
tion available at U.B.C. from ex-
perienced teacher (A.R.C.T.,
B.Mus.)   Phone  Linda  327-8677.
INSTRUCTION  & SCHOOLS
Special Classes
62
POTTERY CLASSES
Beginner, Interm, Advanced
at
POTTER'S  CENTRE
Wheelwork,  Glazinq  &  Firing
To Start September 20th
Phone 261-4764
Tutors—Wanted
64
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
3' x 5' DESK, $20. OTHER FURNI-
ture, dishes, towels. blankets,
clothes size 9. 224-0581 or No. 3,
5658 Dalhousie.	
GOOD USED DOUBLE MATTRESS
$15.00 or offers. 921-9235.	
ROSIGNOL STRATOS SKIS 207
cm. plus bindings $75. Herschung
boots size 7%. $40. Jim 224-0942.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
SLEEPING ROOM NEAR UBC
gates for male student. $55 month.
Separate entrance. 224-9319.	
FREE RENT IN PRIVATE HOME
for experienced carpentry work.
Call 263-5020 or 263-4227.	
ROOM, BOARD & SALARY FOR
girl student in exchange for approximately 2% hrs. help a day
and babysitting. Private room
with own bath & TV. Easy ac-
cess to UBC. Phone 266-5763.
MADE WANTED TO SHARE BED-
room with same in large apart-
ment.  Kits.   $60.   733-0326.	
LOTS OF ROOM AT UNDERCUT
'71,  SUB  cafe,  Sat., Oct. 2.
Room & Board
82
THE SIGMA CHI HOUSE OFFERS
you: largest rooms, comfortable
lounge areas, colour TV. Newest
house on campus. Excellent food.
5725 Agronomy Rd. Phone 224-9620.
Furn. Apis.
83
Unf. Apts.
84
STUDENT   SPECIAL
3  Rooms  of  Furniture
From $199.95
HOUSE OF GROUPS
1278   Granville
Day 687-5043 Eve. 277-9247
Accommodation —
Other Cities
87
Use Ubyssey Classified
TO SELL - BUY - INFORM
The U.B.C. Campus
MARKET PLACE Thursday, September 23, 1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
sfioe sfjopps
GET LOST!
FOR THE REAL MAIM
ONLY.
■ . ■■ i.   ■   ■"   ■ . ■   ■»        l__«t* «1M».     ■■    "      •*=«. *<•.■.. '*•.■
—gary gruenski photo
IRENE SIGISMUND gets set to take the snap from centre Judy Zaichkowsky while Aubin Brink (left) and
Lesley Reid (right) wait for the call.
Home Ec to challenge 'Birds?
gwerSHoesfonwB
jn^nsr^nxASBR'ioCnTioNg
Hiker by
Tan Leather-
only $41.00
Open Thursday and Friday nites.
C.O.D. orders accepted.
Credit and Chargex Cards honoured
The girls from home
economics are out to win the
Teacup football game.
They have been holding
workouts on the grass east of SUB
and coach Ian Jukes is confident
this team can handle the nurses.
"We have had nearly 50 girls
out for practices so we should be
able to put out a good team," said
Jukes.
"The girls are enthusiastic
about beating the (nurses."
There are to be two games in
542 Granville and 435 W. Hastings St.
776 Granville — Adams Apple Boutique
* "Design and word Trade marks in Canada of the
Villager Shoe Shoppes Ltd."
Star-studded track team
By SUE NICOLS and
LYNN POLLOCK
"The women's track team is
the most star-studded team on
campus."
FOR PREFERRED RISKS ONLY
It Pays to Shop for Car Insurance
YOU CAN SAVE MONEY ON CAR INSURANCE AT WESTCO
(fi
tfi
INSURANCE   COMPANY
HEAD OFFICE: 1927 WEST BROADWAY, VANCOUVER 9, BRITISH COLUMBIA
FAST CLAIM SERVICE
FILL IN AND RETURN THIS COUPON TODAY OR PHONE IN THE DETAILS TODAY
FOR WRITTEN QUOTATION, NO OBLIGATION. NO SALESMAN WILL CALL.
MAIL THIS COUPON FOR OUR LOW RATES ON YOUR AUTOMOBILE
Name	
Residence
Address..	
(Please Print)
City	
Phone: Home. Office..
Occupation         	
Age	
Prov..
Married □ Divorced □      Male □
Separated □ Never Married n Female D
Date first licensed to drive 	
Have you or any member of your household been involved
In any accident in the past five years?
Yes D No D (If "yes" provide details on a separate sheet).
In the last five years has your
license been suspended?  	
Are you now insured?   	
Date current policy expires              	
This coupon  is designed  solely to enable  non-policy
holders to obtain an application and rates for their cars.
Year of automobile	
Make of automobile—
No. of cylinders	
Horsepower..
Modet (Impala, Dart, etc.)	
2/4 dr-sedan, s/w, h/t, conv...
Days per week driven to
work, train or bus depot,
or fringe parking area	
One way driving distance	
Is car used in business
(except to and from work)?
Car No. 1
-Days
..Miles.
Yes Q No D
Car No. 2
.Days
.Miles
Yes D No n
Give number and dates
of traffic convictions
in last 5 years.
LIST INFORMATION ON ALL ADDITIONAL DRIVERS
Age
Male or
Female
Relation
To You
Years
Licensed
Married
or Single
% of Use
Car#1
Car #2
FPR UBC 27
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
So says Lionel Pugh,national
track and field team coach and
coach of the UBC team.
Eight of the 13 members are
international record holders -
Debbie Brill, Brenda Eisler, Penny
May, Patty Loverock, Thelma
Fynn, Joan Pavelich, Ann Covell,
and Gail Turney.
"These girls undoubtedly form
the most powerful track and field
team in the country.
Three-quarters of them will
almost certainly be in the
Olympics."
The team will continue formal
training in October to prepare
themselves for upcoming meets.
The most important of these
meets will be the Western Canada
Inter-collegiate Conference
championships in Saskatoon.
They will compete against
teams from B.C., Alberta,
Saskatchewan and Manitoba.
"It is possible to conceive of
every record being broken and
held by the UBC team," said
Pugh.
Intramurals
AU football preliminary rounds
scheduled for Thursday at 12:30
have been changed to Friday at
12:30. Games will be played on
the same fields as scheduled.
Badminton and tennis
competition start on Monday. All
those interested in the racket are
asked to check their playing
times.
A second unit: managers
meeting will be held on October 5
at 7 p.m. Meeting will take place
in the council chambers in SUB.
the near future, one against
physical education and the
Teacup game.
Held annually to raise money
for charity, the football game
between the nurses and home'
economics draws larger crowds
than any other sports event on
campus.
In previous years the halftime
show at the game has featured a
chariot race between the
engineers and the foresters.
Last year the race got out of
hand and some participants were
seriously injured forcing a
cancellation of this year's race.
The Teacup game is to be held
sometime in October.
Grid 'Birds
try again
Saturday
The University of
Saskatchewan football team will
be in town this Saturday to
challenge the Thunderbirds.
The game promises to be a
battle for last place in the league
since both teams have started the
year very slowly.
Saturday in Edmonton the
'Birds suffered their second
consecutive loss at the hands of
the powerful University of
Alberta Golden Bears by a score
of 54-0.
The smaller and less
experienced UBC squad never
stopped trying but couldn't cope
with the Bears' relentless passing
and running attack.
Saturday's game was costly for
the 'Birds.
End Rick Peck and defensive
halfback Joe Gluska both suffered
knee injuries. Peck will be lost for
the season and Gluska for 2
weeks.
Despite their recent losses,
team spirit is reported to be better
than ever on the 'Birds. Page 8
THE       UBYSSEY
Thursday, September 23, 1971
CUPE concerned about women's rights
OTTAWA (CUP) - The
Canadian Union of Public
Employees will recognize this
week that labor unions have a
major role in improving the status
of women.
The recognition is contained in
Elite rule
in Canada
aids US
By MIKE SASGES
Canada needs a new critical
social science to study the myths
of the ruling class, UBC political
science professor Phil Resnick said
Tuesday.
"This study should stress the
study of the ruling elite or the
bourgeosie and the way the state
has been used by this class," said
Resnick.
He called Canada's ruling class
"a comprador class."
"The ruling class doesn't even
own the means of production —
they just manage it for American
economic interests," he told 50
persons in the SUB ballroom.
Anthropology student Dick
Betts said the American
domination of Canadian resources
and manufacturing was only one
part of "Canada's subjugation."
"Not only are our resources
ripped-off, but human labor and
our culture have been ripped off,"
Betts said.
"In no way can we physically
control our own lives because of
this."
And the university aids this
total subjugation, Betts said.
"One has to only look at this
university's research for the
Mid-Canada Development
Foundation that will truly
colonize the north to see this."
"The mechanics of putting this
development into operation don't
exist in this country but south of
the border," he said.
He called Canada a "banana
republic."
"The effects of colonial
repression could be seen in the
Vancouver police force during the
October crisis of last year."
a major policy statement to be
presented to the union's national
conference in Edmonton.
The 35-page booklet, endorsed
by executive members including
CUPE president Stanley Little,
documents   the   trend   in   most
union organizations when it notes
that, although over one-third of
the CUPE membership is
composed of women, they are at
the bottom of the union heap
when it comes to leadership roles.
Women    are    vastly    in    the
minority on national and local
executive in ■ conference
delegations and among field and
education representatives.
The document calls for
proportionate representation of
women in the union hierarchy,
but sets no quotas.
Among other reforms, the
paper calls for:
# An end to
s e x-d i scriminatory job
descriptions.
# The setting of pay rates by
job evaluation to ensure equal pay
for equal work.
# Day care centres through
collective bargaining where
needed at the place of
employment.
# Maternity leave, with
retention of seniority rights.
Supporters of the fight against
sexism see the document as an
important theoretical step taken
by an influential national union
against the male-dominated
tradition of labor organizations.
How it will be received by a
national conference at which
women will likely be, as always, a
minority, is another question.
Even enthusiastic adoption by the
conference will not change the
fact that it is a theoretical
document — not binding on men,
women or their employers.
In that case, women in the
work force will only attain equal
status with men as they become
convinced that it is in fact their
right, and are prepared to demand
and, if necessary, fight for that
right.
Women's studies
gets $3,000 grant
—daryl tan photo
SHUNNING benches covered with pigeon poo and spilt milk,
despondent students make do with hard cobbles and concrete
outside SUB to lounge on.
The Alumni Association has
awarded the women's studies
program a $3,000 grant, said
program co-ordinator Anne Petrie
Wednesday.
Most of the grant will be used
to help pay operating expenses
such as duplication of course
material, publicity and
correspondence said Petrie, who is
expecting 500 people for the first
meeting Tuesday.
"The money will also help to
provide a minimal salaries for the
co-ordinator     and    assistant
co-ordinator, who have been
working on the program on a
daily basis since August," she said.
Petrie said dean of women
Helen McCrae was helpful in
applying for the grant as well as in
recommending the program as a
legitimate field of study.
In a letter to the Alumni
Association, McCrae said: "At this
time I think it is extremely
important that university women
should be knowledgeable and well
informed about matters pertaining
to their sex."
Trudeau lacks solution for jobless young
OTTAWA (CUP) - The unemployment
rate for people under 25, despite the federal
government's Opportunities for Youth
program and the promised economic upswing,
was higher last month than it was in August,
1970.
Prime minister Pierre Trudeau's only
comment, made Thursday in the House of
Commons, was that the government did not
know enough about youth and "their
attitudes toward existing work ethics" to
explain why so many young people were
unemployed.
Unemployed among the 14 to 24 age group
was at a 9.1 per cent rate this August, as
compared to 8.7 per cent a year ago. In July
unemployment was at 10.8 per cent.
The unemployment rate for the total work
force in Canada was 5.1 per cent, with
455,000 people out of work. Of this group,
240,000 were under 25.
Trudeau and finance minister Edgar
Benson admitted Monday that the
government has no solution to rampant
unemployment among people under 25 years
of age.
"The problem is with the teenage group
which has entered the labor force," said
Trudeau, He explained that young people are
not leaving the labor force after the summer
holidays at their normal rate.
There are two possible reasons for this
year's high unemployment among youth:
Either     they     are     not     enrolling    at
post-secondary educational   institutes in the
same proportion as past years, or else there
are fewer jobs for non-experienced workers.
The prime minister said he sees no reason
for the government to implement further
measures to fight unemployment but
admitted that economic statistics released
Sept. 16 "did bring to light the new
phenomenon of the drastic rise in
unemployment of those registered as
unemplyed teenagers."
Of the 455,000 Canadians now out of
work, more than half are under 25.
More detailed figures showing
unemployment rates for workers under 20
will be released within a week. The
government is also studying the possibility of
using price and wage controls to stem the
inflation which Trudeau admitted is creeping
back into the economy.
HOME
FOR
SALE
CLOSE TO
U.B.C.
A warm friendly family home in sunny Southlands. This lovely home was
completely rebuilt by Its building-contractor owner for his own use under a
top architect's direction.
It contains many unique features not found in any ordinary home, such as
a huge fireplace in the living room and a permanent barbecue in the dining
room; these rooms beautifully panelled with native hardwoods, and with
heavy beamed ceiling. This home contains more built-ins, cupboards, closets,
shelves and such than you ever imagined a house could have.
It has a wine cellar, zone heating (two oil furnaces), a garden designed for
beauty with almost no maintenance. It has a completely finished basement
with a beautiful laundry room, huge rec room, large completely fitted-out
workshop and storage.
Main floor has huge living room, den, dining room and large family
room-kitchen.
Upstairs are three bedrooms, the large master bedroom having cathedral
window and natural wood panelling.
If this type of home sounds like your cup of tea, call 266-8903 for
appointment to view. Price: $59,900.00
^^■K^^^c^x^'ic^i^it^M^x^it^x^x^K^A^x^-K^x^'x^K^x^x^vv
HOW'S YOUR IRISH ACCENT?
AUDITIONS FOR THE THEATRE DEPARTMENT'S
THE PLAYBOY OF THE
WESTERN WORLD
TO BE PRESENTED NOVEMBER 5-13
will be held MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 27th
1:30— 5:30
in Room 112 of the Frederic Wood Theatre Building
Auditions are open to all UBC Faculty, Staff and Students

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0126599/manifest

Comment

Related Items