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The Ubyssey Nov 27, 1984

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Array THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXVII, No. 23
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, November 27,1984
£>■!  48 228-2301
CFS loses as thousands vote
By ROBERT BEYNON
UBC's students strongly defeated
the Canadian Federation of
Students referendum which would
have cost $7.50 each.
The Alma Mater Society's election results show 5,084 students or
25 per cent of UBC students voted.
And 85 per cent of those students
voted no.
The results say the Yes side did
not win a single poll at UBC and
almost all polls voted no in the same
proportion. Only the poll in the
Civil and Mechanical Engineering
building voted almost entirely no.
The last time this many students
voted was in 1982.
AMS elections commissioner
Don Mustard said the results were
very clear and he thinks no one will
challenge the results. He added the
fact 25 per cent of UBC's student
society turned out to vote pleased
him.
Mustard  said the  results  show
Experts attack
rights decision
By CHARLIE FIDELMAN
The B.C. Council of Human
Rights chair is incompetent and
wrong to dismiss the case of a Victoria women who filed a complaint
of sexual harassment against her
employer.
"(Council chair) Jim Edgett is
too uninformed and incompetent to
understand statutory human rights
enforcement and sexual harrass-
ment," said Jon Gates, Human
Rights Coalition provincial
spokesperson.
The official report written by
Edgett states evidence that waitress
Andrea Fields was hugged and
kissed by Wilhelm Ueffing, owner
of Willie's Rendezvous in Victoria,
on more than one occasion.
It is the first case heard by the
new council which, despite much
criticism, the provincial government created while disbanding
another.
"But Ueffing hugged and kissed
everyone," said Edgett Monday,
"there was no evidence Fields objected to Ueffing's warm manner."
Edgett said the fact Fields brought
charges against Ueffing is not
necessarily evidence of her objection.
"It is not a defense to say all
employees are treated to equal
discrimination," Gates said. The
fact Ueffing's behavior is habitual
only adds weight to sexual harassment complaints, said Gates. "God
help us when Edgett gets to habitual
racial beatings," he added.
Gates said he is convinced Ueffing would have been convicted
anywhere else in Canada. "What
makes this one so rare is that in this
case the guy has written notes,"
said Gates.
Edgett's report states "two of
these notes could, if taken out of
context, be interpreted as being
crude or offensive." Six notes from
Ueffing to Fields were entered as
evidence, some of these referring to
the "sexiness" of Field's body and
asking her for sex.
When asked about the notes
Edgett said, "out of context means
out of context of all the notes."
The dismissal of Field's case
bypasses a large established body of
human rights legislation and
precidents in all Canadian jurisdictions, said Gates. The Canadian
Human Rights Tribunal set a precedent by saying a negative work atmosphere could of itself count as
sexual harassment, Gates said.
"The notes are concrete
evidence, more than atmosphere or
even one person's word against
another's," he added.
He said this is a classical woman's
case, where the victim is on trial as
in a rape trial. "She was the one put
through the mill," he said. The
government is going to strip women
of protection in the work place, he
added.
Alicia Lawrence, former human
rights branch officer, said the council's decision is unbelievable. "The
trivialization of sexual harassment
is shocking."
Usually the onus or proof is on
the respondent, but Ueffing agreed
to the allegations, said Lawrence.
She said the new five-member
council formed under Socred Bill 11
last April did not move into effect
See page 2: REVIEW
UBC students thought the question
was important and therefore came
out to vote.
CFS executive officer Donna
Morgan said the campaign here failed because UBC did not have the
necessary understanding of CFS
and because few UBC students
worked on the yes campaign.
She added, "UBC is different
than any campus I've ever worked
on before. There are really low turnouts for events. It lacks a sense of
community."
She also said false information
the no committee published shortly
before the election could not be
countered and weighted the voting
against the yes campaign.
"But for the last week we had a
sense things weren't going well,"
Morgan said. She said future AMS-
CFS relations would be more distant and that she was disappointed
UBC students did not join.
She said UBC needs more activity. "Faculty members seem to be
surprised that you want to talk to a
class," said Morgan.
No committee co-chair Donna
Chow said she didn't know why students voted as they did and she
didn't expect so many students to
vote.
— rory a. photo
WORKIN' HARD, THE$E guys really do, ya know, said an unknown Ubyssey photog. Like, they're out there in
the rain, and scum, and stuff. And when those leaves fall all over the place, they cleaned 'em all up even though
there's not so many of 'err now. They deserve some recognition, ya know, so here it is.
Kootenay school may  return
VICTORIA (CUP) — There's a
move afoot in the Kootenays to reopen the David Thompson University Centre, this time with private
funding. It appears the B.C. government is interested.
Nearly two months ago> t Nelson
and area group formed to field proposals for an independentl1' funded
degree granting institution at
DTUC, closed by the provincial
government in May, 1983.
Group spokesperson Wally Penner
said the group has applied for society status (The Kootenay University
Society) and has received numerous
proposals to reopen the centre.
Penner said in an interview last
week the society is approaching the
ministry of education. He said he
talked with education minister Jack
Heinrich at the recent Social Credit
convention, who "indicated he was
willing to meet with society members to discuss their plans."
A resolution to reopen DTUC
with .government funding was defeated at the convention. Asked
why he didn't change the resolution
to ask for an independently funded
institution, Penner replied, "If the
delegates didn't support independent funding, it would jeopardize
what we're doing now."
Heinrich strongly opposed the resolution, saying it was simply "too
cost prohibitive."
"I can't justify those types of expenditures in lean times . . . you
can't have a system like that
(DTUC) onstream which was an extraordinary sponge for absorbing
monies where you could get a great
deal more production in the college
system."
Caldicott appeals to crowd to save planet
By PATTI FLATHER
Helen Caldicott — physician,
peace activist, film star, mother —
had 3,500 people standing up applauding and brushing away tears
Monday night as she urged them to
take individual responsibility for
stopping the arms race and saving
the world from nuclear disaster.
"Anyone who says to me they
don't have enought time to save the
earth is talking rhubarb. Do you
want your babies to live or do you
want them to vaporise?" Caldicott
asked the almost sellout crowd in
War Memorial gym. "That means
changing the priorities in your lives
and feeling very uncomfortable."
"Every one of you can be as
powerful as the most powerful person who ever lived. It's fear that
drives me. I'm damned if these guys
are going to kill my kids," said
Caldicott.
Caldicott, who appeared in the
Academy Award winning film If
You Love This Planet, described a
personal talk with U.S. president
CALDICOTT
smiles a lot
Ronald Reagan she had two years
ago.
"He was sort of affable and he
nods his head like this," she began,
nodding her head to demonstrate.
"Then he told me the Russians are
godless communists."
Caldicott said he refused to
discuss the medical ejffects of
nuclear war, adding every single
statement he made was faciually incorrect. When Caldicott corrected
him, she said, he ignored her and
his eyes glazed over.
"I left the white house clinically
shocked."
Caldicott said a World Health
Organization study of a limited
nuclear war using only 7,000 of the
50,000 hydrogen bombs the two
superpowers have showed two
billion people would die. And a
nuclear winter could result, where
the sun is blocked, ternperatures
plummet, and possibly all species
on earth could die.
"They (scientists) find the
threshold for such effect may be on-
^a^amam^aaWaWbmmm^ammm
ly one per cent of the nuclear
arsenal of the U.S. One per cent,"
she said.
Because the Reagan administration believes in winnable nuclear
war, she said, the official policy of
the Reagan administration is
nuclear winter. "Those people
should be impeached," she said as
the audience applauded.
Reagan will make nuclear war a
mathematical certainty because he
wants to add to the 30,000 U.S.
hydrogen bombs, she said.
She added, "You have just
elected a government that goes
hand in hand with the Reagan administration."
Caldicott said the cruise missile
being tested in Canada ends arms
control because it can be hidden to
avoid satellite detection. "You've
allowed that to happen . . . Yes,
you have," she charged the crowd,
because Canada is a democracy.
Canadian politicians are ignorant
of nuclear arms issues and the people must educate them, she said.
Caldicott said at former prime
minister Pierre Trudeau's request
she spoke to the cabinet and found
they did not know Richard Perle,
U.S. undersecretary of defense and
renowned hawk, really runs the
Reagan administration.
Caldicott said nuclear war could
happen a number of ways: through
computer error, human fallibility
the old age of the superpower
leaders or through a combination of
huge arms race profits and the pride
of rulers.
Caldicott's speech, sponsored by
AMS Programs and UBC Students
for Peace and Mutual Disarmament, was introduced by Vancouver
mayor Mike Harcourt. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 27, 1984
Daycare has cockroaches
WINNIPEG (CUP) — The
daycare centre at the University of
Winnipeg is infested with mice and
cockroaches, and children are subjected to toxic chemicals in the main
play area, but administrators have
refused to take action on the problem, according to centre workers.
Staff members have recently gone
public with their concerns in hopes
of pressuring the university to find
a new location to replace "facilities
(which) have violated Manitoba
daycare regulations since they came
into existence," said one worker
who asked to remain anonymous.
Another daycare employee said U
of W administrators "pulled
strings" to assure the facility remains open without proper renovations.
"We got our licence renewed
time after time on the conditions
that we would be relocating soon,"
she said.
Even administration vice-
president Dr. Ross McCormack
acknowledged years of neglect on
the part of the university.
"The sins of the past are now
visiting on the sons and daughters
of the present," he said. His
secretary Jewel Reimer, added that
"decisions to improve conditions
were delayed because of the impen-
Montrealers
protest fees
MONTREAL (CUP) — Montreal's four universities, totalling
aobut 100,000 full-time equivalent
students among them, will join in a
demonstration Dec. 5 against the
thaw in university tuition fees.
The demonstration will mark the
first time in at least a decade that
the four schools' student associations have linked together in protest.
Bulgarian sings
UBC Esperanto Club is presenting a Bulgarian singing Esperanto
in a benefit concert for Ethiopia
hunger victims.
The benefit concert for Ethiopia
hunger victims is taking place Tuesday, November 27, 7:30, Recital
Hall UBC Music Department. A
contribution of more than the $2
cover charge is welcome, said Mark
Fettes, science graduate student and
Esperanto UBC member.
Review to follow
From page 1
until September so whoever investigated the Fields case was not a
trained human rights officer.
"Harassment is a very delicate subject," she said.
"this is our opportunity to
challenge the legality of the act, the
fairness of the council, of the process, and the adequate investigation
that is needed," said Lawrence.
The next step is the pursuit of
judicial review procedures, said
Lawrence.
Corky Says:
Family   reunions
are all relative!
HAIR
CORKYS
APPOINTMENT SERVICE
731-4191
3644 West 4th Avenue
At Alma
ding program to relocate."
Workers say they are "tired of
being angry" after years of promises of a better location and working in an environment that has been
hazardous to their health, and that
of the children.
Some violations cited by the Winnipeg health department include:
• Inspection ports, used by
maintenance staff to inspect sewage
pipes, are located in the floor of the
main play area, and they are not
cleaned with disinfectant regularly.
• The temperature throughout
the daycare is 80 degrees fahrenheit
or  higher,  due  to  the  numerous
steampipes   running   through   the
building.
• Exits are cluttered because of
inadequate storage space, posing a
potential hazard in case of fire.
• Poisonous gases, including
CC2 and H2S, are discharged from
the sewage inspecting ports in the
main playroom.
• Ventilation is inadequate.
• Chemicals from the print
shop next door infiltrate the centre.
• Floods occur on a regular
basis, and are not properly cleaned
up.
• The daycare centre is infested
by mice and cockroaches.
Chriatnw*. It connotes grVlmj, good tojitf, Mend»Vrajt«ons., snow,, decorations, tt a alto emended by
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BALLET UBC JAZZ
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This is a great way for all newcomers and former
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FOR FURTHER INFORMATION
COME TO SUB 216E
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NOTE: New Ballet I teacher Monday 3:30-5:00
Leslie Whitfield
.  ' * 1 A *
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He also has "fun" shrink framed posters
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266-3306 Tuesday, November 27,1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Computers replace instructors
By VICTOR WONG
Electrical/electronic students at
the B.C. Institute of Technology
are not pleased that computers will
be replacing lecturers there in
January.
Doug Holden, electronics 2, said
the phasing out of lecturers concerns him and other students. "The
material is hard and there is a lot of
it. Without qualified faculty help,
there's no way we can do it.
Everyone is worried that the failure
rate is going to go up," Holden
said.
The quality of education is
already suffering this term, Holden
said, because the instructors are
busy writing next term's material
and cannot help students.
He added they have already
received some of the new material
"and the teachers still have to explain it." The instructors in charge
of tutorial sessions cannot help
them with the new material, he said,
because they do not know the subject as well as the lecturers and cannot explain the problems.
"The (regular) instructors don't
like it," Holden added, "but they
say they can't do anything — they
have to write modules and don't
have time to devote to their
students. They're getting upset."
But electrical/electronic head Ed
Warkentin said Holden
misunderstood the program. He
said HI-TRAC, the High
Technology Training Access program, would make instructors more
available for student consultation.
He said not giving lectures will
free the lecturers up and the fact
they are presently writing up the
new program is not cramping their
time.
He added, "This doesn't mean
we're firing anyone; we still need
the expertise of the staft. In fact
we're hiring six more people for
staff."
HI-TRAC is supposed to let the
student motivate themselves to
study and pace themselves.
With HI-TRAC, he said students
will pick up a paper-based module
of the lesson and log into a computer console at BCIT's study centre. Student will test themselves on
the module's lesson by answering a
series   of   questions   randomly
generated by the computer.
Warkentin said the role of the
computer in the program is exaggerated.
"The computer only comes in for
self-testing and logging in," he
said. "Basically, it's a tracking
device for students. If we find that
one student has been missing three
or more modules, then obviously
there's a problem."
Socreds mismanage B.C. forests
By BETSY GOLDBERG
British Columbia needs more efficient resource management to create jobs, a prominent NDP MLA
said Friday.
"We're an economy tied to the
resource industry of this province,"
Bob Williams, newly-elected MLA
for Vancouver East and a former
cabinet minister told 30 people in
the Buchanan penthouse.
He said this dependence is a highly cyclical one, and that the Social
Credit government has never recognized the problems related to this.
Right-wing paper
covertly
funded from U.S.
By    HOWARD   GOLDENTHAL
and
ALBERT NERENBERG
Canadian University Press
MONTREAL — A powerful
American organization with ties to
the Republican party is funneling
money and guidance to a new wave
of student publications which have
sprung up at universities across Ontario and Quebec in the last 18 months.
The Institute of Educational Affairs, a non-profit foundation based in New York and directed by
William Simon, one of the
Republican party's most successful
fundraisers, gave grants to at least
three Canadian student
newspapers: the McGill Magazine,
the University of Toronto
Magazine, and Libertas, a new
publication at Queen's University in
Kingston..The IE A also gives advice
to the editors of these papers.
In a phone interview from New
York, Jonathan Cohen, the IE A
student journalism co-ordinator,
confirmed the Institute gave money
and guidance to the three
newspapers. Cohen refused to say
how much money the IEA had
given to each paper.
McGill Magazine associate editor
Peter Theotikos said the publication got "quite a bit" of IEA
money last year. Editor Mark Pro-
udman said that although he was in
contact with the IEA, so far this
year the Magazine had not received
any money from this.
None of the publications list their
connections to the IEA anywhere.
The IEA was founded in 1980 by
William Simon, U.S. treasurer
under Richard Nixon's administration and secretary of the treasury in
president Gerald Ford's administration, and by well-known neo-
conservative journalist and
philosopher Irving Kristol.
In the 1980 election, Simon, a
Reagan supporter, made a reputation for himself as one of the
Republican party's most successful
fundraisers. He authored two
books, "A Time for Truth" and
"A Time for Action" which Proud-
man described as "Republican
manifestos."
Simon is president of the influential John Olin Foundation, which is
IEA's major contributor. Simon
also sits as a director on the board
of the Canadian Haliburton Company Power Corporation.
Since 1980, the IEA has funded
69 "alternative" student
newspapers in North America including the three in Canada.
McGill Magazine and University
of Toronto Magazine run many of
the same articles. Last year, the
McGill and U of T magazines
printed features attacking the European peace movement, and criticized students for being "anti-
American" without refering to any
specific organization.
Libertas and U of T carried a
review of the book "Sex and the
Brain" which claims sexual inequality is genetic. Both Libertas and
U of T published an article saying
the United States is afraid to act in
world affairs after Vietnam. This
year, all three magazines accused
the three leaders of Canada's main
political parties of being "liberals."
Libertas carried a pre-election in-
See page 8: OTHER
Consequently they have mismanaged through poor fiscal planning,
said Williams.
The government has invested in
expensive projects, such as Northeast Coal at a cost of :$500,000 a
job, that have not created jobs as
cheaply as possible, he said.
In keeping with his iheme, A
Positive Approach to Unemployment," Williams said job creation
expenditures should not be excessive.
He said one area which could cre
ate jobs if the Socreds did not mismanage it is forestry. "It (forestry)
is a demonstration of their lack of
application of labor and the profligate use of natural resources,"
Williams said, adding that half of
every tree cut is wasted, unlike in
the Scandinavian forestry industry
which is five times more efficient.
He said the main fault of the resource industry in B.C. is new
blood is not being allowed into the
system to create new jobs. "We
have an (tree farm) allocation system that's scandalous,"  Williams
said. He said the community itself,
not government or industry, is the
best manager of its local industry
and should manage them.
He also said small-scale programs
should be emphasized, and added
"big things don't work very well."
Williams said there is much opportunity for job creation within a
community rather than within the
province, citing a successful Na-
naimo credit union as an example
of this.
art beynon photo
300 PEOPLE GATHER Saturday outside American consulate to protest U.S. policies in Central America.
Rankin praises Nicaraguan election
RANKIN . . . talking again
By PATTI FLATHER
Children joked around, people
sang, danced, clapped, and listened
to speakers, dogs ceased each
other, and 300 people marched in a
long picket in the cold Saturday afternoon.
The demonstration, sponsored by
the Emergency Response Coalition,
in front of the U.S. consulate protested U.S. involvement in Central
America.
Supporters, many of them Latin
American, carried picket signs
reading "Reagan get your bloody
troops out of Grenada" and "U.S.
remember Vietnam." Colorful banners were draped on the large concrete building charging "Uncle Sam
is a genocidal maniac. Stop him before he kills more."
After a half hour walking picket
on the Georgia St. sidewalk, several
people spoke to the crowd.
Brenda Webb, one of several
Vancouver lawyers in Nicaragua before and during their elections said,
"All the parties were freely able to
participate. Everyone got the same
amount of money from the government."
Webb said she was impressed
with the scrupulousness of election
officials. Many old people said they
were voting for the first time because they felt this was the first time
elections had meaning, she said.
Webb described an evening counting ballots in a small town, where
there was no electricity so a kerosene lamp was used. "It was a very
exciting moment."
Nicaraguans are very preoccupied
with the war against the contras,
and are very worried they may be
invaded by the U.S. anytime, Webb
said.
Vancouver city alderperson
Harry Rankin said Canadians must
be told in greater numbers the facts
about Central America, and the issue must be spread to all levels of
government.
"We have a job to do. Each of
these tinderboxes that occur in the
world threatens the existence of the
whole world," Rankin said.
Rankin said Nicaraguan elections
are more democratic than in the
U.S. or Canada because each party
is given equal funds. He asked why
Canada could send observers for
the U.S.-supported El Salvador
elections but not the U.S.-opposed
Nicaraguan ones. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 27, 1984
Clonish papers
We'd like to bemoan the fact that in some Canadian universities, clonish
papers bearing student and faculty member's names are appearing. They
are not open expressions of political beliefs flowing comfortably in the
same direction as the prevalent conservative tradewinds but are sly little attempts at instant credibility through the fraudulent use of the names of
respectable people in these institutions.
There is an American organization that is feeding dollars and ideas to
these fledgling student publications which are storefront operations opened up by the Institute of Educational Affairs.
Is this situation a metaphor for the larger political scene in Canada? The
lure of the seemingly limitless American money is so great that we seem
prepared to leap through any size hoop to prove ourselves worthy recipients of their "charity." We are being bought into a subservient position.
We cannot afford to accept gifts of this nature because there comes a
point when we will not be able to say no. We will reach the point when
their conservative, right wing, national ideology is grafted onto us. We
have our own conservatives. We don't need imports. We should be able to
handle our own political concerns in a forum of our own choosing. With
respect to dealings with our neighbours to the south, we welcome trade,
value for value, but we should not be prepared to sell our souls politically or
otherwise.
Human rights big joke
By PATTI FLATHER
The cat's out of the bag. The
eight-month-old B.C. Council of
Human Rights is a joke. And that's
scary.
Of course die-hard human rights
activists knew all along. They raised
a stink from the very beginning,
when the Socreds nuked the old
Human Rights Act, disbanded the
former human rights commission,
and fired human rights branch staff
under Bill 11 last April. That was
when the new five member council
was formed.
rj^^)
From this time on experts in
B.C., across Canada and internationally predicted human rights
protection would diminish.
And then, about two months
ago, a human rights conference was
held in Victoria. Jim Edgett, Council of Human Rights chair, turned
down the invite, saying his attendance would color the required neutrality of the council.
While human rights supporters
puzzled over how that worked,
Edgett and company were pondering the first case facing their new
council. Now the ruling is out — the
council dismissed the case of a
young Victoria woman who complained of sexual harassment by her
employer.
What is startling about the case is
that the council agreed with many
of waitress Andrea Fields' complaints against restaurant owner
Wilhelm Ueffing, but did not consider them sexual harassment.
Fields said on several occasions
her boss tried to hug her, kiss her,
and pinch and grab her body, including her breasts. The council decision agreed Ueffing kissed and
hugged Fields several times, but
because he did to both staff and
regular customers it was justified.
Fields also said Ueffing frequently requested to have sex with her
and wrote her many notes saying
how sexy she was and which also
suggested sex. Six of these notes
were available as evidence at the
hearing. The council decided two of
these were crude and offensive "if
taken out of context."
Edgett, who wrote the council decision, justified the notes by writing
that Ueffing was a "habitual, even
compulsory, writer of notes." Presumably Edgett and company knew
the proper context and ignorant
Andrea Fields did not.
Edgett said the council found no
evidence that Fields objected to
Ueffing's attentions, as she testified.
This decision is a real blow for
women in B.C. and one which goes
against all previous Canadian prece
dents. It remains to be seen how the
council decides on complaints other
than those based on gender, but the
prospects aren't encouraging.
What does the council think sexual harassment is? Presumably attempted rape might apply, but then
if there were no witnesses one can
guess pretty accurately how the decision would go.
It is hard to imagine a more blatant form of sexual harassment
than the type Fields was subjected
to. Very few women, or men, would
not consider it sexual harassment to
receive notes from their employer, a
person in a position of authority,
asking for sex.
And people who pretend sexual
harassment does not exist or is isolated and exaggerated by raving
feminists should look at the facts.
One of the few surveys on sexual
harassment, released by CROP, a
Montreal polling company, in 1983
for the Canadian Human Rights
Commission, found 15 per cent of
women and four per cent of men
felt they had been sexually harassed
in a work or service (customer) situation.
U.S. lawyer Catherine MacKinnon, introduced at her lecture to
UBC law students as being the leading legal academic in the field of sex
discrimination  and  the  law,   said
Letters
Senate discusses academics
It is the role of student senators
to represent students on the university senate and to inform them on
academic matters discussed at senate meetings. The following is an
account and commentary on the
Nov. 14 senate meeting.
Prior to the senate meeting, the
student caucus met to hear reports
from different members on senate
subcommittees. One of the most interesting reports came from Jim
Armstrong, a student senator from
Dentistry who sits on the budget
committee. The budget committee
is asking for input on how to cut
academic programs.
Although at present it is not
known how extensive the cutbacks
will be, the budget committee is
anxious to hear the views of the university community since the decisions will obviously affect all of us
to a greater or lesser extent.
Among questions raised were:
what does one do with students enrolled in a diploma or degree program when it is cut? Does one try to
refund the enrolled students or does
one close the program to all new applicants and allow those enrolled to
finish their degree? If programs
have to be cut, where should the
cuts be made?
In view of the fact that tuition
will probably be going up 33 per
cent next year and the same the following year, what should be done
about student accessibility? The
student caucus was alarmed to hear
that certain students in the applied
faculties such as medicine and dentistry in their first two years of
study were unable to obtain loans to
cover the cost of their study and
equipment.
Caucus decided to ask Byron
Hender of the awards office to explain the current state of the loan
program and its ability to deal with
tuition hikes next year. However, it
seems clear that, given the continuing rise in fees, if financial aid to
students is not increased, obtaining
a university degree will no longer
depend on academic ability but on
the student's economic resources.
At the senate meeting itself Peter
Kendall, the student representative
from Law, introduced a motion to
new in-depth research in the U.S. is
finding 85 per cent of working
women are victims of sexual harassment; 15 to 20 per cent of this harassment serious.
Sexual harassment is a real problem, and so are the views of the
Socred dupes in the B.C. Human
Rights Council, who by their decision deny it is a problem.
The council has no significance as
a human rights watch dog. The
Social Credit government can't fool
any but the most blind devotees of
the fact the council is a figurehead.
Patli Flather is a Ubysser who believes in strong rights and a left.
Freestyle is a column of opinion
open to Ubyssey staff.
THE UBYSSEY
November 27, 1984
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Fridays throughout tfie*
academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British
Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and are not
neCessarily those of the university administration or the AMS.
Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is
SUB 241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising
228-3977/3978.
The Ubyssey had a quiet picnic Monday in SUB 241K. Patti, Robert, and Charlie drank, ate, gobbled
burped and farted- Ingo, Monte and Betsy only heard about it and saw the remains. Rory and Victor
however found the food and ate alone.
move that the library committee examine the "urgent problems caused
by this year's reduction in the library's opening hours."
In view of the limited budget,
opening the library for longer hours
will mean a reallocation of funds
from other areas such as the purchase of books and serials. Which is
a greater evil: fewer up-to-date research journals or a 15 per cent reduction in library hours? It seems
strange that the community and especially all the extramural borrowers, including several members of
our provincial government, are not
more appreciative of the library's
role as a multi-million dollar research facility, and are not more
sensitive to the need to guarantee
the availability of its resources.
An interesting moral dilemma
arose in accepting the new awards
being made available starting in the
1984-85 winter session. As president
George Pedersen pointed out, it is
encouraging to see so many new
bursaries being provided by the
public sector in this time of need.
What does one do when the qualifications of an award become dubiously restrictive?
Related to this problem but of
greater significance was the report
concerning the establishment of the
Centre for Metallurgic Process Engineering. The university is very fortunate because funding for this project will be at least initially provided
by government and industry. In
fact, the centre is expected to generate research funds in the "order
of $2 million per year within a few
years of inception." No one would
question the great value of such a
centre for the university; however,
it would be naive to believe that no
strings will be attached to this investment. One hopes that the terms
will be as advantageous to the university as to its benefactors.
Nominations for student senators
for the academic year of 1985-86
were opened on Nov. 13 and will be
accepted until Friday, Dec. 6, 1984.
Any questions or comments to the
student representatives should be
directed to the student senate office
SUB 262. Phone: 228-6106.
Eva Busza
arts senator Tuesday, November 27,1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Low responds to McLean
I am writing in response to the
speech given by Mr. David McLean
at the Alma Mater Society council
meeting of Wednesday, Nov. 14.
As chair of the board of governors, he expressed many views which
I, as well as other students in attendance, strongly disagreed.
McLean was asked to say a few
words. McLean turned those few
words into a 55 minute lecture.
He discussed the financial problem the university is facing. In the
same breath McLean blamed everyone else for the university's financial problems except the board of
governors and the provincial government.
He also gave council a preview of
what will be eliminated next year
due to the budget shortfall. As McLean stated, the university is presently $1.7 million short and may, if
this trend continues, declare financial bankruptcy.
McLean singled out the faculty
and student body as carrying the
blame for the major financial woes
of this university.
His interpretation of the faculty
association voting down the administration's proposal to rid the association of unproductive professors
was that the faculty was saying they
want the board to have a free hand
to do what they must do. He stated
that the board will eliminate.faculty
to help ease the financial burden,
even if it means that next year the
university will end up fighting many
individual court cases.
He also said he felt there should
not be any student financial assistance in the form of loans — students should take more responsibility by paying higher tuition fees and
support the board of governor's
cuts without complaint.
I disagree with McLean's interpretation of the financial problems
of this university. When is he going
to realize that the students and
faculty are what this university is all
about?
One of his solutions to eliminate
budget problems next year is to cut
classes that only 10 to 15 students,
no matter what the subject area
may be. He said he knows it will
have a drastic effect on the graduate
student program but he said it must
be done.
When is the board going to stop
blaming everyone else for their financial problems and start doing
some long range planning? The
board of governors, chairman of fi
nance, Gerry Hobbs suggested the
board should have moved to more
financial independence 15 years
ago. Well, better late than never,
Mr. McLean.
Doug Low
AMS vice president
DEYONG
PARTY AND DANCE RENTALS
PROFESSIONAL SOUND & LIGHTING
PACKAGES DON'T HAVE TO COST MORE
PHONE FOR INFO. & RESERVATIONS
271 E. 2nd 873-3841
we're doing it again!
annual
Nov 17th-Dec 1st
we've got all kinds of books.
• fiction • non-fiction • remainders
• library discards • best sellers
• classics • art • cookbooks
• childrens books • textbooks and
reference books
all at great savings
Shop early a great opportunity
to buy Christmas presents.
We're Open
Mon., Tues., Thurs.,
Wednesday
Saturday
Fri. 8:30a.m.-5:00p.m.
8:30 a.m.-8:30 p.m.
9:30a.m.-5:00p.m.
BOOKSTORE
6200 university boulevard, Vancouver, b.c.
228-4741
PERM SPECIAL
Women
Men
35.00
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3621 W. 4th Ave., Van.   733-3831 Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 27, 1984
m&
W4&?i
TODAY
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Testimony meeting and Bible reading, all welcome, noon, SUB 213.
JEWISH MESSIANIC BIBLE STUDY
Bible study, noon, Buch D202.
ESPERANTO UBC
Benefit concert for Ethiopia, 7:30 p.m.. Recital
Hall, Music building.
PRE-MED SOCIETY
Lecture: Obstetrics and Gynecology by Dr. Far-
quharson, noon. Wood 1.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Modern   Chinese   ink   paintings  exhibition,   12
p.m.-7 p.m., Asian centre.
OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS
Recovery program from compulsive overeating,
all welcome, noon, conference room, Lutheran
campus centre.
AMS ART GALLERY
4th year B.F.A. show, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., SUB art
gallery.
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Practice  -  all welcome, 7 p.m. UBC Aquatic
centre.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Chinese art show, 12 p.m.-7 p.m. Asian centre.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Aerobics, 4:30-5:30 p.m. SUB 207/209.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Sale of  classes,  $2 drop in  fee,  all day SUB
207/209 partyroom or ballroom.
Pre-registration for next term, noon, SUB 216E.
WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF CANADA
Ethiopian crisis fundraising event: A Lunch for
Life,  11:30-2:30,  SUB,  Bus Stop,  Yum Yums,
Ponderosa.
WEDNESDAY
DANCE HORIZONS
Rehearsal clinic with Keith Ditto, 1:30-4:30 p.m.,
SUB 125.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL UBC
Reverend Wes Maultsaid speaks on:  Human
Rights in Central America, noon, SUB 211.
JEWISH STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION/HILLEL
Hot lunch, noon, Hillel house.
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Time out, newcomers welcome to meet at 4:30
p.m.   in   SUB   237A.   4:30-6:30   p.m.,   Gallery
lounge.
PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVE CLUB
Information meeting for universities' model parliament, noon, SUB 205.
ANARCHIST CLUB
Literature table, 10:30 a.m.-2 p.m., SUB foyer.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Chinese art show, 12 p.m.-7 p.m., Asian centre.
VANCOUVER ADVENTURE AND
TRAVEL CLUB (UBCI
Film on New Zealand by N.Z.  tourist board,
noon, SUB auditorium.
CAMPUS PRO-LIFE
Film:  Conceived in  Liberty,  meeting 4:30-5:30
p.m., SUB 211.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Sale of classes. $2 drop-in fee, all day, SUB
207/209, partyroom or ballroom.
Pre-registration for next term, noon, SUB 216E.
WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICE OF CANADA
A Lunch for a Life, Ethiopian crisis fundraising
event, 11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m., SUB, Bus Stop,
Yum Yums, Ponderosa.
PLENTY CANADA
Slide and video presentation, noon, MacMillan
158.
AMS ART GALLERY
B.F.A. 4th year show, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., SUB.
ENVIRONMENTAL INTEREST GROUP
Speaker: Fraser Delta Group, noon, Geography
212;
PEOPLE'S FRONT
Forum: Communal Violence in India, noon, Buch
A203.
THINK KINKO'S
Quality Copies
Fast Service
kinko's copies
5706 University Blvd.
Vancouver, B.C.
V6T1K6
(604) 222-1688
DINO HAUTE
COIFFURES
4532 W 10th
224-7440
is offering a
Super Style Cut
at a
Super Low Price     I
Clip this and save 25% on \
any perm or body wave   j
Late appointments Thursday
and Friday Evenings.
Offer expires Nov. 30/ '84
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Noah Stewart and Dr. Michael Maunard of Aids
Vancouver will speak on Aids, noon, SUB 215.
AMS ART GALLERY
4th  year  B.F.A.   show,   10 a.m.-4 p.m.,  AMS art
gallery.
ANARCHIST CLUB
Meeting, noon, Buch D352.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Urgent general meeting (all members must attend), noon, Buch B225.
STUDENTS FOR A DEMOCRATIC UNIVERSITY
Public forum   -   the power structure at UBC,
noon, Buch B216.
UBC HIGH SCHOOL BOYS'
BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT
Magee versus North Delta, Handsworth versus
Abbotsford,    D.W.    Poppy   versus   Britannia;
Steveston versus Argyle, all day, War Memorial
gym
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Conversation meeting, 1:30 p.m., International
house.
UBC WOMEN'S CENTRE
Lecture on women's health issues, women only,
noon, women students lounge, Brock Hall.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Sale of classes, $2 drop-in fee, all day, SUB
207/209, partyroom or ballroom.
Pre-registration for next term, noon, SUB 216e.
WORLD UNIVERSITY SERVICES OF CANADA
A  Lunch  for  Life,   Ethiopian  crisis fundraising
event,  11:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m.,  SUB,  Bus Stop,
Yum Yums, Ponderosa.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
Jesus film, noon, SUB auditorium, $1.50.
Announcing the always famous Pre-Ebenezer Festival. All Ubyssey staffers are
invited to attend this Wednesday's surly staff dejeuner where The Bob
Cratchett-Tiny Tim Gift Exchange will be introduced. "I'm not buying anyone a
gift worth more than five dollars," blurted a grizzly old man, muttering "bah
humbug." SUS Room 241K. Be there or be bare.
THE DINER
Serving   U B C.   and   West   Point   Grey
for the last 25 years
We put our Sole in your
FISH & CHIPS
English StYle Home Cooked Meals
at Reasonable Prices including
Roast Beef and Yorkshire Pudding
Open Monday to Saturday
8 00 a m   to 8:30 p m
Closed Sundays & Public Holidays
For the early ones,  we start serving
breakfast from 8:00 a m
4556 W   10th Ave    - 224 1912
We accept Chargex
NOTICE OF
ELECTION
The election of students to the committee to advise the president on the selection of a new Dean of Sciences is being
rerun on November 28 due to irregularities. Polling will be
outside CHEM 250 from 9:30 to 15:00. Science undergrads
and graduates associated with science are eligible to vote.
BRING YOUR CURRENT AMS CARD!
• C«  0**«t    DIITOMOT    I
X
;««»•&_„,
Jack Daniel Distillery Named a National Historic Place by the United States Government.
AT THE JACK DANIEL DISTILLERY we
have everything we need to make our whiskey
uncommonly smooth.
We have daily deliveries of the very
finest grain American farmers can
grow. A stream of pure,
iron-free water (ideal
for whiskey-making)
| flowing close by our
door. And a unique
way of smoothing out
whiskey by filtering
it for days through ten feet of finely-
packed charcoal Thanks to all these
things—and some others too—we
predict a pleasurable moment when
you discover the smooth-sippin'
rareness ofjack Daniel'sTcnnesseCj
Whiskey
Our own iron-free water
Star of Excellence     \
Brussels ~
1954
(you'd like a booklet about Jack Darnel's Whiskey, write us a letter here in Lynchburg, Tennessee 37352, USA.
rTHE CLASSIFIEDS^
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional'
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.50 additional lines, .70c. Additional days, $4.00 and .65c.
Classified nds lire payahl' in advance   Deadline is 10:30 a.m.  the
day before ptihlu aftm
Publications Room 261, S.U.B., UBC,  Van., B.C.  V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $10.00. Call 228-3977.
5 - COMING EVENTS
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC present
a pre post exam party party, Fri., Nov.
30, 3-7 p.m. SUB 205. See you there and
... A skating party Dec. 1, 7:30
p.m. -12:30 Kitsilano Skating Rink,
$3.50, $3.00. VGCC members and
students. Co-sponsored by VGCC.
Refreshments too!
11 - FOR SALE - Private
PLANE TICKET. One-way Toronto-Vancouver on Jan. 6. Female; $200 or best offer. Call 224-3178.
ONE-WAY TICKET to Halifax. Dec. 18.
Male. $250 OBO. 688-4189.
INEXPENSIVE ONE-WAY air ticket for
male to Toronto, Dec. 17. 681-2924
(eves. & weekends).
20 - HOUSING
CLEAN COMFORTABLE single rm in quiet,
pleasant home. Shared bathrm, kitchen
privileges. Ideal for n/s grad stud.
References. $250. Dec. 1 738-5889.
LARGE DOUBLE & single rms. in shared
house at Gates avail, immed. or for second
term. Call Rob at 228-1242.
FURNISHED RM. near UBC with cooking/
laundry facilities, $250 (incl. util.l Rent will
be reduced for typing, babysitting, light
housekeeping duties. Donna 266-1226.
25 - INSTRUCTION	
LSAT, GMAT, MCAT preparation. Call
National Testing 738-4618. Please leave
message on tape if manager is counselling.
30 - JOBS
THE BOATHOUSE
RESTAURANT and KEG
PRIME RIB
are looking for outgoing, enthusiastic and
caring students who are able to commit
themselves to school as well as a part-
time job which offers flexible hours and
lots of opportunity for growth and
development. We are looking for people
to start between now and the New Year
but  would  like to talk  to  you  a.s.a.p.
Please come in and see us.
WEDNESDAY AT 2:00 P.M.
Please do not call
P. S. Girls and Guys
566   Cardero   St.    (next   to   Westin
Bayshore Inn)
CA STUDENT
If you are a 1985 B.Comm.
Graduate interested in working in a small office of a national firm, please send a
resume to:
Peat, Marwick, Mitchell
No. 212-4800 No. 3 Rd.,
Richmond, B.C.
V6X 3A6
35 - LOST
LOST Nov. 7-8 Bet. Woodward Library and
C-lot: Cross pen - black with gold tips.
Great sentimental value. Reward. Rick
278-6366.
40 - MESSAGES
IF THERE ARE ANY WITNESSES to the car
accident on Sept. 25 (at the registration
building) who would like to see justice done
please call Mike at 435-8550.
GET WELL SOON STEVE best wishes from
from your brothers at KAPPA SIGMA.
BOOKS FOR INDIA. Please deposit in rm.
120, West Mall Annex. For more info, see
ad under Messages in Friday Ubyssey or
call 228-3039, 2779.
50 - RENTALS
SKI MT. WASHINGTON, Vancouver Is!
Condominium on ski hilt for occassional
rent. Sleeps 6, Sauna. Ph. 24 hr. answering
service 112-286-3112 or Box 410, Place
Vanier, UBC.
85 - TYPING
WORD PROCESSING $1.50/PG IDS)
CRWR major - Winona Kent 438-6449
located in south Burnaby.
EXPERT TYPING. Essays, term papers,
factums, letters, manuscripts, resumes,
theses, IBM Selectric II, reasonable rates.
Rose 731-9857.
WORD   PROCESSING   SPECIALIST.   All
jobs, year around student rates, on King
Edward route. 879-5108.
WORD WEAVERS - word processing.
Student rates, fast turnaround, bilingual
5670 Yew St. at 41st 266-6814.
YOUR WORDS PROFESSIONALLY
TYPED - TO GO. Judith Filtness, 3206
W. 38th Ave , Van. 263-0351 124 hrs). Fast
and reliable.
WORD    PROCESSING    SPECIALIST.    U
write, we type theses, resumes, letters,
essays. Days, evenings, weekends.
736-1208.
WORD PROCESSING (Micom). Student
rates $14/hr. Equation typing avail, ph
Jeeva 876-5333.
MINIMUM NOTICE REQUIRED. Typing
essays it resumes. Spelling corrected
733-3676.
PDQ WORD PROCESSING. Essays,
Theses, reports, letters, resumes. Days,
evgs/wknds. Quick turnaround, student
rates. 731-1252.
UNIVERSITY TYPING - word processing.
Error guarantee. Pick-up & delivery
available. 251-2064.
TYPIST. Reasonable rates. Will edit. Pickup & delivery. 321-8676.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING, all kinds. Will do
math, sciences, languages, fine arts,
literature. Will correct grammar & spelling.
872-7934.
W/P & TYPING: Term papers, theses,
mscpt., essays, incl. reports, letters,
resumes. Bilingual. Clemy: 266-6641.
WORD PROCESSING. Reports, essays,
resumes, etc. For professional results at
very competitive rates call 266-2536.
WORD PROCESSING/TYPING. Student
rates. Ideal for students on North Shore.
Days, eves., weekends. 985-8890.
TYPING SERVICES. Experienced typist.
Reasonable rates. Call Mary Lou at
421-0318 (near Lougheed Mall).
TYPING: Essays, theses, term papers,
mscps. Reasonable rates. Call 876-2695;
872-3703.
ABOVE AVERAGE TYPIST. For accurate
professional results call Audrey. 228-0378.
TYPING SPECIAL
EXTENDED TO NOV. 30
Double Spacing
Reg. $1/pg. NOW90c/pg.
Reg. $1.80/pg. NOW$1.60/pg.
Fast Accurate Typing
CALL Glenna 734-8561 eves or
weekends
WORDPOWER
3737 W. 10th (at Alma)
Professional
•Editing
"Proofreading
AND
•Word Processing
ALL
At a Word Processing
hourly ratel
15% Student Discount
All types of written material accepted
SUPPORT SERVICES INCLUDE:
•Xerox photocopying
"Binding (Unibind)
•Printing
•Translation & Tutoring
222-2661 Tuesday, November 27,1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Thunderbirds perform before crowd
By MONTE STEWART
"Success breeds success."
That slogan lined the wall of the
Vancouver Canucks' dressing room
. until Bill LaForge received his walking papers last week.
Obviously, the motto did not
hold true for the woesome
Canuckleheads but it just might
become the theme of the Thunderbird hockey club.
This season, the 'Birds — in
sharp contrast to Vancouver's professional team — have gotten off to
their best start in eight years. And
last weekend some people actually
started to take notice. The two
largest   crowds   of   the   season
witnessed a two game series between the Thunderbirds and the
Canada West league leading Alberta Golden Bears.
Alberta did sweep the series —
but just barely. Saturday, the Bears
narrowly defeated UBC 7-5 before
about 500 banner-toting, singing,
heckling fans at Thunderbird arena.
Friday, Alberta snuck away with a
5-4 win over the rejuvenated
T-Birds.
There were approximately 700
spectators at Friday's contest much
to the pleasure of 'Birds' head
coach Fred Masuch.
"It's great having so many
fans," said Masuch. "They can on
ly help us." Even Bears' mentor
Clare Drake — the most successful
coach in Canadian collegiate
hockey history — was pleased with
the turnout.
"I'm glad to see that the fans are
starting to come out again," said
Drake. "They're great for the game
— which I think is the best hockey
in Canada."
Despite the higher margin of victory for Alberta, Saturday night's
contest was the best of the two. The
second period proved to be the difference between victory and defeat
for the Thunderbirds.
The teams played to a 3-3 tie after
one period. Renzo Berra, with two
goals, and Graham Kerr netted first
period tallies for the 'Birds while
• John Reid scored twice and Dave
Otto scored the other goal for
Alberta.
However, the Bears scored two
second period markers, by Craig
Dill and Dennis Cranston, which
went unanswered.
Bill Holowaty and Dave Brownlie
scored third period goals for UBC
while Dill and Cranston each netted
their second goals of the night for
Alberta.
Cranston's goal proved to be the
coup d'etat, coming with less than a
minute after Brownlie had brought
the 'Birds to within one goal.
Friday, Berra also scored twice
while Bill Holowaty and Rob
Jacobsen placed the puck in the
Alberta net as the 'Birds unleashed
43 shots compared to only 26 for
the  Bears.   Cranston,  Otto,  Joey
T-BIRD DELIA DOUGLAS (15) eludes University of Victoria Vikette Sandy Pothier while teammate Natalie
Johnson (21) sets a pick in Canada West tourney at War Memorial gym.
Gryphons grab Vanier Cup
The underdogs came through in
the crunch last Saturday as the
Canadian Interuniversity Athletic
Union football season came to a
close.
A record crowd of 19,842 spectators watched the Guelph
Gryphons upset the Mount Allison
Mounties 22-13 in the Vanier Cup
game at Toronto's Varsity Stadium.
Peter Ceci caught two touchdown
passes — one a 89 yard strike — as
the Gryphons recorded their first
ever national football title.
"I can't ask for anything more
than these kids have given me,"
said Guelph head coach John
Musselman, stating the obvious.
The Gyphons qualified for the
championship game with unexpected victories over former CIAU
champion Calgary Dinosaurs and
the University of Western Ontario
Mustangs.
Musselman had never won a national crown as a coach. He failed
to proceed past the Atlantic Bowl
when he was coaching the St. Francis Xavier X-Men in 1982. The
Thunderbirds blasted SFX 54-1 that
day en route to their first and only
Vanier Cup victory.
*    *    »
The frozen tunderland of Alberta
proved to be just as unhospitable as
the United States for the men's
basketball team last weekend. Fresh
from a pair of losses to Washington
universities the previous weekend,
the 'Birds finished fifth in the
Alberta Golden Bear tournament in
Edmonton.
The Calgary Dinosaurs beat the
'Birds 75-61 in the consolation
game Saturday night. John Vigna
paced the Dinos — who have lost
ace scorer Karl Tilleman to gradua
tion — with 18 points. Ken Klassen
led the T-Birds, scoring 17 points.
The Winnipeg Wesmen, who
beat the 'Birds 81-71 Friday night,
won the tournment with an 80-67
victory over the no longer hapless
Saskatchewan Huskies.
The T-Birds wound up with a 1-2
mark for the tournament. Aside
from the two losses, UBC beat the
host   Golden   Bears  72-68   in  the
opening game Thursday night.
A longstanding UBC tradition
continues this Saturday: at Jericho
Park as the Thunderbird rugby club
takes on the UBC Old Boys in the
Moore Mug match.
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Engert, and Cranston — with the
winner at 16:18 of the third period
— scored for the Bears who were
below their average of 6.4 goals per
<game.
During both games, the exuberant fans consumed beer —
bought from the curling rink lounge
— in the stands. There was no enforcement of the anti-drinking bylaw.
This Friday and Saturday at 7:30
p.m. the 'Birds host the lowly
Lethbridge Pronghorns at Thunderbird Arena. CITR will broadcast
Friday's game live beginning at
7:15.
Hopefully, success will continue
to breed success in terms of both
victories and fan support for the
T-Birds. Who knows? Maybe
Harry Neale will drop by in hope of
learning a lesson.
Hoop head happy
By MONTE STEWART
"We're starting to go as a unit
now. Before, we were not stabilized
as far as the offence is concerned."
If the stability which women's
basketball coach Jack Pomfret has
strived to establish can actually be
maintained, the Thunderbirds
could make the playoffs for the first
time in several years. Last weekend,
the 'Birds showed that they intend
to progress to post season play.
The 'Birds finished fourth in the
Canada West Classic, a tournament
which pits Canada West opponents
against each other. A fourth place
regular season standing is exactly
what the 'Birds must achieve to
qualify for the playoffs.
Sunday, Alberta Pandas defeated
UBC 58-53 in the consolation final
at War Memorial gym. Tonic Kor-
dic paced the winners with 14
points, while Natalie Johnson led
the 'Birds with 11 points and five
rebounds. UVic won the championship with a 57-43 win over Lethbridge.
The close margin against Alberta
was indicative of UBC's improvement since the start of the season.
Alberta whipped the 'Birds by 25
points in the Huskiette Tournament
in Saskatoon. "(The close score) reflected the team's improvement,"
noted Pomfret. "I've no doubt
about that at all."
Alberta coach Debbie Schofeld
offered a slightly different perspective. "1 think the close score
score says a lot for UBC's improve
ment but, I think, in that short time
there shouldn't be that much catchup. So, we're going to have to go
back to see what we're doing."
The Thunderbirds played very
aggressively, especially underneath
the basket where Pandas' forward
Lisa Janz suffered a neck injury on
the final play of the game. "She fell
and somebody fell on her neck,"
Schofeld said. Janz was prone on
the court for nearly 40 minutes
while ambulance attendants very
cautiously bundled her up on a
stretcher and took her to the Health
Sciences centre for observation.
"The officials really let the game
get quite out of control," said an
accusing Schofeld. "When that
happens, those are the sorts of incidents that are going to happen."
The Thunderbirds finished the
tourney with a 1-2 record. The
'Birds beat Saskatchewan Huskiettes 60-35 Saturday night for their
only win. In that contest, Colette
Piloud, who recently returned from
a knee injury led UBC with 13
points. Barb Mercier was the highest scoring Huskiette, netting 18
points.
The other UBC loss came Saturday to the Vikettes. The team which
many feel will win a national crown
beat the 'Birds 57-34 in the opening
game of the tournament for both
teams. Sandy Espeseth led the Vikettes with 12 points and three rebounds, while Natalie Johnson was
the leading Thunderbird with 11
points.
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THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 27, 1984
Other clone papers appear
From page 3
terview with U.S. vice-president
George Bush.
Seven other clone newspapers,
identical to Libertas, have appeared
this month on Canadian university
and college campuses. These newspapers are published by one man,
Rancis Willers, a twenty-four year
old McGill student. With minor exceptions, each newspapers contains
exactly the same articles, including
the Bush interview, while each was
given its own cover and name.
Libertas editor John Mulholland,
contacted in Kingston, said Libertas
was produced with IEA money and
assistance.
"Willers got the money, they put
out the first issue," he said.
Willers admitted he got a grant
from the IEA for Libertas.
Nigel Wright, the first editor of
University of Toronto Magazine,
confirmed the IEA is giving money
to the U of T Magazine.
"Yes it is," Wright said. He
would not reveal the amount of
money.
"No, our funding is not public,"
he said.
Wright is now a policy advisor in
the Prime Minister's office.
David Frum, part-time writer for
the National Review (a conservative
U.S. magazine) and Saturday
Night, and brother of McGill
Magazine's first editor and present
Editor Emeritus, Linda Frum, said
the IEA is exerting influence in
Canada.
"The IEA is operating on both
sides of the border," he said.
Cohen describes the IEA as "a
small grant-making foundation for
worthy projects."
But in 1983 alone, the IEA earmarked $180,000 for student
newspapers and gave start-up funds
for 17 more in North America.
All three IEA funded newspapers
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have been directed by students connected to prominent Canadians.
Linda Frum, the first editor of
McGill Magazine, is the daughter of
Barbara Frum, host of CBC's The
Journal. John Mulholland, Libertas editor at Queen's, is the son of
William D. Mulholland, chair and
chief executive officer of the Bank
of Montreal.
Cohen said the wealth of the applicants doesn't figure in funding.
"Whether you're rich or poor it
doesn't matter," he said.
In the U.S. the IEA's appearance
on campus has cleared the way for
other neo-conservative foundations
to sponsor campus publications.
The John M. Olin Foundation, the
Scaife Family Charitable Trusts,
and the Paul Mellon Charitable
Trust are now giving money directly
to student newspapers which meet
their approval.
Nigel Wright says he has no
qualms about accepting money and
guidance from the IEA.
"We were happy to have the help
and advice from the Americans,"
he said. "They have more experience in setting up alternative
papers."
In 1982, the IEA and American
Spectator, a prominent conservative newspaper with offices in
New York and Indianapolis, held a
seminar for college students interested in starting or maintaining
conservative newspapers. More
than 40 students attended to hear
speakers such as the Spectators' R.
Emett Tyrell Jr. lecture on taste and
strategy.
"Don't print Ku Klux Klan
literature," Tyrell advised.
IEA executive director Phillip
Marcus suggested: "If someone accuses you of being a racist or a sexist, accuse them back of McCarthy
tactics."
One person contacted who attended that conference but asked
not to be identified said: "They told
me that when I was ready to go
ahead publishing, I shouldn't worry
about the money. They said they'd
take care of that."
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