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The Ubyssey Nov 19, 1985

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Array ii  i	
Vol. LXVIII, No. 21
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, November 19,1985
228-2301
McGeer visits, eats and lectures
Expo 86 is the best investment B.C. can make to attract investment
for long term results said the universities science and technology
minister at a private UBC reception Friday.
Pat McGeer said universities and research cannot be protected from
the booms and busts in the economy. Universities must bear the
burdens of society as members of society, said McGeer when questioned about linking universities to the unstable economy by Mark Reder,
arts undergraduate society president.
ihl
Uir
Reder and seven other UBC students attended the reception closed to the press as
part of a Social Credit MLA tour of UBC.
About 150 placard waving students from
UBC and other lower mainland campuses
greeted the visiting MLA's at the faculty club
reception after their one-day tour.
The MLA tour included attending fine
arts classes, workshops on applying Japanese
business techniques to B.C., and seminars on
basic research in the market place.
Students braved the rain and set up a soup
kitchen outside while the MLA's dined on
what one student who attended the reception
called "hoity toity hors d'oeuvres".
The students later stormed the faculty club
lobby and shouted demands to reinstate the
grant student aid program, restore college
and university funding to pre-restraint levels,
reinstate the elected school and college
boards, pass on federal post secondary
education transfer payments, and finally call
a provincial election.
The students were stopped at the door as
campus traffic and security officers and a
faculty member blocked the stairway leading
to the reception area.
Tim Holmes, law undergraduate society
president, who also attended the reception,
urged McGeer to address the crowd. Holmes
said McGeer refused, saying he was already
available to students seven days a week at
times on campus and could be reached
through his constituency office.
When Holmes asked McGeer to address
UBC student concerns in a forum on campus
McGeer said meeting only UBC students
would be unfair to other universities in the
province.
Duncan Stewart, AMS external affairs
coordinator, who also attended the reception, said a meeting between the AMS executives and McGeer has been set for
November 29 to facilitate questioning of
McGeer.
Premier Bill Bennett did not attend the
UBC organized event.
Rhinos offer to return taxes
By NADINE KREFETZ
If the choice was up to you, who
would you spend your tax dollars
on, yourself or the government?
Blair Longley, registered agent of
the Greater Vancouver Regional
District and B.C. Lower Mainland
Rhinoceros Party, is hazarding a
guess that most people would prefer
their own judgement over the
government's. But this innovative
idea is only part of what he has in
mind.
Not only can you choose where
to spend your money, but a large
per cent of it is also tax deductible.
Through the Election Act and
related tax credit amendments
brought to life during the '70's the
Canadian government took steps to
increase individual citizen participation in politics, he says.
Your tax deductible donation to a
political party can be earmarked for
a specific cause. Say you want to
create a job, or contribute.to an
educational program, perhaps even
university tuition. By making a
political donation to the Rhino Party they would then turn around and
aside from a small fee, donate the
money to the project of your
choice. This money would then be
considered a political contribution
and fall under Political Tax Credit
guidelines, which tend to be higher
than those set for charitable donations.
"The taxpayer, through a registered party is engaging in a
registered political act," said
Longley. Currently less than two
per cent of Canadian taxpayers
make contributions to political parties of their choice. This breaks
down to more than $5 billion of
unused federal political tax credits
flowing out of over 10 million taxpayers pockets.
One reason to explain this lack of
participation is that other political
parties for one reason or another
simply do not provide interests that
most of the population can identify
with, said Longley.
The Rhino party wants to break
down this barrier. "Its really people's own tax money — it's money
the government has taken or will
take from them," Longley said.
Your tax money is going to the
political party in power. Whatever
they decide to fund is what you pay
for.
Longley pledges to "empower
any and all concerned taxpayers
whose views he agrees with to work
his registered agency to further their
political cause."
Seventy-five per cent of a one
hundred dollar contribution is tax
chief Electoral Officer and Revenue
Canada which recognize the legality
of Longley's proposal.
Those interested in finding out
more are invited to contact Blair
Langley, #706 — 2725 Mel fa Rd.,
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1N4.
- shan bte abdullah photo
WE ARE NOT amused, says figure from Victoria as quiet protestors object
to their lack of cake, proper student aid, complete instruction and a secure
future. Basketball player, upper left, was happy to let protestors eat cake
but preferred hoity toity hors d'oeuvres for himself.
Consulting firm creates headaches
TORONTO (CUP) — The Canadian Union of Public Employees
(CUPE) is worried that controversial efficiency studies now being
performed on employees at three
Canadian universities will "spread
like wildfire" to other universities
parched by years of underfunding.
The union, which represents
about 8,000 non-academic staff,
has dispatched researchers to Ontario and B.C. to investigate Ritchie
and Associates, the management
consulting firm conducting the
time-and-motion studies.
Part of the Ritchie method involves timing tasks with a stopwatch, and workers at the University of British Columbia complain the
stress is causing headaches, nightmares, ulcers and skin conditions.
UBC employees are working to
rule in protest and bookstore
workers at the University of Vic
toria have staged a one-hour walkout. A similar study by the firm at
Dalhousie University in Halifax is
in its preliminary stage and workers
there are keeping a close eye on the
situation in B.C.
"It seems to me that the Ritchie
people are the old-line managers —
supervise and watch rather than
motivate," said CUPE research
assistant Richard Bainis, who has
spent two weeks in Toronto and Ottawa gathering information on the
company.
He said the union is concerned
about morale and potential lay-off
as well as the health effects on the
workers.
The California and Toronto-
based firm has approached at least
five universities (McMaster and
Simon Fraser turned them down)
with an offer Bainis said would
almost certainly lead to staff cuts.
The   company   guarantees   in
Cutbacks fire up hazards
LONGLEY . . . registered
deductible. "Registered agents of a
registered party can issue official
receipts which for people with taxable incomes are as good as
money," Longley said. In simple
terms the contributor would
receive a receipt for a $75 political
donation tax credit, which could be
deducted from your income taxes.
Longley has submitted to The
Ubyssey excerpts of letters from the
TORONTO (CUP) — Fire marshals made dozens of students leave
a math lecture at the University of
Toronto recently because the class
size violated safety regulations.
The Toronto fire department investigated after it received an
anonymous complaint. There are
only 208 seats for the 280 students
enrolled in the section.
The professor agreed to give
another lecture to students forced
to leave the class, but said he
wouldn't continue. The math
department chair agreed, saying
some students will have to transfer
to a less crowded section of the
course.
Sean Meagher, co-chair of the
student council underfunding committee, is worried that incidents like
the one in Math 130 will become
widespread.
"If the fire marshall is going to
start cracking down, this
university's in big trouble," he said.
"A lot of classes out there are in
clear violation of the regulations."
Said Don Millar, information officer for the Ontario Federation of
Students: "I think (overcrowded
classrooms are) a problem on just
about every campus I know of."
writing that its fee will be recouped
by the university in the first year
after its recommendations are implemented. Since about 80 per cent
of a university's budget goes to
salaries, Bainis argued, labour cuts
are the only way the institutions
could save anywhere near the
amount Ritchie and Associates is
charging for its services.
UBC is spending at least $1.5
million for a restructuring of 12
non-academic departments.
Administrators at UBC and
Dalhousie admit that lay-offs could
result, either through direct cuts or
by not filling vacant positions.
CUPE is worried that, if Ritchie
and Associates is successful at the
three institutions, other universities
feeling the pinch will find the efficiency studies irresistable.
"This could spread like wildfire
across the campuses," Bainis said.
He said university administrators
form a relatively small circle where
news travels fast.
Most of Ritchie's work has apparently been done in the U.S. but a
union official at Wardair, a Canadian airline, claims a study by the
company led to the lay-off of 220
employees.
A secretary at the Toronto office
of Ritchie and Associates said the
consultants are constantly on the
road and only call the office for
messages. In the past, company officials have refused to comment on
their business affairs.
Bainis said the use of time-and-
motion studies "has usually met
with a lot of resistance and it's pretty clumsy management that uses
them . . . it's a very confrontational
method." Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 19,1985
Machine has news for you
OTTAWA (CUP) — Journalism
students at Carleton University say
they have succeeded in broadcasting
the world's first computerized
newscast.
Using a synthesizer capable of
producing seven human-like voices,
the students prepared a regular
broadcast for the Nov. 14 morning
newscast on CKCU-FM, Carleton's
student radio station. Although the
programme was like any other in
content, the use of the voice synthesizer made it unlike any other in
history, said participant James
Hrynyshyn, a third year journalism
student.
"We're  claiming  that   it's   the
first. We're pretty confident that we
were the first," he said. The
students have filed with the Guiness
Book of World Records, and expect
notification in a few weeks.
The voice synthesizer, known as
Joe Schlunk to the students and
their professor George Frajkor, is
able to read stories programmed
through word processors and kept
on computerized discs. With several
alterations, the synthesizer can adjust voice tones, pitch and
characteristics,  and  according to
Hrynyshyn, the results are good
enough to pass by most students'
ears.
"The voices are relatively close to
humans, as far as voice synthesizers
go," he said.
Hrynyshyn said the system
"wouldn't replace the human element. Basically it streamlines a
news office."
The students say other applications include talking books for the
blind, and simultaneous translation
devices.
""  '&&£) ON THE BOULEVARD
hair and suntanning co.
SUNTANNING
10 SESSIONS-$39
HAIR    STYLING
15% off any hair service
with presentation of ad. Expires Nov. 30
5784 University Blvd. Ph. 224-1922
(in UBC Village) % Blk. Away 224-9116
Students Only
25% Discount
on any bodywave
and highlights
(with this ad)
Super Style Cut
at a
Super Price
DINO HAUTE
COIFFURES
4532 W. 10th
224-7440
late appointments Thursday
and Friday evenings
OFFER EXPIRES DEC. 15/85
^^        * Special Seminar *
TIPS ON HOW TO
PASS THE ENGLISH
COMPOSITION TEST
rams
^
(the infamous E.C.T.)
This seminar is to help
you pass the E. C. T.
GUEST SPEAKER:
MS. NANCY HORSEMAN
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 20
12:30
SUB ROOM 212
FREE
Ladies
Sample Sale
Something for Everyone
Fall — Holiday & Cruise Wear
at
The Georgia Hotel
Queen Anne & Windsor Room
Mezzanine Floor
Thursday, November 21st from 10:00 a.m.-8:00 p.m.
Fantastic
Super Savings!!
*  Don't forget to bring a friend
and do your Christmas Shopping •
Mastercharge and Visa accepted
i si month filled with excitement and
/J special events-from author visits
X   L-to fashion shows, from product
days to our annual book sale! Here.are
just a few items happening in Week ff'i
featuring FASHION WEEK!
|8 MON
Sportswear Dept will be
featuring an original
design -"POINT GRLY
CLUB UBC made |ust
for the Bookstore
Canadian Graphics West
will display their new
screening techniques for
these 3 davs
19 TUES
«g BOOKSTORE 228-4741
Sportswear Dept. will be
featuring an original
design - "POINT GRLY
CLUB UBC" made just
lor the Bookstore.
Canadian Graphics West
will display their new
screening techniques for
these 3 davs
2QWED
Sportswear Dept will be
featuring an original
design-'POINTGRLY
CLUB UBC" made just
for the Bookstore.
Canadian Graphics West
will display their new
screening techniques tor
these i days
2JTHURS
INTRAMURAL
FASHION
SHOW
12 '$()- 1 30 pm
promoting BROOKS
Sportswear
One dav special for
UMBRO
Soccer outfits
22~™
One day COUPON
DISCOUNT tor
CHAMPION
Sportswear
In our Book Sale this year the
emphasis is on first rate works
of literature. We have included:
• publishers' remainders and
special editions •"hurt" books
from some of the finest publishers, at reduced prices
•a large selection of children's
books NOVEMBER BOOK
SALE CONTINUES.
Q ALUTE-t^ T-BIRDSI-CIAU NATIONAL CHAMP^
The Bookstore is featuring famous brand name in
Soccer Jerseys - UMBRO
JERSEYS Reg 29<* SHORTS Reg 14**
Special        X995 Special 0,95
Made in England & USA. Sale starts Nov 21st while quantities last!
20
%
OFF
CHAMPION
SPORTSWEAR
(excluding
Discount coupon
& other specials)
DISCOUNT COUPON
on Champion Sweats!
with this coupon get     $ 10^° off
Sweat Top Reg. 4595    NOW 3K95
Sweat Pants Reg. 3 795   <j \ 000 0ff
NOW 2795
COUPON valid from
November 22nd -30th only. Tuesday, November 19, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Star Wars faces severe problems
By JAMES YOUNG
While Star Wars poses immense,
perhaps insurmountable technical
difficulties, the Soviet Union could
defeat it through a number of
relatively easy countermeasures, a
UBC physicist said Sunday.
Speaking to 45 people at the
Unitarian Church of Vancouver,
professor Luis Sobrino said the
most promising version of Star
Wars would require 50 to 100
satellite-based infra-red lasers to
cope with a Soviet arsenal of 1400
ballistic missiles.
"The U.S. may or may not be
able to construct Star Wars
technology, but battle management
is the greatest problem," he said,
adding a computer program longer
than any currently available would
have to be created and there would
be no possibility of testing it.
He said the Soviets could tax the
resources of such a system either by
building more missiles or adding
decoys to existing warheads.
"From a single rocket, you could
have 10 warheads and 100 decoys,"
he said. "If 1000 missiles were launched, you could have 100,000 flying
objects which are indistinguishable
from each other."
Sobrino said the problems facing
the   construction   of   even   one
satellite-based laser are profound.
"The biggest mirror which exists
today, at the Mount Palomar
Laboratory, is 5 meters in diameter,
but this version of Star Wars would
need mirrors 10 meters in
diameter," Sobrino said.
He said it would be relatively easy
for Soviet satellites to damage these
mirrors by shooting sand or dust on
them.
Assuming the U.S. could build
mirrors of 10 meter diameter and
lasers of an unprecedented 25
megawatts and send them both into
orbit, the next problem would be to
focus the laser beam for 6 to 7
seconds on Soviet missiles, Sobrino
said.
He said three countermeasures
the Soviet Union could take against
the lasers' heat are improving the
heat shields on their missiles, making them spin during flight and
reducing the early boost phase to 90
seconds.
Even if the laser was able to
destroy one missile, it would then
immediately have to refocus on a
series of up to 30 other missiles.
"Reagan really thought Star
Wars would work because he didn't
consult with scientists and he was
pushed by the High Frontier people
(a pro-Star Wars lobby group) to
UBC forestry hit
By BRIAN SMITH
The recession in B.C.'s forest industry is reflected in the sharp drop
in UBC forestry faculty enrolment.
Particularly hard-hit are first year
enrolments, down to an all-time low
of 36, compared to boom-year 1979
which saw 145 students entering
forestry.
It is expected that if the industry
is doing poorly, so will enrolment,
explains dean Robert Kennedy.
In order for enrolment to increase, there will have to be a
recovery in the forestry industry, he
said.
But there is still no light at the
end of the tunnel.
MacMillan Bloedel, one of the
private sector's largest employers of
forestry grads, has laid off 30 per
cent of its B.C. work force since
1982, and is currently hiring only
two new employees annually, says
MacBlo representative Lome Armstrong.
Only a third of last year's record
113 graduates have found permanent employment, says Kennedy.
Of that total, 15 per cent decided
to continue their education, he added.
As it stands, enrolment in the
faculty of forestry has dropped to
283, from last year's 355.
However, the number of fourth
year students has only dropped by
two since last year which will ensure
at least another year of surplus
graduates.
The drop in enrolment has not
substantially affected the faculty
size, because student enrolment has
always followed the trends in the
forest industry, said Kennedy.
Another reason why first year
enrolment in forestry has substantially dropped, is because high
school graduates can now enter
forestry programs at three B.C. colleges.
This year, 12 students have
entered forestry programs at
Cariboo and Caledonia college in
the Interior through the Guided Individual Study program.
These students later are expected
to swell the ranks of UBC's forestry
department.
The future looks best for this
year's undergraduates Kennedy predicts.
With less competition for jobs
and a slowly recovering forestry industry these students have a very
good chance, he said.
AMS competes for lotto $
Maybe it is because students at
UBC are busy dutifully buying
millions of 6/49 tickets, secretly
worrying about the massive debts
their leader is stacking up to finance
a big, fancy and fun fair in our
recession-plagued region of the
world.
In any case, they have been slow
in shelling out some bucks for the
Alma Mater Society's very own
Bursary Fund Lottery, the proceeds
of which benefit poor students.
Maybe it was because the winners
of Bill's lottery receive millions of
green ones, whereas the winner of
the AMS Lottery receives a paltry
1,500 buck tuition prize.
It looked dicey for a while, but
thanks to an appeal to the public
and local businesses, the draw is
about to go ahead.
After only a month's delay, the
big draw date for the AMS lottery
has been set for next Monday at 2
p.m. in the SUB concourse.
"Board member Don Holubitsky
sent tickets out — not unlike the
way Lucky Leo mails their tickets to
the public — to businesses and
board members," said AMS vice
president Jonathan Mercer.
"Often with the donation, they'd
return the tickets, so we could sell
them again," he added.
Tickets are still on sale until the
end of this week, and students selling them are advised to return their
outstanding tickets to the AMS
Business Office as soon as possible.
"Any money left over from the
$1,500 bursary prize will be given as
a smaller second prize, since 50 percent of all proceeds will go to
students," said Mercer.
First year Arts student Ed Mou, a
compulsive gambler with a conscience,said: "I bought a ticket
because deep down inside I'm easy,
and if I have a chance to win next
year free. . .well, the odds are better
than winning 6/49."
Support your AMS.
think it was an actual possibility,"
said Sobrino.
"But I haven't spoken personally
with any physicist who doesn't
think that it's crazy," he said.
Despite the near impossibility of
ever constructing a perfect shield
against Soviet missiles, Sobrino said
that statements by Richard del
Lauer, a Reagan undersecretary of
defense, indicate Star Wars could
be used with the existing American
arsenal   to   launch   a   first   strike
against the Soviet Union.
"In this situation, the Americans
would already have destroyed the
majority of Soviet weapons and
Star Wars would then be a defense
against a retaliatory strike," he
said.
— dan andrews photo
"DADDY, YOU DISRESPECTFUL, boorish cretin! Stop trodding on the dead Manigwanas - they must be
returned to Kedor 5!" "They're just a bunch of fucking lumps of shit, pea-brain!" Humanoids were last seen wiping shit off their shoes at a hoity-toity party.
SUB copy centre could double
By EDWARD MOU
The Alma Mater society's copy
centre could receive a new and improved look as early as next year.
The copy centre, which currently
has twelve copy machines and one
larger heavy volume machine
available could purchase 12 additional copiers because of heavy student use.
"We could easily expand to double our present capacity and we are
looking at the bowling alley for new
expansion room" said AMS director of administration Simon
Seshadri.
Students said the copy centre was
the most important service the AMS
provides in a survey conducted last
year by the AMS.
The copy centre at its present
location by a major exit at the
north-west corner of the student
union building cannot expand
because of space restrictions. The
fire marshal currently limits the
number of machines in place.
Seshadri said the AMS is looking
at the bowling alley in SUB basement as a site for the copiers. The
alley needs at least $100,000 in
repairs and is patronized by few
UBC students, he said.
The bowling alley could be converted to house 24 copy machines,
but probably not until next year,
said Seshadri.
"We don't want to inconvenience anyone while school is in session."
Ronald Stewart, arts 3, said copy
machine line-ups inconvenience
copy card users especially.
"A copy card user is obviously a
regular user, and yet they don't
have any machines set aside for
copy card users," he said. "It's not
convenient by any stretch of the imagination."
Yvonne Martins, arts 4, said the
present service is adequate. "You
just  have  to   know  the  off-peak
hours," she said.
Johan Khafra. arts 2, said he is
ambivalent about copy centre expansions. "It doesn't really matter
to me since most of my special
assignments are at night when
things aren't very busy anyway. But
I do use the machines quite a lot for
my maps," he said.
Second food drive planned
A poor show of student support
in the science undergraduate society
food drive last week has not
dampened the SUS executives faith
in UBC students' charity.
Although only 40 cans were collected from bins prominently
located in the student union
building concourse, and the major
science buildings the SUS believes
their second drive planned for late
January will be more successful said
SUS charity organizer Nindy Duggal.
The SUS spent $140 advertising
the food drive, he said.
Duggal said a mock grocery store
will be set up to sell SUS purchased
food to students who will be able to
buy and donate the goods on the
spot.
He said asking students to
remember to bring canned food on
their way to class was "difficult"
for students who have very busy
schedules.
"I think a lot of times it's an inconvenience," he said.
Duggal said the SUS hopes to buy
food in bulk from local grocery
stores and will charge students low
prices for the food donations.
The grocery donation store will
be located in SUB concourse and
will welcome student, faculty, and
community member purchases.
McGill becomes first
to totally divest
MONTREAL (CUP) — McGill
University will move towards selling
about $45 million worth of investments in companies associated
with South Africa.
Almost two thirds of McGill's 34
board of governors members voted
Thursday to make McGill the first
Canadian university to instate a
total divestment policy.
The board will review its policy
every October, considering any
changes in the South Africa situation.
About half a billion dollars of
South Africa-linked holdings have
already been divested by 63 U.S.
universities.
Students at both McGill and
another large Montreal university,
Concordia, have been staging large
protests against investment in South
Africa associated companies recently. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 19, 1985
EXPO fantasy
Last week saw both our premier and the minister supposedly responsible for higher education in this province gushing with enthusiasm at how
EXPO 86 will be the great spark that will herald in the new B.C. economic
boom. Remember hearing the same things about big dams, then about
trees, then about logs? Instead of waiting for this next bubble to burst, our
short-on-brains government should start putting our bucks into a politically
less sexy, however in the long-term more profitable enterprise: the education, training and skills development of British Columbians.
Next October, when the next bubble bursts, hopefully the 15,000 former
EXPO employees pounding the pavement once again will be joined by that
group of dim wits now sitting on their fantasy island across the strait to the
west.
P.S. Maybe they should tell other developing nations about their dreams
of developing an economy by inviting the circus to town.
Help the disabled
By SUZANNE M. ROSE
In 1985, MATN (Medical Aid to
Nicaragua), a Canadian support
organization founded in 1979 to
help Nicaragua reconstruct its
health services, reported on the
health situation in Nicaragua.
It observed that the "shortage of
material goods is only overshadowed by the human toll which continues to mount as a result of the
war waged by the American-
financed counter-revolutionaries.
More than 8,000 Nicaraguans have
died and an equal number or more
have become disabled."
This is in addition to the 100,000
left disabled by the 1979 revolution
itself. It is estimated that there are
more than 10,000 paraplegics and
quadraplegics in Nicaragua, a country of only two and a half million
people.
In 1980, one year after Somoza
was removed from power, a group
of disabled veterans of the civil war
organized themselves as the
Organization of Disabled Revolu-
perspectives
tionaries (ORD). Soon afterwards,
ORD was expanded to include all
disabled in the country. Its goals
have been to enable disabled people
to secure access to buildings and to
opportunities for education, work,
health care, cultural and recreational participation, and political
leadership.
In other words, they seek to
"promote the fuller integration of
the disabled in the economic, social,
and political life of the new
Nicaragua."
ORD's work is part of a
phenomenal movement for appropriate, preventative community-
based health care which has evolved
in Nicaragua since Somoza's
repressive government was overthrown and which, in 1983, earned
Nicaragua the designation of a
model country in its health care by
the World Health Organization.
As part of its fund raising and
educational programs, ORD
presently has two representatives
touring Canada. The two are Hector Segovia, the coordinator, and
Freddy Trejos, the assistant coordinator. Both Hector and Freddy
were casualties of their revolution,
receiving gunshot wounds which
left them paraplegics. Their experience of political struggle and
disability, thus, is quite intimate.
The ORD representatives are
visiting   with   representatives   of
physiotherapy units, disabled advocacy groups, health care
students, sports groups for the
disabled, and cooperative living
groups for the handicapped (such as
L'Arche).
They are particularly eager to
meet with other handicapped people in order to exchange experiences
and ideas.
ORD is itself engaged in many
special self-help projects.
If you are interested in learning
more about ORD's work and about
the development of popular health
care in Nicaragua or wish to show
support for Hector and Freddy's
tour, come to hear them and view
their slide presentation on Friday,
November 22 at 12:30 in IRC Rm.
#4 (adjacent to the Woodward
Biomedical Library)-
If you wish to donate health supplies or money for health supplies
(e.g. crutches) to Nicaragua, you
can do so by contacting Tools for
Peace at 733-1021.
Or better yet, bring a donation to
the Tools for Peace benefit concert
to be held in the SUB Auditorium,
Thursday, Nov. 21, at 12:30.
The band playing, Igni Tawanka,
is from Nicaragua and all donations
received will be going to Nicaragua.
Welcome our new Ombuddy
Suzanne Rose is a
student in solidarity
America.
UBC Rehab,
with Central
After 6'/2 months as AMS Acting
Ombudsperson pro-tem, I am
pleased to announce the appointment of the Alma Mater Society's
new Ombudsperson, Mr. Kevin
Kendall. Kevin is a graduate student
at the University, and comes to us
with a great deal of experience in
areas that are going to be an asset to
the Ombudsperson's office. As
soon as the new ombudsperson is
briefed on his new duties, the AMS
Ombudsoffice will open its doors to
the students. Until this time, I
would like to encourage any
students interested in becoming
volunteers in the Ombudsoffice to
talk to Kevin or myself about getting involved.
With the new cooperative merger
between the AMS Ombudsoffice
and Speakeasy Center, the AMS
will now provide accessible social
services to UBC students. The new
Ombudsoffice will only be successful though if it is used by the
students, i want to encourage all
students to take advantage of this
vital AMS Service.
No matter how small or large
your problem may be, the Obudsof-
fice will be able to help you.
Remember, we're here for you!  I
would like to thank the people who
helped me during my time as Ombudsperson, and also to the people
of the AMS Speakeasy Centre for
their contributions. As well, I
would like to wish Kevin and his
volunteers good luck in what will
hopefully be a busy year ahead.
Jonathan Mercer
AMS vice president
Race good, no banner
I would like to take this opportunity, belated as it may be, to
thank all those who took part in the
66th annual Arts '20 Relay Race.
The turnout broke all previous
records (despite the soggy weather)
and a great time was experienced by
all.
Ubyssey forgot peace protests of yore
1 am writing to draw your attention to a historical inaccuracy in the
Tuesday, November 6 Ubyssey.
your reporter writes, in the second
paragraph, that "Nanoose is also
the location of B.C.'s first arrests
for civil disobedience against
nuclear weapons." There is at least
one other occasion on which arrests
were made in B.C. for civil disobedience against nuclear weapons.
I wish to draw your attention to
this fact not because of interest in
leftist or anti-nuclear trivia, but
because I believe it is very important to retain the most of what
sometimes seems to be an extremely
short memory. Such loss of
memory is dangerous and smacks
of a corresponding loss of memory
which hampered the student antiwar and anti-nuclear movement in
the 60s. At that time, what was
forgotten were the many previous
anti-war and anti-imperialist struggles in Canada in the 30s and 40s.
This memory loss contributes to a
do-or-die mentality in which the
long view of our struggle is lost and
which inhibits our ability to learn
from former mistakes as well as
former victories.
The previous arrests to which I
refer were those that took place at
Comox Air Force Base in the summer of 1965. An attempt was made
at that time to close the base which
was one of three Canadian sites for
nuclear weapons. A number of the
THE UBYSSEY
November 19,1986
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday arid Friday throughout
the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff
and are not necessarily those of the administrataion or the
AMS. Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's
editorial office is SUB 241k. Editorial department.
228-2301/2306. Advertising 228-3977/3978.
"Masthead manic! The place for your name to appear when you've made a name for yourself,"
declared the ubiquitous Sue Mcllroy to James Young. "Why were'n't ours in there?" query Ed Mou,
Nadioe Krcfetzand Remit* Bocmer, who suddenly have the error of their complaint pointed out by the
ever-fasrikmable Deborah Lo and Stephen Wisenthal. "My name's always in there." declared Gordana
Bask to Ron Stewart, at Sarah Millin realiicd she was once again correct. Meanwhile, Mary"McAlister
and Canaille Dionne fume about bdna mentioned casually in the same sentence, and Steve Neufeld,
Kara) Gram, Steve Kontic and Doug Schmidt grumble about being listed like so much column-fodder.
"Who knows, complain and you may be mentioned twice," quipped Sue Mcllroy. "Or even three
times!" giggled Sue Mcllroy incomprehensibly. In a corner of the dark office, however, Pam
whafs-her-name smoldered silently, plotting malicious plans of revenge.
base access roads were blocked by
individuals sitting in front of the
gates. At some of the gates, protestors (the writer included) were
dragged off the road, sometimes
brutally, over twenty times. Four of
the protesters were arrested.
Charges were subsequently dropped
but the series of protest at Comox
during that year had the effect of
raising awareness of the nuclear
peril at that time, not only in the
valley, but to some extent across the
province and the nation. It's a long
and winding road. Lest we forget.
Scott Lawrance
graduate student
Unfortunately, the event did not
go over completely without flaw.
The Arts '20 banner which had been
suspended from the War Memorial
Gym west wall was removed. This
banner is valued at $1200 and
because of this, Intramural Sports
is concerned. We ask that the persons who "borrowed" our banner
please return it immediately. It may
be returned to the Intramural
Sports office (Room 66, Lower
SUB Concourse) between 9 a.m.
and 4 p.m. with no questions
asked.
The Intramural Sports Program
is here for the benefit of all
students, faculty and staff of UBC.
We strive to bring you the best Intramural program in North
America at the lowest cost. But if
property such as our $1200 banner
is stolen, registration fees will need
to be increased. Please help us to
keep the program a good one.
Richard Thomas
manager of advertising
UBC intramural sports program
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GOETHE-INSTITUT
MUSIC ON THE 49th
one of Germany's foremost chamber orchestras
ENSEMBLE 13
presents a Canadian premiere of
Chiffres by Wolfgang Rihm (completed in 1985)
on Sunday, November 24, 1985. 7:30 p.m.
at the UBC Recital Hall
Tickets $7.00 (standard) and $4.00 (reduced)
For reservations call Department of Music, UBC, 228-3113
Goethe Institute Vancouver, 687-4955
'Department off Music, UBC Tuesday, November 19,1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
UBC hockey team has its ups and clowns
By SVETOZAR KONTIC
A Dr. Jekyll-Mr. Hyde performance by the UBC hockey club at
home this weekend left supporters
and experts bewildered.
Friday evening the 'Birds put out
a strong team effort, defeating the
league leading Saskatchewan
Huskies 7-3.
"We beat them to the puck all
night long and that is really the first
time   that   has   happened   this
AT A
GLANCE
season," said UBC coach Fred
Masuch. "We are committed to a
defensive effort and our defense
played super. It has become obvious that this team has to play on a
one on one checking basis to be successful."
Rugged left winger Kevin Griffin
led the attack for UBC with a hat-
trick. Rick Amann, starting to look
like his usual dominant self, scored
two goals while Ken Sherstobitoff
added his first two markers of the
season.
It was a physical game that
became quite chippy at times. Emotions ran high on both sides as the
i.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
'10.
1.
FOURTH AVENUE GRIND
MEN
Paul Quinn, Beta 32:38
Paul Rapp, Georox III 33:28
Seamus Parker, EUS 33:36
Reidar Zapf-Gilje, EUS 33:40
No number 33:50
Stephen Chu, EUS 34:03
Rob Hasegawa, Science 34:06
Bob McGraw, Medicine 34:09
Carl Withler, 3rd Salish Alumni 34:18
Bob Dawne, Rowing 34:29
WOMEN
Carolyn Daubeny, Phed 41:30
2. Karen Warner, Nursing 43:54
3. Susan Southern, Nursing 44:49
4. Sherry Wright, Phed. 45:44
5. Neesha Brar, Agric. 46:09
6. Winona Bishop, EUS 46:35
7. Susan Wait, Nursing 47:01
8. Irene Strucel, Forestry 47:30
9. Rita Ciammaichella, Science 48:34
10.  Ingrid Dreer, Eng. 52:01
WINNERS OF WIMBLEDON - NOV. 14-17
MAIN DRAW
Men's Div. I — Dave Nickel
6-2, 6-4 over Danny Kalla
Men's Div. II - H. T. Chen
6-1, 6-0 over Dave Mitchell
Men's Div. Ill - ??????
8-6 over Ray Chow
Ladies Div. 1 — Jocelyn Dilay
6-7, 6-1, 6-2 over Lisa Shields
Ladies Div. II — Ann Carter
8-4 over Kerri Allen
Ladies Div. Ill — Julia Uyeda
8-6 over Susan Reynolds
CONSOLATION
Men's Div. I — Victor Lum
8-4 over Dan Brooks
Men's Div. II Greg Liang
5-7, 6-4, 6-2 over Jack Whittles
Men's Div. Ill — Barry Fung
8-4 over Derek Daines
Ladies Div. I — Susan Demchuk
8-6 over Caraline Thompson
Ladies Div. II — Jeanie MacEachern
8-0 over Deborah Ratcliffe
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'Birds had their backs against the
wall and Saskatchewan tried to
keep pace.
Saturday night the 'Birds looked
flat and complacent almsot watching the Saskatchewan team in a
5-2 loss. The score is not really indicative of the match; Saskatchewan outplayed the 'Birds and
were never in any real danger of losing the game.
Peter Spafford and Rick
Bourassa scored two goals apiece to
lead Saskatchewan which had 2-0
and 2-1 period leads. Rick Aman
probably had his best performance
of the year in a losing cause and
UBC RUGBY CLUB
DANCE
featuring
INNUENDO
SAT., NOV. 23
SUB BALLROOM
TIX. $5
PLAYERS OR
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AUDITIONS
TIMES: Monday, November 25 5:00-9:00 p.m.
Tuesday, November 26 5:00-9:00 p.m.
PLACE: Frederic Wood Theatre, Room 206
NEEDED: 20 Men Production reheases in February
6 Women   Performances: March 5-15/86
OPEN TO ALL UBC STUDENTS. FACULTY & STAFF
Audition material available in Room 207, Frederic Wood Theatre or phone 228-3880 to
arrange an audition appointment.
AUDITIONS
GET INTO THE ACT
AUDITIONS
Kevin  Griffin continues to look
good as his skating improves.
"We played awful. Hockey is an
athletic confrontation and we were
mere onlookers," said Masuch.
"We had 17 shots all night long and
that about says it all. For a team
that prides itself on defense, our
defense absolutely stunk."
UBC continues its lengthy home
stand next weekend against the
Regina Cougars who were 0-8 going
into action this weekend. UBC is
much better than its 3-7 record and
with the right attitude should soon
be 5-7.
FOR VERY BEST
SANDWICHES
ALSO
Homemade Fresh
Meat & Veg. Samosas,
Cornish Pastry, and
Chicken Pies
IN SUB LOWER LEVEL
Open daily 7:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
You won't get to graduation
without one.
Rent it.
By the day, week, or month.
BUSINESS
MACHINES
534 West Pender, Vancouver, Rentals 683-2237
WE DELIVER
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Lower Level
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Hours: Mon.-Fri.
8:00 a.m.-7:00 p.m.
Sat. 10 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
Telephone: 224-1911
Visa & Mastercharge |
Accepted Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 19, 1985
TODAY
UNDERWATER HOCKEY
Practice, all ages welcome, 7 p.m., UBC Aquatic
Centre.
JEWISH STUOENTS ASSOCIATION/HILLEL
Hot lunch, noon, Hillel House.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Indian cultural exchange trip information, noon.
Gage main lounge.
PRE-MEDICAL SOCIETY
Dr. Sandor talks on cardiology, noon. Wood. 1.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Sing-along at Extended Care, 5:30 p.m., meet at
Lutheran Campus centre.
CHINESE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Beginner's Mandarin, free for members, noon,
Buch. B317.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Dance practice, noon, SUB party room.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Weekly meeting, bible reading, noon, SUB 215.
FILM SOCIETY
Film: "Death of a Salesman", starring Frederic
March, $2, noon, SUB auditorium.
GAYS & LESBIANS OF UBC
Discussion group, noon, SUB 237A.
WEDNESDAY
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Gallery night, 4:30 p.m., Gallery lounge.
UBYSSEY SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM
Screenings for delegates to the CUP 48 national,
noon, SUB 241k.
STUDENTS FOR A FREE SOUTHERN AFRICA
Meeting, noon, T.A.U. office, the Armouries.
ANARCHIST CLUB
Meeting and speaker, noon, SUB 224.
INTERGRITY IN ACTION
Lecture: the art of being yourself, speaker: Dale
Maranda, noon, Buch. B221.
JEWISH STUDENTS ASSOCIATION/HILLEL
Dinner and planning meeting. 5:30 p.m., Hillel
House.
FILM SOCIETY
Film: Who's That Knocking At My Door?, $2,
7:30 and 9:30 p.m., SUB Auditorium.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Aerobics, members free, non-members $2, 5:30
p.m., SUB basement.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL
Talk on human rights in the Philippines, noon,
SUB 205.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Practice, noon, SUB Party room.
ISMAILI STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Ski trip Dec. 23, for info call Rustom, 985-9436.
UBYSSEY SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM
Weekly meeting, everyone welcome, noon, SUB
241k.
UBC WEEKLY ON CITR
Daycare, credit union closure, and other university issues discussed at 9 p.m. on CITR FM 102
cable 100.
ANARCHIST CLUB
Meeting, noon, SUB 224.
THURSDAY
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Guest speaker: Prof. Lynn Smith, faculty of law,
"The Parliamentary Committee on the Charter of
Rights", noon, SUB 215.
UBC WOMEN'S CENTRE
Film:  Not A Love Story, discussion to follow,
noon — women only, 7 p.m. — mixed, IRC 4
and IRC 1.
LATIN AMERICAN SOLIDARITY COMMITTEE
Live music: Igni Tawana from Nicaragua, $3,
noon, SUB auditorium.
SIKH STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Seminar of the role of women in religion, 7 p.m.,
IRC 2.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Lecture: Aspects of Indian Culture by Dr. Aklujkar, noon, SUB 125.
JEWISH STUDENTS ASSOCIATION/HILLEL
Torah study, 11:30, Hillel House.
PRE-DENTAL SOCIETY
Lecture on Oral Surgery by Dr. Braverman, bring
$22 for sweatshirts, noon, IRC 5.
FILM SOCIETY
Films:   Mask,   7   p.m..   Desperately   Seeking
Susan, 9:20 p.m., $2, SUB auditorium.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Bronze class, noon, SUB ballroom.
CHINESE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Chinese painting class, 4:30 p.m., Asian centre
room 604.
GRADUATE STUDENT SOCIETY
Music night featuring Greg Gaines, 8:30 p.m.,
Grad centre, Garden room lounge.
UBC CYCLING CLUB
Cycling clothes are in, please bring money, 11:30
a.m., SUB 212.
CHINESE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Intermediate Mandarin, free for members, noon,
Buch. B317.
UBC STUDENT LIBERALS
Policy committee meeting, noon, SUB 119.
GREAT LAW TRIALS ON THE SILVER SCREEN
"The Trial", based on Kafka's novel, noon, law
building room 101.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Meeting, noon, International House lounge.
AMS ROCKERS
Meeting re Nov. 30 party, noon, SUB 241B.
UBC CHINESE CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Pastor Henderson on the christian perspective of
life, noon, Scarfe room 209.
INTRAMURAL SPORTS
Nachos and oly night for hockey league, 7:45
p.m., Thunderbird winter sports centre lounge.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CLUB
"Getting to Know You", noon, St. Mark's College.
INTRAMURAL SPORTS
Broomball cancelled for tonight.
CAMPUS CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
Speaker Alan Gillman, noon. Brock 302.
THUNDERBIRD BASKETBALL
UBC men host U of Regina Cougars, 8:30 p.m.,
War Memorial gym.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
General meeting, noon, Hebb 12.
FRIDAY
PSEUDO INTELLECTUAL STUDENT SOCIETY
General meeting, elections, bring money, noon,
SUB 212.
UBYSSEY SCHOOL OF JUNKETING
Vote closes on CUP 48 delegates, 4 p.m., SUB
241k.
PREMEDICAL SOCIETY
Volleyball    challenge    against    microbilogy,
Osborne gym.
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CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Car rally and social afterwards, 5:X p.m., meet
at SUB loop, all cars $4.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Lunch hour meeting, noon, International House
lounge.
UBC STUDENT LIBERALS
Model parliament — second resolution meeting,
noon, SUB 212A.
CHINESE STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
Beginners cantonese — free for members, noon,
Buch. B317.
STUDENTS FOR PEACE AND MUTUAL
DISARMAMENT
"After   the   Geneva   Summit:   Where   Now   in
U.S.-Soviet Relations?" Prof. Michael Wallace,
Dept. of Political Science UBC,  noon, Buch.
A100.
FILM SOCIETY
Films:  Mask, 7:30 p.m.,  Desperately Seeking
Susan, 9:30 p.m., $2 each, SUB auditorium.
LATIN AMERICAN SOLIDARITY COMMITTEE
Slide presentation —  Nicaraguan Organization
for the Disabled,  noon,  IRC #4 (adjacent to
Woodward).
SATURDAY
ANARCHIST CLUB
Film:   "The  Mondragon   Story",  7  p.m.,  call
738-3040 or check notice board for location.
Igni Tawanka, the Nicaraguan
musical group is playing on campus
this Thursday at noon, in the SUB
auditorium. (Tickets are $3.) The
six-member band, sponsored by
Tools for Peace, has been touring
B.C. for the past three weeks, going as far north as Prince Rupert,
and bringing a message in the form
of music from the people of
Nicaragua. Their music is a mixture
of experimental, jazz, rock and
modern popular music with
elements of national Nicaraguan
and of Afro-Caribbean music. They
are also playing at La Quena (1111
Commercial Drive) this
Wednesday and Sunday. Donations are accepted (pencils,
candles, blankets) for the Tools for
Peace   collection.
NOT A LOVE STORY
Thursday, Nov. 21 IRC #4
WOMEN ONLY: 12:30 p.m.
MIXED SHOWING: 7:00 p.m.
Sponsored by AMS Women's Centre
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.50 additional lines, .70c. Additional days, $4.00 and .65c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the
day before publication.
Publications Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $10.00. Call 228-3977.
11 - FOR SALE - Private
VAN.-WINNIPEG RETN. Female, leave
Dec. 24, Ret'n Dec. 30. Ph. John 874-0043.
Leave messaae.
85 - TYPING
20 - HOUSING
NICE ROOM in comfortable home. Beautiful
view near UBC. Share with young family.
$300. 228-8552 after 6 p.m.
MARPOLE. Shared accom., clean 4-br.
house, washer/dryr, f-place, carport, $325
plus VS util 321-7335.
ACCOMMODATION is available in the
U.B.C. Student Residences. Fairview Crescent, U.B.C.'s newest residence facility, is
accepting applications from students who
are 23 years of age by December 31st, 1985
or who are graduate students. Totem Park
and Place Vanier Residences have immediate vacancies for men and women of
any age for room and board accommodation. Come to the Student Housing Office,
2071 West Mall, or phone 228-2811, for
information.
30 - JOBS
CP   HOTELS   CHATEAU   LAKE   LOUISE
is now taking applications for Xmas
employment. Positions available from Dec.
20 to Jan. 5. Please send resume ft letters
of reference to personnel office Chateau
Lake Louise, Lake Louise, Alberta, TOL 1E0.
BABYSITTER  NEEDED.  Thursday  &  Fri
day, early afternoons. Call 224-9283.
10 - MESSAGES
CREE to good homes, world's best kittens!
5 weeks old, all colors and sizes. Phone
736-4002 after 6 p.m.
TO THE PERSON who found my wallet outside of Woodward Library on Wednesday:
Thanks for returning it. It's nice to know
there are still people like you out there.
70 - SERVICES
RECYCLE
All metals — jars — bottles — newspapers
7 days a week til 6 p.m. 327-2315.
DOUBLE DATE
ADVENTUROUS! Discover Doubledate.
You & a friend, with someone else 6 a
friend. A friendly foursome having fun.
Hot Air Ballooning, Texas BBQs, Boat
Cruises.
736-4444
HAVING A PARTY? From Neanderthal
cave stomps to the latest computer chip
cha-cha, CITR can deliver it right to your
next party with its mobile sound system and
the rates are fantastic!
80 - TUTORING
SPEAKEASY TUTORIAL CENTRE. Find a
tutor or register as a tutor. SUB Concourse.
M-F 9:30 a.m. to 9:30 p.m.
WORD    PROCESSING    SPECIALIST.    U
write,   we   type   theses,   resumes,   letters,
essays. Days, evgs., wknds. 736-1208.
WORD WEAVERS - Word Processing.
(Bilingual) Student rates. Fast turnaround.
5670 Yew St. at 41 St. Kerrisdale 266-6814.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST. 30 years experience. Student rates. Photocopier.
Dorothy Martinson, 228-8346.
UNIVERSITY TYPING-Word processing.
Papers, theses, resumes, letters, P-U & del.
9 a.m.-11 p.m. 7 days/wk. 251-2064.
WORD PROCESSING IMicoml. Theses
rate, $1.50/dbl. sp. pg. Tables & equations
(Chem., Engineering, etc.) at $14/hr.
201-636 W. Broadway. 876-5333 (Jeeva).
WORDPOWER-Editing, proofing & word
processing professionals. Xerox copies,
student rates. 3737 W. 10th Ave. (at Alma)
222-2661.
EXPERT TYPING: Essays, t. papers, fac-
tums, letters, mscpts, resumes, theses.
IBM Sel II. Proofreading. Reas. rates. Rose
731-9857, 224-7351.
JUDITH F1LTNESS. quality typist. 3206
West 38th Avenue. 263-0351.
WORD PROCESSING: Spelling, grammar
expertise. Days, eves., wkends. Student
rates. Call Nancy 266-1768.
TYPING. Fast & accurate, $1.00 per page.
Call 879-3854.
MINIMUM NOTICE REQUIRED. Essays &
resumes, 222-4661 (before 1 p.m.) 732-0529
(5-7 p.m.).
EXPERT essay, theses typing from legible
wk. Spelling/grammar corrected. 7386829,
10 a.m.-9 p.m. King Ed. bus rte.
TYPING/WORD    PROCESSING.    Ex
perienced   typist.   Reasonable   rates.   Call
Mari-lou, 421-0818 (near Lougheed Mall).
MY WORD! PROCESSING, on IBM-PC+
(hard drive). 12th Ave. & Commercial. Call
Kerry Rigby: 876-2895.
NORTH VANCOUVER. Fast service, carefull
atten. to academic detail, $1.40 dbl. space
page. 985-4929.
EXPERT WORDPROCESSING - Fast and
accurate. Rachel. 731-1970.
TYPING & WORDPROCESSING. Special
student rates. Efficiency guaranteed. Call
Gail at 732-8311 or 266-2879.
PDQ WORD PROCESSING. Essays,
theses, letters, resumes. Days,
eves./wknds. Quick turnaround, stud,
rates. 731-1252.
WORD PROCESSING/TYPING. Student
rates. Ideal for students on North Shore.
Days, eves., weekends. 985-8890.
GEETECH WORD PROCESSING. Student
rates. Fast turnaround. 7 days-24 hrs.
Kingsway/Fraser. 879-2027. Tuesday, November 19, 1985
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Volleybirds kill and get killed over weekend
In Canada West men's volleyball
action last weekend, the Thunderbirds split their Prairie swing matches. Saturday the 'Birds beat the
Alberta Garden Bears 3-2 after losing Friday's match to the number
one ranked Saskatchewan Huskies
3-1.
The 'Birds toyed with the Bears
defeating them 12-15, 16-14, 10-15,
15-4, 15-7. Coach Dale Ohman used
the match to give some of his young
players some valuable Canada West
playing experience.
I   h K :
team
pelts Beavers
The UBC women's soccer team
trounced Surrey Beavers 4-0 in
League play this weekend.
UBC's striker Iren Cultum scored
the first goal on a full volley after a
series of passes by Debbie Nielsen
and Sarah James. UBC's second
goal, off a well-rehearsed cor-
nerkick was also put away by
Cultum. Midfielder Shannon Scott
took the corner which was dummied beautifully by Kathy
Bockhold, the team captain.
UBC held much of the play in the
second half as their superior fitness
began to tell on the Surrey squad.
The third goal was also from a cor-
nerkick, with Shannon Scott taking
a lovely curving corner which was
deflected into the net by a Surrey
defender.
The final goal occurred when
striker Debbie Nielsen received a
miskick from the Surrey goalkeeper
right outside their eighteen yard
box. Unmarked, Nielsen hit a first
time shot to score the 'Birds fourth
goal.
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10 a.m.-10 p.m., Tues.-Thurs.
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TOP GIRLS
By Caryl Churchill
Directed by Julie Akers
NOV. 20-23
8 p.m.
Sat. Mat.—Nov. 23 at 4p.m.
Student Tickets: $4
Box Office * Room 207 *
Frederic Wood Theatre
DOROTHY
SOMERSET
STUDIO
The University of
British Columbia
Res. 228-2678
"With our starting line-up on the
floor in the final two games the
result was not in doubt," said
Ohman.
Senior setter, Brad Willock, came
off the bench to take control of the
match. "Willock rebounded well
from his frustrating performance
the previous night in Saskatoon,"
said Ohman. Greg Williscroft, paced 'Birds with 22 kills and five stuff
blocks. Doug Penner served effectively with 16 service points.
Leading the Bears was power hitter
John MacKinnon with 29 kills.
Friday night in Saskatoon the
number one ranked Saskatchewan
Huskies and the 'Birds split the first
two games of the exciting match
with the 'Birds winning the first
game 15-10, and the Huskies the second 15-11.
In the third game the 'Birds raced
to a 6-0 lead before the roof fell in.
The Huskies proceeded to outscore
the 'Birds 25-2 in a streak which
totally humiliated the hapless
'Birds. Saskatchewan won the final
two games 15-8 and 15-6.
"When the match as on the line
our veteran players failed to provide the necessary leadership.
Saskatchewan played like a well-
oiled machine and is fully deserving
of its number one ranking," said
Ohman. "If we are to win in March
at the CIAU tournament, our
players now know how much they
must improve."
Chris Frechlick led the 'Birds
with 21 kills and Brad Willock added five stuff blocks. The top setter
in the country, Huskies' Brian
Gaulas,   combined   with   CIAU
player of the year candidate, Darcy
Busse, for 22 kills as the Huskies
dominated the 'Birds.
The 'Birds record is now 3-1 in
Canada West play. Next action for
the 'Birds is this coming weekend as
they play host to the Lethbridge
Pronghorns on Friday and the
Dinosaurs of Calgary on Saturday.
Game time both nights is 8 p.m.
SUN.-WED. 10% U.B.C. STUDENT CARD DISCOUNT
2043 W. 4th AVE.
4
UBC
■T.(E-X-C-E ■ L-L-E-N -T) -,r
Th e  eat e rY
1 FREE BURGER
THE GOOD DEAL IS YOUR LEAST EXPENSIVE BURGER IS FREE WHEN
TWO ARE ORDERED. THIS APPLIES TO BEEF & TOFU BURGERS ONLY.
AND ISNT VALID FOR TAKE-OUT OR ANY OTHER COUPON.
ENJO Y YOUR BURG AND HA VE A NICE DA Y!
3431 WEST BROADWAY
738-5296
r
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PIZZA FACTORY ltd
2630 Sasamat St. at 10th Ave
SPECIAL OFFER TIL NOV. 30, 1985
2 LARGE PIZZAS
Italian pepperoni, fresh mushrooms, green peppers
Mozzarela cheese, tomato sauce, plus:
FREE 26 OZ. COCA COLA OR SPRITE
ONLY $15.95
Offer Good for Delivery or Pick-Up Orders
224-3333 x*
^
OPEN EARLY
OPEN LATE
* passport pictures
* specialty papers
* volume discounts
kinko's copies
5706 University Blvd. 222-1688
M-Th8-9       Fri 8-6       Sat 9-6       Sun 11-6
Internationally Published Author
LATEST WORK Just Released:
Over and Under the Table
will work individually with beginning or rejected
writers; plotting, editing, revising, submission to
agent and/or publishers.
WRITE TO: KENNETH ORVIS,
Room 269-955 Burrard
Vancouver, B.C.   V6Z 1Y2
NOTICE OF ELECTION
Student Representatives to serve on the Board of
Governors and the Senate.
This notice is a call for nominations for full-time
students to run for election for the following positions;
BOARD OF GOVERNORS-TWO students
SENATE —SEVENTEEN   students,   (five   at-large   and
one from each faculty)
Nominaton forms giving full details of the requirements of nominations are available in the Registrars Office, the A.M.S. Office (Room
266 S.U.B.), and in the offices of the Studen* Undergraduate
Societies and the Graduate Student Association.
Nominations must be in the hands of the REGISTRAR no later
than 4:00p.m. on Friday, December 6, 1985.
STUDENT DISCOUNTS AND
SAME DAY SERVICE
SAVEE 20% *
SAME DAY SERVICE
AT THE.
WESTERN OPTICAL EYE LAB
With your prescription and
STUDENT I.D. CARD -
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NETWORK INFOSYSTEMS INC.
850 Burrard Street, Suite 305, Vancouver, B.C. V6Z 2J1 Here's what Incredible Savings
look like at Sportif
6:30 pm -10:00 p.m., Tuesday,
November19th.
Sportif's UBC only night.
Simply bring your Student Card to
Sportif's UBC ONLY Night, and it's
worth incredible savings on the regular
retail and sale price of any merchandise
in the entire store.
Refreshments will be served,
courtesy of Fogg 'n' Suds; and, by
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eligible to win one of thousands of
dollars worth of prizes. (Contest
runs 6:30 p.m. —10:00 p.m. and you
must be present to win!)
This special night of UBC ONLY
savings and special offers will not
be open to the general public, but UBC
Student Card holders are entitled to
bring guests with them.
UBC NIGHT AT SPORTIF.
We'tl educate you on what savings should really be.
^SPORTIF
2674 WEST4TH AVENUE IN KITSILANO...736-6411

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