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The Ubyssey Oct 21, 1975

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Array SFU studies
student reps
NORTH WOODS LOGGING OPTION? No, it's one of the
by-products of UBC's snazzy and under-financed swimming pool —
destruction of 19 Lombard poplars standing in way of progress.
Trees came down on weekend, one week ahead of schedule, and
—peter cummings photo
years before replacement grove will tower over concrete edifice that
will appear in slick PR publications glorifying campus and its $4.7
million bathtub. (Story, P. 3.)
Symposium urges independent NDU
The B.C. education department
w''.l transform privately-run Notre
Dame University into a revamped
public institution by next September. Yet nobody at the Nelson
campus knows what is really
planned for NDU. As a result many
are pissed off.
At a symposium Friday people
from the Kootenays voiced their
frustration about the government's
lack of direction. The Ubyssey sent
reporter Marcus Gee to cover the
event.
ByMARCUSGEE
NELSON — A symposium of 100
people at Notre Dame University
Friday demanded the provincial
government grant autonomy to
post-secondary institutions in the
Kootenays.
In a 500-word telegram to leaders
of provincial opposition parties and
government cabinet ministers,
faculty, students and administration figures from post-
secondary institutions in the
Kootenays asserted their independence from the coastal
universities.
The telegram demands the
government act at once to clarify
the structure of the Kootenay
University Centre, which the
education department has said will
replace NDU next September.
The telegram reflects the
consensus at Friday's symposium
that higher education in the
Kootenays must remain independent.
It states: "We, persons from the
institutions of Selkirk College, the
Kootenay School of Art, Notre
Dame University of Nelson and
residents of the Kootenay area,
assert the academic as well as the
broader cultural and political,
-reasons for decentralization.
"We further assert that the
principle of autonomy is vital to the
development of viable post-
secondary programs in the
Kootenay region," the telegram
continued.
Joan Snyder, NDU's faculty
association acting chairman, told
the symposium that Notre Dame
would lose its character as an
alternative university if it became
a satellite of the coastal universities.
"Autonomy would give us the
advantage to develop a university
suited to our needs. Without
autonomy we would be tied to the
coast," Snyder said.
"We think we are better suited to
decide what programs are offered
here than someone from UBC or
SFU."
The original model for the
transformation of NDU, created by
Walter Hardwick, UBC continuing
education head, proposes that the
Nelson   campus   offer   degree
programs from UBC, SFU and the
University of Victoria.
Education minister Eileen Dailly
announced last spring NDU would
become a public institution in
September, 1976.
Several speakers at the symposium berated the education
department for not deciding what
form the proposed university
centre will take.
NDU admissions officer Lee
Karvonen said 100 to 200 people
have enquired about applying to
the university but have been
turned away because of the uncertainty of next year's academic
programs.
"We (NDU) have been on shaky
ground for so long that many
students now look to the coast for
higher education.
"It seems one thing the government doesn't want to do is sort out
the problems of this transformation. We w i s h to have a
definite, final word on the structure of the new entity."
Karvonen said the new
university centre could have a
much larger enrolment than
NDU's current 500 students.
He said students from the Lower
Mainland might come to the
Kootenays to experience the more
intimate learning environment and
to get away from the city.
Many foreign students now attend NDU and more would come to
the new institution, Karvonen said.
An autonomous replacement for
NDU or a collective society of the
Kootenays post-secondary institutions would serve students
best, he said.
"The telegram makes it clear
that we (Kootenay post-secondary
institutions) are working closely
together.
"We have a lot of-common
ground. If we all don't become the
same institution we will still be
closely allied."
See page 2: MAYOR
SFU tries to end bitter dispute
By CHRIS GAINOR
In an effort to end a five-year
boycott of Simon Fraser University by the Canadian Association of
University Teachers, SFU's administration has offered jobs to
two of seven professors fired after
a bitter 1969 dispute.
SFU and CAUT representatives
have been negotiating for several
months in efforts to reach an
agreement to end the boycott —
imposed after seven political
science, sociology and anthropology department professors
were fired by then-administration
president Kenneth Strand.
CAUT vowed not to lift the
boycott until the seven were
reinstated. The boycott was lifted
briefly last year after Pauline
Jewett became administration
president, but was reimposed
because she failed to act quickly on
the issue.
Mordecai Briemberg, one of the
fired professors, told the Ubyssey
Monday SFU's administration has
offered unspecified jobs at SFU to
two professors, and offered two-
year research stipends to four
others.
The seventh professor was not
offered any job, Briemberg said.
All of the so-called PSA seven
find the proposal "unacceptable,"
he added.
Briemberg, who currently writes
for the Western Voice, said he was
informed of the proposed
agreement by telegram.
Under the proposal, he said,
Kathleen Aberle and David Potter
were offered jobs. Louis
Feldhammer, Prudence Wheeldon,
Nathan Popkin and Briemberg
were offered two-year research
stipends.
Briemberg said he thinks the
stipends will be $9,600, but another
See page 8: EX-PROF
By RALPH MAURER
Armed with a Vancouver
lawyer's interpretation of the
Universities Act, a Simon Fraser
University student-faculty committee will be established to get
students on all arts faculty decision
making committees.
The committee's establishment
follows lawyer Stuart Rush's
statement to the SFU Student
Society that in his opinion, the
Universities Act provides for
student representation at every
level of university government.
SFU students are currently
represented on some departmental
committees but are not
represented on any body making
decisions concerning tenure,
hiring, firing and promotion.
UBC students are similarly
represented but are also denied
positions on the same committees.
The Universities Act established
the structure and sets operating
guidelines for B.C.'s three public
universities.
SFU arts dean Sam Smith said
Monday an ad hoc committee
consisting of students and faculty
members would be established this
week to examine and make
recommendations on student
representation on different faculty
committees.
Smith said the decision to
establish the committee was made
after the Rush opinion, and as a
direct result of a wish by SFU
administration president Pauline
Jewett to establish such a committee.
He said the committee's terms of
reference have not been formally
established because of its informal
nature but said he expects the
committee will examine "so-called
sensitive areas such as tenure and
promotion committees."
"It (the committee) is an informal, ad-hoc task forcish sort of
thing," Smith said.
He said the committee did not
have the power to make recommendations to any particular
governing body like the senate and
board of governors but said it
would still have considerable
power.
"The strength of a non-statutory
committee is that it can spread
wisdom pretty broadly, but the
weakness is that nobody has to
listen to it if they don't want to," he
said.
"But I don't see how it can help
but have some broadly-based
political power because of its
makeup."
He said the first job of the group
will be a fact-finding, but he admitted he might be prejudiced in
favor of the student cause.
"I think students ought to be
involved and in a sense I'm
prejudiced because I've had
successful experiences with
students in this regard."
He said the importance of Rush's
decision could be mitigated
because SFU's administration
"could probably get contrary
opinions from legal eagles.
"But the clause (in the
Universities Act examined by
Rush) seems to say they have the
right" to greater representation,
he said.
"That's my opinion, but I'm not a
lawyer. It just makes sense,"
Smith said.
Ron Miller, arts student
representative on SFU's Student
Society, said the break in the long
battle for greater student
representation came when Schiffer
. "just happened to trip across" part
8, clause 40-B of the Universities
Act.
The clause says one of the duties
of faculties is to "provide for
student representation in the
meetings and proceedings of the
faculty."
See page 5: STUDENT Pag* 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 21, 1975
Mayor nixes autonomy
From page 1
The only person speaking at the
symposium who did not favor
autonomy for the proposed
university centre was Nelson
mayor Tex Mowatt.
"Autonomy is not relevant to this
situation," Mowatt said. "Walter
Hardwick came up with an acceptable model in the first place.
To come up with a new plan now
would be a mistake."
Mowatt said it does not matter if
coastal universities choose the
programs to be offered in the
Kootenays because the educational
process is the same on the coast as
it is in Nelson.
But Kootenay students and
faculty should be involved in
academic planning for the
university centre, Mowatt said.
"They forget about us up here.
The institution (NDU) has been
waiting too long," he said. "We
want a game plan (for post-
secondary education).
"Following this telegram, there
should be an announcement immediately."
Frustration stemming from the
lack of local involvement in the
education department's veiled
plans for NDU has been building
ever since the release of a royal
commission report in January,
1974.
The report recommends NDU
become a four-year degree-
granting college under a larger
body to be named the Kootenay
Institute.
Selkirk College, however, objected  to the   royal   commission
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report because people at the
college felt it would lose its first
and second year programs.
Hardwick was then hired as a
consultant to the Universities
Council. He claims he arrived at
the university centre model after
frequent consultation with people
at NDU and around the Kootenays.
Hardwick says he decided that
autonomy was an impossibility for
NDU. He said high per student
costs, low enrolment and the low
worth of an NDU degree make the
university a "non-viable institution."
"There is no way you can say
they are an autonomous, viable
university. They have gone from
crisis to crisis.
"It has not established itself as
an alternative to the established
universities."
Hardwick said Monday that
NDU degrees "have a limited
range of applicability." Students
from the interior would benefit
more by gaining degrees from the
established universities granted at
a Kootenay university centre,
Hardwick said.
"People in the interior are not
looking forward to a third-rate
degree being offered here," he
said.
Hardwick said an autonomous
public university in Nelson would
undermine local colleges such as
Selkirk. However, Selkirk reps at
the symposium came out in full
support of autonomy.
Hardwick denied charges voiced
at the symposium that people from
the Kootenays have not been
consulted about the transformation
of NDU.
"All options have included major
input from the interior," he said.
Many speakers at the symposium said they feared NDU
would lose its unique intimate
learning environment if it offered
courses from universities 700 miles
away. But Hardwick denied this as
well.
"The learning experience has
nothing to do with who stamps the
parchment. It is entirely a matter
of scale. Any small institution has
a similar atmosphere to Notre
Dame.
"There has to be a leavening
influence from the outside," he
said. "It (NDU) cannot exist just
as people in an isolated mountain
valley."
Dailly is expected to make a
major statement on higher
education in the Kootenays within
two weeks.
Hillel -House
Presents
SLIDE PRESENTATION   on
AUSCHWITZ, TREBLINKA,
and WARSAW GHETTO
narrated by
Rabbi Marvin Hier
TUESDAY, OCT. 21,
12:30 P.M.
LUNCH AVAILABLE
HELP YOURSELF
FREE SELF-HELP
WORKSHOPS TO
INCREASE YOUR SKILLS
WORKSHOP 1
-   EFFECTIVE STUDY HABITS
Four    one-hour    sessions    on
developing more efficient methods
of study.
WORKSHOP 2    -
WORKSHOP 3
EFFECTIVE ESSAY WRITING
Eight    one-hour    sessions    to
improve the preparation of essays.
"IMPROVING INTERPERSONAL
RELATIONS"
A workshop to explore attitudes
and feelings towards ourselves and
others.
These free programs are designed to help students
develop skills. All workshops commence the week of
October 27. Sign up NOW since limited enrollment is
necessary.
The Office of The Student Services
Ponderosa Annex "F"
SPONSORED BY THE OFFICE OF STUDENT SERVICES IN
CO-OPERATION WITH THE DEAN OF WOMEN'S OFFICE
FOR YOUR FAVORITE
COCKTAILS
WED.-THURS. - FRI.
5 P.M.- 11 P.M.
Main Floor Off. Inf. Desk - Room 101 SUB
NOTICE OF POLL
General   elections   will   be   held   this   week   to   fill
vacancies in four A.M.S. executive positions. Polls will
be conducted at 14 convenient locations on campus at
the following times:
ADVANCE POLL:
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 23rd, 1975
In the common blocks of the three campus residences:
TOTEM PARK
PLACE VANIER
GAGE TOWERS
Between the hours of 5:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m.
(NOTE: Students in residence are not required to vote at this
time. These stations are provided only as a convenience.)
GENERAL POLL:
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 24th, 1975
In the following buildings or areas:
SUB
MAIN LIBRARY
SEDGEWICK LIBRARY
WOODWARD LIBRARY
WAR MEMORIAL GYM
BUCHANAN BUILDING
civil engineering
education building
angus building
law building
McMillan building
Polls will be open between the hours of 10:00 a.m.
and 4:00 p.m.
A valid A.M.S. card must be presented at all polls in
order to vote, and all students will be allowed one
vote for a candidate to fill each office.
BRENT TYNAN
Returning Officer Tuesday, October 21, 1975
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Whelan plugs Aggie grass roots
By GREGG THOMPSON
Federal agriculture minister
Eugene Whelan urged agriculture
students to maintain close contact
with the farming community when
they graduate.
"Don't become a scientist locked
up in a room doing work on a
project that bears no relationship
to farmers' problems," Whelan
said Friday.
Whelan, who drew a crowd of
about 500, was at UBC to speak to
the agriculture undergraduate
society.
"You will be needed in
agribusiness, government and as
primary producers. You will be
leaders, not followers," Whelan
said.
"Farmers will be looking to you
for your ideas and leadership. You
will have more responsibility than
the average farmer. Farmers will
be looking for great things from
you just because you have formal
training."
Whelan urged students to "keep
in touch with the grass roots. Be
receptive to farmers' ideas and
requests about a more productive
way of farming — it'll pay big
dividends in the end."
He said he thinks there is
currently a balance of respect
between the farm community and
the scientific community.
"Farmers will jump on scientific
research if it is both practical and
profitable. . . scientific people also
have a pretty good idea of farmers'
needs and are directing their efforts to these areas.
"They're on the same wavelength because they communicate," he said.
Whelan claimed the new
economic measures taken by the
federal government will help
farmers in two ways.
"First, the input costs to farmers
should level off. This includes the
costs of feeds, fertilizers,
pesticides, farm machinery and
the like.
"The companies that produce
these items are going to be
monitored so that farmers will
know that farm input costs will be
kept as low as possible," Whelan
said.
Physical plant
mistake fells
SUB trees early
A goof by UBC's physical plant
resulted in 15 poplar trees being
cut down a week early, administration vice-president Eric
Vogt said Monday.
Vogt said the trees, on the site of
the $4.7 million covered pool to be
built south of SUB, should have
been felled next weekend.
"It is a regrettable incident. I
was as astonished as anybody to
see the hole where the trees were
cut down this morning," he said.
Physical plant director Neville
Smith was instructed to delay the
felling until a new grove is planted
on either side of the War Memorial
Gym parking lot, Vogt said.
"We have taken steps to make
sure physical plant goes ahead
with things as instructed in the
future," Vogt said.
He said a physical plant employee "a level or two below"
Smith forgot to instruct the contractor felling the trees to wait
until next weekend.
A total of 19 poplars are being
felled to make way for the pool.
Frank Keetley, physical plant
superintendent of operations and
maintenance, said Monday one of
the poplars was blown over in a
recent storm and found to be
rotten.
Keetley said assistant forestry
professor Bart van der Kamp will
check all poplars on campus for
rot.
He said farmers have been
particularly hard hit by inflation.
Whelan said the new federal
program will also help farmers
because farm produce prices will
not be controlled under the
program.
Whelan said farmers don't affect
the inflation spiral, but it is the
"middlemen, speculators and
manufacturers that need control."
He said price freezes would
adversely affect agricultural
producers who, as in the case of
beef producers, are already
operating at a loss.
"Beef calves on the prairies this
year are selling at a fraction of
what it costs to produce them. To
freeze beef farmers into such a
position would be totally unfair
and, in the long run, counterproductive," Whelan said.
He added that because Canadian
farm produce is sold on a North
American market, controls would
interfere with the free flow of
prices, which he said are largely
influenced by the U.S.
"That's why farm products will
continue to find their own levels
and that's why farm products have
not been put under price control."
Whelan also said farm product
prices will continue to be set by
farm marketing boards.
He said the boards have
traditionally been fair and
reasonable in their price setting
procedures, and that they will
continue to level out supply with
demand.
"I want farmers to make a
decent return on their products but
I also want to reassure consumers
that farm marketing boards are
going to be fair with consumers,"
Whelan said.
"Farm marketing boards are not
the villains in the inflation spiral,"
he said. "They were fighting in
flation long before the federal
government came up with the new
economic guidelines."
Whelan said he expects
"processors, wholesalers and
retailers to be responsible and
reflect price trends in their product
prices."
"The federal government will
not tolerate, however, bigger profit
margins," he warned.
"Any savings realized through
lower prices paid to farmers must
be passed on down the line in lower
prices to the consumer. The
government will deal harshly with
any companies who don't pass on
savings."
LOOKING FOR TADPOLES, physical plant workers Monday probe
mysterious pond that appeared near Empire Pool after drenching
monsoon rains of last few days. Search proved fruitless, however, and
—peter cummings photo
frustrated fishermen had to be content with soggy socks, discarded
swim trunks, beer bottles and funny little pieces of latex that were
sticky or something . . .
NUS ignores regional participation
Delegates to a recent National
Union of Students conference
didn't get around to discussing
regional participation in NUS.
Alma Mater Society president
Jake van der Kamp, who returned
Monday from last week's NUS
conference in Fredericton, N.B.,
said he had hoped the conference
would discuss reorganization of
NUS to provide regional representation.
Instead, the issue will come
before a NUS conference in Ottawa
at the end of the month, van der
Kamp said.
Participation of regional
organizations in NUS was one of
two issues which van der Kamp
and Janet Neilson, UBC's other
delegate to the conference, wanted
discussed.
Neilson is a B.C. Students'
Federation staffer and acting AMS
external affairs officer. She will
not return to UBC until next week.
AMS council voted last Wednesday to send van der Kamp and
My job? Well.eeuhe.el dunne
Administration president Doug
Kenny's assistant can't or won't
say what his duties as assistant
are.
Donald Soule, a full professor in
UBC's theatre department, was
appointed assistant to the
president last July.
But in an interview Monday,
Soule said he could give no details
of his responsibilities.
"I really can't say what my job is
here. Several people have asked
the same thing but it's really
difficult to spell out.
"At times items come up that the
president asks me to do and I do
them," Soule said.
Soule receives an annual
honorarium'of $3,500, in addition to
his $37,500 prof's salary, for his
services.
Kenny and Soule are said to be
"good friends" and have worked
closely together in the past.
Kenny was arts dean from 1970
until July when he became administration president.
Soule was one of two assistant
arts deans for the same period.
When Kenny moved his offices to
the old administration building,
Soule followed suit and now occupies an office one floor above
Kenny's.
Although the assistant to the
president position is not new,
former administration president
Walter Gage did not employ one
during his five-year term.
Kenny was in Fredericton, N.B.
Monday and could not be reached
for comment.
Neilson to the conference, but did
not set official policy, for them to
bring up there.
A special council meeting was
set for Oct. 14 to determine policy,,
but only 10 councillors showed up.
Van der Kamp said most of the
Fredericton conference was
devoted to discussions of student
financial aid, the other issue that
van der Kamp wanted to bring
before NUS.
He said Neilson attended
seminars on financial aid, while he
went to other seminars.
"There were some motions made
about student aid. Mostly we were
concerned about a petition on
student aid which UBC has a copy
of," van der Kamp said.
He said he and Neilson wanted to
discuss lifting of residency
restrictions on student aid and
propose changes to the current
definition of an independent
student.
To be classified as an independent a student must have
been a full-time student for four
years, worked for a consecutive 12-
month period or be married. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 21, 1975
UEL snow job
There's a snow job
coming over the horizon.
Hiding behind the swirling
conglomeration of ice
particles and grey clouds is
Dinos Lambrou.
You remember Dinos. He's
the president of LRS
Development Enterprises
which holds options on 3.6
acres of land on the
Endowment    Lands.
LRS wants to do
something with their land.
And that doesn't mean
renting to the 179 middle
income people who are
currently huddled in
buildings   on the land.
The question which has
been worrying everyone is
how will LRS redevelop?
A supermarket? Congenial
graveyard? Garbage dump?
Super-expensive,
ultra-luxurious housing for
high-income people?
The latter. Or so we were
told on Sept. 24. At that
time William Henson, a
lawyer for LRS, told The
Ubyssey the redevelopment
would have to be restricted
to higher income clientele
because of ever-increasing
land and construction costs.
Enter Dinos. (Please don't
mistake him for the
Flintstone's dog.)
Dinos told The Ubyssey
late last week something
rather interesting. He
claimed that detailed plans
for     the     redevelopment
haven't been even worked
out and the cost factors
hadn't been calculated.
What details? Whether the
bathtub will be made of
turquoise or marble?
Whether champagne rather
than water will flow in the
toilets?
Obviously some concrete
proposals had been worked
out within the company.
Otherwise why would LRS'
double-knit lawyer mouth
off so specifically about the
whole enterprise (restricted
to high incomes, costing
about $35 million to
develop . . . .)
There are two corporate
opinions here and, as we all
know, there is only one
truth.
Is Dinos backtracking —
shaking in his little oily
boots because of the violent
public reaction against his
plans?
Is he denying everything
now, hoping to come up
with a new money-making
scheme which will be
amenable to the UEL
administrators, the tenants
and the government?
And will the year see an
early snowfall?
Only time will tell, if you
catch our drift.
Delly no deli
A few years ago, it was announced that a real
delicatessen   would  be  established  in  the SUB   basement.
We're still waiting.
A delicatessen is a place that sells smoked meats, the
countless varieties of European sausages, sausage rolls,
hams, roast beef, corned beef, chicken, turkey, pickled
herring, dills, olives, bean salads, tossed salads, macaroni
salads, lox, bagels, cheese blintzes, buns, breads, roquefort,
gruyere, limburger, smoked oysters.
In other words, a real delicatessen is an establishment
you walk into and have a hell of a time deciding what to
eat.
Some UBC staffers recently approached the Delly
looking for food and found: half a dozen boring
submarines; stale buns; one kind of sausage (greasy Genoa);
a fridge full of prepackaged process cheese and pounds and
pounds of edam; some tired looking pieces of disgusting
pizza; and two employees who did not know the difference
between edam and emmenthaler.
The Delly is not a real delicatessen.
The Alma Mater Society should invite a real delicatessen
to move into SUB because food services is still winning.
A11ACK
ON INFLATION
a program of national action
OFFENSIVE
CONTRE L'lNFL/rriON
un engagement national
I*
Government     Gouvernement
of Canada        du Canada
Direction of arrow reveals new direction of Liberal government economic policy for Canada.
Letters
Leave me
alone guys
In reply to Mssrs. Chinkis and
Rozens' letter, which appeared in
your Friday, Oct. 17 edition, and
was extremely critical of my
participation in the Dayan visit, I
feel that an explanation is in order.
You make allusions that I have
betrayed my commerce comrades
by acting in an uncommerce-like
manner. I would like to say to you
that there is often a considerable
difference between what you read
(be it "Stanbury's Framework for
Policy Analysis in Commerce 492"
or "The Ubyssey") and real life
facts. Surely your years at
university (and especially in
commerce!) haven't blinded you to
this.
Too often students must rely on
scanty information when
evaluating the Alma Mater Society
executive and this is clearly one of
these instances.
1) I am not the administrator of
the speakers' program or their
funds. We have a speakers'
committee headed by Jake van der
Kamp, AMS president, to do this.
2) That I brought the Dayan
proposal to council at all is an
indication that I fully realized the
support (or reaction) Dayan's visit
would generate.
3) The AMS operates under
budgetary constraints (heard of
them?). Dayan was paid $6,000
plus expenses for his visit and little
talk. The total speakers' program
has only $2,000 plus $1,500 allocated
to club and undergraduate
speakers.
The AMS share of Dayan's visit
would have been $2,500. Given our
budget constraints this was impossible, and these constraints are
established by the AMS council,
not by myself. It would have meant
charging considerably more admission than 50d. And don't forget
that not everyone loves and adores
Dayan.
The great student response you
indicate to me seemed a little split
between Dayan supporters and
those who didn't want to see him in
the country, much less the
university. You ask the council to
spend its money, which it collects
from all students, to ensure that no
money is left for other points of
view.
You seem biased.
4) You base my "lack of insight"
on a quotation in The Ubyssey. I
have better things to do with my
time than correcting Ubyssey
misquotes, and quotes out of
context. I draw the line at personal
attacks on my actions by ill-
informed people. If you care to look
at facts, then do a little research
(my number is 228-3973).
One last comment. I feel that I
have accomplished my' job admirably when an outside group
does something for us for free,
rather than to use AMS student
funds. You seem to think otherwise.
This indicates that you are
evaluating my actions from the
point of view of the people who
really did pay (minus the $350 of
ticket money), in this case that of
Dayan's supporters. I do not serve
the case of Zionism, or that of the
Palestinians or that of Gerald
Ford's, for that matter.
I only try to ensure that AMS
students get the best deal possible,
and that no one group gets a
disproportionate share.
Dave Theessen
AMS treasurer
THtUBYSSlY
OCTOBER 21,1975
Published  Tuesdays,  Thursdays and  Fridays  throughout  the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the
AMS   or   the   university   administration.   Member,   Canadian.
University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly
commentary  and   review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are
located in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2301; Sports, 228-2305; advertising,
228-3977. Editor: Gary Coull
"How long are you staying in Nelson?" asked Chris Gainor. "Not two
weeks," retorted Gee, no student in B.C. geography. "So, when does the
9-hour odyssey begin?" asked Ralph Maurer, Peter Cummings, Doug
Field, Matt King and Heather Walker. "You mean three-hour idiocy,"
chortled Mark Lepitre, Len MacKave, Tom Barnes and Cedric Tetzel as
Gee boarded the sleek, ultra-modern Greyhound, somehow contriving to
chew gum at the same time. Passengers Sue Vohanka, Gregg Thompson,
Gary Coull and Nick Smirnow were clearly embarrassed by the pathetic
sight. A few hours later, Gee regarded his watch. He could read the
hands — it was the a.m.'s and the p.m.'s that confused him. "If it's 9:30
in must be Nelson," he said. But his hemorrhoids began to torment him
— a sure sign he was wrong. "Speaking of which," said Doug Rushton,
"what do you think of Preparation H?" "For all the good they'll do
you, you might as well stick them up your ass," retorted druggist Mark
Buckshon.
Share
It is estimated that between 10
and 50 million people will die from
starvation in the next year.
Two-thirds of the world's preschool children suffer malnutrition
sufficient to permanently damage
their physical and mental growth.
These children, if they do not die,
may live their lives as cripples
because they didn't have enough
food and nutrition when they were
young.
Some are born blind because of
malnutrition. Maybe, somehow,
we can accept the fact that people
die because they, just don't get
enough to eat. We can't conceive of
how they would die, how long it
would take, or if they would be in
any pain.
Maybe we can rationalize our
attempts to ignore their plight, and
soothe our consciences by
reasoning — they'll die and be out
of their misery, and so it's better
that we just let them be.
Maybe!
But what about the ones who
won't be so "lucky?" What about
the estimated half billion people
living on the edge of starvation?
The ones who face hunger every
day of their lives.
And what about the children who
survive the lack of food, but do so
at the price of losing their sight, or
having their limbs twisted
grotesquely out of shape and
become useless. Can we really
ignore them?
Sure, we've heard it all before.
It's terrible, but there's nothing we
can do about it.
Nothing?
True, we can't save them all. We
can't feed everyone who needs
food, not on our own. But we can
reach some of them. We can, if we
care just a little, give our help to
some of the children who
desperately need it; who, through
no fault of their own do not have
enough to eat.
That's what "SHARE" is all
about. We're trying to reach some
of these starving and needy
children. To be effective, we need a
LOT (you) to give a LITTLE help.
SHARE is run and operated by
students; that's where we get the
name — "Student Help and
Relief." It's student organized with
student funding.
We hope to "adopt" some of
these children through Foster
Parents Plan, and give them the
chance to life and health that they
deserve. No, we can't reach them
allj not even a majority, but we can
reach some, some starving
children who really need our help.
The cost? A couple of dollars
from each of you, or less, if your
need is greater. What it will mean
to them is food, health care,
education and hope.
PLEASE, take a minute and
drop in to SUB with your contribution, we'll be there during
lunch hours, and for those of you
who find this arrangement inconvenient, there will be a
collection box in the co-op
bookstore at all other times.
SHARE is completely non-profit.
All monies collected (100 per cent)
are forwarded to the foster
parents' plan.
Please, help us help.
Ken Downing
law 1 Tuesday, October 21, 1975
THE      UBYSSEY
Pag* 5
AMS election statements
The Ubyssey is required to run
candidate's statements for Alma
Mater Society elections. There is a
by-election this Friday for four
positions vacated by resignations.
Advance polls will be held Thursday.
Ombuds
person
Moe Siheta
Independent
If properly utilized, the position
of ombudsperson can be extremely
effective. But to be effective, the
representative must be genuinely
dedicated and experienced. Both
my social work education and my
involvement with on-campus affairs demonstrate qualities of
genuine concern and experience.
I hope you will consider these
factors when voting on Friday.
Finally if elected I will ensure that
the office will be staffed all days by
capable people; people who "give
a damn" and will keep the doors
always open to you.
Student rights
unspecified
From page 1
SFU's Student Society asked
their lawyer Stuart Rush for his
interpretation of this clause.
Schiffer said Monday the
committee would consist of four
students and four faculty members.
"We hope we'll develop some
guidelines that will be useful to
other students at this university
and students at other universities
covered by the Universities Act,"
he said.
Schiffer said SFU has a whole
range of attitudes toward student
representation "and depending
what department you're in you
never know what rights you're
dealing with."
He offered SFU's philosophy
department as an example of "a
department that effectively shuts
students out."
He said the attitude of the
- department is that "faculty
members alone are competent to
decide matters of academic personnel, course content, grading
and admissions."
But he said SFU's communications department allows
students parity representations
with faculty.
"Students  participate   in  ail
*    committees except legal tenure,"
he   said,   and   often   outnumber
faculty   members at   meetings.
Graham Nicholls
Independent
In running as a completely independent, non-political candidate,
I intend to represent students in the
true spirit of the office, rather than
to try to run their affairs for them.
My policy is to expand the office by
using volunteer assistants, informally integrating with
Speakeasy, and keeping dependable hours. My interest in the job
has already led me to assist the
previious ombudsperson and to
work with and help in organizing
Speakeasy for over two years.
Co-ordinator
Nadine McDonnell
Student Unity
Essentially, the AMS coordinator is responsible for ensuring student control of SUB. The
'Pit,' the 'Lethe,' the co-op
bookstore, the bowling alley and all
the rooms available for student use
fall under the jurisdiction of SUB
management committee. The coordinator chairs and airects this
committee. Any improvements or
complaints and all policy about
SUB is the responsibility of this
committee.
As co-ordinator I would complete
SUB policy, develop alternate
facilities and ensure that students
do 'run' their own building.
Thomas Chan
Independent
Co-ordinators are responsible for
the operation of the student union
building. They  allocate clubs'
space and book functions to student
organizations. Past co-ordinators
were usually part of a political
slate, dependent one upon each
other.
As a student and club member, I
have used SUB for three years. I
have no political affiliations, and
am solely interested in proper and
effective running of the student
union building, the most usable
part of your AMS fees.
Treasurer
Ralph Bedford
Independent
• I will not support
discrimination against women in
any way.
• I really don't know what I'm
doing in politics; I'm basically an
honest guy!
• I'm running as an independent
to avoid the rigidity of party
politics.
• Iamagainstthe "ivory tower"
syndrome. I would like to introduce
ACCOUNTability in this office.
• I propose a more equitable
distribution of funds.
• In conclusion, I will not insult
my worthy opponent's intelligence.
I never take advantage of handicapped people.
Dave Coulson
Student Unity
In holding the responsible and
demanding position of AMS
treasurer I would continue the
responsible chairing of the AMS
finance committee, the overseeing
of financial allotments, as well as
improving the control system of
clubs, undergraduate societies,
and other auxiliary organizations.
With impending restructuring of
the entire AMS and a new fee
framework, AMS operations will
SECOND NOTICE
OF ELECTION SCIENCE STUDENTS
At the close of nominations on October 3, 1975 the number of
candidates nominated exceeded the number of vacancies to be
filled in two of the thirteen constituencies.
Elections in these two constituencies will be held on
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 22, 1975
Between 10:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m.
at the following polling stations:
CONSTITUENCY POLLING STATION
1. First Year Hebb Theatre
13. Biochemistry/Physiology     Wesbrook (Room 100)
(Bring your A.M.S. card please)
Notice from  the Office  of the Dean of Science and Science
Undergraduate Society.
ISSUES AND ANSWERS
ALL CANDIDATES MEETING
All students are invited to attend a forum in the Conversation Pit, Main Floor
S.U.B., on Thursday, October 23rd. At this time, candidates for all vacant A.M.S.
positions will have an opportunity to present their views regarding issues of
importance to the entire student body. In addition, members of the audience will be
invited to question candidates on any relevant subject.
Nominees for the offices of Treasurer, External Affairs Officer, Internal Affairs
Officer, Co-ordinator, and Ombudsperson will be in attendance.
BRENT TYNAN
Returning Officer
be substantially altered. I would
work to improve the organization
of the AMS bureaucracy, as well as
pilot the AMS and its accompanying organizations through
its first, and hopefully last, deficit
budget.
External
affairs
Bob Coodwin
Independent
t I would like to introduce a
better system of student representation so that the wants and
needs of both university and high
school students will be known at
UBC and to the federal and
provincial governments.
• I propose to establish a closer
relationship with the students. My
office will always be open to you.
• I want to introduce efficiency
in student government.
• I never drink anything
stronger than pop (but pop will
drink anything).
Lake Sagaris
Student Unity
The job of external affairs involves : liaison with various
governments, other schools, and
the provincial and national student
organizations. As an executive
member of the B.C. Students'
Federation I've found that information received from NUS,
BCSF and UBC committees is
invaluable to lobbying governments successfully. Summer
unemployment, financial aid and
housing are serious student
problems on which I've been
working.
It is extremely important that
someone experienced in AMS and
provincial affairs fill this position.
SUBFILMSOC presents
IA T$UCH OP gWssf
(with George Segal & Glenda Jackson)
Thurs./Sun. - 7:00 SUB AUDITORIUM
Fri./Sat. - 7:00/9:30 75c & AMS Card'
HELP WANTED
10-15 STUDENTS
for
AMS ELECTION POLLING
STATIONS—OCT. 24
Any Period Between
10:00 A.M. & 4:00 P.M.
RATES: 2 PIT TOKENS per/hr.
Contact: AMS BUSINESS OFFICE
ELECTIONS
The A.M.S. Elections Committee has accepted the
following nominations to fill presently vacant
executive positions:
Treasurer:
RALPH BEDFORD
DAVE COULSON
External Affairs Officer:
BOB GOODWIN
LAKE SAGARIS
Internal Affairs Officer:
DAVE THEESSEN
(Uncontested)
Co-ordinator:
thomas chan
nadine McDonnell
Ombudsperson
GRAHAM NICHOLLS
MOE SIHOTA
Please consult other sections of this issue for further
election information.
BRENT TYNAN
Returning Officer Pag* 6
THE      U BYSSEY
Tuesday, October 21, 1975
Women
in motion
Women in Motion, an
eight-day sports festival, will get
underway Thursday.
Various sport and recreational
activities will be demonstrated
and participating women will
attend clinics of their choice.
Clinics include swimming,
skating, rhythmic gymnastics,
karate and self-defense and games
such as lacrosse, netball,
volleyball, squash and racquet
ball.
Women can also have their
fitness evaluated in the War
Memorial Gym, at either noon or
4:30 p.m.
Hot flashes
Call Nancy Sutton at
266-4639 or drop into room 208
at the gym for further
information.
Question
If you received a financial aid
questionnaire when you were
notified of your award, but
haven't yet turned in the
questionnaire, your time has
come.
Alma M ater Society
co-ordinator Lake Sagaris wants
you to turn in the completed
questionnaires to her in the AMS
executive   offices,   so   she   can
begin to tabulate results.
More iWY
The second phase of the
Women in Art exhibition gets
underway Wednesday when
Dawn comes to the SUB art
gallery.
The exhibition shows the
work of 40 B.C. women artists,
including Evelyn Roth, Minn
Sjolseth, Audrey Doray, Vivianne
Wong and Dorothy Manning.
The invitational exhibition is
part of the International
Women's Year at UBC fiasco.
The gallery is open 10 a.m.-5
p.m. Monday through Friday,
and from noon to 5 p.m.
Sunday.
'Tween classes
TODAY
PRE-MED SOC
Dennis Popple speaks on the
mental processes of a dying
person, noon,  I RC  1.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Dinner at 6:30 p.m., Marlin
Aadland leads discussion of the
holy spirit, Lutheran campus
centre.
SKI  CLUB
General meeting and free ski
movie, noon, Angus 104.
PRO-LIFE
General   meeting,  noon,  SUB  117.
KAYAK AND CANOE CLUB
General   meeting,  noon,  SUB 205.
CHARISMATIC CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Prayer and sharing, noon,
conference room, Lutheran
campus centre.
ARTS UNDERGRAD SOC
Executive meeting, come and see
what  arts  is doing, noon. Bu. 107.
LOST AND  FOUND
Open noon — 2:30 p.m. and 4-5
p.m. Monday, Wednesday,
Thursday and  Friday, SUB 208.
COUNCIL FOR EXCEPTIONAL
CHILDREN
Films about exceptional children,
noon, education building 204.
GERMAN CLUB
General meeting, 7 p.m.,
International house.
CONTEMPORARY DANCE CLUB
Yoga   classes,    2-3:30    p.m.,   SUB
party      room,      dance     classes,
3:30-5:30  p.m.,  SUB   party room.
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Author Katie Curtin speaks on
advances of women in China and
the problems that remain, noon,
SUB auditorium.
CANADIAN CROSSROADS
INTERNATIONAI
Meeting, offering three- to
10-month work experience in a
developing country, 8 p.m.,
IDERA resources centre, 2524
Cypress.
WEDNESDAY
DEMOLAY CLUB
General  meeting,  noon,  SUB 213.
FEMINIST  KARATE ASSOCIATION
Practice,     beginners    welcome,     8
p.m., SUB 207-209.
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB
General meeting to organize tour,
noon, Angus 24.
CYCLE TEAM
General meeting to discuss 1976
race schedule, noon, war memorial
gym, 211.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORG.
Testimony meeting, subject is
casting out devils, noon, SUB 113.
SCIENCE UNDERGRAD SOC
Departmental elections for faculty
reps, polls for first year rep, 10
a.m.-4 p.m., Hebb theatre, polls
for biochem/pysiology rep, 10
a.m.-4 p.m., Westbrook 100.
AMS HOUSING COMMITTEE
General meeting, all welcome,
noon, SUB 224.
DEAN OF WOMEN FREESEE
Film, The Ascent of Man, noon,
SUB auditorium.
CCM
Eucharist,      8      p.m.,      Lutheran
campus centre.
NEWMAN CLUB
Meeting, noon, SUB 125.
Women in motion
Health, Spot 1 ond Recreation
OCT. 23 ■ 30 — AT U.B.C.
PLAN TO PARTICIPATE
I. THE SPORTS FESTIVAL
Free Clinics — Come Dressed To Participate!
Oct. 23, 12:30 - Empire Pool - Water Polo, Synchronized Swimming.
Oct. 24 4:30 - Memorial Gym - Rhythmic Gymnastics.
Oct. 25 1:00-5:00-   Winter Sports Centre -  Ringette, Basic and Power Skating, Speed
Skating, Squash, Racquetball.
Oct 25 3:00 - Gym G - Body Awareness for Sport
- Gym E - Fencing.
Oct. 26 11:00 a.m. - Mclnnis Field - Soft Lacrosse.
2:00 - Memorial Gym - Netball.
Oct. 27 7:00 - Memorial Gym - Co-ed Volleyball.
Oct. 28 12:30 - Mclnnis Field - Soft Lacrosse.
Oct. 29 7:30 - Memorial Gym - Yoga
- SUB - Karate and Self Defense.
Oct. 30 1:00 - From Memorial Gym - Bicycle Races.
7:30 - Memorial Gym - Rhythmic Gymnastics.
II. THE CONFERENCE - SUB BALLROOM
Oct. 23 - 7:00-10:00 p.m. - Registration and Social.
Oct. 24 and 25 - 8:30 a.m.-10:00 p.m.
Oct. 26 - 9:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m.
I
PRE-REGISTER - RM. 208 MEMORIAL GYM.
DAY REGISTER - SUB BALLROOM - $1.00 STUDENTS.
Information: 228-2295
Studying is one job
you don't get paid for.
But we'll pay you if
you get disabled
on the job.
Our Pre-Grad Plan is specially designed for final year students
who can't afford to be disabled during the critical period of their
training.
If you qualify, we'll pay you an income while you're
disabled - even if you're not earning anything at the moment.
For more information on Canada Life's Pre-Grad Plan, call
Maria Trowbridge at 684-8521.
•n
The Canada Life Assurance Company
THE CLASS/FIFOS
RATES:   Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional Unas 25c.
Commercial - 3 lines, 1 day $1.80; additional lines
40c. Additional days $1.50 & 35c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable In
advance;. Deadline is 11:30 a.m„ the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
5 — Coming Event*
Ski Club Grand Ripoff Sale
Thurs., Oct. 30 (all day) In SUB 111/
111. 1*11 your eld ikli, booti, picks.
Whatavar. Bring aqulpmant to SUB
ISP or IMF any noon hour prior to
tha sala OR to SUB 311/213 on tha
day of tha Rlpoffl
65 — Scandals
DELIVERANCE, Sat., Oct. 23 in the Old
Auditorium, 7:00 and 9:30. Priee is
$1.00.   Burt  Reynolds  does  his  thing.
70 — Services
TO —For Sale — Commercial
LITRONIX STATICIAN now available
at Co-op Bookstore S.U.B. basement.
Computes means, standard devations,
variance, sigma-X2. Rechargeable —
only S89.95.
T1 — For Sale — Private
1971 OMC JIMMY CUSTOM 4X4 AUTO.,
p.s., p.b., completely customized,
stero spoke wheels, Armstrong tires.
Only 2 brought into B.C. Call Rick
Stevensen, 660-5681 or 261-7713.
HARLEY DAVIDSON, panhead chopper.
Lots of chrome, stroker kit. S2600 or
serious offers. 433-1039 after 7:00.
SWINGING COUPLES A SIN6LIS meet     >
others in Wash.  & Western Canada.
Est.   1969.   Free   sample   ads,   details.
CY  Club,   P.O.   Box  7S3,  New West
minster, B.C. V3L 4Y8.
PERMANENT HAIR removal by Electrolysis Kree Method in my homo.
Prices are reasonable. Phone 738-6960.   r
80 - Tutoring
EXPERIENCED MATH TUTOR will
coach 1st year. Calculus, etc. Evenings. Individual instruction on a
one-to-one basic. Phone: 733-3644. 10
a.m. to 3 p.m. dally.
SPANISH & FRENCH LESSONS given
by native speaker. Doug, 363-8898.
85 — Typing
20 — Housing
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPINO, my
home. Essays, thesis, etc. Neat accurate work. Reasonable rates —
263-5317.
FAST, EFFICIENT TYPINO near 41st &
Marine Dr. 266-5053.
25 — Instruction
30 — Jobs
TEN TO FIFTECN STUDENTS required
for A.M.S. election polling stations,
Oct. 24, 10 a.m to 4 p.m. Rates 2 Pit
tokens per/hr. Contact A.M.S. business office.
LIKE TO EARN S10 FOR A DAY in the
dark?   Come   to  Room   13   In  Henry
Angus Bldg., 12:30 on Wed,, Oct. 32.
90 - Wanted
35 - Lost
REWARD FOR LOST racoon fur hat.
Lost near Sedgewick or Coffee Shop.
PLEASE returnl 263-9779.
40 — Messages
50 — Rentals
SPACIOUS TWO-ROOM SUITE, ground
level, fireplace, private bath, entrance.
Share large kitchen with woman grad.
student 5225/mo. 228-0683.
60 - Rides
WANTED   —   PEOPLE   TO   SHARI   ski
cabin at Whistler. $400 for the season.
Evan Cardiff, 988-2141 days; 980-7457
evenings.	
99 — Miscellaneous
EUROPEAN-SPANISH STUDENT wishes
cultural exchange with university
girl. Invites exchange for visit. Write
Gonzalo del Pino, Madre de Dios 18,
Malaga, Spain.
20 PERSON CABIN on Hollyburn Mountain on the North Shore. Mid-week
$40 per night; weekend $50 per night.
936-2224.
USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED
TO SELL - BUY
INFORM Tuesday, October 21, 1975
THE      UBYSSEY
Pag* 7
SPOR TS
Football 'Birds win one for WIFL
By TOM BARNES
Credibility as much as
anything was gained in the UBC
Thunderbirds football team 34-15
romp over the Montana Tech
Orediggers.
The credibility had to do not only
with how good the 'Birds are but
also with the level of competition
that the Western Intercollegiate
Football League supplies them.
It has long been assumed that the
WIFL is bush in comparison to the
small college conferences in the
U.S.A. "Ten years ago teams like
Montana Tech were kicking hell
out of UBC," said 'Bird coach
Frank Smith. While Montana has
not been winning much this season,
the games, with such teams as the
University of Puget Sound, have
been close.
Smith feels that the credibility
attained by UBC is further
enhanced by the fact that UBC had
to adapt to the U.S. rules, travel 700
miles by bus, and play without four
Volleyball 'Birds dump VCC
ByMARKLEPITRE
The Thunderbird volleyball team
started off on the right foot by
defeating Vancouver Community
College in their first match of the
season at War Memorial Gym last
Sunday.
The 'Birds are playing in the
B.C. Senior Men's Volleyball
League this year and are hoping to
do well in it. The 'Birds put on a
good show and easily won the
match 15-1, 15-3 and 15-6. The
Thunderbirds obviously outclassed
the VCC team in both ball control
and tandem plays.
Most of the 'Birds points were
gained with no effort, they simply
served the ball and watched VCC
make mistakes. But their opposition came up with some fine
rallies at times and it looks like
they will get much better as the
season progresses.
UBC coach Lome Sawula,
recently obtained from Dalhousie
University, was interviewed after
the game. When asked what he
Rugby champs
The Thunderbirds rugby team
broke out of the doldrums by
demolishing all comers in the
Canada West Tournament in
Victoria.
The 'Birds finished the competition with a 3-0 record to capture
their fourth consecutive Canada
West Rugby title. It is the first
Canada West title won by UBC this
year.
The 'Birds opened the tournament last Friday by downing the
University of Alberta Golden
Bears 59-9. On Saturday the
University of Calgary Dinosaurs
fell to the 'Birds 16-3. On Sunday
UBC wrapped up the title with a 15-
4 Whipping of the University of
Victoria Vikings.
The next objective for UBC is to
take the first half title of the
Vancouver   Rugby   Union   First
Field-hockey
The University of Victoria
Vikettes stomped through three
days of rain-soaked field-hockey
without dropping a single game to
win the first annual Canada West
women's field-hockey tournament
last weekend.
The UBC Thunderettes followed
closely in 2nd place with a 4-2-0
record. The two UBC defeats came
from the strong Vikettes team.
The Victorian team will be back
Nov. 7, 8, and 9, when UBC will
play host to representatives from
the other four conferences and
UVic for the first Canadian
Women's Inter-collegiate Athletics
Union field hockey championships.
The other teams in the Canada
West tournament, University of
Calgary and University of Alberta,
finished second and third with 2-4-0
and 0-5-1 records respectively. The
only Alberta point was off the draw
they managed against the mighty
Vickettes.
Division. While they have been
defensively sound so far the back-
field has lacked the spark needed
to push over crucial tries.
The 'Birds will have a chance to
prove they are untracked this
Saturday at Balaclava Park where
they are to meet the Kats at 2:30
p.m.
While their seasonal record now
stands at 6-0-2 the UBC First
Division record is 3-0-2.
thought of the match he said, "I am
quite pleased with the team's play
during our first match, but I am
expecting much more of them for
the future. What you saw today is
the minimum quality of play that I
expect this year."
The Junior Varsity team (the
UBC Totems) also played on
Sunday. They defeated B.C.O's, a
city team, second team in four
games. The scores were 15-5, 16-5,
15-13, 15-10.
Next weekend the 'Birds are
hosting a high school tournament.
Some of the best high school teams
in B.C. will be participating so the
calibre of play should be excellent.
All action takes place in War
Memorial gym, starting next
Friday at 9:00 p.m.
Play resumes early Saturday
morning and finishes with the
women's finals at 7:00 p.m. and the
men's at 8:00 p.m. After this there
may possibly be an exhibition
match between the 'Birds and
University of Victoria. The next
day the 'Birds will travel to Victoria to play the Vikings in league
play.
U.B.C. Intramurals
Dance to "VAMP"
Wednesday, Oct. 22          8:30-12:30
SUB BALLROOM
$1.50 per couple
- REFRESHMENTS AVAILABLE -
in conjunction with the Women in Motion Conference
Men's Intramural
Cross Country Cycle Race
CHANGE OF DATE
October 23 to October 30
Staff!
The Ubyssey sports page will
hold its first staff meeting today at
noon in the Ubyssey office, 241K
SUB.
Anyone interested in writing for
the best sports page west of Blanca
is invited to come. It would be nice
if the sports staff showed up too.
RK
GIVE YOUR HAIR
A PHYSICAL CHECK-UP
DID YOU EVER THINK YOU MIGHT HAVE SICK HAIR?
If you suspect you might have "sick" hair —shouldn't you
make plans to give it a check-up?
Call today for your Hair Analysis appointment!
Ask for
your stylist
Corky
Leo
Ernie
Maryke
Carlyne
APPOINTMENT SERVICE
3644 WEST 4th AVE., AT ALMA
731-4191
starters. Ten Hon Choo and Dave
MacKay-Dunn both were out with
knee injuries. Bernie Crump
suffered a partially separated
shoulder and Gary Metz is still
recovering from appendicitis.
The game itself was close in the
first half. The only points the
'Birds put on the board were Mike
MacLeod's touchdown and Tom
Kaffer's convert. The half ended
with the teams deadlocked 7-7.
Fullback Gord Penn led UBC
with three touchdowns in the
second half. Kaffer added one
convert on them. Dan Smith
rounded out the UBC scoring with a
36 yard pass to Shaun McGuiness
at the beginning of the second half.
On Penn's third touchdown,
Frank (coach) Smith called for a
two point convert attempt.
(Quarterback, Dan) Smith fired a
pass to Evan Jones to make it
good. With these two points the
'Birds broke the all-time UBC
seasonal scoring record. In ten
games the 1959 'Birds scored 216
points. After seven games this
season UBC had put 217 points on
the board.
Meanwhile there were two
games in the WIFL.
The University of Alberta Golden
Bears thumped the University of
Manitoba Huskies 35-12. In an
important game in the race for
first place the University of
Calgary Dinosaurs stunned the
University of Saskatchewan
Huskies for the second time this
vear, this time with a score of 37-
20.
As a result the standings now
are:
GP W L FA Pts
Calgary 5 4 1 156 93 8
Sask 6 4 2 178 109 8
UBC 5 3 1" 141 112 8
Alberta 6 3 3 123 123 6
Man.       6      0   6       72    233     0
TV & STEREO
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Phone: 228-4277 Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 21, 1975
Ex-prof rejects 'rip-off
From page 1
source said the stipends would be
$12,000.
John Leggatt, who is currently a
tenured professor at Rutgers
University in New Jersey, was not
offered a job or a stipend.
"I'm not going to accept this ripoff of the working people," said
Briemberg. "SFU has been trying
to buy itself out of this hole for the
past six years. The university, by
negotiating this agreement, is
acknowledging they were wrong."
He said several committees
formed to investigate the firings
"all found out that there was no
reason we should be fired."
"We all should have our jobs
back," he said.
Administration president Jewett
announced Friday that "CAUT and
SFU are considering a tentative
proposal to solve our differences."
She continued: "The proposal
was developed by a committee
representing the CAUT academic
freedom and tenure committee and
a committee representing SFU."
One source said SFU's board of
governors decided at its Oct. 7
meeting to make the offer to the
seven-professors.
Briemberg said negotiators for
Permanent
housing office
both sides met last weekend and
amended the proposal slightly.
He said CAUT said it would
make a decision by Nov. 30, which
is later than desired by the
university.
The amended proposal must go
before the board of governors
again, Briemberg said, and the
CAUT academic freedom and
tenure committee will meet Nov.
14 and 15 to decide whether to
approve or reject the proposal.
CAUT's executive board will
meet two weeks later, and then a
special CAUT council session will
decide whether or not to lift the
boycott, Briemberg said.
Under    the   boycott,    CAUT
sought
Some diamonds
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a cut above
and Ben Moss
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6 diamond bridal set in white
or yellow gold
Engagement Ring  $375
Wedding Ring  M10
San cflloss
de&etiers
Pacific Centre
Oakridge Shopping
Centre
discourages potential faculty
members from considering
working at SFU.
The seven professors were fired
as part of an administration purge
of the PSA department, which at
that time allowed students parity
with faculty on hiring and tenure
committees.
Twenty months after the firings
and subsequent battles involving
the university and the courts,
CAUT began its boycott.
When Jewett was appointed
university president, she pledged
to solve the PSA seven problem.
However, she apparently met with
opposition from other administration members, who did not
want the seven to be reinstated.
UBC needs a permanent off-
campus housing office, a
spokesman for SUB's temporary
off-campus housing office said
Monday.
Dave Johnson said the office has
asked acting housing head Mike
Davis to keep the office open until
Dec. 15.
"This will give us time to develop
a proposal for a permanent off-
campus housing office," he said.
"It will also give us enough time
to compile our listings and find out
how much rents usually are."
Lid Strand, an employee of the
off-campus housing office, said
Monday he thought the service is
used enough to justify a permanent
office.
"We talk to about 50 people a day
here, and at least another 60 look at
the boards without talking to us,"
he said.
Davis will decide Friday
whether or not to continue the
office. He was unavailable for
comment Monday.
CHOOSING THE RIGHT
CAREER ISN'T EASY
We'd like to offer you a challenge — a career in
dealing with professionals — a career in Life
insurance sales and/or sales management.
It's one of the few careers that offers you
freedom of action and decision and an
unusually high measure of security and
personal satisfaction.
We know it isn't easy choosing the right career.
Perhaps we at Metropolitan Life can help you
make the right choice. Why not drop by and
see us. We'll be on Campus on:
Wednesday, November 5,1975
o
Metropolitan Life
Where the future is now
If you'd
liKetoknow
about us,
Well like
to know
about you!
Meet us on campus
November 4 and 5.
<i>
CANADIAN IMPERIAL
BANK OF COMMERCE
hair studio inc.
UNISEX HAIRSTYLES
FOR APPOINTMENT
224-1922
5784 University (Next to Bank of Commerce)
Notice to Graduating Students in
SCIENCE
A MEETING WILL BE HELD IN CHEMISTRY 250
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 22 at 12:30 p.m.
to hear a representative from the Placement Office
(Office of Student Services)
on the subject
Graduate Employment
chartered
accountants
We are seeking several graduates to become (initially) STAFF-
ACCOUNTANTS in our Vancouver office, or any other office of the Firm
in which you may be interested. There is excellent opportunity for
personal growth as a CA. in public practice, industry, education and
government service. The positions will be of interest to B. Comm., M.B.A.,
LIC's in Acctg., and M.Sc. graduates.
To apply, mail your resume by WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29, to the
Director of Personnel, ARTHUR ANDERSEN & CO. 2300-1055 West
Hastings Street, Vancouver, B.C. V6E 2J2. All resumes will be
acknowledged and selected applicants will be contacted requesting them to
make interview appointments at the Placement Office for November 17, 18
or 19.
ARTHUR ANDERSEN & CO.
AGRICULTURE
GRADS!
WANTED
ASSISTANT DISTRICT
AGRICULTURALISTS
Alberta Agriculture is currently recruiting for the above
positions. If you are graduating with a B.Sc. in Agriculture with
course work of a general nature including animal science, plant
science, soil science and some specialization in agricultural
economics and farm management, we would like to talk to you.
Courses in agricultural engineering, horticultural science, rural
sociology and communications will be an asset. You must be
eligible for membership in the Alberta institute of Agrologists
and be able to provide an automobile for business travel.
How to Apply:
Read the career literature and the Alberta Agriculture poster in
the campus Placement Office. Written applicants must be
submitted no later than November 5, 1975.
YOUR FUTURE
OUR FUTURE
vdlbcrra

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