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The Ubyssey Feb 24, 1966

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Array THE UBYSSEY
Vol. XLVIII, No. 52
VANCOUVER,   B.C.,  THURSDAY, FEBRUARY  24,   1966
CA 4-3916
— powell hargrave photo
IRATE UNIVERSITY BOUND students were jammed all the way back to St. Anslem's
church Wednesday morning when police blocked off one lane of University Blvd. just
east of Wesbrook Crescent. The detour was caused by construction blocking the east
bound  lane of the boulevard opposite the  Gym.
HOMES FOUND
Camp takes in families
By ANN BISHOP
Some of the families to be
evicted from the Wesbrook
area, May 15, have already
found accommodation in Acadia Camp.
This is the result of a survey
conducted last week by the
married students' housing committee which sent questionnaires to the evicted students
to learn their opinions and
plans.
Chairman of the housing
committee, Jim Slater, said
housing administration is giving top priority to students
with children, to prevent
any unnecessary change of
schools.
Of the 16 questionnaires
sent to the students, 12 were
completed and returned.
Eleven of the 12 are in graduate studies, and the other is
in arts.
Four of these families have
children attending local
schools.
The full results of the survey are now in the hands of
housing 'administration which
which refuses to release them.
Slater said the students being evicted are aware their
houses are being torn down to
build the health centre and
will not be affected seriously.
"As far as I know those in
graduate studies will not be
in the final crucial stages of
their theses.
"It is difficult to ascertain
how many have found accommodation as many have
already moved into Acadia
since the eviction was first
'announced, and other families
have moved in to take their
places.
Slater said the results of the | and he feels confident, "they
survey have now been turned will do everything possible to
over to housing administration | re-locate these students."
Grits form minority gov't,
in mock parliament today
Mock parliament opens noon today in Brock with
the Liberals forming the minority government.
In the parliamentary elections Feb. 2, the Liberals
polled 43 per cent of the votes giving them 34 of the 80
seats.
Official oppostion are the New Democrats with 23 seats.
Each party will submit one bill to the parliament during its two day session.
7,000 rare
books given
to library
An anonymous donor has given UBC  a   collection
7,000 books worth $270,000.
The books from the collection of rare science and medical books are owned by Oxford biochemist Hugh Sinclair.
The collection, the largest
private one in Britain, contains
books dating from the sixteenth century.
BY   REMBRANT
Included in the list of authors
of books coming to UBC are
Sir Issac Newton, Albert Einstein, and William Harvey.
The collection also contains
The Anatomy of Melancholy by
Richard Burton, and Observations of Nicolaas Pulp, Rem-
brant's physician.
This book contains a small
sketch which some experts believe was done by the Dutch
artist.
Library head Basil Stuart-
Stulbbs said Wednesday he believed the collection was the
most expensive ever given to
UBC as a unit.
SOME  CIRCULATED
"There is practically no figure in the history of mediicine
not represented in the collection," he said.
The medical books will go to
the Woodward library memorial room and the scientific
books to special collections in
the main library.
Some of the more recent
publications will be put in circulation in the main stacks.
Stuart-Stubbs said the books
were available for any student
to study in the library.
The collection will arrive at
UBC the first week in March.
of
BASIL   STUART-STUBBS
. . . more books
"Right now they arc on the
high seas in tea chests," said
Stuart-Stubbs.
'ALMOST FELL'
He said the story on the
Rcmbrant sketch had been exaggerated by the national press
until it became a painting.
"When I heard on the radio
this morning we were getting
a Remlbrant painting along
with the collection," he said,
"I almost fell into my shredded
wheat."
Stuart-Stubbs said the collection had been started by Sinclair while still an undergraduate and he had seen part of it
on a recent visit to England.
WISE  WINS
BY  11  VOTES
Narrow victory decides arts election
Don Wise, arts III was elected president of the arts undergraduate society by a slim
eleven vote margin Wednesday.
Runner up, Jim Cooke, arts
II is considering contesting the
election. "I am consulting with
the people who worked on my
campaign before I decide." he
said.
On the second ballot count,
Wise received 121 votes as opposed to Cooke's 110. Third
candidate, Victor Hamm,  arts
III was eliminated on the first
count with 27 votes.
There were three spoiled ballots.
"I'm glad I won, and want to
thank the students for voting
for me," Wise said Wednesday.
FROM   LEFT,   DON   WISE,   HEATHER   PATTERSON,
ELAINE EVERETTE AND MARLENE OLSEN
. . . Don cheers on pretty supporters
"The reason I ran three campaigns was that I don't like to
give up. I was dedicated to
getting on the Arts council and
'.■specially to have a vote on
the AMS  council."
Wise previously ran for
president of the AMS, and then
for the position of coordinator.
There were many irregularities in the election.
There was difficulty in getting students to look after the
polls.
"I had to go and round up
people from their classes,"
said Wise.
Votes were counted without
the supervision of the acting
returning office, Terrel Popoff,
arts III, although they were
scrutinized. Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday,  February 24,   1966
— powell hargrave photo
THINGS ARE BUSY at Wesbrook these days as students line up for chest x-rays. Outbreak of flu on campus has also increased business at the health service clinic. Five
students   are currently  in  the Wesbrook   hospital with the flu bug.
SAYS  WILLMOTT
Yanks fail in Viet Nam
By ANGUS  RICKER
UBC Professor William Willmott delivered another slashing
indictment of American involvement in Viet Nam Wednesday.
Willmott, of the Asian Studies department, told an auditorium audience of 500 students, "The refusal of the American backed Diem regime to
hold free elections under the
terms of the 1954 Geneva
Agreement confirmed that
American policy in Viet Nam
was a failure."
Willmott spoke in the third
of five weekly lectures on Viet
Nam jointly sponsored by the
UBC Viet Nam Day Committee
and UBC New Democrats.
Willmott characterized the
Diem regime as capitalist, anti-
Communist and repressive.
"Diem destroyed the 11 political parties in South Viet
Nam through police terror and
a McCarthyite program of
branding any opposition as
communist. This is when the
term Viet Cong originated," he
said.
"Diem policy in the countryside only alienated the peasants. Fortified villages were
constructed by forced labor to
separate peasants from guerillas.
"In 1956 Diem abolished local elections and replaced the
locally elected village headman
AMS supports
NHL protest
UBC students have joined
the protest against Vancouver's
failure to receive a National
Hockey League franchise.
AMS president-elect Peter
Braund and first vice-president-elect Charlie Boylan attended a protest committee
meeting  Sunday.
A protest meeting will be
held at 8 p.m. tonight at the
PNE Gardens.
Businessmen, sportsmen, and
labor leaders will be present at
the meeting.
Braund suggested that a
petition protesting the loss of
the franchise be circulated for
students to sign.
with personal appointees,"
Willmott said.
Willmott described the guerilla warfare presently being
waged by the National Liberation Front as political warfare as well as irregular military activity.
"The guerilla fighter cannot
antagonize the people he lives
with. His life depends on his
having the respect of the
people."
Willmott cited the indoctrination given NLF recruits as
proof of their closeness to the
Vietnamese peasant.
"General Giap's four-point
dictum is respect the people;
help the people; protect the
people and follow orders."
Willmott claimed that in the
context of political warfare
NLF tactics make sense.
"The slaying of village headmen is the killing of a Saigon
government appointee who is
associated with military recruitment, taxes and rents.
Other villagers are not so
much frightened by this occurrence as they wish they had
done it themselves.
"Similarly, bombings in Saigon are not indiscriminate but
political. A bomb in a cinema
open daily to Americans and
their guests appears to the
Vietnamese as an anti-American and anti-white act.
"The security difficulties of
the Americans only reinforces
the    Vietnamese     view    that
Americans are not there as
friends but as conquerers of
some sort,"  Willmot said.
SO IT SEEMS
UBC bypassed
by flu epidemic
The flu bug has bitten UBC but no one knows how hard.
A UBC Health Service official said she didn't know for
certain how many people have
been hit by the flu.
"But it is nothing in comparison to the epidemic in Vancouver," she said.
Five students are in Wesbrook hospital now with flu.
Residence dons estimated
there were approximately 30
resident students too ill to attend classes.
The flu epidemic which hit
Vancouver a week ago has left
city schools with an absentee
rate of 18 per cent.
Best treatment for the flu is
to stay in bed and drink
liquids.
Frosh  enticed
by  engineers
The red mass will inveigle
frosh into its fortress today.
Art Stevenson, engineering undergrad president said
Wednesday the frosh were
invited so they could get an
idea of what engineeing entailed.
He said interested students
should meet in engineering
201 at noon for the two hour
tour of the applied science
facilities.
DUTHIE
books
Books for almost every
taste and purpose can
be  found,   easily,   at
DUTHIE  BOOKS  LTD.
901   ROBSON  STREET,
VANCOUVER,   B.C.
PHONE: 684-4496
4560 W. 10th Ave.,
Vancouver, B.C.
Phone: CA 4-7012
Spring  Formal Specials
Complete Outfit
Tuxedos Colored Tails
$6.50 Jackets $8.50
$7.50
E. A. LEE Formal Wear Rentals
623 Howe (Downstairs)      MU 3-2457
A-GO-GO DANCERS
Dance To The Accents
TOTEM PARK BALLROOM
Friday, Feb. 25th
9:00- 1:00
AMS CARDS, PLEASE
SAM WALSH
NATIONAL LEADER: Parti Communiste du Quebec
"QUEBEC IN REVOLUTION"
FRIDAY NOON ANGUS 104
Student Communist Club
(jetting Ijlamed?
Yours for the Asking . . . Our FREE
"Take Home" Invitation Album — mailed
to you or call at our store
Our own Silver Embossing section does all
the little extras at LOW COST; napkins,
matches, place cards, etc.
rm CARD SHOP
Corner Robson and Burrard MU 4-4011
ORGAN, BRASS and CHOIR
MUSICAL EVENING
Artists performing will include the Vancouver
Brass Ensemble; Earl Harrison, Baritone; Suzanne Gibson, F.R.C.C.O., Organist, and the West
Point Grey Baptist Choir. A collection will be
taken in aid of the Organ Fund.
8:30 p.m.   -   February 27
West Point Grey Baptist Church
llth Ave. at Sasamat
TUESDAYS
WEDNESDAYS
(Beginners & Preschool Children)
U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
SKATING SCHEDULE — 1966
Effective September 24th, 1965, to April 15th, 1966
12:45—2:45 p.m.*
2:00—3:30 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m.
FRIDAYS 3:00—5:00 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m:**
SATURDAYS 3:00—5:00 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m.**
SUNDAYS 12:45—2:45 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m.
*    Special student admission: 15 cents.
** Except when hockey games scheduled — No. 19 & 20.
Jan. 28 & 29, Feb. 11 & 12 and two more dates not scheduled.
ADMISSION:  Afternoons    —    Students 25c    Adults 60c
Evenings    —    Students 50c    Adults 75c
Skate Rental 35c per pair — Skate Sharpening 35c pair
For further information: Call 224-3205 or 228-3197 Thursday,  February  24,   1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Sciencemen
plan monitor
of satellite
Sounds from a U.S. satellite
are soon to be converted into
weather pictures, as three UBC
students and a federal government biologist work to aim an
antenna at the Essa II.
David Sloan, Donald Intithar
and Peter Kuijt from UBC's
science faculty are working
with Bryan Frazer from the
government's research station
at UBC.
¥      *      ¥
Their equipment, miuch of
which they had to scrounge or
borrow, is being stored at the
airport.
The team hopes to produce
pictures to help weather forecasters by giving them a satellite view of an area 2,000 miles
by 1,000 miles.
Cloud formation and other
data will be shown with a new
picture appearing every three
minutes.
The Essa II is scheduled to
toe launched Friiday.
•      •      •
A computer from the university's computing centre will be
used to take figures from the
U.S. Environmental Science
Services Administration in
Miami, and give the time and
location of the satellite, and the
angles at which the antenna
must toe pointed to pick up its
picture signals.
The group has spent up to
$200 apiece on this project.
"We are keeping our fingers
crossed that we can do it," said
Sloan.
Employment
help offered
job seekers
Summertime is coming, and
the student placement office
is once more offering help to
the student seeking summer
employment.
Summer employment registration will take place the
week of Feb. 28 to Mar. 4 at
noon in room 100 of the old
Arts Building.
Registration is open to all
years, all faculties.
On registering, the student
will hear a talk by a placement officer, and then will be
asked to fill out a card stating
his year, faculty, experience,
and other relevant information.
The cards are filed, to be
used when an employer calls.
Last year, the student placement office received 1,167 applications from women, and
1,575 from men.
A spokesman from the office
said virtually every student
who applied received employment, although some failed to
report when they started work
or found employment by their
own resources.
Ubyssey erred
The Greeks will sing at the
Queen Elizabeth Theatre Friday, March 4.
The annual fraternity Song
Fest will not be held Friday,
as reported in Tuesday's Ubyssey, but on the following Friday ..,.,,,,,,,_,,, ,',
— norm  betts photo
PA'AMAI DANCER Linda Rubin twirls for joy, barefootedly,
during Brotherhood Week dancing display in Brock Tuesday by four ethnic folk-dance groups.
HENDER RETURNS
Agenda routine
at CUS meeting
Delegates to a board meeting of the Canadian Union of
Students at Ottawa last week discussed a variety of subjects
from birth control to Viet Nam.
UBC delegate to the meeting, AMS president Byron Hender, said the agenda was "just
routine".
CUS is preparing a brief to
have the criminal code amended to legalize the dissemination
of birth  control  information.
A report on the Viet Nam
congress resulted in a resolution to send a Canadian student
or recent grad to Viet Nam and
South East Asia to report on
conditions.
The board also discussed the
Canadian Student Means Survey which shows student earning power as opposed to expenditure.
This is a national survey by
CUS in co-operation with the
Dominion Bureau of Statistics,
and will be released March 4.
CUS is also trying to lower
the voting age to 18 years. The
discrepancies in the federal
voting act which prevented
many students from voting in
the recent election are also under consideration.
AMS  committee
lack  chairman
AMS public relations officer Derry Nelson said Wednesday chairmen are needed
for five student committees.
The committees are CUSO,
OUiS, High School Conference, Special Events, and
WUS.
Applications for the tfive
positions are due 4:00 p.m.
today in the AMS' office.
EUROPEAN!
Cord  Double
Breasted  Suits
with Epaulets
(Bells or Stoves)
IF YOU CAN'T FALL IN,
AT LEAST SPREAD THE
"BAD WORD".
Bad Boys Ragge Shoppe
315  SEYMOUR
POORLY   EQUIPPED
Events' official
slams auditorium
The theatre department is not doing its part in providing
lighting for the auditorium, Special Events technical director
Basil Hobbs charged Wednesday.
"The auditorium is ill-lit and
ill-equipped," he said.
"Most of the stuff is old and
antiquated. The only good
tiling is a lighting panel which
buildings and grounds has installed."
The theatre department is responsible for the lights and
equipment, while buildings and
grounds looks after the structure.
The theatre department
should spend some money to
equip the auditorium with regular stage lights because the
Musical Society and Special
Events often have to rent lights
for their events, he said.
POOR  LIGHTS
"Often a top notch performer is not shown at his best because of the poor lights and
equipment," said Hobbs.
"During recent Mussoc rehearsals, one of the lighting
bars fell down when the ropes
broke. It was lucky no one was
killed," said Hobbs.
L .J. Bayly, B and G assistant
superintendent said he has
made an investigation into the
complaint.
"It seems to me the theatre
groups are pretty much using
it without supervision," he
said.
QUALIFICATIONS?
"I don't know what their
qualifications are. They seem to
be just using it, not looking
after it.
"We checked everything a
year ago, but in the meantime, things have become unsafe," said Bayly.
He said ladders needed re-
securing, ropes were too worn,
and the electrical arrangement
in the loft should be rearranged.
Buildings and grounds will
be making these improvements
in co-operation with the theatre department.
"They are getting together
with us to tell us what should
'be done," he said.
MARILYN HILL
. . . classes?
Ubyssey gal
darkens photo
staff image
By  NORM  BETTS
The Ubyssey has come up
with yet another amazing discovery.
One of The Ubyssey's staff,
usually a hotbed of non-academics, has been to EVERY
one of her classes since September.
This startling fact came to
light Wednesday when several
of The Ubyssey's photo staff
attempted to detain Marilyn
Hill, arts I.
When she complained that
she would miss one of her classes, one of the photogs shrugged.
"So what," he said.
"Well I haven't missed a
class all year," she retorted.
After checking by The
Ubyssey's editorial staff proved Marilyn's story, the photog's
were forced to let her go to
class.
What will be the purpose of
6 KEY CLUB?
Fun,   frolic,   profit,   —   You
name it.
BIG MILLER
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Published Tuesday, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AM8
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3242,
Loc. 26. Member Canadian University Press. Founding member, Pacific
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mail by' Post Office Department,
Ottawa,  and  for payment of postage in  cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 1966
"The responsibility of the press
is to report the Truth."
—Batman, Feb. 3,   1966
Cough upl
\
Cheers for the anonymous donors of the world.
Latest of that noble race to rear his head is that
donor of $270,000 worth of rare medical and scientific
books to UBC's library.
The library, as the chestnut has it, is the heart of
this place — so a gift designed to help kindle the flames
of knowledge can truly be considered a heart-warming
one, if we may be permitted.
Now, a suggestion is floating around loose that all
of us should have a chance to become anonymous donors
to the library. And it is a suggestion we like:
At present, the main library operates until 10 p.m.,
with the Sedgewick wing open for studying up to midnight. There is some possibility, according to UBC's
hard-working head librarian Basil Stuart-Stubbs, that
Sedgewick may be kept open till 2 a.m. during the mad
pre-exam cram — but of course this offers no relief
for hard-pressed essay-writing main stack users.
Now it has been suggested that because this a university where determined priorities do not place late
operation of main-stack library facilities in a high
position, the student body as a whole should kick-in
enough loot to keep main stacks open later during the
pre-exam weeks.
Ask any frustrated student who manages to collect
all his essay-source material by 9:30, only to have the
glorious closing gong go, whether he thinks a late operating library to match Simon Fraser's is a good and
worthwhile project.
So either a can-rattling classroom blitz, or a less
dramatic AMS grant seems to be in order to gather up
the as-yet-not-confirmed-but-probably-1 e s s-than-$l,000
cost of keeping main stacks open even as late as
midnight.
After all, since the administration which establishes
those precious priorities doesn't have to use the library,
it's only fitting students should pay extra to keep the
library open.
LETTERS  TO  THE   EDITOR
'You've distorted the  Baron1/
Editor. The Ubyssey, Sir: made for guest towels, tooth- pondents allowed to attend, of
I do not wish to again raise brushes,   and   suitable   night- the two writers O. Sinyavski
the issue of irresponsible and wear. and  Y.   Daniel,   (the   former
distorted journalism but your (3) The   way   one   has   to 'better    known    as    "Abram
issue of Tues., Feb. 22 leaves make an entrance is extreme- Tertz".)
me no choice. ly humiliating. All this wait- The recent>  closed trial ^
In the banner you referred ing for people to vacate the these tw0 writers   and their
to the "Red Baron" and ran a halls and walking around on subsequent sentencing to hard
picture of an aircraft. tiptoe — it almost makes you labor for seven and five years
The aircraft pictured was a feel as though you're sneak- respectively   for   publishing
Supermarine Spitfire — NOT mg m! We suggest something books outside Russia) was a
a Sopwith, Camel as flown by *>e done about this. mortal   blow   to   freedom   of
Snoopy nor a Fokker D VII We realize that you do have speech  and   expression,   that
piloted by the Red Baron. a lot of men on your campus, freedom that we and the radi-
Fie on you and your all too °ut y°u really ought to guard Cal students most thoroughly
obvious    irresponsibility    in them more carefully! believe to be the central core
your journalistic endeavors. BUBBLES and TRIXIE 0f democratic philosophy.
R. THOMAS •      •     • The production  of such a
'FORGET  PARTY' brief is necessary to prevent
of ourT°uesdSaev %£?* ***<>*■ ™* Ubyssey. Sir: even the last vestiges of dis-
of our Tuesday pholo. ^   ^^   ^^   ^ senting opinion being crushed
*      *      * has     "radical     leadership" by a conforming and intoler-
PROBABLY OBSCENE which, according to its mem- ant. bureaucracy in the Soviet
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir: bers, is there to see that jus- Union.
May we extend congratula- tice is done, wrongs are right- If the present student coun-
tions to the fellows in Fort ed, and evils set right in this cil is at all serious in its pro-
Camp for their extreme hos- world. testations of upholding free-
pitality. The recent Viet Nam brief, dom and justice, then the only
However,   even  the  warm thus, no doubt falls into this honorable course is to forget
welcome which they extended category. its personal party affiliations
could not make up for the Having handled this brief and set about preparing the
greatly lacking conditions. We according  to  their  oft-stated brief with the  utmost  dis-
propose the following altera- aims, the next step of the stu- patch,
tions: dent council should be clear. H. WEILER
(1) We think a women's A second brief must now be Grad Studies
washroom should be installed prepared   and   sent   to   the
to avoid embarrassing situa- Soviet Union, requesting the «^^i^i^is*^^$smi^^Mimmimim&
tions in future. immediate release, and public EDITOR: Tom Wayman
(2) Provision    should     be retrial   with   foreign   corres-      N«w*  Ron Wtor
Associate George Reamsbottom
' -                                                 '     City Al Donald
Photo  Norm Belts
UH, really? department -""^^aws
Ass't City Danny Stoffman
AN KHE, Viet Nam (CP) - "Someone   heard   something 1^.^ "I"^^^^
Mistaking  her  for  a   Viet and  probably  challenged,  but    Features   Mike Bolton
Cong, a U.S. soldier Monday Maggie couldn't answer back."       cup Don Hull
shot  and   killed  Maggie  the She died instantly. News was slow, copy was slow
Mule, the mascot of the U.S. -l.      -l.      -l. but w,e «?al'y e°4 It all. Stu Gray
«          «         M went looking for Roger, Val Zuker
First Air Calvary division. <IThe pubiic buys its opinions wrote  about  books,   Ann   Bishop
^                    •>               r talked   to   Malcolm.    Carol   Wilson
Maggie had been permitted as it buys its meat or takes its got  lost,  Kit  Milne  uased  with
_                                   j _.       ,                    _ miit     nr.   +v,„   -,-.,• v,„4»-l„   +i--.t   i* Chuck, Angus Ricker turned pink-
to move around freely in parts mllk,  on the principle that it e-f Jim Good COUnted ballots; ian
of the camps perimeter at An is cheaper to do this than keep f0™^tpt1^e^ubr^|e,B^fnH^gj^
Khe to graze. But a Viet Cong a cow. So it is, but the milk ed   cornersoc'   Marilyn   went   to
mortar attack made the guards is more likely to be watered." SftfiigS-S StSSn'TtotfESfdand
extra cautious. An officer said: - Samuel. Butler, ?™eal<Ba^r -Sued  ul^y^ Thursday, February 24,  1966
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
CROSS CANADA
McGill questions grant
MONTREAL (CUP) — H.
Rocke Robertson, principal and
vice-chancellor of McGill University, has asked the Quebec
government to reconsider the
amount of its grant to McGill
University for the coming year.
In a written statement Feb.
16 Robertson called the government's treatment of McGill "inequitable" and "an error in
judgment" and stated that the
grant increase of only $100,000
will face the school with a deficit of about $3,500,000.
The grants, announced Feb.
15, gave McGill, $7,612,000, or
some $100,000 more than in
1965-66. The Universite de
Montreal will receive $16,367,-
000, an increase of about $2,-
000,000.
Robertson called into question Quebec's system of dividing the province's population
according to language for the
purpose of university grants
and equalizing the per capita
sum according to the ratio of
English and French-speaking
people in the province.
Roberston points out that unt-
der this system the government
grants McGill only $502 per
student each year, while the
Universite de Montreal re-
jceives $1220 and Laval $1290.
"But, more important than
the failure of the estimates to
deal fairly with McGill's requirements is the significance
of the governlment's decision as
a possible indication of its attitude to McGill," he said.
iSince 1960-61, according to
Robertson, grants to McGill
have increased by only 47 per
Tories roast
'melting pot'
in Mac debate
HAMILTON (CUP) — "Don't
throw Canada into the melting
pot and blend it with the so-
called Great Society," pleaded
the Tories at the McMaster Debating Union.
The resolution, "That economic integration with the
United States is in Canada's
interest," was defeated by an
audience vote in the first of
a series of debates replacing
model parliament.
The Liberal government
speakers both concentrated on
abolishing tariffs as a means
of revitalising Canadian industry.
Prime minister Dave Wool-
ford said North America as a
whole would be a more viable
economic unit than Canada
alone.
"You are being taxed for
patriotism. Tariffs cost as
much as the Canada Pension
Plan and are only an incentive
to inefficiency," he said.
Opposition leader Chuck
Donley said research, unions,
and industry would be dominated toy the U.S. "We have two
separate societies, we need two
separate governments."
The second Tory speaker
said he feared the political influence of right-wing extremism and anti-socialism could
make Canadians "parrots of
American policy."
cent while grants to Laval have
gone up 208 per cent, and to
U of M 242 per cent.
Referering to the large number of donations to McGill, he
pointed out that the university
costs the province far less than
Laval or U of M.
The government policy can
only serve to diminish the
ability of McGill to maintain
its high standards, he said. Any
lessening of standards would
hurt Quebec and all of Canada.
Robertson added that historically and academically, McGill considers itself closely
linked to Quebec, believing itself to have a vital role to play
in the scientific, technological
and cultural development of
the province.
ON DROPPING WUSC
Dissatisfied Dal
puts off decision
HALIFAX (CUP) — Dalhousie University's student
union has postponed a decision on the former chairman's
recommendation that Dalhousie drop its World University
Service of Canada activities.
Margaret Muggah, a former
member of the WUSC committee, was appointed interim
chairman to replace Jane Massey who resigned because "the
local committee is becoming a
collection agency."
Council president Robbie
Shaw said there was still a
move to withdraw from WUSC,
but no decision would be taken
until after the WUSC national
assembly early next fall.
Shaw denied the problem
had been a local one or a
matter of personalities:
"We have been dissatisfied
with WUSC in general, not just
the local committee. We are
unhappy that the local committees are unable to earmark
funds for specific projects.
Couucil pays
two  students
EDMONTON (UNS)—Student council president and
the editor of the campus
paper at the University of
Alberta at Edmonton will receive salaries next year.
Salaries will range from
$2,100 to $3,300, replacing
the honorarium of $200 the
president now receives and
the $185, paid to the editor
of The Gateway.
Elementary   &   Secondary
FUTURE
TEACHERS
KE*EP
YOUR
EYES
on
VANCOUVER
•
Every year the
Vancouver School
Board
HIRES
many teachers
directly from
university
•
When the time comes
APPLY
to the
Vancouver
School Board
1595  West  10th Avenue
For an  interview
call RE 1-1131
PRIDE &
PREJUDICE
With Laurence Olivier
TODAY
12:30, 3:30, 6:00 and 8:30
AUDITORIUM 50c
Canada toured in parf
by Rhodesian students
OTTAWA (CUP) — Two Rhodesian students are touring parts of Ca'nada to explain the implications of the
Rhodesian crisis to Canadian students.
Chris Chetsanga, 28, and Robert Zvinoira, 36, both
formerly active in Rhodesian nationalist movement, are
being sent on tour by the Canadian Union of Students to
those campuses wishing to help pay for the tour.
The two tours now underway in the Maritimes and
the West will be followed by others in central Canada
during March if a speaker can be found.
GSA NEWS
GRADUATE STUDENT ASSN.
SPRING GENERAL MEETING
NOTICE OF AGENDA
1. Reports from the executive members.
2. Treasurer's report.
3. Expansion  Brief.
4. GSA - AMS fee relations.
5. AMS budget structure.
6. GSA crest.
Social Work Opportunity
in Oregon
"Mr. R. A. Ouellette, Recruitment Coordinator, Oregon
State Public Welfare Commission will be on  campus on
MONDAY, MARCH 7
to interview qualified applicants for positions in Oregon.
Minimum qualifications include one year of casework,
similar qualifying experience, or successful completion
of the first year of graduate education in social work.
Salary range from $460 to $625.
Please contact the office of Student Services for interview
reservations.
Beginning Tuesday
March 1st
THE BOOKSTORE
WILL HOLD ITS
ANNUAL SALE
OF
DISCONTINUED  TEXTS
Art Prints, and Stationery Items Page 6
THE
UBYSSEY
Thursday,   February  24,   1966
The
Cauliflower
Ear
By  AL   CHRISTIE
UBC is getting the short
end of the stick in its approach to athletics these
days.
The fans next year are gs-
ing to be treated to Western
Canadian type competition
such as that we had to persevere through a few years
back.
No more will we see the
Hawaii Rainbows nor top
notch competition such as is
at easy disposal from Point
Grey to California.
But we will get competition from teams such as that
of the University of Manitoba. At Christmas, I had the
good fortune to read that a
local Winnipeg Senior A
team had practically tripled
Manitoba in an exhibition
basketball game.
Also of interest to some
of you may be the fact that
the high scorers for the A
team were John Cook and
Jack Lusk, both former
Thunderbirds.
This is in our immediate
future in sport.
One may argue that an
independent schedule such
as we have now is not as
enjoyable to the athlete as
a league competition leading
toward a goal would be.
This argument has a basic
merit but it is over-shadowed by the fact that on a certain weekend when the T-
Birds are wiping some weak
sister league affiliate they
could be having a real ding-
dong battle with a much bettor   team.
Equipment- wise UBC
sports are going to suffer.
The reason for this is expense.
I don't know what the
figures are, but I am sure
that travelling costs are going to leap so high that there
will be no money left in the
budget for basic  equipment.
Right now, UBC is behind
many schools in this aspect
and it is because there is not
enough money available.
Athletic cards are sold to
those who want them at
UBC. At the University of
Western Ontario a part of
every students' admission
fee each year is taken for
athletics and every student
is automatically given a pass
for all campus athletic
events.
This can be done because
it is in the hands of the university administration. Here
the same fund raising is in
the hands of students elected
lo AMS and MAC for one
year.
The fortunate thing about
this whole mess though is
that it has made us see more
clearly. We see that WCIAA
is not desirable for UBC on
a full scale. We also see that
the running of athletics is
not in the right hands.
Both of these things are
under consideration now and
no doubt a statement should
be forthcoming from AMS
or MAC or the university
administration    office    soon.
What do you think* . .*-.*.
UBC  WINS
Gal swimmers
are best in west
UBC's powerful women's
em Canadian Intercollegiate
Saturday.
UBC topped three other universities with 114 points. University of Alberta from Calgary was second with 79, University of Saskatchewan (Saskatoon) followed with 60, and
University of Manitoba was
last with 26 points.
UBC's exceptional diver,
Carol Ann Morrow, totalled
324.30 points to dominate competition on the three metre-
board.
In the speed swimming
events, UBC's Maureen McCal-
lum placed first in the 200
yard freestyle and second in
the 100 and 400-yard freestyle
events.
Lynn Pomfrst, daughter of
UBC men's swimming coach
Jack Pomfret, placed second in
the 100-yard breaststroke, individual medley and butterfly
events.
In the WCIAA women's volleyball championships, UBC
tied with the University of
Alberta (Edmonton) for third
place winning seven of 12 sets.
swimming team won the West-
Championships  in  Winnipeg
Sports
schedule
MEN'S  ATHLETIC
ASSOCIATION
Elections for president, vice-
president and secretary-treasurer at noon, Friday, room
211, War Memorial gym.
•      •      •
SQUASH CLUB
Important general meeting
Monday noon, Bu. 212. Every
member must attend for the
election of next year's executive.
Intramural
Soccer Final
P.E.I. vs. PE. II
Today Noon - Stadium
SUMMER JOBS
1st, 2nd and 3rd Year Students
Engineering, Arts and Science
You will inspect buildings, obtain construction details
and prepare data for computer processing. You will
work for Dept. of Public Works (Canada). Salary range
$255-$410 monthly. Arrange appointment for interview at office of Student Services now.
INTERVIEWS WED., MARCH 2
CHEMISTS
and
FORESTERS
A representative from one of the world's largest
chemical companies will be on campus to interview
graduating Chemists and Foresters. Immediate duties
include product development and improvement of
adhesives for the plywood industry. Must be capable
of  becoming a  technical  service  representative.
and
Make appointment at Placement
Office for Interview on
MARCH      1
MONSANTO CANADA LTD.
UBC volleyball nets open
for international tourney
The B.C. Open Volleyball championships start at 10
a.m. Saturday in the War Memorial gym.
UBC Thunderbirds team will be represented by Carl
Henning, John Daem, Ken Witzke, Kit Fortune, Bob Vos-
burgh and Vic Lee.
Vosfourgh, a seven-year veteran, Daem, a former member of Belgiums national team, and Henning, a three time
big block winner and an outstanding spiker for four years
will lead the UC squad in its first crack at a championship
since the WCIAA "title three years ago.
Don't envy the man who
wears slacks from the
Bay - be one and put
her   under   your   spell!
Look your confident best in lightweight Terylene
and wool slacks from the Bay — recommended as
everything you could want in traditionally
styled, quality slacks ! Note the Dak-style waistband and Vi top pocket. In a rich new scale
of handsome Spring colours; grey, oxford, navy,
brown, olive, irridescent blue and olive, pewter,
sage,   mustard   and   fawn.   28-36.   Pair.   16.95
the   Bay   Campus and   Career   Shop,   second   floor.
the
S&y
GEORGIA at GRANVILLE Thursday,  February  24,  1966
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
—dennls gans photo
PUTTING OOMPH into slapshot, graceful co-ed fans on field hockey shot Wednesday.
Girls' varsity field hockey team downed Thunderette basketball team, admittedly somewhat out of its element off the courts.
Rugby Birds
break Bears
26-game line
By DOUG MOSER
UBC rugby Birds snapped
the University of California
Golden Bears 26-game winning
streak Monday at Berkeley.
Thunderibirds' 11-8 victory
over the Bear* was their first
victory against the tough American squad in 11 games.
In the second half the Birds
opened the scoring when Bob
Sandilands scored a try in the
corner.
Ohas Pentland then finished off a fine movement, cominig
out of a loose scrum about 30
yards out.
The Bears roared back after
the Birds incurred a series of
davasting penalties and scored
a try under the posts. Moments
later they tied the score on another penalty kick.
In the last second of the
game, the Birds were awarded
a penalty from 35 yards out.
Mike Cartmel, whose kicking
was superb all through the
tour, booted it over to break an
8-8 tie and give UBC the win.
CORSAGES  FOR  SPRING  FORMALS.
REASONABLY PRICED.
from
STRATHCONA FLORAL CO.
5555 West Blvd.
Phone AM 1-7271
EVERYTHING ON
SA
*E
At
RUSHANT
CAMERAS LTD.
4538 West 10th
The Store with the
Technical Photo Knowledge
PHONE:
224-5858     -     224-9112
FOR SALE SHEET
AT OREGON STATE
Double or single
—our teams won
Bob Puddioombe and Bob Bardsley led a six-man team
from UBC in weekend action in the Oregon state indoor
tennis championships at Eugene, Ore.
Other   team  members   were
Cam Dalgliesh, Pierre Lam-
arche, Vic Rollins, and Barry
Shakespeare.
Puddicomibe and Bardsley
outclassed singles champion
Tom Gorman and Steve Hopps
from the University of Washington in the deciding doubles
match with 6-3, 4-6, 7-5 scores.
Puddicombe lost a semi-final
singles match to Jack Neer in
another close one 4-6, 7-5, 6-3.
Vic Rollins was eliminated in
quarter-final singles by Jack
Neer 6-3,  6-1.
Results in second round singles play were Hopps over
Bardsley 6-2, 3-6, 7-5; Gorman
over Lamarche 9-7, 6-1; Ol-
medo over Dalgliesh 1-6, 6-4,
6-0; and Clint Knox outlasted
Barry Shakespeare 7-5, 4-6, 10-
8.
Hockey Birds
finish season
UBC's hockey Thunderbirds
finish their season this weekend.
• •      •
Birds host Notre Dame University from Nelson at 8:30
p.m. Friday and Saturday at
the Winter Sports Centre.
Last weekend at Calgary,
UBC split two games with the
University of Alberta Dina-
sours, winning tho first 5-2, and
losing the second 4-3 in over-
lime.
• •      •
Birds, who are on a 9-9-1 record, will be without the services of goalie Ken Broderick.
He left Sunday to join the national team in Germany.
Brian Wallace will take his
place.
• •      •
UBC will compete in the
Western Intercollegiate Conference next season, thus ending a two-year independent
schedule.
SPECIAL EVENTS PRESENTS
THE
Vancouver Symphony
ORCHESTRA
with MEREDITH DAVIES, Conductor
NOON TODAY - 35c — ARMOURIES
Playing Wagner, Turina, Walton, Shostakovich, Bernstein
Tomorrow, Friday, Feb. 25
12:30 p.m. - 35c Auditorium
KIMEO ETO
— blind Japanese Koto player
— 'Direct from the Danny Kaye Show
— Vancouver Premiere
— a very unusual concert not to be missed.
Rent
A Gown
Lovely   Selection
Brides
Attendants
Formal  Wear,
Fur    Stoles,
Tux.   &  Din.
Jackets,   Costumes.
MARIE BRUCKER SALON
Designers and  Dressmakers
Sales and  Rentals
2608   Granville 733-6727
4691   Kingsway 435-1160
BAY
STARTS TOMORROW
MAN  IN THE MIDDLE
Robert Mitchum
France Nuyen, Trev Howard
Plus
CAROUSEL
Gordon MacRae, S. Jones
STUDENTS 75c
DELTA
STATS TOMORROW
NATURE GIRL AND THE
SLAVER
Marion  Michaels
Plus
A GLOBAL AFFAIR
Bob Hope, Lilo Puver
"Your Bridal Portrait
is something special"
YOU DESERVE THE BEST
PLEASE  CALL -
736-0261
WEDDING PHOTOGRAPHERS
2580 BURRARD
STUDIO
731-6424 Page 8
THE        UBYSSEY
Thursday,  February  24,   1966
'TWEEN CLASSES
Symphonic notes rest
The Vancouver Symphony's
final UBC appearance playing Shostakavitch, Walton,
Bernstein, Turina, and Wagner — Meredith Davies conductor. Noon, Arm.  35 cents.
EAST  ASIA  SOC
Two Japanese films noon,
Bu. 102. Admission by donation.  Everybody welcome.
• •      •
SLAVONIC CIRCLE
Russian    conversation   from
1 p.m. in IH with guests from
Russian ship  Ola.
IH
A panel -of students from
Africa discuss religion, social
change and race relations in
Africa at 8 p.m. in IH upper
lounge.
• •      •
SUS
General   meeting   noon   today in Henn.  200.  Candidates
for next executive.
PHYSICS   SOC
Roscoe Williams speaks on
Lasers in Henn. 204 at 1:30.
• •      •
NVC
General meeting noon in Bu.
224.. All members please attend.
• •      •
PHOTO  SALON
Showing of colored slides
for the Annual Salon of
Photography noon in Aug.
104. Display of black and
white photography continues
in Ed. Lounge until Mar. 4.
• •      •
HILLEL  FOUNDATION
Simma Holt speaks on the
new story of the Doukabors
in our present society noon
in Bu. 100.
• •      •
PRE-LAW SOC
General meeting noon in
Bu.  221.
Do you  have to be a  rich
playboy to   join the
KEY CLUB?
No,  — you can always act
like one.
10% Discount Given to
All U.B.C. Students on
Corsages
Vogue Flower Shop
2197  W.   Broadway 736-7344
WE CAN LOOK
YOU IN THE EYE
Did you ever buy a camera at the
top price (as high as $400) and
then see it on sale at the same store
a week or two later (below $300).
Makes you kind of mad, doesn't it?
Well that will never happen at Kerrisdale Cameras. We might never
go quite as low as $300 but we
would never try to sell as high as
$400.
A year round price of $320 or $330
would be more reasonable and we
could still look you in the eye if
someone had a later sale. At Kerrisdale Cameras we try to give you
a fair shake the year round. Ask
any of our regular customers.
Kerrisdale Cameras
2170 W. 4] st    AM 6-2622
POETRY  READING
Dorothy Livesay of the creative writing dept. reads poetry with Tom Wayman noon
in Bu. 219.
FILM SOC
Pride and Prejudice with
Lawrence Olivier in Aud. at
12:30, 3:30, 6:00, and 8:30. 50
cents.
•      •      •
IH
Exhibit of paintings by
Chinese artist Iu I-Hsiung,
Feb. 24-March 4.
EUS
EUS sponsors a tour of the
Engineering facilities from
12:30-2:30. All invited. Meet
in Eng.  201. Get there early.
• •      •
ARCHAEOLOGY    CLUB
Lab open 1:00-3:00 p.m.
All   welcome.
• •      •
PRE-SOCIAL
Field trip to Haney Correctional Institute departs
from in front of Faculty Club
on Marine Dr. at noon. Non-
members welcome.
CLASSIFIED
Rales: 3 lines. 1 day. $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Adranc*
Please bring or send to Publications Office, Brock Hall.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost 8_ Found
11
FOUND ADS inserted free. Publication! office, Brock Hall. Local 26,
224-3242. 	
THIEF. PLEASE RETURN THOSE
Psych, books to Lost and Found.
Finals are comin. Don't be a
crud
LOST: BLUE MAN'S SKI JACK-
et at Lower Mall Dance last
Wed. Please return to lost and
found under bookstore. Not worth
much,   but   was   an   old   friend
FOUND: KEYS (INCLUDING V.W.
key) in men's washroom, 1st floor
Hebb Bldg., Fri. Feb. 11. Owner
can   reclaim  in  Hebb  II.
FOUND: ONE PEN ON KEY
punch machine in Computer
Science Annex. Phone Way.ne,
431-2493 between 6:00 p.m. and
6:30   p.m.
i-OIIND: ONE SET OF ENGRAV-
ed protzen. Phone Charlie at 433-
4918.
FOUND: LONDON FOG RAIN-
coat on North Brock Hall coat
rack. Left in place of mine—
name   on   label.   Phone   946-6698.
WOULD THE PERSON WHO
borrowed my car coat from Ph.
101 Lab. Tues. afternoon please
contact    Mike   at    876-2684.
Greetings
12
DEAR SANDY, SINCERE BEST
wishes on this, the occasion of
your  21st   birthday—Doug.
HAPPY   BIRTHDAY   PAUL  JONES
—H.    (M.B.E.    returned).	
HAPPY      BIRTHDAY      Q-BALL.
—Henri.
Special Notices
13
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSU.R-
amce rates? If you are over 20
and have a good driving history
you qualify for our good driving
rates.   Phone Ted  Elliott.  224-6X07.
RUMMAGE SALE. ACADIA CAMP
Recreation Hall. Friday, Feb. 25,
1-9 p.m. and Saturday, Feb. 26,
10-2  p.m.        	
THE SLIPPED DISC-O-THEQUE
Pre-Med Annual Ball, March 5th
at The Coach House, bar, door
prizes. With the Dartelles. $3.50
couple,   at   A.M.S.
DARLING: I DON'T CARE IF IT
isn't new. I love you. R. H. Would
the mysterious card sender please
make their identity known. Both
R.H. and G.P. are very interested.
Get  in  touch in the same manner.
WANTED: DEAD GUITAR .PLAY-
er for Folk Rock Group. No Ex-
perience  necessary.   CA  4-4555.
DANCE TO THE NOCTURNALS
Sat., Feb. 9-1, Brock. Fer. $1.00,
Residents   50c.
DANCE TO THE BIG BAND.
Rhythm and blues sound of "the
organization Fri. at the Groove-
yard.
DANCE TO THE FABULOUS
Nocturnals Saturday, Feb. '26,
Brock Hall. Admission, 50c for
residents, $1.00 non - residents.
Don't   miss   it!
PLEASE
Would the persons carrying laundry bags who were in the Tenth
Avenue crosswalk at Trimble at
8:35 p.m. last Friday when a car
was stopped by the police please
phone   228-875'4   or   228-2412?
WINTER     IS    COMING.
Larry   Kent.
Winter   is   Toronto's   Answer  to
Larry  Kent.
Because   Winter   Kept   Us   Warm.
Transportation
14
RIDE WANTED FROM CAMPUS
at 5 p.m. each eveninpr to Richmond or 41st & Granville. Phone
BR   7-6646.
Wanted
15
TWO LADIES' BICYLES WITH
gears wanted. Call Daphne, UBC,
Local 244 or 733-2304 evenings.'
HELP! BADDY NEEDED. GOOD
sets of Classical Studies 315 and
English 429 notes. Phone CA 4-
6049.
WANTED: ONE, THAT'S RIGHT,
one metal ski. 200 cm long. Bad
time on mid-term break. Phbne
733-2669   after   6.
WANTED! ONE SINGLE KNIESEL
Riesnslalom ski. 205 cm. Phone
Gary,  WE  9-5990.
Automobiles For Sale
21
'61 SUNBEAM HARDTOP. CLEAN.
Smart as new. Whitewalls, tw_in
carb, overdrive, sporty economical,
for quick sale, $850.00. Phone 922-
0236. 	
1966 TR 4-A. EXCELLENT COND.
Tonneau Cov. W.W.'s. Radio.
Must sell.   Best  offer.   327-8692.
SWAP OR SELL — 1952 MORRIS
Reconditioned A-40 OHV engine,
$165 or offers. Phone Duncan,
261-4882.
'62,      600-D     FIAT.      ALL     ROUND
good condition. City tested.  What
offers?   YU   8-8253.
Repairing.  All   Kinds
38
Goi-P, ALIAS MEAT BALL, BRING
extra clothes Fri., hope you swim
well. Frosh Underground Committee.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Typewriters ft Repairs
42
GOOD CLEAN TYPEWRITERS, fit
up. Also Typewriter repairs at
60 percent savings. Poison Typewriters, 2140 W. 4th. Phone RE
1-8322.
Typing
43
PROFESSIONAL TYPING, ARDALE
Griffiths Limited, 70th and Granville,  263-4530.
STUDENTS — TYPING DONE, MY
home. Essays, reports, etc. Low
rates,  Phone  261-2996.
TYPING 25c PAGE OR $1.95 HR.
West End, 685-5539 eves. Campus
pick-up & delivery. 224-6341,
(John).   Leave   tel.   no.	
THESIS TYPING
'65   W.P.M.    4   YRS.    OFFICE   Experience.   Call   Inger   at   254-2556.
Reasonable rates.
WILL  DO  TYPING IN   MY  HOME.
Reasonable rates.  224-9174.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted 51
PIZZA PATIO IS CONTINUUM.
with Its policy of making employment available to students for part
time evening work—one or two
evenings a week. Students considering applying must have clean
driving record for use of Company
cars and be 21 years of age or
older. Contact Manager at .the
Pizza Patio most convenient to
you after 5 p.m. Locations In Kerrisdale, South Van., Downtown
and  West   Van.
PS:   New   outlet   now   open   close
to  U.B.C. 	
TWO STUDENTS WANTED FOR
part time work now, and full time
during summer. Duties include
maintenance work on apartments
& revenue houses and occasional
chauffering. Applicants must * be
reliable and of neat appearance. All
applications in writing. Send name,
address & phone number and recent photo to Mr. Alexander, 1320
Comox,   Vancouver 5.
EXPERIENCED DEAD AND BASS
guitarists still needed for up-and-
coming British R & B group. For
audition, phone Stu, YU 5-5541.
Dance
62
DANCE TO THE ACCENTS. TO-
tem Park, Friday, Feb. 25, 9 -1
a.m. A.M.S. Cards, Please.
Miscellanous For Sale
71
FOR SALE: ELECTRIC GUITAR.
3 pick-ups, strap. Also amplifier.
Excellent condition. Phone George
224-9039.
Questions and
Answers on
SUB
RESIDENCES
Chairman,
SUB Committee.
Sir:
1. What part would you
anticipate the residences
will play in the new activities program which the SUB
will make possible?
2. Would there be any advantages for a residence
which is affiliated with the
AMS in comparison to a
residence which is not affiliated? JOHN WOODS
1. It is hoped that the residence students will get a
great deal out of the new
facilities to be available in
the new building, however,
this will be entirely up to
those residence students in
charge of residence programming. A very careful
analysis of residence programs over the last few
years indicates that the program has always responded
CONSTRUCTION
Chairman. SUB Committee.
Sir:
1. When will construction
on the palace begin?
2. State the exact cost of
the SOB:
a. when the first referendum was held.
b. when (and if) construction actually begins.
3. Is the looong delay in
construction in any way a
function of personalities involved in negotiations?
4. Will the fact that the
commercial enterprise which
put automatic pin-setters into the gym lanes this year
and later removed them due
to lack of use affect your
current plans for 20 bowling
lanes?
5. Many people who were
on campus when the referenda on SUB were railroaded through by a slick PR
job now feel even stronger
against the project because
of the delay and the increased cost. Do you see any legitimacy in their demand for
another referendum on
SUB?
DON   WISE
1. Working drawings will
be completed, by the Fall
and the decision as to tendering and ultimate construction dates will be up
to student council. Council
will have to consider the
local construction picture at
the time and the number of
bidders likely to offer tenders. We will be ready to
go in the Fall, but whether
we do or not will depend on
student council.
2. When SUB was approved, costs to the students were
slated to range between $2.8
million and $3.1 million depending   on   the   size   the
Forking
Chairman,
SUB Committee,
Sir:
Please outline the parking
facilities for SUB. If such
facilities are planned, will
they be an extra cost to the
students in original construction costs?
John Stenstrom,
Comm. IV
There will be a parking
lot big enough for 500 cars
to the north end of the SUB
site. This lot is paid for by
the university and it is slated to be a student lot in the
evenings with students hold-
to the facilities available. If
such is the case one would
expect to see a revival of
the bowling leagues and
other recreational tournaments. It is also expected
that the very active dance
program will be given an
opportunity to expand. It is
expected that the monetary
returns to the sponsoring
group will grow in proportion to the size of the program.
2. Naturally any group affiliated with the AMS will be
able to use the facility free.
This will of course mean
a considerable financial saving to the groups involved.
It should be pointed out that
the rental rate which will
necesarily have to be charged to non-affiliated groups
will be much higher than
it now is. That is provided
the existing policy remains
in effect and only student
council can determine that.
building came in at. It came
in close to the maximum
size outline for the program
and costs were therefore expected to be about $3.1 million. As costs now stand students will be contributing
about $3.3 million.
3. No.
4. The building is slated to
have only 8 bowling lanes.
The answer to the question
is no.
5. A check has been made
on the amount of money
spent advertising for SUB
and the amount was $1,114.-
76 up to May 31, 1965. It
is estimated that about $800
was spent during the referendum itself. This was divided up aproximated twice as
much spent advertising the
pro side as the con side. All
those arguing against the
building were too busy talking to write anything, until
a goup, including Tom Way-
man, finally sat down at
their typewriters and wrote
the con arguments which
were printed and paid for
by student council.
The argument raised that
a slick PR job was done
might have some validity
depending which side one
was on, but, one has to remember that most of the
PR was done in front
of the library, where all
sides were heard. It should
also be noted that in the
SUB referendum more than
7,000 students voted. That
represented more than half
the campus at the time. This
should be some indication
of the interest that was
aroused. One further point.
Students at the time voted
more than 80 percent in
favor of the project.
ing a student parking sticker allowed to park free. Student council has also authorized the investigation into
the feasibility of parkade
construction incorporating a
number of tennis courts on
top. A report on this project was filed last summier
and is currently being further pursued. It appears that
construction costs, which
will naturally have to be
borne by the university, will
be in the neighbourhood of
$1,000 per car. A further
report on this will be filed
with council later this year.
Further Questions to Box 119, AMS
Office or SUB Office

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