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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Jan 19, 1979

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Array Wong, Armstrong on board
By GEOF WHEELWRIGHT
Politicos Glenn Wong and Bruce
Armstrong were elected as student
representatives to the UBC board
of governors Thursday, easily
defeating law student candidates
Carlos Brito and J. Vian Andrews.
And Anne Gardner easily topped
the polls in the student senator race
with 1,157 votes, followed by Doug
Watts with 852, Brian Short 799,
Chris Niwinski 785 and Geoff
Smith 625, according to results
released from the UBC's registrar's
office.
Wong had a wide lead over his
closest opponent Armstrong; he
polled 1,041 votes while Armstrong
mustered 903.
One surprising election result was
the remarkably small number of
students who turned out to vote.
Only 1,740 ballots were counted
in the senate election while 1,759
students filled out ballots for their
favorite board candidate.
Armstrong said he thought his
election and that of Wong was an
Gardner tops senate poll, Watts,
Short, Niwinski and Smith follow
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXI, No. 41
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, JANUARY 19, 1979
228-2301
indication of students' opposition
towards recent board actions such
as the expulsion of student board
member Paul Sandhu.
"I hope that Dr. Kenny and
other board members take note of
this election," he said.
Armstrong said he and Wong will
probably bring to the board's
attention the actions of housing
director Mike Davis in a recent
Gage Towers incident. The student
representative assembly has asked
for Davis' resignation and students
will be meeting with him Tuesday to
discuss his performance as housing
director.
"It's quite possible we will bring
up the whole subject of his (Davis')
competence," Armstrong said.
He said possible tuition fee increases and the ejection of Sandhu
are other issues he and Wong want
to bring up at the first board
meeting.
"You'll   see   a   more   unified
student position," Armstrong said.
Wong said one thing he wants to
stress is the necessity for openness
on the board.
"It's a publicly funded institution and the students have a
right to know (what goes on at the
board meetings)," he said.
Wong and Armstrong polled the
most votes at all but three of the 13
polls on campus. At the civil and
chemical engineering building and
the law building polls Andrews and
SEAMY SIDE OF Alma Mater Society politics is demonstrated as newly-
elected student politicos exert influence on Ubyssey to run their photo on
front page. From left, well middle of road actually, are board of governors
—peter menyasz photo
members Glenn Wong and Bruce Armstrong and senators Geoff Smith
and Chris Niwinski. Celebration in Pit marks second time in week that
Smith has used pressure to get his picture in paper.
Broadbent slams foreign investment
By TOM HAWTHORN
The federal government cannot
protect the economic interests of
Canadians because foreign interests
control Canadian resources, federal
NDP leader Ed Broadbent said
Thursday.
Broadbent  told  500  people   in
Hebb Theatre that Canada will be
in serious economic difficulty if
Canadians do not regain control of
the natural resources base.
"Ontario is about to become a
'have not' province and the reason
is that the branch plant structure is
seen to be uncompetitive," he said.
Broadbent also warned that B.C.
could lose control of its fishing and
fish processing.
"Japanese capital has started to
move into the B.C. fishing field,
and has now invested between $20
and $40 million. Japanese interests
have now obtained shares in 12 of
Go directly to jail, do not pass BCRIC
By PETER MENYASZ
For once, people on welfare might be just as well off
as the people in prison.
What do they have in common? Similar status as
potential shareholders in B.C.'s Resource Investment
Corporation.
People enjoying the state's hospitality in either provincial jails or federal penitentiaries may not be
eligible to receive the five free shares offered by the
provincial government last week.
On first enquiry, a source in the attorney-general's
office said that there should be no difficulty in obtaining the shares for prisoners that want them, as all
one-year residents of B.C. are eligible.
But Eila Loughlin, public relations spokeswoman
for the Canadian Penitentiaries Service, was not so
certain.
"Under the regulations, a person has to go to the
bank to apply for the shares and has to go back to the
bank to pick them up," said Loughlin.
It is not likely that the Penitentiaries Service will
release all of their inmates to allow them to get their
shares from the bank, she added.
On Wednesday The Ubyssey learned that some of
B.C.'s underprivileged citizens may lose their welfare
benefits if they accept the Social Credit government's
offer of the five free BCRIC shares. The gift would be
considered an asset, possibly pushing welfare
recipients past their allowable asset level and leaving
them ineligible for social assistance.
See page 3: BCRIC
60 B.C. fish processing plants and
control two of the top three."
The Canadian Development Corporation, a federal corporation
established to aid businesses with
capital grants and loans, has not
made enough funds available for
B.C. fishermen and this has forced
them to accept Japanese capital,
Broadbent said.
"Canadian fishermen, both as
fishermen and processors, have
attempted to get capital from the
banks and failed. Nor did they get it
from the Canadian Development
Corporation."
The CDC has created 20,000
jobs, but half of those were created
outside of Canada, he said.
"The CDC is operating like any
other multinational. It has
forgotten its central task.
"We should ensure that B.C.
fisheries and processing plants be
owned and controlled by the people
of B.C."
Broadbent said even Third World
nations were serious economic
See page 3: JAPAN
Brito were winners while at the
MacMillan building Andrews and
Wong polled highest.
Two other elections were held
this week for law senate candidates
and the science undergraduate
society fee referendum.
Don Thompson won the law
senate seat while Tuesday's SUS fee
referendum passed with 296 votes
in favor and 64 opposed. The
referendum was short of quorum
by 150 voters. SUS was forced to
hold the referendum because a
similar one last year also failed to
reach quorum.
The first board of governors
meeting for the new representatives
is Feb. 6, and new senators will not
attend a senate meeting until April.
Most newly elected student
senators said they saw a need for
more student caucus solidarity.
According to Niwinski, a veteran
senator, the person elected as
caucus chairman will have a great
effect on the success of the caucus.
23 of
2,300of
23,000
With 23*000 UBC students, a
quorum of 2,300 was needed to
hold Thursday's Alma Mater
Society general meeting.— but
only 23 people appeared.
fhe meeting, held in SUB ballroom at noon, was to introduce a
new constitution to students and
to vote on whether or not to adopt
it.
AMS president Paul Sandhu
criticized the supporters of the
new constitution for the expense
and time the AMS had to spend
on reviewing it. Much preparation
was needed for the special general
meeting when there seemed to be
no visible support for it, he said.
Sandhu said Thursday the AMS
spent more than $1,000 on legal
fees to review the legality of the
new constitution under the provincial Societies Act. Several
hundred dollars were used to
advertise the meeting, as required
constitutionally, in The Ubyssey
and an untold amount of money
went to pay AMS office staff td
arrange the meeting, type up
documents and maintain
correspondence with lawyers and
students.
"The thing that disappoints me
is that they can get a petition
signed by over 1,000 people and
only 20 people show up for a
meeting," said Sandhu.
He said because of the lack of
people at the meeting he seriously
doubts whether or not students
knew what they were signing when
they signed a petition last fall
endorsing a new AMS constitution.
"It is obviously not the way to
change the constitution," he said.
"It's what I expected," said
constitution mover Brian Short of
the general meeting's poor turnout.
Short said "Thursday the
students who signed the petition
did not show up because they
knew another constitution
proposal would be coming up and
support it instead.
He said those who signed the
petition realized before the
meeting they would not be able to
get 75 per cent of the 2,300
student quorum to support
Thursday's constitutional
proposal.
A hearty crowd of 23 AMS
hacks, engineers and curious
See page 3: MEETING Pago 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, January  19,   1979
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AL STEWART — Time Passages
DR. HOOK — Pleasure and Pain
STEVE MILLER BAND - Greatest Hits 1974-78
THE WHO - Who Are You
ELTON JOHN - A Single Man
BLUES BROTHERS - Briefcase Full of Blues
ROD STEWART — Blondes Have More Fun
DEVO - Are We Not Men?
CARS — Cars
3
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WHILE QUANTITIES LAST
Open 9:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Thurs. and Fri. till 9 p.m. Friday, January 19,  1979
THE       UBYSSEY
Pag* 3
Alcohol research funds run dry
By JEFF RANKIN
The federal government has
drastically cut funding for research
into alcohol and drug abuse, according to UBC research administrator Richard Spratley.
Spratley   said   Wednesday   that
grants for research into the nonmedical use of drugs, as other areas
of health and welfare, have been
reduced by "at least a third."
"There is a drastic cut in the
amount of money that's available,"
he said. "What it means is there is a
big drop in one corner of medical
research."
He said that although UBC
currently has six big projects under
way in health services research for
which funding is guaranteed, new
grants for research into drug abuse
THE SHOW MUST go on, but Alma Mater Society president Paul Sandhu, left, can't see why. Sandhu chaired
AMS special general meeting attended by about 23 of UBC's 23,000 students at noon Thursday. Quorum needed
was 2,300. The meeting, was forced when engineering undergraduate society president Brian Short, seated right,
presented AMS with 1,200 name petition calling for new constitution — to be adopted by vote at meeting.
'Japan buying out fishing'
From page 1
competitors with Canada because
multinationals like International
Nickel Inc. (INCO) exported
capital from Canada.
"We're being threatened by
Third World nations who are
selling their natural resources
cheaper than we are," he said.
"Other nations have had the
leadership to say a country
shouldn't live from election to
election. That is not the way to
galvanize a people that want to be
serious about their country."
A branch plant economy with
massive foreign investments makes
it impossible for Canada to
compete with Third World nations
with similar resources and cheaper
labor, he said.
Broadbent said in an interview
after the speech the NDP wants all
exports of capital by large companies to be reviewed and only
permitted if certain benefits are
guaranteed to Canada.
"There is a need for an overall
sense of national purpose that is
linked with the national economy,"
he said in the speech.
Canada needs a stated national
policy so that instead of exporting
oil and natural gas, it exports
finished petroleum products,
Broadbent said.
The NDP would abolish the
Senate and increase the House of
Commons by 100 seats, he said.
Twenty seats would be given to
each of five regions, he said in an
interview. The seats would be
distributed according to a percentage of party support, like the
West German system, Broadbent
added.
The NDP would also call for a
moratorium on expanding nuclear
energy so that a royal commission
could examine the environmental
and health aspects of the industry,
he said.
Broadbent said opposition leader
Joe Clark's statement that the Progressive Conservatives would
negotiate a sovereignty-association
agreement with a separatist Quebec
government was a "very serious
mistake" to make before Quebec's
upcoming referendum.
Meeting short of quorum
From page 1
passersby appeared for the general
meeting. A quorum of 2,300
people, who had to arrive within a
half hour of the meeting's official
start, was needed for the meeting to
formally convene.
Short said he will now work on a
referendum by petition, which will
require a 75 per cent majority and
at least a 10 per cent voter turnout.
The referendum will concern a
revised version of the new constitution.
But Sandhu said he doubted
Short would get the turnout
because only about 1,500 students
voted in the recent senate and board
of governors elections. The constitution issue is far less widely
known by students and therefore
will receive even less voting attention than campus elections, he
added.
Short said the student representative assembly had been given a
chance to discuss the new constitution but had refused because
they were happy with the current
document.
"They've had their chance," he
said.
The constitution discussed would
have reduced each faculty's representation to one student, the undergraduate society president
within the faculty. Current representation is by faculty population.
It also would have taken 16 of the
17 student senators off the SRA.
All currently sit on the assembly.
BROADBENT
no Joe Stalin
have been eliminated entirely.
Health care delivery, which
concerns incidence of disease and
disease rates, is the other area hit by
major cutbacks, Spratley said.
(Both health care delivery and drug
abuse come under the health and
welfare program.)
"This is a program that puts
close to a million dollars a year into
UBC," he said.
The cutbacks are not just part of
a general trend resulting from poor
economic climate, according to
Dennis Vance, associate dean of
research in UBC's faculty of
medicine. Overall federal funding
for all aspects of medical research
will be increased to $68.5 million
from last year's $63 million, he said
Wednesday.
"I think the climate in B.C. is
improving," said Vance.
He said the provincial government has recently started to direct
money from the lottery fund into
medical research.
"It just started in the last four
months," he said, "but this is going
to have a very positive effect on
research at the university."
Spratley said he was enthusiastic
about the provincial government's
contributions, especially in the area
of health and welfare, but added
that it would only partly make up
for lost federal funding in that area.
Federal cuts have been causing
problems at other Canadian
universities. Two University of
Manitoba researchers have been
forced to accept appointments
outside Canada because of government funding cuts for their project.
U of M sources said one of their
researchers had been researching
the relation between hypertension
and heart disease but had quit
because the project was stalled
indefinitely.
Margaret Saw, the federal
assistant deputy minister of health
services, said the declining support
for medical research was necessary
given the state of the country's
economy.
Traffic head tows
university's line
By DAVE Van BLARCOM
Members of UBC's administration do not foresee any changes to
current policies of towing away the
cars of owners who have not paid
parking tickets.
Dave Hannah, superintendent of
traffic and security, and Erich
Vogt, vice-president of faculty and
student affairs, said Thursday that
there are no plans to change the
regulations despite the intention of
two law students to challenge the
policies in court.
Darrell O'Byrne, law 3, and
Malcolm MacLean, law 1, said
Wednesday that they will challenge
in court the validity of the traffic
regulations as well as the authority
of the university to tow away
vehicles, even if the regulations are
valid.
Hannah said that although the
particular issue challenged by the
two law students has not been
tested in court, the university has
successfully fought a number of
past court actions arising out of
towing incidents.
"We've won the cases so far. If
young chaps want to take it to
court, well and good. If they win,
well and good," he said.
"If they feel there should be a
new policy, they should take it up
with the administration," Hannah
said.
Vogt said Thursday one solution
would be to build more parking
spaces, adding that there was a
shortage of funds for construction
of parking structures.
"We are in the process of
negotiating for a large new parking
structure. We would have to build
one where the hospital is being
built," Vogt said. The structure
would not be included in the
funding for the hospital itself, he
said.
Vogt said he could not support a
policy of refusing to register
students who have not paid parking
fines.
"There is a reluctance to penalize
people academically for something
which is not academic," Vogt said.
He said there is a fine line between library fines, which may be
related lo academic activity, and
parking fines which may not.
BCRIC banks on jail
"Clark's statement is the most
serious mistake made by a political
leader in modern times. I think Joe
Clark made a very serious
mistake," he said.
From page 1
Loughlin also said that the Penitentiaries Service as yet has no
official position on whether or not
inmates will be eligible for the
shares, but added that a legal
opinion on the situation is currently
being sought.
When questioned on this point,
the source at the attorney-general's
office admitted that it might be a
problem for the prisoners to pick
up their shares at a bank.
She felt that there might be a
solution, though.
"If there's no time limit, then the
people could pick them up after
they're released, unless they're in
for 20 years," she said.
But according to the information
released by the provincial government in their announcement Jan.
11, applications for the shares must
be completed by June 15.
If this regulation is upheld in all
cases, then those in prison will not
be able to get their shares, even
after they are released.
The information released by the
provincial government also states
that "people who are ordinarily
residents but temporarily absent
from the province" are also
eligible.
Once again, a decision will have
to be made on whether or not B.C.
residents that are in jails or penitentiaries outside the province will be
eligible to receive their free shares.
People in jail need not lose hope,
though. The regulations for
eligibility for the shares includes an
appeal provision.
With a little luck, criminals will
join welfare people and old age
pensioners in receiving special
consideration regarding the free
shares, and participate in the
program that premier Bill Bennett
feels is so important for us all.
"It is their opportunity now to
own something that can grow in
value and help contribute toward
the growth of our economy and
province," Bennett said in the
official government announcement.
Oops 2
In Thursday's story "Colleagues
hit arts prof" we incorrectly quoted
a source as saying that no one in the
political science department
deemed professor W. J. Stankiewicz's behavior unacceptable. The
source actually said no one deemed
Stankiewicz's behavior as acceptable. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, January  19,   1979
Facts of life
A new crew, bright-eyed and bushy-tailed, has been elected to the senate and
board of governors. No doubt they are brimming with optimism and with ideas
on how to change the world, but there are a few facts of life they should know
about politics on the university's senior governing bodies before they enter the
arena.
The first is that not everyone wants them there. Many senior board and senate
members still feel students have no place on these bodies and are resistant to
proposals from their younger and more inexperienced colleagues.
The second is that their conceptions of what the senate and board should deal
with will differ significantly from that of the others. They serve different constituencies and come from different backgrounds.
On the board the new reps will have to deal with board members who think
that body should operate like a private corporation's board of directors. This will
pose difficulties for the rookies as they try to serve their voters and the board at
the same time.
The board's rules on secrecy, for example, will make it particularly difficult for
student members to fulfill their vows to keep their constituents informed.
However, students may be more fortunate this year than previously, as the two
new reps, Glenn Wong and Bruce Armstrong, appear able to work together,
making a united front possible.
A united front is also important in senate where student representatives have
often been intimidated by the experience and knowledge of the senior senators
who dominate campus politics.
If a strong student voice is to be heard on this body it will be vital to have an effective caucus organization which will be able to pool the collective talents of student senators in order to direct and coordinate student input on senate issues.
Again, students may be fortunate in their choice of senators this year as all of
them have some experience in student politics and know the issues well.
TELL THE OTHERS UE'VE
GOT SOME ttORE TO
t-eaw on THIS fERfc!
=10
emwvad
Letters
Davis says door open to students
In the last week, several
allegations have been made
regarding my management attitudes
and my attitude towards the behavior of students in residence. Unfortunately, I have been .misquoted
and conclusions have been reached
by bodies outside the residence
system without, I believe, any
efforts being made to hear both
sides of the issue. I would like to
take this opportunity to reply.
Any examination of the student
housing and conference department's organization and procedures
will, I believe, indicate an
organization that allows for and
requests as much input as residence
students are willing to give.
The management system clearly
allows for input from residence
students via the residence
associations' participation in the
single student and family student
coordinating committees and the
budget committee. The presidents
of the associations have a clear
mandate to discuss all issues or
complaints as well as to make
recommendations at these
meetings. The associations also
have direct access to a senior
residence advisor in each area, who
in turn, initiates discussions outside
the regular meetings.
This system has, I believe, been
successful for all concerned this
year. My only concern with this
system has been when external
channels have been used for
complaints or suggestions. In my
opinion,    all    residence    students
should use the residence association
as their communication vehicle to
the student housing and conferences department.
My attitude towards behavior of
students in residence has always
been that students in residence
should respect the rights, safety and
property of others and maintain a
standard of behavior which reflects
this respect. (I have never said that
individuals are guilty until proven
innocent.)
Standards committees, made up
of peers, have been set up in each
single student residence to assist in
Rotten rentals
the implementation of this respect
for the residence community. In
most cases, standards committees
can function effectively to determine the extent of involvement
of individual(s) in a situation.
Standards committees listen to
arguments and descriptions about
incidents and have the prerogative
to call witnesses and individuals
who may have been involved.
Once the standards committee
meets, the housing department gets
into the process only after the
standards committee submits its
recommendations. This method of
assessing behavioral incidents has, I
believe, worked successfully for all
concerned and will continue to provide an appropriate way for the
residence community to set limits of
behavior that are reasonable and
protect the rights of all parties in
any dispute.
I have an open door policy for all
students,   both   in   residence   and
those   off   campus    who    have
questions   about   the   residence
system. It is unfortunate that in the
latest discussion on residence living,
neither I nor my staff were consulted before decisions were made.
Michael Davis
director
student housing and
conferences department
r
Now that the cat's out of the bag,
the rentalsman has backed off.
You may recall that in my perspectives article of Jan. 5, I showed
how certain questionable practices
of   a   UEL   landlord   (Balfour
THE UBYSSEY
JANUARY 18, 1979
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the
AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in
room 241K of the Student Union Building. Editorial departments. 228-2301; Advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Mike Bocking
Quick as a hare, Geof Wheelwright and Verne McDonald ran into the Ubyssey office and slammed
the door behind them. "That was a hair-raising experience," they panted. "Who's thair?" asked Vicki
Booth and Mary-Ann Brunoro. "Are you haired of hearing?" inquired Peter Menyasz. "No, she's just
splitting hairs," said Julie Wheelwright. Red-haired Heather Conn and receding-haired Jeff Rankin
stared with wonder at Tom Hawthorn, whose hair curled in luxurious tendrils around his shoulders. Bill
Tieleman and Gregory Strong looked up in time to see Ross Burnett open the door a hair's breadth and
quietly slip out. "Hair today, gone tomorrow," they sighed. "Whair is he going?" asked Larry Green
and Robert Jordan. "You hair-brains," said Mike Bocking and Doug Todd. "They're off to the hair-
port! And staffers who aren't going there should come to the filing session at noon today!" blaired
Wendy Hunt, Murray Helmer and Simon S. Danes.
Wait Damn-You suddenly announced she was hairrified to realize there would be a clipping party today at noon in The Ubyssey office. But Bill Tieleman and his hairem shocked her even more when they
announced a bonyfyde punk party would be held the same night. Other staffers went bald in shock as
they read the details on The Ubyssey door and promised to bring wigs to the next day's festivities.
Rentals) appeared to be condoned
by the rentalsman. The tenant
involved fought back by taking
them both to B.C. Supreme Court.
They were to have gone before
the court on Jan. 11. But only one
working day after my article appeared, the rentalsman had an un-
precedently abrupt change of heart.
The tenant received a phone call
saying that an "erroneous"
decision had been made and that it
had been reversed in her favor.
This tenant was lucky to have the
power of the press behind her.
Other tenants in the row housing of
the Kings Road area are not. For
example, one woman has been
evicted so that renovations may be
made to her home. However, the
Residential Tenancy Act requires
that the evicted tenant be given first
choice when the house is re-rented.
Balfour refuses to do this and so is
once again being taken to court.
Where will it all end? Tenants are
fighting tooth and nail with limited
resources for rights which should be
taken for granted. The rentalsman,
meanwhile, idly stands by and lets it
happen. There's a terrible flaw in
the system. And it looks like it's the
office of the rentalsman.
Mark Rogers
Kill mouthy morons
Kill. Are there people in any of
your classes who make you
contemplate murder? Are you at
the stage where you foam at the
mouth and scribble obscenities on
your desk? Fear no more, help is
on the way.
It is virtually impossible to
spend any amount of time at
university without encountering at
least one of these pathetic
creatures. They seem to have ^his
insatiable need to be noticed and
usually have something totally
irrelevant to say on any given
subject.
This dearth of constructive expression is compounded by a
tendency to elaborate at length on
these non-thouchts and it is the
i arc piol'esMir indeed who has the
presence ol mind io squelch these
time wafers
This situation i* most serious in
ili*:u«iii>n groups where a portion
ot vour total giadc is. allocated for
participation Having one of these
jeiks in a tiUcu.v-.iori group is bud
enough, but with Iwoor more, the
oppuriuniiic> lor any constructive
debate ate practically eliminated.
V	
In addition, a large number of
teaching assistants lead these
discussion groups, and while they
are usually very competent, they
lack the authority to stop these
clowns from babbling on.
What can be done about these
people? Well, you can always try
the "Scope" approach. You
know, the mouthwash — show
them this article and pray that
they will get the hint. It is by far
and away the most preferable and
least painful method of getting the
message across.
If showing this article to the
offenders themselves does not
work, you might try taking the
issue up with your professor. Ask
around your class to see if there is
a consensus of opinion and then
ask your professor to communicate the feelings of the class
directly to the offending party.
Whichever approach you try,
stress tart, hecause there is a Kttle
iif ihese people in all of us, and us
the »a>in.u goes, there but for ihe
giace of (iod. . . .
Kevin McGee Friday, January 19,  1979
THE       UBYSSEY
Page .5
Letters
Gage residents stay guilty until.. •
Recently Gage residents received
a blue form letter signed by two
students — Mike Mooney and
Patricia Davis — stating the "fair"
attitude of housing with regard to
the unfortunate incident at Gage of
Dec. 5.
In this letter it stated, "it was
decided that having some people
take responsibility for their
behavior, or what they allowed to
occur in their quads is better than
no one taking responsibility.
Furthermore it was decided that it
was appropriate to hold everyone
responsible in the quads until individuals who actually threw the
objects were identified. It is an
accepted standard in Gage that the
occupants of a quad — as in an
apartment building — are
responsible for the type of behavior
that takes place within their quad."
Further on the letter states "a
joint decision was made by
housing, the advisors and the
G.C.C. president (sic) to act immediately by sending out the first
letters, holding everyone present in
the identified quads responsible."
Let us look at each one of these
quotes individually. The first quote
basically states that if there are 10
guilty parties, but you cannot find
them, it is alright to tell 50 people
that they are guilty, as this 50 is
bound to include the 10 really
guilty.
The second line is clearly a
"guilty until proven innocent attitude," something that the martial
Type right,
don't write
The last remaining remnants of
The Ubyssey typing pool have
upped and left, leaving one hapless
victim to type the treasured
manuscripts submitted by Ubyssey
readers.
Before this last staunch supporter
of the students' right to know
expires under the strain, contributors are asked to type their
letters, perspectives pieces and hate
mail;    preferably    double-spaced.
Further, our perspectives column
is in need of new material. If there
is a burning issue- or viewpoint
which you must get off your chest,
send it to us. Any viewpoint short
of libel is welcome. But it must be
typed.
rule of housing thinks it can get
away with as residences are not
under the landlord-tenant act.
The last quote, making reference
to living in an apartment building,
couldn't be farther from the truth.
It is my understanding of Canadian
law that if a drunk person assaults
someone in apartment 105 of a
large apartment block, the resident
of 104 cannot be charged because
PUBLIC
228-6121
skaHnc
FRI. & SAT.
7:30 p.m. . 9:45   p.m.
SUNDAY
1:00 — 3:00 p.m.
STUDENTS
& CHILDREN     .75
ADULTS $1.25
THUNDERBIRD
WINTER
SPORTS CENTRE
GRADUATING?
Now open
OFFERING:  Free sit.
ting  fee  till  mid-term  Break.
(Reg. price $15.00.) Evening appointments accepted. For an
appointment call
224-2275
Conveniently located at 4480
West 10th Ave. (10th and Sasa-
mat), Vancouver, B.C. V6R 2H9
he failed to go over and prevent the
occurrence.
They state that it is an accepted
standard at Gage of mutual responsibility. I never remember
signing an agreement to be
responsible for other people's
actions.
Also the letter states that it was
decided to hold all those present responsible, so how can a person out
Vote for vulgarities
Upon reading last Thursday's
article on punk rock, I decided to
check things out myself
(masochistic as this may seem). The
doors of the Windmill opened at
9:30. Yes, the cover charge was
$2.25.
Yes, Jerry Useless, safety pin
through his cheek, was there. Once
inside, I felt that the decor, the
atmosphere, was vaguely familiar
somehow. Memories of a different
Earth to
Davis, tune
in please
In the Jan. 6 Ubyssey housing
director Mike Davis was quoted as
saying that he had not heard of any
complaints in residence in general.
What type of evidence does he
need?
In Gage there are reports of
increased vandalism, there has been
an exceptionally high turnover rate
of occupants over Christmas and
there was the Dec. 5 incident. This
is the result of the general dissatisfaction of Gage residents.
The position of housing director
is not a figurehead position. It
demands staying in tune with the
environment. If Mike Davis is so
isolated from reality and out of
touch with the situation of
residences he should be replaced.
He is a servant of the people, not
the reverse.
Snake
Please withhold my real name
because the length of my stay in
residence is solely dependent on the
whim of Mike Davis.
SOFT
CONTACT
LENSES
Per pair
All Fees
Inclusive
$00-00
age, a time before . . . but no.
The first group didn't have a
name. "I guess we're the special
guest," says the woman with the
guitar. They begin to play. Clean,
solid sound. "So you think you're
free?" she sings. Ear-splitting
volume? The Yes concert at the
Coliseum was louder. The drummer
takes over as vocalist.
"As you can see, we are not
men," she says in a British accent.
"You're not Devo!" someone
shouts. But she does have
something to say. "England, England, I hate you but I want to go
home," go the lyrics, tastefully
done.
And what of the crowd? Some
are standing by the stage, some are
sitting by their tables, all
responding to the music. No
violence. No vulgarities.
The next group, Private School,
is setting up. Jerry Useless is quietly
talking with the guitarist. Two
policemen walk in. One says to the
other; "Fuzz. Haven't heard that
one in a while."
No one is paying them any attention. A waitress walks by with a
tray of beer. "No thanks," says the
cop, "I've already had one." They
leave a minute or two later.
The final band is Tim Ray and
the Druts. This music is not punk.
It's a form known as New Wave.
The sound is intricate and pleasing.
Everyone quietly finishes their
drinks, the show is over.
Angry music? Slightly perturbed
maybe. This music has potential, I
feel. Check it out. Buy your mother
some ear plugs and take her along.
And leave your jaundiced eye at
home.
Charles L. Dodgson
computer science
EYEGLASSES
Student Discount
Available on Eyeglasses
at a hockey game that night come
and explain his involvement in the
incident?
May I suggest two methods for
Gage residents to fight this
stupidity.
1) Write a short note asking
Mike Mooney, president of the
Gage community council, and cosigner of the letter, to send an
apologetic letter to all Gage
residents, else resign immediately.
Put your note and your copy of
the blue form letter (if it is still
around) in an envelope and mail to:
Mike Mooney
president
Gage Community Council
Box 827
Gage Towers
Bausch & Lomb SOFLENS also available
KAUFMANN & JESSA OPTICAL SHOP
1535 W. Broadway
341 North Road (and Lougheed Hwy.)
7314188
931-7
UBC
READING, WRITING AND
STUDY SKILLS CENTRE
COMMENCING THE WEEK OF JANUARY, 27, 1979, THE
UBC READING, WRITING AND STUDY SKILLS CENTRE
WILL OFFER SHORT COURSES IN GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION, WRITING THE SHORT PAPER, WRITING THE
LONG PAPER, READING IMPROVEMENT, VOCABULARY
BUILDING, SPELLING IMPROVEMENT AND STUDY
SKILLS DEVELOPMENT, ALL COURSES HAVE LIMITED
ENROLLMENT AND PRE-REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED.
FOR REGISTRATION INFORMATION,
CALL 228-2181, LOC 245
Leave the envelope at the front
desk or drop it in a campus mail (no
postage needed) box.
2) Tell your floor rep what you
think of the incident and have
him/her pressure for reform at the
next GCC meeting.
If any Gage resident has been
forced to produce physical evidence
to prove their innocence, I would
like to know about it. Leave a note
in Box 150, Gage, giving me your
name, phone and quad so that the
extent of this violation of civil
liberties may be gauged, and
further possible action (maybe even
legal) on the part of the AMS may
be contemplated.
Craig Brook >
science SRA representative
CWCHCITCE cDcW[ARiF ^OO^S
specializing in science fiction and fantasy
4374 CW 10th cAcVcE..cSJ4cNCOcUcVcERj,
228-8223
Hours 10-8 - Sun. 1-5-^
In SUB
Basement
• Sausage Rolls
• Meat & Vegetable Samosas
• Potato Chops
• Italiano & other Submarines
• Ice Cream
• Also Special Sandwich
Counter
(Open 11 a.m.-4 p.m.)
GRADUATE STUDENT
CENTRE LOUNGE
OPEN for LUNCH
(12-1:45 MON.-FRI.)
Serving:
Liquid Nourishment
Hot Snacks, etc.
Members & Guests Welcome
W
nee
kterhouse
;Ca
CHARTERED ACCOUNTANTS
SUMMER
EMPLOYMENT
Third-year Commerce Accounting Option or First-
Year Licentiate in accounting students who are interested in summer employment with the Vancouver Office of Price Waterhouse & Co.: Please
mail copy of your U.C.P.A. form or personal
resume and most recent transcript of marks to:
Personnel Manager,
1075 West Georgia Street,
Vancouver, B.C.
V6E 3G1 Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, January  19,  1979
'Tween classes
TODAY
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
Regular meeting, noon. International House.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Wine and cheese party, 8 p.m., SUB 212.
Badminton tournament registration, noon, SUB
216A.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
General meeting, noon, SUB 130.
FILMSOC
Joint general meeting, noon, SUB 247.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Disco dance, 8:30 p.m.. International House.
YOUNG ALUMNI CLUB
Happy hour, 4 p.m., Cecil Green Park.
UBC HANG-GLIDING CLUB
Meeting  on  obtaining a pilot's licence,  noon,
SUB 111.
DEBATING SOCIETY
Practice    debate    and    general    meeting    for
McGoun Cup, noon, SUB 211.
CSA
Sports night, 7:30 p.m., Thunderbird gym A.
Hot
flashes
Boogie on
'til you drop
If Donna Summer, the Village
People, the Sylvers, the Silver Convention, and K.C. and the Sunshine
Band make you want to hustle until
you pay the bills, then make sure
you get down to International
House's disco dance tonight at
8:30.
And on Tuesday at 7:30 p.m.,
Bob Aldrich of the department of
preventative medicine and anthropological studies of the University of Colorado will speak on
ethnic communities of the Pacific
Rim.
11 OPTIC
0 ZONE
Student Discounts
ARBUTUS VILLAGE
733-1722
UBC SKYDIVERS
Meeting scheduled for today is cancelled.
SATURDAY
CSA
Movie:   The   East   is   Red,   2:30   p.m.,   SUB
auditorium.
MONDAY
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Women's drop in, noon, SUB 130.
DEBATING SOCIETY
McGoun   cup   practice   debate   and   general
meeting, noon, SUB 215.
CSA
Mandarin class, noon, Angus 212.
Display  of  China Week,   11:30 a.m.,   SUB art
gallery.
TUESDAY
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
General meeting, noon, SUB 130.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Dr. Bob Alduis speaks on Ethnic Communities of
the Pacific Rim, 7:30 p.m., International House
coffeepiace.
BAHA'I CLUB
Informa. discussion on the Baha'i Faith, noon,
SUB 113.
S.I.M.S.
TM group meditation, noon, Angus 210.
PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVE CLUB OF UBC
Regular meeting, noon, SUB 119.
Floor hockey game, 7:30 p.m., Phys. ed. centre
gym E.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Supper, film Sexuality and Communication, 6
p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
WEDNESDAY
WOMENS COMMITTEE
Lesbian drop-in, noon, SUB 130.
AMNESTY UBC
Letter writing workshop, noon, SUB 212.
THURSDAY
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Women's drop-in, noon, SUB 130.
AMNESTY UBC
Informal meeting for all, noon, SUB 212.
GAY PEOPLE OF UBC
General meeting, discussion, noon, SUB 212.
PSYCH STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
"What do you do with a B.A. in psychology?"
noon, Angus room 110.
S.I.M.S.
TM weekly meeting, noon, Angus 210.
SATURDAY
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Girls' floor hockey practice, 5:30 p.m., Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre.
HILLEL HOUSE
FALLAFAL LUNCH
AND
ISRAEL FILM
Tuesday, January 23
12:30
®CUSO
Dialogues on
Development
THURSDAY, JANUARY 25th
"Development/Underdevelopment"
Part I of an eight part series on some issues of development
which will include talks, audio-visuals, simulation games and
discussion. Call CUSO to pre-register. 228-4886.
Upper Lounge, International House,
7:30 p.m., Thursday
Sponsored by The Centre for Continuing Education
and CUSO UBC.
LIBRARIES
LOCKERS AND
YOUR RESIDENCE
ARE PRIME TARGETS FOR
THIEVES TO ATTACK
REPORT ALL THEFTS TO THE R.C.M.P.
224-1322
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: Student - 3 lima, 1 day $1.50;«MBtiMtt(t titm 36b.
Commercial - 3 Hiwt, 1 day $2.75; addftktaai ttw* 88ft, A6Mmti<$wfo&m64&i*
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone mderepey&bto to «ctanca
Deadline is 11:30a.m., theda^t^Orepubfie^iorj.
Publications Office, Room 34t. S.U.B., HBC, ifeft., &£ WT 1 UK
5 — Coming Events
25 — Instruction
DISCO DANCE AT
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
8:30 p.m. Friday, Jan. 19
Tuesday, Jan. 23, 7:30 p.m.
Ethnic Communities of the Pacific Rim "An In-
formal Evening in Coffeepiace" with Dr. Bob
Aldrich of U of Colorado's Dept. of Preventive
Medicine and Anthropological Studies.
PIANO and Theory tuition for Grades
1-10 and A.R.C.T. by Graduate of
Musikhochschule Frankfurt, Germany.  Westend.   682-4141 or 682-7991.
THE JANUARY 19th EVENT
Speaker Mr. DAVID SUZUKI, introduced by
DAVE BARRETT, MLA. Concert by SUSAN
JACKS and Band. Followed by a Dance.
January 19, 8:00 p.m.; Italian Cultural Centre,
Grandview ii Slocan. Doors open 7:00 p.m.
Tickets S10. (NOT AVAILABLE AT THE DOORI
call 879 4601
Production   of   North   Vancouver-Seymour   8
Norm Vancouver-Burnaby NDP.
HATHA Yoga Classes starting Jan. 22.
Mon. and Wed. eves. $24 for six
weeks.   Call 255-5831. j
30 - Jobs |
SUMMER      EMPLOYMENT:      How     to   ;
secure summer jobs in B.C. Labour
jobs, clerical, local and Northern
employment, etc. Best to apply
early! Send $2 for student Summer
Employment Guide. Satisfaction or
refund. Labour Market Info Service,
Box 7810 Sta-A (Dept UB), Edmonton,
Alta.   T5J3CM.	
fS — ^cetndals
DISCO Dance Lessons for Students.
Classes begin the week of Jan. 22
in residence ballrooms. Cost is $15
for 9 weeks. Register in residence
common areas.
11 — For Sale — Private
COMMUNITY SPORTS — Excellent
prices for ice skates, hockey, soccer,
jogging and racquet sports equipment. 733-1612. 3615 West Broadway,
Vancouver, B.C.
CSA    FOLK   NIGHT.   Friday,   Jan.   19,
Come     one—Come     all.     Bar.     Free
70 — Services
CAMERA and Typewriter repair and
service. 669-6500 ext. 412. Free esti-
mate.  24 hour service.
81 — Typing
TYPING — 75c per page. Fast and ac
curate by experienced typist. Gordon,
685-4863.
TYPING: Essays, theses, manuscripts,
reports, etc. Fast and accurate ser-
viae. Bilingual, demy 324-9414.
TYPING. Theses, term papers, technical, equational, etc. IBM Selectric
TI correcting typewriter. 6 years experience. My home. Phone 234-8365
evenings.
90 - Wanted
READING and/or typing service required for blind student. Wages
negotiable. Call Bruce 224-9545, room
406, Caribu House. Student preferred.
Some minor editing of essays for
spelling,   grammar  required.
99 — Miscellaneous
SKI  WHISTLER
Rent   cabin   day/week   732-0174   eves.
INSTANT
PASSPOR
PHOTOS
kgrtiMfiJLsLTD
■ *^    4538 W 10th
224-9112 or 224-5858
1969 BUG.
683-6911.
Well cared for. $1,150. Mark
20 — Housing
WOW. One bedroom furnished apt.!
With carpets, drapes, parking! Two
appliances! Utilities included! Saver!
Only S165 (IAOI). Rentex 299-8331.
KITSILANO! Large one bedroom furnished suite! Carpets! Drapes! Two
appliances! All utilities paid! Bargain for $160.   (ISI).  Rentex 299-8331.
Use Ubyssey Classified
TO SELL - BUY - INFORM
The U.B.C. Campus
MARKET PLACE
IT'S OUR
TWO FOR ONE
TACO SALE
AGAIN!
Last year, Senor McTaco had a two for one taco
sale that was so popular that we've decided to do it
again this year, too.
For 80# and the coupon below, you'll get two of
our delicious tacos . . . two for the price of one!
That's a big deal for big appetites, especially if you
know that our tacos are the best tacos in town. Just
cut out the coupon below and bring it into either
Senor McTaco's restaurant. Ole!
SENOR
MCTACO'S
Robson Square Food Fair, In the Courthouse Complex,
or, 3396 West Broadway Ave. (at Waterloo.)
5**?TACOS*FOR*8*0<T*i
9 This coupon is good for the purchase of two tacos Q
^ for SOC. Coupon must be presented. One offer per M
A person. Offer expires January 31, 1979. J PAGE FRIDAY
INSIDE PAGE FRIDAY
KUROSAWA — his films analysed
DREAMSPEAKER —   powerful movie and books
AUTUMN SONATA - Bergman's latest reviewed
DEVO —   de-evolves on stage
TANYA TUCKER -   packaged for sale
• KRAPP'S LAST TAPE -    inside Beckett
• SUPERMAN —  comic book character dies in film
• VSO —   successes and failures
• POETRY —   student works showcased
• RANDY HANSEN -  Jimi Hendrix re-lived \film criticism i
Filmmakers owe debt to
Kurosawa ihe"Emperory
By WENDY HUNT
To the western world Akira Kurosawa is
the Japanese director. This spring Cinema 16
will be showing some of the films which have
won Kurosawa critical acclaim and continuing popular support at home and abroad.
He also tried to commit suicide a few days
before Christmas of 1971. A housemaid
found him slumped in a half-filled bath. His
neck, elbows, wrists and hands had been
slashed in 21 places.
Kurosawa's films are as popular with other
filmmakers as they are with audiences. If
imitation is the highest form of praise, then
Hollywood is bending over backward for
Kurosawa.
American westerns
Rashomon which examined truth and its
many faces became The Outrage, a most
unusual western indeed. The Seven Samurai
was the blueprint for the less ambitious
Magnificent Seven. The tight lipped hero of
Sergio Leone's spaghetti western, A Fist Full
of Dollars, was modelled after Yojimbo.
Kurosawa's chambara or sword films
translate well into American westerns. This is
not just coincidence. Kurosawa owes a debt
to this genre and has acknowledged its influence on him.
The essential ingredients in both the chambara and western are identical. A man with
his weapon sets himself against the world.
Before the war the Japanese film industry
had laid down a tight, successful pattern for
sword films. Kurosawa had the imagination
and talent to break this mold while seemingly
to remain inside. Rashomon captured the
Grand Prix at the Venice Film Festival
assuring Kurosawa of international
recognition.
This same recognition is ironic in light of
Rashomon and its exploration of reality and
what one believes to be real. Critics often
stated that the acting style in this movie was
influenced by Kabuki and even the Noh,
classical forms of Japanese theatre.
Kurosawa eventually stated, "I haven't read
one review from abroad that hasn't read
false meanings. . ." When pressed he
revealed the true story.
One night in Kyoto just before shooting
started Kurosawa and his staff were looking
at a print of a Martin and Johnson jungle
picture. They were impressed by the animals,
especially by a lion on the prowl. Kurosawa
said, "Well, Mifune, that's Tojomaru. Make
the human like an animal." Toshiro Mifune,
an actor who appears in many of Kurosawa's
films, made his role of the bandit Tojomaru
as lion-like as possible.
In the same way the role of the woman in
Rashomon was based on a black panther
seen in a movie in a downtown Kyoto
theatre. As Kurosawa observed, the performances of animals in jungle pictures are
somewhat removed from the Kabuki
technique.
An innovative director, Kurosawa experimented with new filming techniques. In
the battle scenes of The Seven Samurai he
used superpowered telephoto lenses to move
the audience into the fray.
He also began using a multicamera
technique, shooting one scene
simultaneously from several angles.
Kurosawa could cut directly from one
perspective to another without stopping the
action.
". . .This has allowed me to have both
continuity and to integrate into the film the
precise moment when one actor feels himself
to be inside the skin of the character ... it is
for the same reason that I use the long lens a
lot, for the distance permits the actor to
forget the camera more easily. ..."
Emperor Kurosawa
Shooting at a ratio of 10 to one means that
much of the footage ends up on the cutting
room floor. But Kurosawa knows what he
wants and makes sure he gets it. He exercises
a great deal of control over his films from
script to editing. He has earned the nickname
Tenno or Emperor although the people he
works with do not spread it.
Kurosawa has been a prolific filmmaker.
The opening of Rashomon in 1950 marked
his twelfth picture in seven years of directing.
In 1936 he left the Doshusha School of
Western Painting where he had been
studying since leaving school. When he
realized he would never make a living as a
painter he applied and was accepted to the
apprenticeship program at PLC Studios. At
26 he began his film career as an assistant
director. His early training as a painter shows
YOJIMBO
Toshiro Mifune as the original "man with no name" confronts ar
DODES'KA-DEN . . . least known of Kurosawa's films and a rambling exploration of
the intense day-to-day life of shanty-town dwellers in Tokyo.
in his attention to composition and later
color.
The years of 1950 to 1965 saw as great an
outpouring of energy and work as his earlier
years. It is from this period Cinema 16 has
drawn six films to show on campus for Series
III featuring Kurosawa.
Ikiru is set in modern Japan. Kanji
Watanabe, a petty municipal official
discovers he is dying of cancer with only six
months to live. The emptiness of death
frightens him as much as the emptiness of his
life.
He flings himself into pleasure and then
seeks comfort in companionship. Neither
fills the void he feels has been his life. He
finally decides to force a playground through
the rigid bureaucracy of which he has been a
staunch supporter all his life. This act,
beneficial only to others, redeems
Wanatabe's life in his own eyes.
Filmed in 1952 Ikiru held a special
significance for Japan. The war had
weakened the old traditions which had given
shape to daily life. Kurosawa told people that
life has the meaning you give it. Ikiru — to
live fully is the goal, not only exist.
Kurosawa is best known for jidai-geki.
These are period films of Japan's Middle
Ages. During this time the samurai rose to
prominence, figures of fear and adulation.
Kurosawa brings to life a feudal society.
Characters are formed by their environment
and in turn act upon it.
Seven Samurai
The Seven Samurai or Shichinin no
Samurai was finished in 1954 after 18 months
in production. Red Beard, another Kurosawa
epic was in production for two years.
The Seven Samurai recounts how ronin,
literally "men on the wave," swordsmen
who owe allegience to no man help a group
of peasants defend their village against
bandits. They aire masters of their craft yet
they join the villagers for only a bowl of rice.
Old and new, humor and pain, courage
and fear, hope and resignation, life and
death are blended together to form an
organic whole. Character is not sacrificed to
plot. Kurosawa balances these elements for a
film of perfect proportions.
The Seven Samurai was also the most
expensive film made in Japan up to that
time. This was because most of the scenes
were shot on location. The original length of
the film was 200 minutes, but it has never
been shown in its entirety outside Japan. One
hundred and sixty minutes is the length
usually shown.
Regarding a third version edited for the
Venice Film Festival Kurosawa said,
"naturally no one understood it. They all
complained about the first half's being
confused. It certainly was. The second half
the Venice people liked well enough because
that only had a few minor cuts which as a
matter of fact, helped it."
Kumonosu-Jo, The Castle of the Spider's
Web, is Kurosawa's version of Macbeth,
released here as Throne of Blood Kurosawa
uses stylistic devices remembered from a Noh
drama he had once seen. The scenes with the
witch, the make-up worn by the wife of
Washizu, the Oriental Macbeth, the
background music and the general timing of
intimate scenes are obvious to students of
Noh. These elements were deliberately included as an experiment.
Guns and swords
Their appearance at all is most unusual for
Japanese films. Film is still considered to be
a foreign medium and the gulf between it and
native classical theatre is rarely crossed.
The sword is as much a part of the samurai
legend as the man himself. The gun is to the
gun fighter as the sword is to the samurai. Its
mere presence is enough to mark a man.
The first shot of Yojimbo exploits and
emphasizes the importance of the sword. A
man stands with his back to the camera
against an undefined background, a sword in
his sash. Everything has been said about this
man. Yojimbo are itinerant swordsmen who
find employment as assassins or bodyguards.
The amused, contemptuous hero of
Kurosawa's 1961 film arrives in a village and
THRONE OF BLOOD . . . Kurosawa's power
devices from Japanese Noh theatre.
Page Friday, 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, January  19,  1979 \film criticism
llagersin great cowboy tradition.
>ceeds to pit the two opposing forces, both
1, against each He then sits back to enjoy
fun.
ied Beard, Akahige, 1965 was Kurosawa's
: period film. Noboru Yasumoto, a proud
ing doctor is sent to work under the fierce
i Beard in a public hospital instead of
ting the more socially acceptable job at
irt. During his painful education the
ciple learns from and is profoundly
inged by the older man.
Curosawa chose to express the bonding
ween Red Beard and Yasumoto through
sic. A central motif from Brahms is
ociated with Red Beard. As Yasumoto
ds value in dedication and responsibility,
motif is associated with him as well. It is
ibute to the relationship which is growing
ween them.
Compassion
Curosawa hones the teacher/pupil re-
ionship to a fine edge in Red Beard. He
kes a broad statement on the brotherhood
man. Man being the weak creature he is,
jds to learn humane ideals from leaders
ong enough to share their strength with
lers.
T0PF6
Cameron's dreamspeaker opens
doors on distant cultures
By WENDY HUNT
No evil can overcome the power of a
Dreamspeaker, and if the initiation is
painful, the rewards are great. There are
those on the Island whose eyes see through
the sea, whose ears hear past the wind, and
some are men and some are women.
There are those who can calm the angriest
sea and soothe the most hurting soul, and
some of these are men and some are women.
There are those who know without ever
having to be told and some of these are men
and some are women, and there are those
who will Endure and some of these are men
and some are women.	
Dreamspeaker and Tern Eyos Ki and the
Land Claims Question
By B. A. Cameron
Published by Clarke, Irwin
Dreamspeaker first reached the public as a
CBC drama a couple of years ago. A gutsy
and straightforward production, it is very
much like the woman who wrote it, B. A.
Cameron.
Born in Nanaimo Cameron has lived there
for most of her 40 years. Vancouver Island
has been her home and its people her source
of inspiration.
Reading and writing have always been two
great passions, but her career as a writer did
not get off the ground until eight years ago.
When her third child left for school, she
dusted off the typewriter and began working
full time. Four years ago Canadian filmmaker Daryl Duke, took her under his wing
and taught her the ins and outs of writing
scripts. It has been only a couple of years
since Dreamspeaker won the Etrog,
Canada's Oscar, for Best Screenplay.
Currently Cameron is transforming
Gabrielle Roy's classic novel, The Tin Flute
into a TV mini series. "I'm very excited
about it and very honored," "She is
one of my long-time favorite writers."
On the side Cameron is digging up some
appalling research on child abuse and incest.
"I don't know if this will be a novel,
novella, short story, film, or what, but I'm
working on it anyway. It'll be 'a thing' until
it takes its own form."
ndering of Macbeth incorporates stylistic
B. A. CAMERON . . .   Island    author.
Cameron is not bound by any one literary
form, although she prefers poetry and
scripts.
"I didn't decide to turn the script into a
story," she said. Dreamspeaker started as a
story but it was taking too long, too many
things were burning to get out and the film-
script form was quicker, more compact and
fit the immediacy of the feelings I was
having."
Dreamspeaker and Tern Eyos Ki and the
Land Claims Question was recently released.
It is Cameron's first book and contains two
novellas.
Dreamspeaker recounts how a young boy,
Peter, escapes into the forests of B.C. from
the rehabilitation centre where he was institutionalized after setting a school on fire.
Peter is befriended by an old Indian and his
mute companion.
Both are dreamspeakers. When Peter is
forcibly returned to the centre, he hangs
himself.
This is as far as the CBC production
directed by Claude Jutra goes. In a compelling manner it outlines the blind and
impersonal ways of white society. The
emphasis is on the negative side.
To a great extent the differences in the
story and the program are due to a lack of
money.
"Without a huge budget for optics and
special effects we couldn't handle Sisiutl and
the director made some decisions," Cameron
said. "They obviously worked, the film has
received wide acclaim."
The novella goes further and examines the
positive values of love and caring within the
framework of native Indian culture.
The program presents the old man and He
Who Would Sing as two individuals. The
book adds depth to their cultural
background. These two characters present a
new way of thinking.
A monster is chasing Peter and is trying to
suck out his soul. In white society psychology
would explain this phenomenon as an extension of Peter's own sickness, a fantasy
real only to him.
Indians have given it a name: Sisiutl, a
that isn't possible in visual images. The
ending isn't really different at all.
"The same things happen for the same
reasons, but with prose you can explain that
which was going on inside peoples heads.
With film you can only show what they did
because of what was going on in their
heads."
Tern Eyos Ki and the Land Claims
Question is the second short story. It
provides a humorous complement to Dreamspeaker.
Listening to Tern Eyos Ki tell her story of
bunnies and bombs is much like listening to a
good friend ramble on, not able to get a word
in edgeways and not really caring.
"The silent Indian is a myth of TV and
movies," said Cameron. "They start out
about land claims, then go on about their
grandfather's brown shoes he bought at T.
E. Eaton's and two days later they get back
to the point."
And the point is Indians see many incidents as being interrelated.
Tern Eyos Ki is funny and shocking. She
speaks from her cultural values which are
different from the values of white society.
Her frank account of the mating habits of the
village dogs is outrageous. It makes kennel
breeding look prissy.
DREAMSPEAKER ... a frightened, angry boy finds refuge with Indian spirit world.
stinking, twin-headed serpent. It's not just in
your mind. It's real.
"Fear has many faces," said Cameron,
"and for Peter it all focused around slithery
things, things he couldn't grab hold of,
things that slipped out of his grasp the way
life had eluded him.
"I believe in Sisiutl. I've seen him. Only
when I saw him he was a 'her.' I believe in
Tsonqua: her scream is so horrendous you'd
have to be a simpleton to not be afraid, but if
you can hear that scream, feel fear and still
believe, she will bless you the way Sisiutl
does.
"I have known the Earth Witch, I spent
years seeking her and it wasn't until I found
her that I found a special peace and self-
acceptance that has made life wonderful ever
since."
Death figures strongly in both book and
program. But the book does say that death is
not final. At the end of the show the suicides
give it a feeling of absolute finality. The
book goes on to reunite them in a spiritual
world. This gives the book an almost
triumphant ending.
Television requires that characters actions
be judged by what we consider their motives
to be. We add the veneer of our culture to
theirs. In this way we eviscerate Indian
culture.
Cameron makes clear the character's
motives in Indian terms in the story.
"I continued with the novella because I
can explore things in prose that I can't explore in film," she said.
"The internalization is possible in prose
Cameron gives us a glimpse into the
spiritual world once more. Old Woman
Knows. She has a gift of sight into matters
which are hidden from the rest of us.
She says that a village woman who has has
had several miscarriages must not go to prenatal care. The Indian women realize that
pre-natal care is worthwhile. They also know
about Old Woman. The baby is born and
lives.
How does Cameron know so much about
Indians? "They live all over this big rock and
have been my friends, neighbors and
'adopted' family for most of my life," she
said.
"I don't think you 'get' insight. It 'gets'
you. You suddenly feel things behind your
eyes and between your ears and they link in
with your belly button and you 'know.'
"The Nootka people at Ahousat have been
very kind, very helpful and very loving to me
and have shared greatly, giving of their time,
their hospitality and their past. I feel totally
at home there; I feel part of them."
Cameron covers a lot of ground in Dreamspeaker and Tern Eyos Ki and the Land
Claims Question. She opens the door to
a distant culture and leads us into peoples'
minds.
Once inside we discover how limited our
own horizons are, how restraining and
engrained our own prejudices have become.
So much so in fact that we no longer
recognize them as such. We accept them as
the norm. Sometimes we need someone to
shake us up. B. A. Cameron is a shaking type
of person.
Friday, January 19, 1979
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 3 •BRASS TARGET*
FAMOUS
PLAYERS
theatres
Evenings 7:15, 9:10
Warning: some violence
-B.C. DIRECTOR
PARH ROYAL
UVER
MOVIE LISTINGS ON THIS PAGE ARE
EFFECTIVE JANUARY 19-25
Evenings: 7:00, 9:30
Mats. Sat. Sun. 2:00
Warning: some
violence —B.C.
Director
WINNER OF SIX CANADIAN FILM
AWARDS FOR 1978'
 CAPITOL 6,
820 GRANVILLE MALL
 COLUMBIA	
NEW WESTMINSTER 521 0830
■ RICHMOND SQUARE-
BER THREE ROAD 273 4474
STANLEY	
GRANVILLE at 12th 733 2622
Cap: 1:30, 4:15, 7:05, 10:00
Richmond Sq: 7:00. 9:30. Mats. Sat. Sun, 2:00
Guildford: 7:00, 9:40. Mats. Sat. Sun. 2:00
Cap: 3:15, 5:15, 7:15, 9:30
Paramount: 7:00, 9:00
Richmond Sq: 7:10, 9:00
Warning:   some  gory  violence  and
nudity  -   B.C. DIRECTOR
Franco Brusati's
Warning: occasional nudity; some coarse language
B.C. DIRECTOR
English subtitles
Cltt^MM
 DENMAN PLACE..
1737 COMOX 683 4647
Evenings 7:30, 9:30
 CAPITOL 6 __
B20 GRANVILLE MALL 669 6000
 GUILDFORD	
GUILFORD TOWN CENTRE 5811716
-RICHMOND SQUARE.
NUMBER THREE ROAD 273 4474
Cap: 2:00. 4:00, 6:00, 8:00, 10:00
Guildford: 7:15, 9:15. Mats. Sat. Sun. 2:15
CMPSIES
 CAPITOL 6 _
820 GRANVILLE MALL 669 6000
Warning:  some  violence,   with  coarse  language
throughout - B.C. DIRECTOR
_ GUILDFORD	
GUILFORD TOWN CENTRE 5811716
C^Ept*
Evenings 7:00, 9:30.
Mat. Sat. only 2:00
_dQfl™ CHRISTIE'S —
DEflTHflttMLE
3:00, 5:00, 7:00, 9:00
PARK ROYAL
 CAPITOL 6 _
B20 GRANVILLE MALL 669 6000
Warning: Nudity and sex -B.C. DIRECTOR
C^app
Warniny: occasional nudity     B.C. director
7:30, 9:30. Matinee Sal. only 2:00
 FINE ARTS —
1117 WEST GEORGIA 685 7821
Gum        'iVEiir
Eastwood WNich
Downtown: 1:35, 3:35, 5:35, 7:40, 9:45
Lougheed Mall: 7:15, 9:30. Mats. Sat. Sun. 2:00
Sut Loose*
DOWNTOWN
Warning: frequent coarse language; occasional nudity
- B.C. DIRECTOR
LOUGHEED MALL
J.R.R. tolkien's
feRd&l^i
Cap: 1:45, 3:45, 5:45. 7:45, 9:50
Columbia: 7:30, 9:30. Mats. Sat.
Sun. 2:00
Invasion of the
Boct> Snatt*iers
The seed is planted...terror grows.
2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30
WARNING: May frighten some children
- B.C. DIRECTOR
— CAPITOL 6_
820 GRANVILLE MALL 669 6000
-VANCOUVER CENTRE^
GRANVILLE4GEORGIA 6694442
Warning: some frightening scenes
-B.C. DIRECTOR
 COLUMBIA	
NEW WESTMINSTER 521 0830
No 7:15 show at Capitol 6
Friday only
Capitol. 2:45, 5:00, 7:15, 9:30
Loutjheed Mall: 7:00, 9:15
CAPITOL 6
LOUGHEED MALL
ROBERT SHAW HARRISON FORD
FORCE TEN
FROM
NAYARONE
Warning: some violence and coarse language
B.C. DIRECTOR
7:00, 9:00. Mats. Sat., Sun. 2:00
WOODY     DIANE        TONY
ALLEN    KEATON    ROBERTS
"ANNIE HALL'
 COLUMBIA
NEW WESTMINSTER
GLENDA JACKSON and OLIVER REED,
Van   Centre: 2:00, 4:00, 6:00, 8:00, 10:00
Lougheed Mall. 7:40. 9:45   Mats. Sat., Sun. 2:00
Warning: frequent coarse language: suggestive scenes
and dialogue    B.C. DIRECTOR
lUifGodP,/flW**
...isitfunny!
ADMISSION $3.00
CIRC
.VANCOUVER CENTRE.
GRANVILLE t GEORGIA 6694
w^iss<f
Goodbye Girl 7:30, Oh God 9:25
Warning:   some   coarse   lan-
guage-B.C. DIRECTOR
LOUGHEED MALL
*m$m>
 THE BAY	
DENMAN at BARCLAY 685 9822
Free parking for Bay Theatre patrons at the
C immunity Centre Lot, 1799 block Haro.
SPECIAL MATINEES SATURDAY AMD SUNDAY ONLY
Park Royal, Paramount, Lougheed Mall: 2:00 p.m.
Richmond Square: 2:15 p.m.
^fffflft
PARh ROYAL        J|^       PARAMOUNT.
'UVER 922 91741 NEW WESTMINSTER
LOUGHEED MALL —1|L- RICHMOND SQUARE
■ BURNABY 917 liiAilNUMBER THREE ROAD 273
COMING
SOON
WALT
DISNEYS
STANLEY^—
I GRANVILLE at 12td 733 2622
Owalt Disney Productions
NOW in STEREOPHONIC SOUND
Page Friday, 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, January  19,  1979 1 film/classical music j
Autumn turns violent
By LARRY GREEN
Autumn Sonata, Ingmar
Bergman's newest film, is one
destined to be paid homage to as a
revealing, riveting experience by his
avid followers.
The film is not a comfortable one
to accept and it starts with an atmosphere of warmth that is shattered almost with violence. But
Autumn Sonata shows at its best
Bergman's talent for the ensemble
acting and character analysis that
form the base of his "modernistic
period" films.
Autumn Sonata
A film by Ingmar Bergman
Starring Ingrid Bergman and Liv
Ullman
At the Varsity: Subtitles
The visit of Charlotte, Ingrid
Bergman, looking tall and
beautiful, a famous pianist whose
lover has just died, to Eva, her
plain, middle-aged, parson's wife
daughter (Liv Ullman) whom she
hasn't seen for seven years, starts
pleasantly enough — the kisses, the
tears, the chatter. Early on
Bergman reveals the undershadings
of each character as they interact
with each other and tension sets in.
Finally they confront each other
with their past feelings and Eva
reveals her hate for Charlotte having destroyed her youth with her
egoism. Charlotte leaves suddenly
as she did thoughout Eva's
childhood, both of them regretting
their encounter and their lives.
The structure is similar to
Bergman's Persona (1966), a shortish black-and-white mystery that
introduced Ullman in Bergman's
work. Persona was filled with illusions and searing pain and allegory
as though the audience's conventions about film-making were
meant to be destroyed as they watched.
But the central story within this
fascinating canvas concerned a
psychiatric nurse (Bibi Andersson)
who confronts her charge, an actress who will not speak (Ullman).
Other than the fantasied absorption
of Alma the nurse and Elizabeth the
actress  into  one  woman,  all  the
other elements of Autumn Sonata
are there.
There is the unwanted
motherhood of the glamorous
woman and the loss of the dowdy
woman's own child. The first appears to be the stronger personality
while it is the second who finds the
strength to reveal herself, the confrontation of Alma/Eva against
Elizabeth/Charlotte, the importance of a letter in relating to the
audience undercurrents of emotions, the disillusioned departure
and retreat, child deformity and
guilt.
With Autumn Sonata, Bergman
discards the gloom of his "dark
period" and the nagging doubts of
the meaning of life and art in Persona in order to concentrate wholly
on two women characters in their
own environment. He achieves this
with an almost violent intensity
which replaces the metaphysical
misery of Persona with a deep well
of emotions.
Sven Nykvist's usual incomparable camera work gives the film
his own special look and Ingrid
Bergman and Liv Ullman rise to the
director's intentions with almost
painful accuracy. Their interaction,
let alone their confontation is the
reason for this film and they meet
the demands with their own matching talents. Lena Nyman, as
Charlotte's spastic, forgotten
daughter, is hard to forget.
Most of the critics' attention and
awards have been focusing on Ingrid Bergman. She has already won
the New York Film Critics award
and with her director, the National
Board of Review Award which was
also voted to Autumn Sonata as
best foreign film.
Reviewers seem to have endowed
her here with a star-like blaze that
she doesn't project and would be
out of character if she did. Yet it
would be disastrous to assume that
Liv Ullman plays any other role
than that of the emotional core of
the film.
Ullman plays Eva the plain wife
as a whole person without making
her look frumpily undignified or
ridiculous. She doesn't lood as bad
as the critics have been saying ex
cept in one early, extraordinary
scene at the piano (just as last year
Sophia Loren didn't look as sexily
marvellous in A Special Day as they
implied) and in every way she
stands beside Ingrid Bergman's performance.
There are faults. Ullman's husband, Halvar Bjork, never emerges
past being a loving, blank presence,
seeking as he lacks a real role. He
narrates at the beginning and again
near the end which doesn't really
work and when he finally says what
he thinks to his mother-in-law it is
not very helpful to the film.
Ullman's and the director's
daughter Linn Ullman plays the
child Eva in flashback, and we are
constantly told how unhappy she
was. Yet in this non-speaking role
we see a ravishingly pretty and neat
little girl who shows no sign of the
depression or anxiety that usually
affect one's appearance. There are
many of these nodding roles — too
many and they are almost all men
who do not speak.
Autumn Sonata is fascinating to
watch and disconcerting to
remember. Somehow it isn't a great
classic. It's too heavily weighted on
INGRID BERGMAN AND LIV ULLMAN
lives of nightmarish guilt to be
representative of human conditions
the way, Sunday Bloody Sunday
(1971) is with its sexual triangle.
While some people may consider
this to be a major drawback, others
in nightmarish guilt.
will consider this scathing rawness
to be a classic treatment. Basically,
Autumn Sonata is on a level of its
own and as vintage Bergman it stays
in the mind for a long time. It is an
unforgettable work.
Witless Superman wastes mind
VSO brings new cheer
By ROBERT JORDAN
Nineteen seventy-nine came in
with a roar at the first Main Series
concert of the year by the Vancouver Symphony. Akiyama conducted.
The concert opener was the world
premiere of Philip Lui's Dis. "Dis-
what?" one might ask. "Disappointing?" "Dis-cordant?"
"Dis-eased?"
Actually, Dis was all of these.
Written in North American
Academic Dissonant style, the piece
joins countless others written in this
tortuously obnoxious manner
which are premiered each year but
mercifully never to be heard from
again.
Two "restless" movements alternated with a central "gentle" one.
The final movement writhed, twitched and jerked seemingly interminably until the ganglia finally ran
down and the hideous reptilian
thing was still.
The apparent enthusiasm with
which the orchestra, supplemented
by a battalion of percussion, attacked the work was about the only
praiseworthy element in the entire
production.
After Dis, Beethoven's Piano
Concerto No. 1 had never sounded
so beautiful. This sense of beauty
was in no small way aided by guest
pianist Emanuel Ax's gently and exquisitely phrased playing.
This concerto is still essentially
fledgling Beethoven. Aspects of his
later volatile dynamicism are present embryonically, but the piece
still demonstrates a preponderence
of classical esprit. It was this
classical spirit which Ax chose to
emphasize last Monday.
His control in pianissimo
passages was a marvel to behold.
Every note was sparkling clear and
even and beautifully controlled.
Phrase nuance and shading could
have been termed state of the art.
Yet lyricism and robust expression
were not sacrificed when musically
required.
It was a lovely performance. The
aura of Ax's wonderful control and
sensitivity spread to the orchestra
reduced in size which did its level
best to match and mould itself to
his delicately shaded interpretation.
Khachaturian's seldom-heard
Symphony No. 2 was to have closed
the programme. Apparently the orchestral parts were virtually illegible
so with predictable lack of ingenuity, "those who do the choosing at the VSO" chose
Rachmaninoff's often-heard Symphony No. 2 instead.
Why not one of many equally
deserving yet less frequently played
symphonies? Rachmanioff's first,
Martinu's fourth or Sibelius'
seventh to name only three?
Judged   on   its   own   terms,
Rachmanioff's Symphony No. 2 is
undeniably rather large and
overstated at times. But the bombast is sonorous not brutal and who
with even a milligram of sentiment
in his or her soul could not respond
to his sumptuous melodies?
The symphony is nothing if not
performed largely heart-on-sleeve.
The VSO strings sawed their hearts
out. The brass filled the Orpheum
with resplendent sound. All perfectly to order according to the nature
of the piece.
Akiyama's interpretation was
well conceived, not shirking his particular specialty (bombast) one iota,
but also allowing the yearning
melancholy of the soaring melodic
lines to sing its message
uninhibited. The symphony ended
in a gloriously trimphant swirl of
sound, the final notes punched out
with emphatic vehemance.
Save for the aural aberrations of
Dis, this concert was, for the most
part, quite an enjoyable one.
Despite the grumblings over the
choice of the substitute for the
Khachaturian, the Rachmnanioff
was well performed indeed.
Will Vancouver ears ever be
assailed by the undeniable, if less
familiar, bombast of
Khachaturian's second symphony?
Not at the next concert anyway, so
you can leave your ear plugs at
home for that one.
By VERNE McDONALD
Superman is marvelous entertainment to take the kiddies to,
unless you have qualms about
exposing them to racism, sexism
and leering bad taste.
Never has so much money been
wasted on minds so small. The
result is a movie that shows off the
spectacular results of a spectacular
$38 million budget, but displays not
a groatsworth of wit.
Superman
Directed by Richard Donner
At the Capitol 6,
Guildford,    Richmond   Square
The story, makes no attempt
to improve on the thin plots of the
comic books and even manages to
devolve a little to a level of theme
and characterization below theirs.
The cold, singleminded genius
Lex Luthor of the original DC four-
colors becomes a vain, pompous
clown, Gene Hackman living under
a sewer with an idiot and a
voluptuous floozy, Valerie Perrine.
Lois Lane is played by Margot
Kidder and transformed from an
inquisitive, adventurous reporter
into a batty, brainless version of
Diane Keaton's New York girl.
Christopher Reeve in the title role
is just as one-dimensionally square
as the original and has probably
condemned himself to an entire
career as the wooden boy scout in
blue underwear.
Only Marlon Brando, much
spoken of for his $3.4 million for
some two weeks work, escapes with
some dignity as he is the only
member of the cast to play his part
in a relatively straight way.
Brando as Superman's father
Jor-El, and director Richard
Donners with his generous
borrowings from Stanley Kubrick,
set a tone suitable for a good
science-fiction movie, a 2001 or at
least a Star Wars.
But as soon as Kal-El reaches
earth to begin the real action, the
movie dribbles into banal cliches
and self-conscious slapstick. There
are the one liners: A thug on a
getaway boat gives Superman a
futile whack with a crowbar and
Superman quips "Bad vibrations?"
Then there are minority groups.
You have to look fast for them, but
several times when Superman takes
off there's a black pointing
skyward, stupified, shouting
"Wow," or something even more
ethnic. There is also an inarticulate
Indian chief profiting from Lex
Luthor's evil schemes.
There is poetry. Lois Lane as she
flies with Superman around the
statue of Liberty, says passionately
to herself,' 'You can fly, right up to
the sky. . ."
In most other scenes she drools
over Superman's tightly-clothed
body and asks such piercing
questions as "How big ... I mean
how tall are you?"
Lois Lane's incipient neo-
nymphomania is only one example
of the implicit sexism of the movie
Superman. She has been reduced
from a hardheaded woman to a
klutzy reporter who can't spell
"rapist" and by the end of the
movie she is a helpless doll, buried
alive in more ways than one.
Such is Superman's self-
professed allegiance to "the
American Way." His final
statement at the end of the film is
spoken to a prison warden. "Don't
thank me, warden. We're all on the
same team."
The end result of all this is
hilarity is that much of it is
unintentional and the superb
special effects are finally the only
interesting thing about this silly,
trivial movie.
The opening credits with their
laser projections qualify for my
nomination for the Academy
Award for film titles. Unfortunately, in many ways they are
the high point of a cheap comedy.
Friday, January 19,  1979
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 5 ^poetry/theatre J
Beckett begs questions
By GREGORY STRONG
Stanley Weese's production
Three by Samuel Beckett at the
Freddie Wood Theatre is a textbook
theatrical event. There are no surprises but the play is an evening of
good solid work.
At the Friday night premiere
there was a faint hint of perfume as
the women arrived first in elaborate
coats and the men later in their
good jackets. The director himself
sat with his confederates in seats in
the left aisle.
"Three by Samuel Beckett"
Directed by Stanley Weese
A t the Frddie Wood Theatre
Tonight and tomorrow night
of trousers and coat who's tracked
his entire life onto a series of tapes.
Now in his sixty-ninth year, before
he makes the final tape of his life,
he listens to one that he made thirty
years earlier and finds he can't
understand it.
In a sense the play is about leaving tracks, Krapp's name is an obvious scatological note and the idea
of a last tape refers to what is left,
what remains, in Krapp's case only
the pessimism and cynicism of old
age.
Krapp's Last Tape is an exploration of the effects of memory and
time on identity. There's a terrific
contrast between the doddering old
Krapp on stage and the confident
MATTHEW WALKER ■
—guy palmer
Krapp hoards memories on spools of tape.
Some people go to theatre to
wear new clothes and to see light
entertainment. But Samuel Beckett
is one of the most difficult 20th century playwrights. By the end of the
evening, these people had either left
or were complaining that Beckett
bored them.
Three by Samuel Beckett,
Krapp's Last Tape, Breath and Not
1 is like the playing of some weird,
terribly personal dream. Beckett's
work runs completely counter the
popular notion of self-discovery.
"You can't discover yourself,
forget it." is the implicit message.
"Being," asks Krapp, "remain
ing.'
The   words   have   become
bankrupt because there can be no
meaningful concepts or even questions stuck in time and space as we
are, the void Becket describes, so
vast and indifferent that even personal identity is a dubious proposition.
Krapp is a slightly comit. .gure.
He's a failed artist who sold seventeen copies of a single novel. He's a
balding old man in a badly cut suit
voice of the younger Krapp on tape.
Beckett once wrote that
"memory was the great washingline
of the mind." As in Krapp's Last
Tape, images from the past, our
memories, have no more legitimacy
than our daydreams because as we
age, we continually re-interpret our
memories. The old Krapp cannot
understand his earlier selves and
thus his entire being is called into
question.
The Stanley Weese production
broke no ground in Three by
Samuel Beckett, but the direction
was accurate and simple. Matthew
Walker was also a particularly good
choice for Krapp. His British accent
a sense of locale to the play and added to the personality of the
character.
Walker is a fine character actor
and he has done a great deal of
good work for the Freddie Wood
over the years. He knows how to
play an audience as well as use
Beckett's sight gags, and pratfalls
yet he didn't lose the poignancy of
Krapp's situation.
Despite the weight of his
philosophical themes Beckett can be
a master comedian. A great admirer
of Charlie Chaplin and Buster
Keaton, early in the play he has
Krapp slipping on a banana peel
and uncorking a bottle and drinking
it offstage.
The amazing thing about Beckett
is that he takes the most difficult
and abstract concepts and communicates them in a dramatic form.
The issues are still the old cosmic
ones of man's fate in and place in
the universe and Beckett would
want nothing more than the complete eradication of the self.
And at one of the most moving
points in the drama, Krapp almost
achieves a mystical harmony with
the world, in a complete spiritual
and sensual union as the tape recalls
a lost sexual experience where
Krapp lay with a woman in a boat.
"/ lay down across her with my
face in her breasts and my head on
her. We lay there without moving.
But all around us moved, and moved us gently, up and down and from
side to side."
PAUSE. Krapp's lips move. No
sound.
"Past midnight. Never knew
such silence. The earth might be
uninhabited."
Director Weese chose to present
the three Beckett pieces on the same
evening worked well as complemen-
taries although some audience
members at the premiere didn't enjoy their evening.
The other two pieces in the program, Breath and Not I were also
well done. Breath, is a theatrical
surprise where a curtain is slowly
raised then dropped on a stage full
of rubbish while the audience hears
heavy breathing and Not I where
only a woman's red lips are shown
on a black stage near a hooded
figure.
Not I is probably the most difficult to understand or even appreciate because it is one of
Beckett's later pieces and his style
has become increasingly
economical. The woman's mouth
isolated under the beam of white
light from which it can't escape is a
shocking and obscene image.
It's a mind from body split and
typical of Beckett where the outside
world, the beam of light is continually intruding on an individual's
isolation. Beckett sees the mind as a
sanctuary from the world rather
than an instrument to be used in it.
Student Lesley Wade as the
mouth had the difficult task of
communicating a high speed
monologue in an Irish dialect to an
audience which was largely confused. But the voice had a strange
fascination and the lips peering out
of the white hole were strangely
compelling.
Beyond the darkness is Beckett
himself pointing beyond the world
we see, to other mental experiences
like a series of Chinese boxes, one
inside the other. He offers no
spiritual comfort to an audience
only the withered olive branch of
his resignation to life.
Kurosawa films are from a different world
From PF3
Dodes'ka-den was released five
years after Red Beard, a considerable length of time between
films for Kurosawa. The 1970 film
explored the fascinating but casual
relationships between poor people
trapped in the Tokyo shanty-town.
It lacks the power and chohesive
force for which Kurosawa had
become known. It has not received
much attention even as a work by
Kurosawa.
Kurosawa's   latest   film,   Dersu
Uzala, while not part of Cinema 16,
will be shown at SUB in late spring.
In Dersu Uzala Kurosawa again
returns to epic proportions. Dersu
is a man of nature. He finds a
kindred spirit in the explorer-surveyor Arseniev.
Unfortunately each comes from a
different world. For Dersu it is his
world which is retreating before the
crush of civilization which will wipe
him off the face of the earth. Even
friendship cannot cross the gulf of
time.
Although plot takes second place
to characterization, Kurosawa
brings all his talents to bear as an
artist in the use of color. The
breathtaking beauty of the seasons
provides a solid yet changing background which highlights the
transitory nature of friendship.
Kurosawa looks at people and
admires them while admitting their
faults. Yet he tempers both judgment and film with compassion and
perspective.
Hidden Secrets
I asked an old man
what secrets must I look for
He said
If you climb the mountain
and feel
rain and wind and sun
when you return a man
awaits you with a gun
that you will see
is no secret.
—Simon S. Danes
The Street
On the street
you can see the pigeons
cruising and squabbling for crumbs
on the clean lean mornings
when the children are herded again
into the chalk dust corral
of their teacher's mind
a handful of flowers
plucked from the weary street
smelling of poverty and yesterdays
and the beer from cheap hotels.
See the boys there
out of work and out of touch
leaning against the walls
of some building already condemned
they are the same
and already know it
but they strut their muscles
peacocking the afternoon
with the smile of the doomed
and the grin of the ignorant
dreaming of t.v. women
or an easy lay
selling what they have
for a beer or two
look out for the street, kid
it killed your daddy too.
—Simon S. Danes
One Death
I dare not live too long.
Dead men trek
The streets,
Their steps
Forcing me to feel
my dead life
And theirs.
—Simon S. Danes
ARTS
BEARGARDEN
Friday, January 19th
FREE BEARS
GREAT MUSIC
4:00 - 8:00
Buchanan Lounge
Page Friday, 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 19,  1979 Electrical experience
turns on local crowd
By PETER MENYASZ
The only disappointing thing
about Randy Hansen's concert last
Friday night at the Gardens was the
audience, or lack of it.
A small crowd of only about
1,000 yelled themselves hoarse
demanding encores of the man proclaimed as the reincarnation of Jimi
Hendrix.
Reincarnation or not, Randy
Hansen was impressive.
Judging from the looks of the
crowd, the average age must have
been about 17 years. It would be
unlikely to expect most of them to
remember much of Jimi Hendrix's
music, much less the man himself.
That didn't seem to make much difference, though.
For those of us that remember
Jimi,   Hansen's   performance  was
ing to beat the guitar to death with
its strap, just as Hendrix did.
The only thing missing was setting it on fire.
The acrobatics were present, too.
From simple gymnastics like jumping onto the monitors to play to
more difficult maneuvers like
backward somersaults while playing
a guitar solo.
Hansen emulated Hendrix's passion for getting close to his audience, rushing off the stage and
prancing through the crowd. He
even made a detour on one such excursion up into the stands,
serenading eager fans with an extended riff.
All of Jimi's best-loved standards
were part of the show: Manic
Depression, the Star Spangled Banner, Are You Experienced,
yigiap^ andmore-
—peter menyasz photo
HANSEN . . . electrifying guitar experience.
like reliving a 10-year-old memory.
For those that don't remember, it
must have seemed like an
unbelievable concert.
All of the old Hendrix tricks were
there, of course. That's what you'd
expect from an impersonator.
Hansen played his guitar behind his
back, over his head, with his teeth
and ended his performance by try-
What is significant is that the
songs were almost perfect down to
individual notes. Perhaps the audience wouldn't have noticed that,
unless they studied up on Hendrix
before the concert.
Certainly those of us that grew up
listening to Jimi's music had to be
impressed by the precision of the
impersonation.
Okay, so maybe all of the facets
of the performance mentioned so
far are a matter of practice and it
could be argued that any mildly
talented impersonator could do a
reasonably realistic job.
What makes Randy Hansen different is the energy that he puts into
his show. It was Jimi Hendrix's
energy that was the magical attraction behind his music. There were a
lot of great musicians in Hendrix's
time, but few/ that threw so much of
themselves into their music.
The crowd was wild on Friday
night, and it was Hansen's hard
work and musical ability that drove
them to a frenzy.
After the concert, back in his
hotel room, Randy Hansen seems a
little more relaxed. No matter that
he's not black, no matter that the
Afro wig has been put aside, the
aura of Hendrix still surrounds
Randy Hansen.
Perhaps the publicity wasn't
enough to draw a big crowd to the
concert at the Gardens. Perhaps opposing a concert by Devo at the
Commodore was the cause of the
poor showing for Randy Hansen.
No matter. Those that saw the concert certainly received their money's
worth.
There is a po ay that Randy
Hansen will return to do i ;ofr:.;r
concert in Vancouver in ..ie near
future. It can only be hoped that
Jimi Hendrix fans and rock music
lovers will make a greater effort to
watch Hansen's incredible act.
Devo asks musical question:
Are We Not Men?
By MURRAY HELMER
Devo is a five man team of
loonies from Akron, Ohio who
have made it their responsibility to
spread the theory of de-evolution
through music. De-evolution is the
breakdown of society, or as the
group so aptly puts it, man's reversion to pinhead. As crazy as it
sounds, this wacky concept attracted two sellout audiences to the
Commodore last week to witness
the latest phenomena in rock music,
the group Devo.
With their ludicrous ideas in
mind, I walked into the Commodore Friday night with a review
already written in my head. I had
planned to use several derogatory
phrases en route to lambasting a
group whose only drawing point is
kindled by absurdity. Unfortunately, I find writing this review much
more difficult a task than I anticipated. Devo was good.
Devo is not just another punk act
cashing in on a craze. They are a
highly stylized act whose innovations to rock music are centered
around a combination of science
fiction and fantasy. It has been
termed industrial rock but the bottom line still spells entertainment.
A Devo concert is a major production, complete with costume
change. Granted, ripping off yellow
chemical-retardant suits to expose
orange shorts, elbow pads, and a
hockey helmet isn't your average
costume change, but Devo isn't
your average rock group.
Early in the show, lead singer and
keyboardist Mark Mothersbaugh
literally got to know his audience by
diving headlong into the crowd.
Then calmly he climbed back
onstage  and  continued  his  song.
Likewise, guitarist Bob Casale paid
his own visit when he leapt from the
stage onto a nearby table amidst the
bewildered fans, all the while
strumming away.
The show was fast paced but
short. Mark Mothersbaugh runs a
tight ship on stage, allowing
minimal time between songs. He
leads the group through their
choreographed movements, hopping, spinning and strutting his way
through such Devo standards as
Uncontrollable Urge, Sloppy, and
the Devo anthem, Jocko Homo.
Comprising the rest of the band
are Jerry Casale on bass, Bob
Mothersbaugh on guitar, and Allen
Myers on drums. All members are
the product of Kent State's art
faculty where three films were produced by Devo Inc. Even in their
formative years these men were
nuts. One film spawned the
character Booji Boy, a masochist
who gains pleasure from sticking
forks into electric toasters.
Booji Boy made his first Vancouver appearance during the third
encore, featuring a song from the
forthcoming Wiggly World album,
the group's second. He sings in a
high falsetto and displays childlike
qualities, far removed from the normal antics of the man under the
plastic mask, Mark Mothersbaugh.
Devo is a group of individuals
whose wide range of talent enables
them to blend their music with their
message. At the same time, Devo
makes music that everyone can
relate to. Intellectuals are satisfied
by lyrics with familiar themes and
inspiration. Musicians realize that
all elements of instrumentation are
adeptly fulfilled. As for me, I'm
just content to sit back and be
entertained.
murray helmer photos
DEVO . . . de-evolution from rock history in Akron, Ohio.
Friday, January 19, 1979
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday. 7 Icountry rock[
Tanya teases and pleases
By DOUG TODD
She has a powerful, melodious
voice and a natural sensuality, so
it's too bad that Tanya Tucker's
producers make her put the microphone cord through her legs and
end each song with a Penthouse
pose because that's when she starts
looking uncomfortable.
Tanya "Miss TNT" Tucker's
overflow show last Saturday at the
Commodore was part of the
phenomenally popular new country
rock sound being put out by people
like Linda Ronstadt and Waylon
Jennings.
The bouffant wig of the old
country look is gone and the
southern twang is going. With
Tanya Tucker it's been replaced by
a skin-tight costume and a band
that's as good at playing the driving
rock of Not Fade Away as it is
MUSSOC PRESENTS
/jNTTHIlim
JAN. 31-FEB. 10
Preview Jan. 30
8:30 p.m.
OLD AUDITORIUM
TICKETS: Concert Box Offices,
Outlets & AMS Business Office
STUDENTS: $2.00 Tues. Thurs.
playing the easier country beat of
What's Your Momma's Name?
Tanya Tucker is only 20 years old
but she has had a long career that
goes back to age 14 when she made
a hit out of Delta Dawn.
Unfortunately, overzealous
producers got in early on this
growing talent and have attempted
to make her into a symbol of hard
sex. Her posters show her in black
leather and erotic poses looking like
a motorcycle queen.
On stage when she sings a rocker,
the image almost works, but not
enough to make you overlook that
she is not spontaneous enough to
make the image believable. Only
when she came back for the encore,
did she really seem to relax, move
freely, and enjoy herself, and then
she was without the stylized poses.
Singing her old country songs she
had a natural bittersweet warmth
that seemed more authentic for her.
She made known that it was
because of these songs that she was
up on stage and one could see her
uniqueness coming through them.
To her credit, the soft country
image was sometimes effectively
combined with the harder rock one,
when lines like "If my lips were
dry, would you wet them dear?"
were combined with "If my needs
were strong, would you lay with
me?" But, over-all, the switch from
country to Chuck Berry rock was
too   manipulated   and   unnatural.
The heavy  hand  of her  MCA
producer was at work throughout.
It was a Texas oversell in the final
set-piece when Tanya sang her
tribute to Texas (it's the closest
place she's been to heaven) and the
band and the backstage crew
started waving Texan flags and
passing them out to the audience.
But her band is skilled, and
played Heartbreak Hotel and most
other songs with precision and
power. Tanya's clean, strong voice
was impressive on many pieces and
male backup vocalists added a
novel touch to the show. The
boisterous audience didn't fail to
show its approval.
The long, two-hour wait for her
show in order that it could be taped
live by CFOX radio was relieved
only by a courageous New York
comedian who made jokes about
"steel belted radial condoms for
real traction on wet surfaces" and
then ventured into a series of drug
and hemorrhoid jokes.
Art Carney, in town to make a
film, sauntered onto the stage for
fun to plunk out Misty and other
tunes on the piano, but most of the
audience hardly , noticed as he
played without a word, stopping
only to smell his armpits.
But the crowd wanted Tanya,
and they wanted a hard country
sound to stomp to. So they got an
up tempo, slick show and a slightly
uncomfortable young woman
whose   producers   are   trying   to
TUCKER . . . pretty package packs a powerful punch.
portray  her  as  a   lusty   and   experienced seductress.
If Tanya Tucker had been able to
develop her personality and her
show on her own, the crowd might
have   heard   a   more   creative   in
tegration of country and rock. They
might have seen a more confident
performer — a performer who
knows who she is. But judging by
the applause, the crowd got what it
wanted.
RED LEAF
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685-4735
Page Friday, 8
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, January  19,  1979 \ vista I
By MARY-ANN BRUNORO
World Citizenship and the 1979
Year of the Child is the theme
chosen for the art contest to be held
in Robson Square, August, 1979.
Three cash prizes of $200 each will
be awarded to the best entries. Since
imagination will count more than
art skill, visual images of all kinds,
whatever their medium, form, or
size, as long as they are appropriate
to the theme, will be accepted. The
contest is open to everyone and the
deadline for entries is May 31, 1979.
For further information, contact
WC-79-1YC, 3765 W. 3rd Ave.,
Vancouver.
A Terrible Beauty: The Art of
Canada at War is being exhibited at
the Burnaby Art Gallery, 6344
Gilpin St., until Feb. 11. Featured
are a large number of paintings and
drawings from the Canadian War
Art Collection, works of artists who
were and who have become important figures in the development of
Canadian art. This is the first major
presentation of the collection since
1946 and its only B.C. exhibition.
Admission is free.
After having greatly researched
the subject, the Touchstone Theatre
Company is ready to present Hot
Rods and Heavy Water, a collective
work about the nuclear power question. Original music has been composed for this new work which
features interchanges between reality and fantasy, dream and
nightmare. It opens tonight at the
Robson Square Theatre, corner of
Robson and Hornby, with performances Tues.-Sun., 8:30 p.m. until
Feb. 4. Admission: $3.50-$4.0O.
Wed.-pay what you can.
Vancouver's newest theatre company, The Theatre of Simplicity,
makes its debut this weekend with a
double-bill of one-act plays, The
Stronger by August Strindberg and
Sweet Eros by Patrick McNally, at
the Upstairs Underground Theatre,
11 W. 2nd Ave. Tues.-Sun., 8:30
p.m., until Jan. 28. Admission: $4.
Ernest Hills, presented by the
Vancouver Guitar Society, will
give, Sun., Jan. 21, at the Kitsilano
Lutheran Church, 2715 W. 12th
Ave., a Renaissance and Baroque
Lute Recital. Admission: $3; time:
8 p.m.
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It was the Deltas
against the rules...
the rules lost!
NATI«NAV
LAMPMN
s
ANIMAL U*U*V
A comedy from Universal Pictures
Warning: Occasional nudity, suggestive
scenes, coarse language throughout. —B.C.
Dir.
Show Times: 2:05 4:05 6:05 8:05 10:05 daily
CORONET 2
851   GRANVILLE    685-6828
NEIL SIMON'S
Show Times:
12:55 2:40 4:30 6:15 8:05 10:00
Sunday:
2:40 4:30 6:15 8:05 10:00
odeoN
s.arring ALAN ALDA-MICHAEL CAINE 881 GRANVIUE
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THE GIRLS OF
Hladame Claude
CORONET 1
Show Times: 12:55 2:40 4:30 6:20 8:15 10:10
Sunday: 2:40 4:30 6:20 8:15 10:10	
'Warning: Frequent nudity, some sex." gsi GRANVILLE
— B.C. Dir. 685-6828
'Halloween' is a horror masterpiece .
-Richard Corliss. New Times
HALLOWEEN
Show Times:
7:30 9:30
DROAdwAV 21
Starring Donald Pleasance
Warning: Some frightening scenes. ?0 7 w. BROADWAYI
-B.C. Dir. 874-1927        ■
Show Times:
7:20 9:30
Warning: Frequent violence, coarse
language. —B.C. Dir.
DARK
CAMBIE at 18th
I m*^m* a
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oonata
-INGMAR
"BERGMAN
-INGRID
BERGMAN
Show Times: 7:30 9:30
In English
with fry
ULLMANNl
VARSITy
224-3730
4375  W. 10th
Friday, January 19,  1979
THE       UBYSSEY
Page Friday, S mFtE
388 UMMAGUMMA—PINK FLOYD | 2-LP-SET |   	
517 FIRST GLANCE—APRIL WINE	
835 TEN YEARS OF GOLD—KENNY ROGERS	
840 CITY TO CITY—GERRY RAFFERTY	
858 WHEN I DREAM—CRYSTAL GAYLE	
879 WHATEVER HAPPENED TO BENNY SANTIMI—CHRIS REA	
903 LOVE OR SOMETHING LIKE IT—KENNY ROGERS	
904 YOUNGBLOOD—WAR |nEw|	
934 THE GAMBLER—KENNY ROGERS |NEWJ   	
1014 HEMISPHERE—RUSH	
1044 AQUALUNG—JETHRO TULL	
2653 SGT.   PEPPER'S   LONELY   HEARTS   CLUB   BAND—THE   BEATLES
2835 MAGICAL MYSTERY TOUR—THE BEATLES 	
4167 MISFITS—THE KINKS	
6454 THERES A HIPPO IN MY TUB—ANNE MURRAY | NEW|   	
4198 SHAKEDOWN STREET—GRATEFUL DEAD	
11497 FLY LIKE AN EAGLE—STEVE MILLER BAND	
11512 LITTLE RIVER BAND—LRB	
11630 BOOK OF DREAMS—STEVE MILLER BAND	
11645 DIAMANTINA COCKTAIL—LITTLE RIVER BAND	
11698 STRANGER IN TOWN—BOB SEGER	
11783 SLEEPER CATCHER—LITTLE RIVER BAND	
11787 SHOTS FROM A COLD NIGHTMARE—MOON MARTIN	
11859 PLEASURE AND PAIN—DR. HOOK	
16059 SIR ARMY SUIT—KLAATU 	
1192 PARALLEL LINES—BLONDIE	
4180 PYRAMIDS—ALAN PARSONS	
4205 PLAYIN' TO WIN—THE OUTLAWS | NEW |  	
6456 LIONHEART—KATE BUSH | NEWJ   	
4190 TIME PASSAGES—AL STEWART	
1201 LIVE—JETHRO TULL | 2-LP-SET |  	
3404 1967-1970—THE BEATLES | 2-LP-SET \    	
8500 LIVE—BARRY MANILOW | 2-LP-SET |   	
8502 TAKE NO PRISONERS—LOU REED | 2-LP/NEW |   	
11856 ANTHOLGY—THE BAND |T-LP-SET/NEwl   	
11537 ROCK 'N ROLL MUSIC—THE BEATLES JTlP-SET |    	
8601 GREATEST HITS—BARRY MANILOW | 2-LP-SET |   	
17006 SANCTUARY—THE J. GEILS BAND | NEW |  	
11872 GREATEST HITS—STEVE MILLER BAND	
11905 GREATEST HITS—WINGS/PAUL McCARTNEY	
TAPES
5.49
4.99
4.99
4.99
4.99
4.99
4.99
4.99
4.99
4.99
4.99
4.99
4.99
4.99
4.99
4.99
4.99
4.99
4.99
4.99
4.99
4.99
4.99
4.99
4.99
4.99
4.99
4.99
4.99
4.99
7.99
7.99
7.99
7.99
7.99
8.99
4.99
4.99
4.99
RECORDS
THE HOME OF HIGH FIDELITY
3.99
3.99
3.99
3.99
3.99
3.99
3.99
3.99
3.99
3.99
3.99
3.99
3.99
3.99
3.99
3.99
3.99
3.99
3.99
3.99
3.99
3.99
3.99
3.99
3.99
4.29
4.29
4.29
4.29
4.29
6.99
6.99
6.99
6.99
6.99
6.99
7.99
4.99
4.49
4.79
OPEN UNTIL 9 COOM.,
556 SEYMOUR ST., DOWNTOWN       THURSDAY & FRIDAY    682-6144
Page Friday, 10
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, January 19,  1979

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