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The Ubyssey Feb 4, 1977

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Array Vott^lfc No: 45
THE UBYSSEY
?Jt VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 1977 -^^»4a
228-2301
AUCE faces tough battle
By STEVE HOWARD
The Association of University
and College Employees, local l,
has a short history and a tough
goal.
Since its certification three years
ago, it has tried to represent
democratically UBC's 1,200 library
and clerical workers, 90 per cent of
them women.
"We organized our own union to
fight for our special needs, one of
which was that as women we
traditionally received the lowest
wages for skilled work," AUCE
organizer Peggy Smith says.
In this traditionally non-
unionized field, workers formed an
independent trade union because
existing unions they could have
joined are male-dominated and
discriminate against women
workers, Smith says.
The union has growing pains.
When AUCE signed its first contract in September,  1974,   union
organizer Emerald Murphy
described it as "probably the most
progressive contract around involving women workers."
But some sections of the union's
contract have never been implemented, former union president
Ian Mackenzie says. These include
a recall list for sessional and
temporary workers who have been
laid off and a reclassification
procedure for misclassified
workers. Some people do work
which is not properly described in
their official job classification,
Mackenzie says, and a
reclassification could raise a
worker's salary.
Grievance committee chairman
Kevin Grace claims the administration is trying to destroy
AUCE's grievance procedure by
provoking grievances and
protracting them. Grace says this
is a tactic to psychologically wear
down union members.
And the union has been without a
contract since Sept. 30. Talks about
a new contract have gone to
mediation, but the administration
will not discuss wages until a
decision is made on rolling back
wages from last year's contract. In
December the Anti-Inflation Board
rolled back AUCE's wage increase
for 1976 to 15 per cent from 19 per
cent.
AUCE must pay back $500,000,
the four per cent ruled by the AIB
to be excess wages for 1976.
It is difficult for AUCE to keep
the strong support of its members
and to establish itself permanently
at UBC while the tough AIB
guidelines are in effect.
The union asked for an exemption from the guidelines on the
grounds that its members are
discriminated against in wages
and therefore deserved the full 19
per cent increase. But the AIB did
not accept this argument and the
union did not appeal the decision
and risk a further rollback.
AUCE's position is that clerical
and technical skills should receive
equal pay. The union has been
trying to gain parity in its base pay
rate with the base rate of technical
workers on campus ever since
AUCE's first contract, union
spokeswoman Fairleigh Funston
said.
AUCE wants wage parity with
workers in physical plant, food
services and residences, who are
represented by the largest union on
campus, the 1500 member
Canadian Union, of Public Employees. In this year's contract the
union is asking for an increase of
$191 per month for the lowest paid
jobs, plus four per cent lost in the
AIB rollback, union vice-president
Pat Gibson says.
The rollback does not affect the
union's demand that equal wages
be given for equal work, he says.
WHILE  EASTERNERS SUFFER  through freezing temperatures and
nasty blizzards, lucky British Columbians enjoy unusually beautiful
—doug field photo
weather. But this tranquil spot behind uncompleted Asian Centre could
soon become muddy miasma with arrival of inevitable monsoons.
Controls cover lowrise, says lawyer
Gage lowrise residence are probably covered
by the Landlord and Tenant Act, according to
Vancouver lawyer Stuart Rush.
Rush has told the Alma Mater Society there
is "a strong case" for including the residence
under the act.
If the lowrise is covered, rents can only be
raised by 10.6 per cent, instead of the 17.8 per
cent increase approved by the board of
governors this week.
Dave Van Blarcom, chairman of the AMS's
student housing access committee, said
Thursday the committee asked Rush to give a
first glance opinion on the issue.
The decision depends on whether lowrise
residents are classified as licensees, Van
Blarcom said.
. "The main difference between a licensee who
isn't covered under the landlord and tenant act
and someone who is covered is the
arrangements they have," he said.
"Certain services are provided to people who
are in a licensee arrangement. Lowrise people
get linen change and a maid service.
"Also, another characteristic of the licensee
arrangement is lowrise residents pay their rent
in two big installments, and have an eight
month rental period."
But one of committee's arguments is that
maid service in the lowrises is intermittent.
Van Blarcom said lowrise units get cleaned
about twice a year.
"And people in the lowrises very rarely use
the linen change service," Van Blarcom said.
He said because housing puts single beds in the
lowrises, the bedding they provide is for single
beds also.
"Most couples living there (in the lowrises)
get double beds, so they can't use the linen that
is provided," he said.
Committee members and student board
members Moe Sihota and Basil Peters met
recently with acting housing head Michael
Davis and Erich Vogt, vice-president in charge
of student and faculty affairs, and discussed
rates.
"They (Vogt and Davis) were unwilling to
change and are not prepared to look into the the
situation," Van Blarcom said.
He said the administration will use a "divide
and conquer" method of getting around the
problem.
"They will say that if the lowrises are
covered by the Landlord and Tenant Act, rates
at Totem and Vanier will have to increase more
than they have."
Van Blarcom said the committee's first step
will be to see how many lowrises tenants want
the residence covered by the act.
He said there will be a meeting noon Monday
in SUB 230.
If the meeting is a success, SHAC will make a
formal approach to the rentalsman and give
reasons why the lowrises should be covered by
the Landlord and Tenant Act, and ask him to
make a ruling.
"If he (the rentalsman; decides against us,
we'll appeal to the county court." said Van
Blarcom.
Since the workers voted to
reduce their wages by $32 a month
to comply with the AIB ruling,
AUCE's wage demand is an increase of $223 a month. It seems
like a lot, but it is only slightly less
than the $225 a month increase
AUCE won for its lowest paid
members in its first contract.
Previously, they earned $408 a
month.
"There was this misconception
that women were working for pin-
money," Funston said.
Some women support husbands
who attend school and others raise
families on their own, she says.
Organizers hoped for a strong,
democratically run union. They did
not want to be members of a large
union controlled by the head office.
"The executive positions have
little power," Funston says.
All positions are subject to recall
by the members and the executive
need the members' approval to
cash cheques larger than $100, she
said.
Funston said the decisionmaking power is spread among
many people. She said the chairpersons of committees such as the
contract committee, the grievance
committee and the strike committee, sit at executive meetings
and have one vote each, as do the
elected union officers.
"We want to avoid the situation
of having an executive-run union,"
Funston said.
But she said union organizers
must devote a lot of time to union
work, and most workers cannot
afford the time. She said most
organizers are single and have
spare time, but this excludes
workers who are too busy for much
participation.
Funston is the union's only paid
organizer.
She says another problem is the
union's high turnover of 30 per cent
a year. Many young people only
work for a short time at UBC and
do not strongly support the union.
Seepage 3: AUCE
Final forum
on UEL fate
on Monday
The public will get its last chance
Monday to express opinions about
the future of the University Endowment Lands.
The provincial government UEL
study team will hold a final public
forum at Lord Byng high school
Monday before it submits its
recommendations on the UEL to
the government Feb. 18.
Study team member Hayne Wai
said the team will set up several
workshops at the forum to get the
public's views about administration and land use of the
UEL.
Workshops scheduled for the last
forum Jan. 26 were cancelled after
the initial presentations took
longer than anticipated.
"Most of the people there are
going to want those workshops,"
Wai said.
He said the purpose of the
workshops is to get people together
in small groups to exchange
opinions on the UEL and reach
some conclusions on what should
be done.
No major changes in the study
team's proposal have been made
since the last forum, he said.
The workshops will centre on the
study team's proposals for
See page 2: FINAL Page 2
THE        UBYSSEY
Friday, February 4, 1977
Keep dope
in the dark,
says study
LONDON, Eng. (ENS-CUP) —
Keep your pot in the dark!
That's the word from a group of
University of London pharmacists
who found that darkness — not a
cold temperature— is the essential
factor in keeping cannabis at its
original level of potency.
According to High Times
magazine, the group used several
methods to test marijuana, hash
and THC solutions for potency
before and after storage. They
discovered that cannabis keeps
reasonably well for up to two years
when stored in tight, closed, dark
containers at room temperature.
Refrigeration helps only slightly
they report. However, laboratory
solutions of THC are totally
destroyed after only six days'
exposure to light.
The researchers also suggested
that smokers only clean as much
weed as they plan to use immediately, because crumbling it
destroys the gland cells that store
the resin and help protect it from
light and oxygen.
Final UEL forum
Monday night
From page 1
parkland, housing, UBC access to
the UEL and research facilities,
team member Gerry Rolfsen said
Thursday.
"We'll mostly be discussing land
use, including the specific problem
of the research park," he said.
The Musqueam Indian band's
claim to the UEL will probably
also be discussed in the workshops,
Rolfsen said.
Other workshop topics will be
UEL park administration and the
planning process used by the study
team in investigating the UEL, he
said.
Because of the number of people
from outside the UEL area attending the forum, the question of
future administration of UEL
residential sections is being
discussed separately with the
residents, Rolfsen said.
He said the team will clarify its
proposals at the forum and
distribute a questionnaire to get
more information from the public.
The results of a similar
questionnaire handed out at the
last forum have not been tabulated
yet, Wai said.
The Monday night forum  will
_ start at 7:30 p.m. in the Lord Byng
auditorium, 3939 West 16th.
PANGO PANGO (UNS) — The
loco constabulary failed to stop a
team of smears from emptying the
national fountain before Turkey
McGobble's swim.
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT
REGISTER NOW
Placement Office
Office of Student Services
Ponderosa Annex F
HOLLYWOOD
STARTS TODAY
Till Feb. 12th
Ingmar Bergman
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9:15
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733-3822 Friday, February 4, 1977
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
Tuition increases inevitable
By KATHY FORD
Some UBC board of governors
members contacted Thursday said
they are opposed to tuition fee
increases, but most say they see no
choice but to increase them.
"I'm generally opposed to unnecessary fee increases," said Ken
Andrews, president of the UBC
Local of the Canadian Union of
Public Employees.
Student board member Basil
Peters said fee increases are
unfortunate because they will
make university less accessible to
students from lower income
groups.
"It will affect a small percentage
drastically," he said. "It's not a
desirable situation that some
students will be affected so that
AUCE has
tough time
ahead of it
From page 1
In December, 1975 the union
went on strike for seven days to
protest administration stalling in
contract talks, Mackenzie says.
After the strike, a new contract
was signed which gave workers a
19 per cent wage increase, subsequently rolled back to 15 per cent
by the AIB.
All other campus unions
respected the picket lines, but most
students and faculty voted with
their feet crossing picket lines and
attending classes. Some students
buzzed the pickets with cars and
threw water bombs at them.
"A lot of students at UBC think
they'll get great jobs when they
graduate," Mackenzie says. "But
many of our members have
degrees."
Mackenzie says many students
do not realize they may find
themselves taking union jobs after
they graduate.
AUCE should have explained the
reasons for the strike more
thoroughly- to students, Funston
says.
AUCE won wages equivalent to
the lowest wage of level of AUCE
workers for student library and
clerical workers. Wages for
students working fewer than 10
hours a week rose to $3.67 an hour
from $2.50. Students who work less
than 10 hours a week are not union
members, and so could br paid
below union wages before AUCE
had their wages included in its
contract.
The union included student
workers in the contract because of
its philosophy that wages should be
the same for all work of equal
value.
The union called for a mediator
in the current contract talks
because it claimed the administration wants to weaken the
grievance procedure, thus undermining job security, and would
not discuss wage demands.
Funston claims the administration is bargaining in bad
faith, "When we make a proposal
they say: 'We don't want to discuss
it. It's in the AIB guidelines'. But
the union claims negotiations
should proceed normally, with the
AIB reviewing the final
agreement."
If the union strikes again this
year, its settlement will be covered
by the AIB guidelines. The AIB had
not yet decided if last year's
contract was covered by the
guidelines, when AUCE went on
strike last year.
The AIB guidelines weaken the
strike's effectiveness on wage
issues, because the AIB can roll
back wage increases. AUCE is in
its second year under the
guidelines, in which a six per cent
wage increase is the highest
normally allowed.
they won't be able to attend
university."
Board member Pat Chubb said
she does not like to see tuition fees
increase.
"I have always been opposed to
any increases where they can't be
afforded. We should explore other
avenues first.
"There are probably ways to
help students if fees go up, and we
should look into these.
"We've been hit by the budget
and there we are without money.
Everyone has to pay, even the
students.
"Tuition fees have got to go up.
It's a bad situation, and we must
find ways to assist students." .
"And I'm perturbed that people
are getting conned into looking at
each other, pointing fingers and
making observations about waste,
soft spots and so on.
"The real issue is whether fee
increases are necessary.. I'm
opposed to them at this time."
He said tuition fee increases will
not have any affect on the accessibility of university to
students.
"There are lots of other blocks in
the way of people going to
university," he said. "In fact, fees
are the least important."
Lawyer Pearley Brissenden said
he hates to see tuition fees go up.
"But I don't think it will have a
perceptible effect on accessibility," he said.
"There is no question that it will
certainly affect some students
negatively, but over all, I don't
think it will have much effect."
Lutheran Campus Centre
chaplain George Hermanson said
he opposes tuition fee increases,
but under the circumstances they
are necessary.
"On one hand, I am opposed to
increased tuition fees, but on the
other, given the things that might
happen, I have to say yes, they
should rise," he said. "I certainly
don't think it's good if it will affect
people coming to university.
"But there are lots of other
reasons why people from lower
classes can't get here."
Board chairman Thomas Dohm
said the whole board was opposed
to any fee increase.
"It will only be done as a last
resort, and it will be done reluctantly," he said.
"We are deep into study of the
subject."
Members Sadie Boyles and
associate medicine dean William
Webber said they would not
comment on fee increases.
Loan changes sought
OTTAWA (CUP) — A Nova
Scotia MP has asked the government to amend the student loan
repayment schedule and to shorten
the minimum study period
required for loans.
In the House of Commons
Tuesday, Andy Hogan, NDP
member for Cape Breton-East
Richmond, also asked the
government to make more money
available for the program Young
Canada Works program in areas of
very high unemployment.
In his opening remarks Hogan
said, "in view of the continuing
serious national unemployment
problem that has been so
detrimental to the morale of young
male and female adults," he asked
the secretary of state to review the
Canada Student Loan Act,
"making repayments dependent
on the students' ability to pay and
second, to change the minimum
time for a student to receive loans
from the present 26 weeks
minimum to 12 weeks so that
students from low-income families
can more easily pursue summer
school courses as well as one
semester courses."
But Hogan's motion could not be
discussed  because  it   did   not
receive the unanimous consent of
the house, as required.
Hogan said afterward he was
requesting a review of the act
because of the serious unemployment and the difficulty in getting
loans. He also said he resented
manpower and immigration
minister Bud Cullen's use of the
word "kids" to describe many of
the students affected by the
growing unemployment.
The lack of time for completing
Young Canada Works and the
amount of money allocated for the
program should be changed, he
said.
—doug field photo
ENTRANCE IS BLOCKED to groves of academe as physical plant nearby Asian Centre and faculty club. Swimmers may also share pool
workers repave leaky bottom of Nitobe Gardens pool. Rumors to with cars and goldfish pending completion of aquatic puddle beside
contrary, repaved pool will not become scenic parking lot for visitors to    SUB.
Autonomy plan Labor plot says analyst
By MARCUS GEE
A plan to give Scotland and
Wales partial autonomy from
England is a plot by the Labor
government to retain power, an
English political analyst said
Thursday.
Anthony Birch, political science
professor at Exeter University
said the Devolution Bill which
would give Scotland and Wales
separate parliaments is an attempt
by the ruling Labor Party to
preserve its majority in
parliament.
"The Labor Party is more interested in maintaining its advantage than in creating stable
form of government."
Birch told 20 people in Buchanan
that if the bill passes the Labor
Party will be assured of the support of the Scottish National Party
in parliament. Labor won the last
election with a slim majority of
seats in parliament.
Scotland is a traditional Labor
stronghold, so the Devolution Bill
is an attempt to stave off total
separation and preserve votes for
the party, Birch said.
So the government created a
plan to give Scotland and Wales
subordinate assemblies, premiers
and governments.
"The devolution plan is to give
the Scots and the Welsh something
to keep them busy," Birch said.
Birch said the devolution plan is
a compromise which pleases
nobody. He said the Scots are
angry about the veto powers the
English parliament would have
over the subordinate assemblies
and both regions are displeased
that they would have no taxing
powers.
The main aim of the Scottish
nationalists is to extricate the
region from what it sees as the
disaster of the British economy.
"The Scottish National Party
says the English are incompetent
and inefficient, and the growth of
the SNP parallels the economic
failures of England."
Birch also said there is a
possibility the Welsh Nationalist
Party and its supporters may turn
to violence to achieve their goals.
He said the Welsh nationalists'
main aim is to preserve the Welsh
language and culture while the
Scottish nationalists are more
interested in economic improvement.
"The English find it difficult to
believe why anyone would want to
speak Welsh," he said.
But he said the Welsh nationalist
party only has the support of the 20
per cent of the Welsh population
that speaks the language. So the
party does not have the strong
electoral support enjoyed by the
Scottish National Party.
But he said the SNP is supporting
the bill as a stepping stone to
complete autonomy.
Neither the Scots nor the Welsh
have any legitimate economic
grievances which would warrant
separation from Britain, Birch
said.
He said the British system of
social services ensures a more or
less even distribution of services
throughout the United Kingdom, a
benefit to the poorer areas.
But the discovery of North Sea
oil has made the prospects of
survival of a separate Scotland
much brighter, he said. Page 4
THE        UBYSSEY
Friday, February 4, 1977
It's about time a few things
were put in perspective regarding the vendetta between
Harold Livermore and the
UBC administration.
Livermore was dismissed as
head of the Hispanic and
Italian studies department
last fall by the board of
governors.
Since his dismissal, Livermore, who retains his professor's job at UBC, has
written several letters to The
Ubyssey and the downtown
papers regarding his dismissal
and attacking the board for
several things.
He is correct in his criticisms of the procedure which
the university administration
and the board used to dismiss
him as department head.
*He is quite justified when
he protests that he can't have
had a fair hearing if he wasn't
given access to the evidence
and documents which resulted in his dismissal and if he
wasn't given an opportunity
to present his side of the
case.
That's been a criticism The
Ubyssey has had for years.
When professors are dismissed or denied tenure or
demoted, they're never given
access to the "confidential"
Livermore
in perspective
"Name's Livermore. Brilliant scholar, and wants us to read his newspaper clippings, too."
information   which   brought
about their dismissal.
Equally bad, they're not
given a precise, detailed description of the criteria
they're expected to meet to
qualify for tenure or whatever. The criteria, as currently defined in the faculty
handbook, are loosely stated,
and can be twisted easily.
They're not good enough.
But Livermore has gone
about things the wrong way
in the attacks and criticisms
he's been making in the press
about UBC's poor quality
administration.
He has made sweeping
charges — but then has
repeatedly refused to present
the information and facts (if
there are any), on which his
charges are based.
He's naive if he expects
anyone, The Ubyssey included, to get excited and
worked up about his charges
if they're not backed up.
Don't get us wrong — The
Ubyssey is not the defender
of the board of governors or
the administration.
But we can't back Liver-
more's charges either — not
until we know the information he's basing them on.
Letters
Livermore repeats his criticisms of UBC's administration
Your issue of Tuesday carries a
statement by the chairman of the
board of governors saying "Harold
Livermore is lucky to be still
working at UBC."
While I appreciate the goodwill
of those who give their services to
the university, I dislike the tone of
this remark, and hope Mr. Dohm
did not make it.
I am lucky to have a decent
salary, lucky to have tenure, lucky
to have books at my disposal, lucky
to have some colleagues whom I
esteem and lucky to have my
health, my good name and my
work.
True as this is, it isn't the point.
I also have responsibilities.
Mr. Dohm does not attempt to
deny the statements in my letter to
the Sun (Saturday).If he is
defending the situation I describe
there, I hope he will say so.
I repeat that if I have not been
able to build a better department,
the blame lies with the administration, which has miserably
failed to get the best staff available
and has saddled the taxpayer with
quite unjustifiable burdens.
As regards the question of my
dismissal, Mr. Dohm says I had a
good hearing.
How does he know this? He has
Law grad warns would-be law students
I am a recent graduate of the
UBC faculty of law and would like
to make a few statements to those
students considering studying law.
Don't! There are more than 200
students graduating each year
from UBC and next year the
University of Victoria will be
turning out about 100.
Add to this the multitude of out-
of-province students who swarm to
UBC.
Articling positions are becoming
scarcer each year.
Contrary to what people seem to
believe, all students do not obtain
articling positions and there do not
exist great numbers of jobs outside
the Lower Mainland.
The Law Society of B.C. will not
assist students in finding articling
positions and they allow out-of-
province students who come from
higher ranked law schools than
UBC to take positions that UBC
graduates should have.
If a student does find articles, the
employer can terminate the articles for whatever reason.
I was articling with a Vancouver
lawyer who dismissed me because
he didn't like my hair.
This makes it especially difficult
for the student, because articling
positions are obtained one to two
years in advance.
All legal jobs require a student to
have articled and be called to the
bar, yet no assistance is given to      Anyone    studying   law   should
students in obtaining articles, consider the above.
Many law firms are still
prejudiced against hiring women.
Lawyers that I have talked to
readily admit this.
Usually every firm has its token
woman. Once she is hired they feel
that they have done their duty.
However, if your father is a
lawyer or a businessman or you
plan on graduating in the top
quarter of your class, you probably
won't run into the problems I have.
J. R. Michaels
1975 law graduate
V.
THE UBYSSEY
FEBRUARY 4, 1977
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the AMS
or the university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary
and review. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in room 241K of the
Student Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301;
Advertising, 228-3977.
Co-Editors: Sue Vohanka, Ralph Maurer
"Seems to me we left off a masthead recently with a dangling telephone
conversation," Nancy Southam said to Heather Walker and Marcus Gee and
a few other people. "No, no and no," Kathy Ford said threateningly. Sue
Vohanka, blithely ignoring her, turned to Steve Howard and Verne
McDonald and said: "It wasn't just the telephone conversation. She'd given
up guessing, after ruling out Shane McCune, Merrilee Robson, Paul Wilson,
Vicki Booth, Ian Morton, Bruce Baugh, Michael Swaan, Doug Field, Jon
Stewart and Jim Matson." Gray Kyles asked Richard Currie, Greg Strong
and Judith Ince if they had any idea what happened 10 minutes after the
phone was put on its hook. They didn't. And neither did Larry Green or
Robert Jordan, which wasn't a surprise to Doug Rushton because they all
work for PF. David Morton and Anne Cormack were blissfully unaware of
the trivial office gossip which so deeply affected Chris Gainor — quite
naturally, as he played a big part in it. Only Ralph Maurer and Ford herself
had the answers, and they're not telling until the newswriting seminar and
clipping session at noon today in good old SUB 241K. Be there.
not heard my appeal and doesn't
know my side of the story.
The dean, having accumulated
the "evidence" (dated March 25)
on which is based his demand that I
should resign said that I could not
see it.
My letter asking for it remains
unanswered.
I finally obtained part of it on
Aug. 6.
If I Had not gone to a lawyer
experienced in academic affairs I
should not have got it then.
If I had not refused to resign, I
should not have got it at all.
In view of the persistent attempts at suppression practised
against me, how is Mr. Dohm to
judge what has been suppressed in
Logo again
The continued insistence of the
Ubyssey staff to use a front-page
logo resembling the garish lettering most commonly found
beneath large velvet paintings of
dark-skinned female nudes in
tacky apartment suites, leads me
to reluctantly conclude that one of
the following, miserable conditions
is extant:
The Ubyssey staff thinks it is
publishing the Emery Weal.
The Ubyssey staff, having
already adopted a dress style
consisting of (among other things)
bobby-pins, Christmas sweaters
with sleeves casually rolled up to
the elbows and neatly-trimmed
sideburns, has discovered an old
political dissertation by Henry
Kissinger of Harvard University
extolling the virtues of the good ol'
1950s and thinks this is an excellent
example of what it was like.
The Ubyssey staff has taken a
Chris Gainor joke and turned it into
a logo that defies revision.
It is to weep.
Rod Mickleburgh
whatever may  have  been  communicated to him?
It is a fundamental principle that
any accused should be told
everything which is being said
against him and given the opportunity to reply.
The court of Star-chamber was
suppressed in 1640.
Mr. Dohm says that the board of
governors can't hear appeals
because if it did it would be
swamped with them.
I hardly expected this candid
confirmation of the ad-
ministr.ation's failures from so
well-informed a source.
Harold Livermore
professor, Hispanic studies
Chickens
Congratulations, engineers.
You have managed to sneak up,
overwhelm, and murder a lone
chicken.
It only took the 50 of you in attendance at the time.
Listen UBC, the engineers tortured a chicken to death with an
axe.
I'd just emerged from the
cafeteria, after my lunch, in time
to see a bunch of assholes in
engineer uniform chanting around
a fellow engineer who was
dangling a quivering, headless and
bloody chicken from a broomstick.
I assume that the brave individual didn't have the guts to
touch the dangerous animal.
This courageous individual then
stuffed the gory, still-moving
corpseintoa paper bag, (obviously
pleased with himself as were the
rest of the morons), and walked off
down the hall.
I don't care about the symbolism
involved.
This is the most disgusting
spectable of engineer pre-
pubescence that I have witnessed
yet.
G. Merry
arts student Friday, February 4, 1977
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters
'Harmless pranks9 defended
In response to the endless stream
of criticisms The Ubyssey has been
printing of late I would like to add a
few comments.
N. Green deems the Godiva ride
pathetic.
So what? Did it do anyone any
harm?
What of the general outrage
about the new red hands on the
clock tower — another harmless
prank.
I could only laugh at the "logic"
presented in the letter about Kevin
McGee using his brain in a rational
manner.
As for McGee himself, who
suggests that we rid the world of
Hot damn!
Hot damn! $300!
So you think you can justify
engineering week with a paltry
donation to the children's fund —
talk about tokenism.
It's like the reaction of a kid
caught writing dirty words in his
scribbler — "I'll wash the dishes,
Mommy."
If the engineers were really
serious about demonstrating their
concern for others more needy,
they would have donated the
equivalent of the entire cost of
engineering week to the fund.
We suspect that the total cost of
booze, balloons and women on
horses, and the energy expended
on juvenile pranks, far exceeds
$300.
We would also like to point out
that   though   the   engineers   did
. organize the pancake breakfast, it
was the student body at large that
donated the $300.
Doug Todd
George McLaughlin
Susie Yuen
arts 4
these "mindless buffoons"
(engineers, I guess), I suppose he
feels that this society would
prosper without us.
He would be in fine shape until
his car ran out of gas.
What about the Red Rag?
It is admittedly extremely crude
and of absolutely no literary merit,
but is anyone asked to read it?
Did you see any spare copies
around an hour after it was
distributed?
Meanwhile, no attention is given
the destructive pranks performed
by other groups on campus this
week.
We don't know who painted the
large blue graffitti on the side of
the new civil-mechanical
engineering building, but anyone
can follow the trail of paint drippings back to the rear entrance of
Macmillan and make his or own
guess.
The best The Ubyssey can come
up with is a few sad attempts at
sarcastic cuts about the
engineering undergraduate
society's future offices and some
familiar comments about kiddies'
balloons, both on the front page of
course, where such important
news belongs.
Perhaps if some of you people
came out of your holes and looked
around, you'd see things in a different light.
Blair Trenholme
applied science 2
More rules
You're not doing too bad with the
typing stuff.
But can I ask that letters be
triple-spaced when they're typed?
Thank you.
Ubyssey typing pool
In response to a letter in Friday's
paper suggesting that the
engineers' reputation, especially
amongst female members of UBC,
is a result of bad publicity and as a
mask they are maintaining, I
would like to suggest that perhaps
said elusive females avoid
engineers for more fundamental
reasons — such as lack of integrity.
I cite as my example an incident
that occurred at the T-Cup football
game.
Numerous unsuspecting home
economics cheerleaders were
assaulted with an odiferous
organic material (more basically
known as shit of unknown origin).
Such a courageous, macho act by
an engineer wrapped in plastic!
It is unfortunate that good
clothing, such as school sweaters,
many of which were borrowed,
were destroyed.
We were quickly approached by
a representative of the engineering
undergraduate society who
profusely apologized and assured
us that we would be reimbursed for
damages.
That was more than three
months ago.
After numerous communiques
With the EUS we have yet to
receive the money and cannot
afford to incur these costs ourselves.
I must point out, however, that
home economics supports the
engineers' crippled children
charity by participating in the T-
Cup game and such honorable
treatment as we received does not
exactly increase or even maintain
this support.
One assumes that the prowess of
members of this faculty is in doubt
when they are willing to spend
larger sums of money to maintain
an image by supporting
questionable and childish antics
such as Lady Godiva, yet are not
KEVIN McGEE ... not endangered, but still a turkey in Brock pond      -i°n stewart photo
Why women avoid engineers
willing to spend a lesser sum to
maintain more desirable qualities
such as honor and integrity
and. . . .
No wonder UBC engineers are
shunned by the majority of campus
women in light of such intolerable
behavior.
Sandra Leidl
Lowell Croasdell
home economics 3
McGee again
The slanderous comments by
Kevin McGee concerning
engineers appear to have no
foundation.
Perhaps he should read articles
by his contemporary authors
before he expresses his slanderous
views.
The following excerpt came from
Nobel prize-winning author
Alexander Solzhenitsyn.
"I had grown up among
engineers and I could remember
the engineers of the 1920s very well
indeed.
"Their open, shining intellects,
their free and gentle humor, their
agility and breadth of thought, the
ease with which they shifted from
one engineering field to another,
and, for that matter, from
technology to social concerns and
art, then, too, they personified
good manners and delicacy of
taste; well-bred speech that flowed
evenly was free of uncultured
words; one of them might play a
musical instrument, another
dabble in painting; and their faces
always bore a spiritual imprint."
BUI Chow
applied science 3
UBC's backward subculture
Having attended this happy
institution for a mere five months,
I often find myself unable to explain certain of the local goings-on.
Especially opaque were the
events occurring Wednesday
outside the Buchanan foyer, in
which a large crowd had gathered
to hear the visiting lecturer in
Buchanan 106.
We could not help but notice the
spectable of five or six red-attired
persons (assuming a liberal
definition of that word) creeping
along on the other side of the glass.
The members of this phalanx
exhibited acute cases of emotional
acne and penis envy, and emitted
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Letters, should be signed and
typed. Pen names will be used
when the writer's real name is also
included for our information in the
letter and when valid reasons for
anonymity are given.
Although an effort is made to
publish all letters received, The
Ubyssey reserves the right to edit
letters for reasons of brevity,
legality, grammar or taste.
Letters should be addressed to
the paper care of campus mail or
dropped off at The Ubyssey office,
SUB 241K.
the general impression of
struggling to overcome a deep-
seated (and undoubtedly accurate)
sense of their own inferiority.
After a whispered consultation,
this little group thrust open the
doors leading into the foyer and
shouted out something vaguely like
"arts eats shit" (I am unsure
because among their other
deficiencies they apparently
lacked the power of coherent
speech).
After this triumph they scurried
off amid giggles of mutual
congratulation, much to the
amusement of those at whom the
exploit was evidently aimed.
I can only suggest that there
lurks at UBC a curiously backward
subculture that might interest
some enterprising anthropology
student in need of a research topic.
That is, if he or she can summon
up enough cultural relativism to
overcome the natural repugnance
aroused by members of the group
in question.
R. Berrow
arts 1
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Friday, February 4, 1977
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Lear's essence revealed
By GREGORY STRONG
The new Playhouse production of
King Lear attempts to increase
audience identification with Lear
by removing the play from an
historical context.
King Lear is a man of power and
authority who in his extreme age,
gives the administration of his land
to his daughters according to their
professed love for him. He is at the
"winter of his life" and feels incapable of reigning, yet attempts
to maintain the authority and
bearing of a king.
King Lear
By William Shakespeare
Directed by Philip Hedley
Queen Elizabeth Playhouse
Until Feb. 25
The tragedy occurs as Lear's
will is broken by his possessive
daughters, Regan and Goneril, and
Lear falls from power. This plot
operates against the background of
a disordered Shakespearean
universe where storms and natural
catastrophes reflect the
displacement of Lear as king and
he emerges as a tragic figure,
subject to fate.
This production makes every
effort to break the illusions within
the play. The stage is a rotunda
covered in a thick shag carpet with
two side ramps leading from the
circle. A series of long aluminum
sheets with painted designs hang
from the ceiling and ring the stage.
During the performance, these
sheets are flexed and shaken by
cast members to create the noise of
thunder in the storm sequence of
the play.
All the props are clearly visible
beyond the stage. The actors wear
costumes of simple velour shirts
and corduroy pants with an emphasis on accessories like large
gold ear rings, quilted felt cloaks
and felt headpieces denoting rank.
The actors actually begin the
performance with audible
breathing exercises and they can
be seen practising behind the set.
Much of the audience was
disappointed with this approach,
but the interpretation suggests a
relation between the theme and
everyday experience.
Powys Thomas as King Lear,
gives a very moving performance
as he explores the psychic nature
of Lear's fall from power. He is a
character of enormous stature and
sweeping rages, reduced first to a
very lyrical madness and then to a
frail old age.
Heath Lamberts, who will be
remembered from his roles in both
Tartuffe and the Count of Monte
Cristo, plays the king's fool with a
characteristically daring and
aggressive acting style. He
provides an excellent complement
to the brooding silences of the king
and his breakdown into madness.
Margaret Robertson is a well-
studied   Goneril   and   brings   a
ruthless cupidity to her role.
The actors in King Lear were
remarkably good and though the
staging of the play as an archetypal drama is certainly not an
untried, or novel idea, the high
calibre of acting within the
Playhouse Company and the use of
many of their students led to an
exceptional performance.
King Lear finally ends in a very
touching tableau as Lear carries in
the dead body of his youngest
daughter, Cordelia. He kneels over
her in devotion to her love for him
and then heartstruck, falls limply
by her side. Another character,
Edgar, the Duke of Gloucester,
speaks a simple eulogy over the
body, "the eldest hath borne most;
we that are young shall never see
so much, nor live so long."
The beauty of .moments like
these is what the essential King
Lear is about and the Playhouse
production is more than faithful to
the text.
Guest director, Philip Hedley
has done extensive work in
traditional theatre in England. He
has also been involved with
England's Drama in Education
program. Hedley used many of the
exercises and theatre games from
this program to prepare the cast
members in their four-week
rehearsal of King Lear.
The educational program  is
LEAR
Dammit, but these bras are hard to undo."
known as, the Developmental
Drama Strategies in the English
school system. It uses drama as a
tool for the understanding of
historical or contemporary
situations and as an aid to the
social development of children.
It is applied as a preliminary
foundation for actors studying a
play. Theatre games become tools
to understanding a dramatic
situation and the actors work out
their understanding of a role by
drawing from their own experiences and determining the
objectives of each character.
Mussoc shows high spirits, but ...
By LARRY GREEN
Want to feel like a full-fledged
rat? Pan a Mussoc production.
The UBC Musicial Theatre
Society used to present semi-
professional productions of
Broadway shows. Last year
Mussoc went through internal
changes and cancelled a
production of an ail-American
musical, Fiorello.
The new show, Words with
Music, is an original pastiche of
American show songs, and the
production, from program to
props, is all amateur.
Words with Music
■Directed by Kim Buchart
At the Old Auditorium
February 2-5, 9-12
Student matinee Feb. 10
There's nothing wrong with
putting on your own show, if it has
zest and high spirits. Musical
theatre is on a self-love binge at the
moment  (typified by A  Chorus
Line), and a refresher course in
showbiz sounds like a good idea. In
this case, the show would need to
use as many ideas as possible in
the hope that some of them work.
The main problem of Words with
Music is that not many of them
work. One wishes a Pygmalion
theme would magically occur so
that the performers would rise up
and become suddenly talented.
The set is bare, mainly a
moveable backdrop that looks like
a big shredded sheet. There are
opticals projected behind it that
range from obscure to witty to
dazzling, and are the best things in
the show.
Words with Music isn't a chaotic
mess, it's just a well-intended little
clinker. There is no feeling of
discipline or bite. Rarely is a
performer doing something right,
which provides interest. The
producers have enough sense not to
stretch capabilities with gut-
busting dances or complicated
vocals. Yet in Words with Music,
the bad things overshadow the fair
as a matter of routine.
When Mussoc presented George
M! in 1975, the blatant
Americanism was nauseating.
They must still have a penchant for
it, because Words sometimes turns'
into a tribute to American theatre.
It should be a stream of the
musical moments everyone likes
best. And it doesn't really need a
narrator to tell us about the
American musical movement.
While the Americans aren't the
only ones who makes musicals
(Anneof Green Gables?, Kronburg
1582?), the musical play comes
almost entirely from the U.S. Even
so, we don't need constant
reminders that make us feel left
out for being in the wrong country.
We can get that on television.
In the one-and-three-quarters
hour show, the second act is better
than the first; it seems to find its
bearings. Songs come fast (even if
the orchestra drowns out the words|
and the dancers look happy. The
songs are interesting standards,
and the full cast singing is lovely.
While there is not one singer of
any great poise, vocal variety, or
intensity, some of them come
across well. Laurel Hester belts
out, in the best show business
tradition, I Don't Know How to
Love Him. A few numbers were
nearly good, as was some of the
dancing; the occasional performer
of great charm (Grace Wong in I
Feel Pretty and Kim Stebner as an
elf, comes to mind). Ian Morton
makes common sense as a stage
manager, and the comic relief, a
fat stage mother, is necessary but
dull after a while. Cheryl Hut-
cherson has physical presence but
she does not speak clearly. Instead
she whoops.
If it is painful to dump on an
amateur show in trouble
(especially one with tradition
behind it), there's no need to spare
this orchestra. Is it too much to
expect a grown-up band to sound
half decent? If Words With Music
really wants to be called amateur,
its musicians give it more help
than any other factor. One can
admire the verve of young singers
and dancers, but to sound like an
off-key calliope is inexcusable.
Besides Laurel Hester, Lorraine
Thompson's warbling, and a very
few other moments, only one scene
was exceptional. Jayne Postuk
sang What I Did for Love from A
Chorus Line, the show that's
threatening to kill us all. Although
it isn't a very good song, and Jayne
Postuk isn't a terric singer the
Broadway cast album singer is no
better. There is no set, no costume,
no orchestra. Only one woman, a
spotlight, a piano. It lifts and, even
in spite of itself, the number floats.
That's what talent can do.
Being grateful that Words with
Music doesn't assault the audience
is small consolation. The only thing
we can do is respect the high spirits
and count our blessings — the
show's brevity and modest goals.
STUDIO 58
Chekov's
"THREE
SISTERS "
Feb. 7 - 26
8:00 p.m.
324-5227
MUST RESERVE
VCC Langara 100 W. 49th Ave.
MUSSOC
presents....
an onsinai
revue
February 2-5 &
9-12 8:30 p.m.
Old Auditorium
Tickets V.T.C.
& Outlets
Student Matinee
Feb. 10th
12:30 P.M.
$2.00
Tickets
A.M.S. Business Office
WORDS WITH MUSIC . . . stars PF drama heavy Ian Morton, third from right
~7olnaance JKeilaurard
OPEN FOR LUNCH 11:30
DINNER FROM 6:00
1251 HOWE ST.
6843043
Page Friday, 2
THE        UBYSSEY
Friday, February 4, 1977 »     «s ^** V1
■ \?*c-
J^s%
movies
Supreme Kid overcomes
By GRAY KYLES
Vancouver film director Peter Bryant's
first feature, The Supreme Kid, is the story
of two modern-day hobos. Though they live
on the road they are going nowhere and they
don't care.
Shot in June, 1974 the low-budget
Canadian picture has taken a long time
getting to the screen. It is finally having its
first commercial run tonight.
But despite the fact that the film has not
yet played to regular movie audiences in
Canada, it has been seen around the world.
The Supreme Kid
Written and Directed by Peter Bryant
At the Broadway Cinema
It was the official Canadian entry at the
Karlovy Vary Festival in Czechoslovakia
last summer where it received enthusiastic
response. The festival is the third most
important in the world and the film's acceptance is a testament to its quality.
The Museum of Modern Art in New York
gave it a showcase presentation and it has
also been shown at Cannes, the London film
festival and at Thonons les Baines in
France.
Although it has received no awards,
foreign distributors are interested in the
picture. But they have adopted a 'wait and
see' attitude and will base any offers on the
picture's box office performance in Canada.
A major reason for the delay of the
commercial release is of course the
reluctance of theatres to carry a Canadian
picture.
FEATURE
. .. characters with real personalities
But this time the theatre chains aren't the
only ones to blame. The film itself has
suffered two mishaps which have kept it off
the market.
When Bryant sent the film to Toronto for
the pre-selection committee from Cannes it
disappeared in transit. Eventually it turned
up after causing some serious delays.
But the most serious problem concerned
the lab printing of the film. Rather than
using its regular process the lab decided
with no authorization, to try out a new
technique.
The result was a severely scratched print
which was almost irreparably damaged. It
took several months of threatened law suits
and more lab work before the film was
successfully repaired.
Peter Bryant graduated from SFU in 1970
and on the strength of his student films was
awarded a fellowship at the American Film
Institute in California.
After studying there for a year, he
returned to Vancouver and worked on a
number of films. His best-known production
is the short comedy, The Rocco Brothers.
Since filming The Supreme Kid, Bryant'
has been teaching at UBC where he is a part-
time instructor in the Theatre Department's
film program.
The Supreme Kid is about two young
drifters on the road. In their travels Ruben
and Wes come across several strange
characters, including a group of bikers and
a homosexual "padre of the highway."
But the most important character they
meet is Wilbur. He lives in a rundown
tenement in Vancouver and is the ultimate
bum.
Bryant's strong points in the picture are
his characters and his comedy. He creates
three dimensional characters with real
personalities, people you come to know well
in 90 minutes.
The comic touches are usually understated and bizarre. Yet there is always a
touch of pathos.
Wilbur is a tragicomic character, a loser
who won't admit it. When Ruben and Wes
first meet him they are stunned by the junk
cluttering his slum room. But he just strikes
a haughty pose and offers them any kind of
coffee they desire, except instant.
All three of the major roles are played by
Canadian actors who are developing
reputations. Their fine performances give
strength to the picture.
Frank Moore plays Ruben, the Supreme
Kid. He began his professional career as a
singer-dancer but has lately concentrated
on acting. After completing Bryant's film he
starred in Joyce Wieland's The Far Shore
for which he recently won the Best Sup-
SUPREME KID ... modern-day hobos on the road
porting Actor award at the Canadian Film
Awards.
He gives Ruben a tough, funky image who
has been on the road for years. Nothing
surprises him.
Not so Wes. He is younger, naive and not
really serious about the hobo life. Much of
the film deals with his growing up and
learning the lessons Ruben teaches him.
The part of Wes is played by Jim Hen-
shaw. This young Toronto actor has appeared in A Sweeter Song, Lions for Breakfast and the short film Divertimento.
But Moore and Henshaw almost lose the
show though to Don Granberry who plays
Wilbur. He is a natural clown and brightens
every scene he appears in.
He presents Wilbur with a dignity lesser
actors would miss entirely. Although he is a
clown he is a sad one, moving quickly
toward his destiny.
Bryant gets fine supporting performances
from local personalities such as ferry
David Mulligan, Bill Reiter, Gordon
Robertson and Byron Black. However some
of the minor roles are weak, and a few
scenes suffer from awkward players.
The only female lead, Helen Shaver, is
fine in a limited part that doesn't present
any challenge for her or the audience.
Bryant appears to feel more at ease with
male roles.
The musical sound track by Howie
Vickers is a major part of the film and is
deserving of mention. Vickers is besj; known
for his work with The Collectors, the great
Vancouver band of the sixties. For The
Supreme Kid he has written a solid, rocking
score which is linked thematically to the
story. It is excellent.
The weaknesses of the picture are found in
the dialogue and the pacing. If Bryant can
overcome the problems he has in these
areas he could become a major director in
the very near future.
Although the dialogue is natural, witty
and generally well written, there just isn't
enough. There are long periods of either no
sound or a bit of scrappy conversation that
requires more.
This happens in three or four scenes which
are also too long and slow. The picture
begins slowly and doesn't grab the viewer
right away and it also lags a little in the
middle.
But these are minor problems that are to
be expected in a directors first feature and
should disappear in his subsequent work.
For movie fans who are willing to accept
some awkward moments in an otherwise
interesting film, The Supreme Kid offers
good entertainment.
Make Your Mark in Life
You  can   be   catapulted
to  the  heights  of fame
in   Page   Friday's   annual
Creative   Arts   issue   this  Mar.   4.
Yes,   Page   Friday  is  once  again
welcoming  poems,   short  stories,
photographs  and graphics  from   all
faculties.   You  don't  have  to  be   a  Creative
Writing   hack  to   enter.   And  if you   <
painter  or  scutptor,   we   can   arrange
photographer to  take  pictures  of yo
wherever  it  may  be.   Phone   the   Ubyssey
office  at  228-2301.  A//   entries  wili  be
judged  by  the   Page   Friday  staff and
a   book  prize   wiil   be   awarded
to   the   winner.
Make   your  mark  in   iife.
Remember,   the   deadiine   is   Feb.   25.   Hand  in   all   entries
at   the   Ubyssey  office,   Room   241K  of the   Student   Union   Building.
Friday, February 4, 1977 THEUBYSSEY Page Friday, 3 books i
Kosher fare in Jewish life
By SHANE McCUNE
Jewish Life in Canada is neither
an important historical work nor
an important art selection, but it
would make a good gift for
someone with a very small coffee
table.
Jewish Life in Canada
William   Kurelek   and   Abraham
Arnold
Hurtig Publishers
90 pages; $9.95
Kurelek, a self-taught Albertan
painter, has increased his exposure lately through one-man
shows and book illustrations. In
addition to the Hurtig series on
ethnic groups in Canada (including
Jewish Life, and soon to include
books on Ukrainians and Irish in
Canada), Kurelek painted the
illustrations to the recent McClelland and Stewart edition of W.
O. Mitchell's Who Has Seen the
Wind.
And Kurelek is just that — an
illustrator, not an artist. Like
Norman Rockwell, he specializes
in sentimentality, often expressed
in rural landscapes or scenes of
family life. Unlike Rockwell,
Kurelek couldn't paint a portrait
for a postage stamp. His work has
a primitive, childlike style, and his
figures are virtually faceless.
KURELEK'S JEWISH FAMILY .. . figures virtually faceless
Kurelek's notes, printed opposite
each painting, are equally simplistic. Describing an illustration
of a Jewish dairy farm outside
Winnipeg, he writes:
Homely details in this painting,
such as the puppies wrestling in the
grass, the swallows winging their
gyroscopic way about the barn
door and the cat and kittens
waiting for their saucer of milk are
drawn from my own memories. My
little daughter Cathy, who is one of
my art critics and an aspiring
veterinarian, says the kittens are
really mice because of the shape of
their ears.
Talent turns trite
Cathy is right.
The flack in charge of the dust
jacket notes does Kurelek a
disservice in his references to the
painter's "creative genius" and
"magnificent art work." Kurelek
is a competent draftsman and a
sincere and unpretentious communicator — no more, no less.
The second half of the book is a
series of historical and sociological
essays by historian Abrham Arnold, former editor and publisher
of the Jewish Western Bulletin.
They scarcely constitute a
definitive treatise on the history
and cultureof Jews in this country,
but they are informative and
concise.
Arnold notes anti-Semitic quotes
and incidents, but avoids
recrimination or bitterness. Instead, he focuses on the positive
contribution to Canadian culture
and politics made by Jewish immigrants.
Both Kurelek and Arnold avoid
excessive emphasis on the Jewish
communities in Montreal and
Winnipeg. Arnold notes that Jews
were elected as mayors, aldermen
and MPs in both Victoria and
Vancouver before the turn of the
century, despite the small number
of Jews in B.C. at the time.
A year after Vancouver's incorporation in 1886 David and
Isaac Oppenheimer were elcted to
city council, and David Oppenheimer served as mayor from 1888
to 1892.
"Yet when he retired as mayor,
Vancouver did not have 100 Jews,"
writes Arnold.
Measuring 10 inches by eight and
one-half, Jewish Life in Canada
has a format as straightforward
and unpretentious as its content,
and at $9.95 is more reasonably
priced than most Canadian "art"
books.
The catch, of course, is that it is
one of a series. And who really
wants four or five books of Kurelek
illustrations?
By VERNE McDONALD
If Houston had concentrated
more on the characterization of
Ghost Fox herself, the white
woman who is captured by Abnaki
Indians in New England during the
colonial wars of 1750-1760, the fast
pace and skillful writing of this
book would be more effective.
Ghost Fox
By James Houston
McClelland and Stewart,  302 pp.
As it is, we never get any but the
most superficial look at her
thoughts and feelings as she is
captured, enslaved, escapes, is
recaptured, married to a brave,
and continues on through more
trials and tribulations, until the
only word left to describe her attitude is stoic.
This lack of depth in characterization would not be so great a
difficulty if the theme (not a
terribly   original   one)   did   riot
depend on the reactions of Ghost
Fox to her new environment and
how she learns to accept it. We are
told what she does in a superb
narrative style, but the why is left
out.
The vividness of the author's
style would be better used if he had
a more original and challenging
theme to use it on. Both the tale of
capture by the Indians and the
concept of becoming so habituated
to a new way of life that one rejects
the old when returned to it, are
trite formulae that fail to measure
up to the talent Houston displays.
Withhisnovel, The White Dawn,
on book club lists and already
released in a movie version,
Houston seems headed down the
same road as Arthur Hailey,
producing moderately literary
books that are easy to read and
make good movie scenarios.
Canadian writers seem to be
forming into two groups: the well-
off ones who go south and write for
the masses and the poor ones who
stay north and write for English
journals. Pierre Berton is of course
by himself, being able to perform
the slightly magical trick of
staying north and writing for the
masses that don't even exist.
Probably Houston has no pretensions of becoming a writer of
more depth and artistry. Yet his
craftsmanship had me reading
from one chapter to the next
almost compulsively, though I
could not help but notice how the
flaws stood out against his compelling writing. It is not that he has'
done it badly, it is that he could do
much better with his talent.
KIM KETTYLS & DOUGLAS EDGAR
Kim Kettyls and Douglas
Edgar would like to extend regards to all those
who attended their Private
"Where It Is" Party at the
Hyatt Regency, and to express our regrets to the
several hundred turned
away due to our capacity
and limited ticket availability. We look forward
to entertaining you at our
next function.
In its February issue. National Lampoon sets out
to answer a question that has been on everyone's
mind since November 22,1963...
WHAT IF?
GRAND FIF^ 1WLM INAJJGL RAL. ISSl'E
■ inn i iiii.J«tA
at the Centennial and
Maritime Museums!
Volunteers and would-be volunteers are invited to our Open House and Information
Day Tuesday, February 15 from 2:30 to 4:00 p.m., and from 7:30 to 9:00 p.m.
We'll have slide shows of volunteers in action, gallery tours, a look at the backstage
areas of the museums, coffee and conversation with staff and volunteers.
Many exciting opportunities await you at the museums . . . our volunteers work in
School Programs, Public Programs, in the Gift Shop and Membership Services, and
special Curatorial projects. There's a lot to be done and we can do it. . .
WITH A LITTLE HELP FROM OUR FRIENDS!
1100 Chestnut Street at Kitsilano Point
736-443f local 250
Page Friday, 4
THE
UBYSSEY
Friday, February 4, 1977 jut-
rvr**^
V#f
boohs
Arehange falls from grace
By JUDITH INCE
Durer's Angel by Marie-Claire
Blais fails as a self-contained work
of art. Although the power of Blais'
prose compensates for this
weakness to a large degree, this
third novel in the Manuscripts of
Pauline Arehange series is
ultimately unsuccessful.
Durer's Angel
By Marie-Claire Blais
Translated by David Lobdell
Published by Talon books
Durer's Angel traces the
adolescence of Pauline Arehange.
A high school dropout, she is
brutalized by the working world,
disappointed by her friends and
family, and denied her ambition to
be a writer.
For the reader familiar with the
previous novels in the trilogy, The
Manuscripts of Pauline Arehange
and Vivre! Vivre!, the plot of
Durer's Angel, with its abrupt
changes of scene and flashbacks, is
relatively straightforward.
For the uninitiated, however,
Durer's Angel is a labyrinth of
ambiguous details. Blais does not
reintroduce characters which have
•appeared in her previous novel.
Similarly, she makes frequent
allusions to episodes from
Pauline's childhood described in
the other two works of the series
( GENE WILDER JILL CLAYBURGH RICHARD PRYOR
SILVER 5TRERN
Shows at 12:40, 2:45, 5:05, 7:20, 9:40
MATURE—Occasion coarse
language. — R. W. McDonald
Takes You Where Taxi Driver Didn't Dare!
ROGER MOORE    -    STACY KEACH
THE STREET PEOPLE"
Requent Violence
—R. W. McDonald,
«,»—-,.».»—,.-.. .       B.C. Director --.        881 GRANV|lLE
Shows at 12:15, 2:10, 4:10, 6:10, 8:10, 10:10    682-7468
In Concert & Beyond Led-Zepplin
THE SONG REMAINS THE SAME
plus ODE TO BILLY JOE
of Bobby Gentry's Song
MATURE:    Occasional    nudity     &    coarse
language. —R. W. McDonald, B.C. Dir.
Shows at Song 1:05, 5:15, 9:35
Billy 3:25, 7:45
r*~       THE PEACOCK IS BACK!!
j   See Everything You Hear About Nudist Camps
I NAKED PEACOCK
j plus Naked & Free
! THE NEW LIFE STYLE
j   Sex, male & female nudity.
i   7.?- W- M£Donal.d',BiS- Plr,V,   ,  ,„   ,  «1   GRANVIILI
1 Shows at Peacock 1:25, 4:20, 7:20, 10-20
S Free 12:00, 2:50, 5:50, 8:45
rALAN ARKIN
as Sigmund Freud
VANESSA REDGRAVE
as Lola Devereaux
L
THE SEVEN-PERCENT
SOLUTION
MATURE—Shows at 7:30, 9:40
and NICOL WILLIAMSON
os Sherlock Holmes
f a film by francois truffant
S SMALL CHANGE
* "Thoroughly  charming  is the only way to
describe this Incredibly enjoyable movie.
—John Haslett Cuff, Film/News
i Show Times: 7:00, 9:00
| English Sub-titles — Mature
a film by Peter Bryant
THE SUPREME KID
with Frank Moore, Jim Henshaw
Occasional sex, frequent
coarse language.
—R. W. McDonald. B.C. Dir.
Shows at 7:30, 9:30
A  DELIGHTFUL CLASSY AND UNBELIEVABLY HONEST
PIECE OF FUN
«
It
MATURE — English Sub-Titles
SHOWS AT: 7:30, 9:30
Back by Popular Demand
bROAOWAV 2
VARSITy
224-3730
4375 W. 10th
Young Love, Mysticism
^       and    Intrigue
WEIRD AND
WONDERFUL
LOVE STORY .    .
MASTERPIECE'
Elizas HoroscoOi
Produced, Written and Directed by I
GORDON SHEPPARD A
Starring ELIZABETH MOORMAN - TOM LEE JONES
and LIKA KEDROVA - Guest star RICHARD MANUEL of "THE BAND"
duisbAR
MATURE:
Occasional nudity.
—R. W. McDonald, B.C. Dir.
SHOWTIMES:
7:30-9:30
without any explanation of them.
Although the technique of
plunging the reader immediately
into the action ("in medias res") is
a conventional literary device, in
Durer's Angel Blais oversteps the
bounds of convention and into the
territory of arrogance. By
assuming that the reader is
familiar with the intimate details
of her other novels, Blais mystifies
and alienates the uninitiated by her
obviously significant but equally
ambiguous references to the past.
Even for the seasoned Blais fan,
her presumptuous attitude has
something of the quality of an in-
joke.
Another serious flaw of Durer's
Angel lies in its title. The original
French title, Les Apparences, is an
appropriate one, reflecting the
dichotomy between the public and
private faces of the novel's
characters, Pauline included.
Durer's Angel refers to the
nickname which Pauline gives to
the central figure of Albrecht
Durer's famous engraving,
Melancholia. It is from this print
that Pauline draws inspiration and
the strength to endure her bleak
existence, regarding Durer's
Angel as her soulmate in despair.
Blais, however, has not looked
carefully enough at Durer's
engraving. For several pages she
writes of the Angel's unearthly
beauty and spiritual vigor,
referring throughout to "him,"
when in fact, the figure in question
is a woman. Such a mistake would
be excusable if this angel did not
play the pivotal role that it does in
the novel. Pauline's most ardent
dream is that she meet a man who
possesses the qualities she so
admires in Durer's angel. In the
light of the true identity of the
figure in the etching Melancholia,
such longings take on ambiguous
sexual overtones that the author
has clearly not intended.
Apart from a single moment of
joy Pauline experiences in the last
sentence of the book, Durer's
Angel is enshrouded with gloom.
The novel is crammed with scenes
that rival Fellini in their nightmarish quality.
In one chapter, for example,
Pauline describes her job in a
mental hospital where doctors
gleefully adnunister ice baths and
shock treatments to their helpless
patients.
Unlike the mental patients who
protest their cruel "rehabilitation"
treatments, Pauline submits
without a struggle to a miserable
existence.
Her passive acceptance of every
conceivable ignominy is prompted
by such overwhelming self pity
that the reader quickly loses
sympathy with Pauline's chronicle
of despair. After a while one
wonders if perhaps Pauline enjoys
her suffering, and if given the
opportunity she would abandon the
rote of the martyr.
DURER'S ANGEL . . . androgynous figure fools author
Women and
saints date
By GRAY KYLES
If you are constantly forgetting
appointments you could probably
use a good datebook calendar.
There are at least three on the
market that are relatively cheap
but of good quality.
Every Woman's Almanac 1977
The Women's Press
Paper, $3.95 	
Her Story: A Canadian Women's
Calendar
Hurtig Publishers
Paper, $3.95	
Calendar of Saints
Being Incorporated Ltd.
Paper, $4.65
SUB FILMS presents
DUNBAR at 30th
224-7252
JACK NICHOtSOW
0NEFUW0¥ER
nucucrco*NEST
This Thurs. - 7:00
Fri., Sat., Sun. - 7:00, 9:45
NOTE:	
Extra show on Sunday \
Every Woman's Almanac is a
small and handy calendar
designed for women. It features
information on the women's
movement and basic material on
subjects such as immigration,
rape, employment opportunities,
and birth control. Each month is
designated for a specific subject.
Besides being a valuable source
book it is a fairly good calendar,
though the slots for each day are a
little small. The pages are sewn
into the spine so that the book can
take a lot of handling and still hold
together.
Another datebook published by a
women's group is Her Story: A
Canadian Women's Calendar.
Her Story has a more general
appeal than the Every Woman's
Almanac. It is designed for people
who are interested in the women's
movement but don't require
current information.
Most of the material is concerned with important moments in
the long history of the Canadian
movement and with specific
women of prominence both past
and present.
TTie book is larger in format and
has a nicer layout. The right pages
list the days and dates of the week
and the left are the information
pages. It has a coil binding.
Another datebook available is
the Calendar of Saints. The
"saints" included are very modern
ones such as Lily Tomlin, David
Spangler and Kate Millet.
It is the largest of the three and
contains more information.
The art work is simple but attractive and the book is very well
organized.
Friday, February 4, 1977
THE        UBYSSEY
Page Friday, S >•&•'. „***»**"  y****
muste
ffxW V"w.
Campus concert applauded
By ROBERT JORDAN
The Vancouver Symphony Orchestra provided a thoroughly
enjoyable hour or so yesterday
noon for those who went to hear it
play in the War Memorial Gym.
Kazuyoshi Akiyama was at the
helm, guiding the orchestra
through well-known orchestral
waters.
The concert was sponsored by
the Dean of Women's Office
assisted by the UBC Alumni
Association. Of the many things
these organizations do, bringing a
live symphony orchestra to
campus is decidedly one of the
most worthwhile. The price was
right (free), the program was
entirely suitable for the occasion
'Berlioz' Benvenuto Cellini
Overture and Brahms' Symphony
No. I) and the receptiveness of the
large audience demonstrated that
similar concerts in the future
would be enthusiastically appreciated.
The orchestral sounds came
rolling forth from the cavernously
reverberant acoustics of the W. M.
G., mingling with vague olfactory
reminiscences of the most recent
events physical educational: an
interesting varient on the multi
media concept. The W. M. G., of
course, was designed for indoor
sports, not symphony concerts. Yet
the reverberant sound, albeit
somewhat deadened by the dense
crowd in attendance, was almost
welcome in comparison to the utter
deadness of the Queen Elizabeth
Theatre, the VSO's usual home.
An amiably receptive yet equally
conversational and somewhat
restless crowd greeted the concert
with obvious, though occasionally
inattentive appreciation.
Now and then, an occasional
snippet of recognizable music rose
above the ambient jumble of noise.
The Berlioz Overture streaked its
gaudy way — still without
cheerleaders, though.
The ponderous opening of the
Brahms Symphony strode mightily
forth, causing anyone within
earshot to tremble with awe. Don
Adams, tympanist, was paying as
much exaggerated attention to his
part as anyone ever has to simple,
repeated crotchets. The famous
horn solo in the last movement was
rendered in about as disgusting a
fashion as it could have been.
Freed from the stigma of concert
hall performance and its attendant
worries of coherent interpretation,
Mozart trashed
By ROBERT JORDAN
Even Mozart conceded the
technical difficulties of his Piano
Concerto No. 15 in B Major, K. 450,
in a letter to his father. These same
difficulties were the unfortunate
undoing of pianist Sheila Henig in
the first work of the Vancouver'
Symphony Orchestra's second
Main Series Concert of 1977.
The "interpretation" of this
soloist was not really possible to
critically evaluate as it was so
deficient technically. Notes were
missed and runs were either
rushed or rattled off mechanically.
All the subtle nuances of expression, utterly essential in
Mozart and admittedly difficult for
any pianist to convey, were simply
not in evidence in her performance.
Whether this was due to nerves,
insufficient familiarity with the
piece or just lack of expertise is
hard to say, but even though no
restarts were necessary, the
performance bordered on the
disastrous.
Many artists of note appear with
the VSO and poor Sheila Henig was
just out of her league. Applause
was slight, which was surprising,
as Vancouver audiences typically
reward performances of such
mediocrity with standing ovations.
Kazuyoshi Akiyama directed the
accompanying orchestra, suitably
reduced in size to match the intimate nature of this typically
lovely Mozart work. The Queen
Elizabeth Theatre's greedy
acoustics guzzled eagerly at the
lamentably thin tone of the upper
strings, rendering it lifeless and
dull.
Perhaps the VSO should avoid
Mozart's music until it moves into
the Orpheum Theatre. Even then,
the string section's homework will
just have begun.
Anton Bruckner's Symphony No.
9 in D Minor concluded the
program. Clearly a certain
previous composer's ninth symphony was haunting Bruckner's
spirit. A great deal of the
mysterious, shadowy and weird
pervades this work, not to mention
certain textural and thematic
similarities.
Bruckner never did finish the
work. Despite the fact that the
three completed movements last
about an hour, it still sounds incomplete. The gentle close of the
concluding Adagio movement is
not enough to pacify the feelings
aroused by the towering thunder-
ousness of the preceding two. The
second movement Scherzo is
particularly energetic and its wild
dissonances were attacked with
savage gusto by the heavy brass.
The VSO's performance was
enthusiastic to say the least. There
was marginally more attention
paid by the conductor to sustaining
the intensity of the quieter sections. For sheer volume, the fortissimo sections were without
compare.
But the tone of the VSO's upper
string is lamentably scrawny. The
woodwinds are individually fine
players, but they need to unify
their interpretive approaches.
The brass section has
phenomenal power, but no polish —
any number of them could be on
the verge of severe internal
hemorrhage at times.
And Akiyama's placement of the
viola section to his far right may
render them more easily audible to
him but utterly inaudible to the
audience.
Because of its lack of textural
and contrapuntal complexity,
Bruckner's music survives well in
an acoustically inferior hall such
as the QE Theatre. Most orchestras, the VSO included, enjoy
playing it very much.
In spite of its less than taxing
intellectual involvement, a sensitivity to the undeniable power
and quality of the ideas in
Bruckner's music, makes it a
rewarding experience for many
listeners.
In light of the shortcomings,
Monday night's performance by
the VSO undoubtedly satisfied a'
great many concertgoers and
justifiably so, as the performance
was really quite a good one.
PANGO-PANGO (UNS) —
Residents of this tiny island
kingdom were alarmed today by
threats from the fuchsia  blorgs.
Big or Small Jobs
also Garages
basements
& YARDS
732-9898
CLEAN-UP
technical errors and the like, the
orchestral players could let
themselves go somewhat. The
atmosphere in the W. M. G. was
relaxed and informal. Technique
be damned. The gain in spirit and
enthusiasm from the orchestra,
admittedly rarely a problem with
the VSO's brass and tympani
sections, was quite heartwarming.
And paradoxically, the technical
aspect, by being concentrated upon
less, went a large way toward
solving itself. Under the circumstances, the performances
were quite reasonable indeed.
The goodwill and enthusiasm for
the VSO for ventures like this are
deep and genuine. The D. of W. 0.
and the UBC A. A. are to be
congratulated for sponsoring this
event. Mr. Akiyama and his
Vancouver orchestra are to be
accorded a heartfelt requittal for
gracing our  campus  with   their
symphonic sounds.
Undoubtedly funds do not permit
two or three such concerts a term.
Nevertheless, they would be
welcome and successful. Most, if
not all, of those in attendance
yesterday would be quite willing to
cough up a dollar or so to "help
defray costs" in order to present a
greater number of similar undertakings in the future.
VSO . . . guided by Akiyama at War Memorial Gym
doug field photo
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In fact, that's the selling technique
used by Braun dealers across
Canada. They compare and demonstrate the Braun L-830 with the most
expensive speakers in their store.
They have only one complaint.
They're not selling as many $600.
ones as they used to.
The reason is Braun's years
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no additions or subtractions —
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If your objective is pleasant,
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Think of the versatility with speakers
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With Braun Audio you know
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Page Friday, 6
THE
UBYSSEY
Friday, February 4, 1977 By RICHARD CURRIE
ACME Theatre's Vancouver
Revued! Renued ends Saturday
night. Show times for tonight and
Saturday are 8:30. Tickets for
students are $2.50. A Dream of Sky
People, a Jabberwocky Children's
Theatre production, is a story
based on the Cree legend of
creation for school aged children.
It is being presented as part of the
Sunday afternoon children's series
at the centre at 2 p.m.
Our Town is held over at the
David Y. H. Lui Theatre at 1036
Richards for three more weeks.
Showtimes Monday through
Friday 8:30p.m., Saturday 7and 10
p.m. Reservations 669-0931.
The Burnaby Art Gallery will be
introducing two young Canadian
artists, George Rammel and
George Dart, to Vancouver starting Wednesday Feb. 9. This will be
Rammel's first exhibition and the
major piece in the show is a
figurative reflective image in
Carrera marble. There will be
eight other sculptures in wood,
polyester, steel and bronze.
Dart will exhibit silkscreen
prints and etchings, paintings on
paper, drawings and a series of
pastels.
In the lounge will be a selection
of photographs taken by Mayor
Tom Constable on his recent visit
to China. All exhibits continue until
March 6.
The Henry Young Quartet will be
giving a free performance at the
BAG this Sunday, Feb. 6 at 2:30
p.m. Henry Young is a self-taught
Vancouver resident who has been
described as one of the foremost
jazz guitarists in the world today.
Ontario writers Chris Dewdney
and David McFadden will read at
the BAG this Monday, Feb. 7 at 8
p.m. Dewdney is both an artist and
a poet, and his most recent
publication is Fovea Centralis.
McFadden is a poet who used to
work for the Hamilton Spectator.
His latest work is entitled A Knight
in Dried Plums.
Rob Tyhurst, Caroly, and David
Conn will read at the West End
Community Centre this Sunday
from 3 to 4:30 p.m. Open poetry
readings will be held before the
scheduled poets from 2 to 3 p.m.
The WECC is at 870 Denman and
the readings are free of charge.
The Stars of Mauna Kea is still at
the Planetarium and will continue
through February. The Centennial
Museum has a new exhibit consisting of tropical sea shells,
mainly from the South Pacific.
Music Under the Stars presents
Tchaikovsky! on Wednesday, Feb.
9 at 7:30 p.m. Recorded music by
Pink Floyd will also be under the
stars throughout Feb. and this
week's shows will be Sunday and
Thursday at 9 p.m.
Margaret Mead's New Guinea
Journal is in the Centennial
Auditorium tonight through
Sunday at 8 p.m. with a Sunday
matinee at 2 p.m. Seats $1. The
Wasa exhibit from Sweden
remains on view until the end of
February at the Maritime
Museum.
The Unfortunate Diving Duck
Trilogy, Part III involves electronic music, tape collage,
readings, slides and film. The
Western Front will present this
program of new works by three
composer-performers from
California and Oregon, Anthony
Gnazzo, John Adams and James
Cuno Sunday, Feb. 6 at 8:30 p.m.
Dave Buchan's show GEEK/CHIC
is at the Front Monday, Feb. 7 at 9
p.m. The Front is at 303 East 8th.
The Open Door and The Night
Watch are both co-operative types
of coffeehouses for musicians and
music lovers. There are two open
doors; one Sundays at 708 Hawks
St., and the other Thursdays at 163
East Cordova. Both doors open at 8
p.m. The Night Watch is on Sundays at 7 p.m. in the basement of
the United Church at West 2nd and
Larch.
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For two decades Dynaco products have consistently
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Audio enthusiasts, and especially kit builders, are among
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perfectionists ourselves, we frankly doubt the implication
that better sound could be achieved by spending
more money, at least within the physical considerations
(size, power, etc.) which define practical limits.
Never is an attempt made to limit quality for the sake of
cost. Yet, our demand for maximum value dictates that
every ounce of fat comes off if it does not directly aid sound
quality, reliability, or easier kit construction. Most of the
products we sell are kits. Inherent simplicity is the key to our
electronics. Not only does that make them easier to build
(and easier to service, too) but simpler circuits that do the
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means even greater assurance of conservative operating
margins and ultimate performance.
Every Dynakit buyer can be certain that the kit he buys is
identical to the factory built version. Completely assembled
circuit boaros on premium FR4 fiberglass are in-circuit
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In loudspeakers, which are comparatively recent
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consumer contact and recognition. The A-25 is, we believe,
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Hundreds of thousands of Dynakits,
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at bargain prices. Either in the form of
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models, the Dyna units have
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costing far more.
"As we see it, the 'secret' of Dynaco's
success has been in their refusal to
incorporate gadgets or passing fads
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—Julian Hirsch in Stereo Review
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Friday, February 4, 1977
THE
UBYSSEY
Page Friday. 7 Page 14
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, February 4, 1977
'Tween classes
TODAY
CHINESE CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIPS
Bible study, noon, SUB 212A.
GSA
The Musqueam and the UEL, noon,
grad centre garden room.
POLITICAL SCIENCE
STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Professor Carty speaks on Northern
Ireland, noon, Bu. 2230.
AMS ART GALLERY
Exhibition, the arrow of time:
myths, legends, art and science In
astronomy, 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.,
to Feb. 11, SUB art gallery.
SKI CLUB
Disco, 8:30 p.m., SUB party room.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Meeting, noon, International House
lounge.
CHINESE CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Bible study, noon, SUB 212A.
CITR RADIO
Hockey broadcast: UBC vs Alberta
Golden Bears, 7:45 p.m., CITR
Radio 650.
UBC YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Speaker:    Steve   Watson,   WI    ombudsman, 8 p.m., 1208 Granville.
Hot
flashes
fast chance
SKYDIVING
Meeting, noon, SUB 215; dinner and
Gastown pub crawl, 5 p.m., Spaghetti Factory.
CHINESE STUDENTS'
ASSOCIATION
Folk song group, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.,
SUB 213; ballroom dancing, 7 p.m.,
SUB 212.
UBC MEN'S GYM TEAM
Competition:  UBC vs Eastern Washington,   7:30 p.m., PE unit 2, gymnastics gym.
CHINESE STUDENTS'
ASSOCIATION AND
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Cantonese class, noon, Bu. 316.
SATURDAY
CITR RADIO
Hockey broadcast: UBC vs Alberta
Golden Bears, 7:45 p.m., CITR radio
650.
UBC INTRAMURALS
Men's curling bonspiel, all day, winter sports centre.
CHINESE STUDENTS'
ASSOCIATION
Film show: Mount Everest, biological research, our song, 2:30 p.m.,
SUB auditorium; members' sports
night, 7:30 p.m. to 11:30 p.m., gym
A, winter sports centre.
UBC MEN'S GYM TEAM
Competition: UBC vs. Washington
State, 7:30 p.m., PE unit 2, gymnastics gym.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Function, 8 p.m., Sandman Inn:
advance tickets noon, SUB 216A.
to bleed
Today is your last chance to
bleed at the Red Cross donors
clinic in SUB.
Pleasant blood suckers will be
standing by from 9:30 a.m. to
4:30 p.m. in SUB 207, 209, 211
and 215 ready to accept your
pints, then give you tasty cookies,
coke and coffee after.
All donors are eligible for a
daily draw for dinner for two at
the Keg 'n' Cleaver restaurant and
the undergraduate society whose
members turn out in the greatest
numbers will receive 10 cases of
beer.
PANG0-PANG0. (UNS) — Waz
Bleater, during a walk in the
largest bog on this tiny island
kingdom, dropped in for a little
chat with his liar fiend Frothy
Foam.
In his characteristic manner
Bleater refused to tell anyone what
they discussed. When contacted by
The Daily Blah, Foam followed
suit.
VANCOUVER
INSTITUTE
lectures
Prof. ALEX B. WOODSIDE
U.B.C. History Dept.
CHINA and VIETNAM
THE NEW ERA
Prof. Woodside is a leading expert
on Asian affairs, especially China
and Viet-Nam.
His lecture will deal with these
two countries' future relations
with the west.
Saturday, Feb. 5-8:15 P.M.
Lecture Hall 2, Woodward IRC
ADMISSION IS FREE
Vancouver institute
lectures take place on
Saturdays at 8:15 p.m.
on the ubc campus
in lecture hall no. 2
instructional resources
centre
admission to the general
public I? free
SUNDAY
UBC INTRAMURALS
Men's curling  bonspiel, all day, winter sports centre.
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Basketball and volleyball practice,
6:30 p.m., gym A, winter sports
centre.
MONDAY
WOMEN'S CENTRE
Meeting,   5:30   p.m.,   SUB   225,   all
women welcome.
SOCIETY OF OLDER STUDENTS
.  General meeting, noon, SUB 212.
DEMOLAY CLUB
Meeting, noon, SUB 213.
PSFG KUNG FU
Practice,   4:30   to   6:30   p.m.,   SUB
party room.
AMS ART GALLERY
Public gallery tour:   Lionel Thomas,
noon; AMS art gallery.
CHINESE STUDENTS'
ASSOCIATION AND
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Free Cantonese class, noon, Bu. 316.
I CATVDIA TAVERN A        I
IS ig
|3 FAST FREE PIZZA DELIVERY                                        IS]
£" Call 228-3512/9513                                                  IS
IS 13
Jj 4510 W. 10th Ave., Open 7 Days a Week 4 p.m.-2 a.m.           |j
l!D [=jlsla[glEH3llil3l3lEiIaE
Ifs the tops!
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT
REGISTER NOW
Placement Office
Office of Student Services
Ponderosa Annex F
Who Is This Man
and
What Does He Want?
"(There) is only one law that is
necessary for the governments to
make .... and that law would be
gain the knowledge of Science of
Creative Intelligence and practice
Transcendental Meditation twice a
day. With this one law, the purpose
of all the laws will be fulfilled. "
Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, 1974
Wednesday, February 9th at 12:30 in SUB Ballroom
BROOKS ALEXANDER and
DAVID FETCHO
of the Spiritual Counterfeits Project of Berkeley,
California, will be speaking on what TV really is —
a science or religion? Admission is free.
Sponsored by Inter Varsity Christian Fellowship
Coming February 9-11
WILLIAM
STRINGFELLOW
the AUTHOR    the SOCIAL CRITIC
the THEOLOGIAN    the ATTORNEY
WEDNESDAY - FEBRUARY 9
12:30 - Law School Rm. 101
"THE LEGAL PROFESSION VS. JUSTICE"
1:30 — Seminar Rm. 179 Law School
7:30 — Lutheran Campus Centre
"THE DEMONIC ELEMENTS OF PROFESSIONALISM'
THURSDAY - FEBRUARY 10
12:30-S.U.B. Ballroom
"ETHICS FOR CHRISTIANS AND OTHER ALIENS"
7:30 — Lutheran Campus Centre
"THE CHARISMATIC GIFTS OF THE CHURCH"
FRIDAY-FEBRUARY 11
12:30-S.U.B. Ballroom
"SIGNS OF HOPE"
3:30 — Lutheran Campus Centre
Open Discussion
Now Canada's favourite
sloe gin has something
extra. Pour a jigger over
ice, add ginger ale, 7-Up,
soda... and suddenly it's
got a foamy head all its own.
New MORRIS
It's a
foamy-topped
sensation!
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:    Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 35c.
Commercial —  3 lines,  1 day $2.50; additional lines
50c. Additional days $2.25 and 45c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone ahd are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, S. U.B., UBC, Vancouver.
5 — Coming Events
THE GRIN BIN — Largest selection of
prints and posters in B.C. 3209 West
Broadway (opposite Super Valu) Vancouver.  738-2311.
20 — Housing
SKI APEX during mid-term break.
Snow's plentiful. Ask for Bill at
228-8943  or  221-9868.
10 — For Sale — Commercial
COMMUNITY SPORTS
RACQUET STRINGING
Very low rates. Excellent workmanship. 24-hour service, plus exceptional prices for racquets. Call 733-
1612. 3616 West 4th Ave. Open 10
a.m.
1962 PONTIAC. Good condition, 50,000
miles, one owner, recently tested.
$350 or best offer. 731-2269 evenings.
ACCOMMODATION for two students.
Male, non-smokers preferred. Furnished upstairs $80 per month, downstairs $90 per month. Apply after
4:00 p.m. 5548 Kings Road, next to
campus.
DOCTOR, DENTIST, MEDICAL student
wish to rent house, large suite; Jericho, Spanish Banks, UEL. Long term,
good landlord relationship important.
Tony, 732-5288; Stewart, 228-0849.
References available.
ROOM & BOARD AVAILABLE. 2270
Westbrook Cres. (on campus). Phone
228-8943  or   224-9866.
70 — Services
1964   VALIANT.   60,000   miles.   Open   to
offers. Phone 261-2824 after 6:00 p.m.
MGB '66. Good motor, bad body. 70,000
miles, $350. 228-3832 or 731-0823.
11 — For Sale — Private
LOUDSPSAKERS Hegeman One's praised by the Absolute Sound upto 64
watts.$250.   Phone  Nick  929-2662.
VEGA. 1971 wagon 34,000 miles. $600.
Days, 228-4925, leave message., Nights
228-9851.
'F=Jr=Jr=JF=Jn=Jr=ur=Jr=dr=Jr=Jr=i
USE
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED
HAWAII BOUND? Our two week package starts from $379.95 all inclusive.
Hotel/kitchenette, airfare. Call Nash,
6891-8688 for bookings now. Office
open until 7:00 p.m. everyday. Weekends 10:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
PIANO TUNING — Expert tuning and
repairs to all makes. Reduced rates
to students. Call Dallas Hinton 266-
8123 anytime.
85 — Typing
EBCELLENT TYPING at home on IBM
Selectric. Vancouver pick-up. Reasonable   rates.   986-2577.
CAMPUS DROP-OFF for fast accurate
typing. Reasonable rates. Call 731-
1807  after  12:00.
EXPERIENCED TYPIST. Work at home.
Rate: 70c per page and up. Phone
876-0158   if   Interested.
99 — Miscellaneous
SKI WHISTLER
Rent cabin day/week.  732-0174 eves.
CAR STEREO SALE
'SANYO SP414with JENSENS SPEAKERS
(10 oz. Dual-Cone)
For Only
179
.95
Features:
• AM-FM    multiplex    cassette    witn
AUTO-EJECT
• Fast - Forward
• Fast - Rewind
• 12 watts R.M.S.
• 1 year Parts & Labour Warranty
Reg. $225
DELTATRONIX
5664 Imperial
at Kingsway
437-1422 Friday, February 4, 1977
THE        UBYSSEY
Page 15
'Birds must win in Lethbridge
By PAUL WILSON
The UBC Thunderbird basketball team must win Friday and
Saturday when they play the
University of Lethbridge
Pronghorns if they hope to get a
berth in the Canada West playoffs.
UBC is currently in third place in
the Canada West league with an 8-6
record. In first place is the
University of Alberta with an 11-3
record The University of Calgary
and the University of Victoria are
locked in a second place tie with 9-5
records.
Only two teams from the six
team league take part in any post
season play. The first place team
hosts the second place team for a
best of three playoff series to
decide the western entry into the
Canadian Intercollegiate tournament in Waterloo Mar. 3-5.
"We cannot afford to lose any
more games this season," said
'Bird's coach Peter Mullins. "The
league is so close that if we hope to
reach the playoffs we have to take
all the points we can."
Last Friday, the 'Birds took a
convincing win from the University of Saskatchewan Huskies in
Saskatoon 81-68. But the next night
the 'Birds were outrebounded by
the Huskies 57-28 and beaten on the
scoreboard 79-70.
One of the major reasons for the
'Birds loss was Husky forward 6'6"
Roger Ganes. Over the two games,
Ganes scored 76 points and pulled
down 43 rebounds. The hapless
'Birds just couldn't contain
Saskatchewan's star.
The story has been the same ever
since Mike McKay was injured
Jan. 8 in Edmonton. Centre Ed
Lewin has done well in scoring
finishing last weekend's two game
series with 37 points. But he has not
been able to fill McKay's shoes in
the rebounding department.
Although McKay has played three
games less than Lewin he still
leads him in total rebounds' this
season 204-174.
Sailors place second
The UBC sailing team finished a
close second to the University of
Washington in the UBC Annual
Winter Regatta held Saturday and
Sunday at Jericho Sailing Centre.
UBC held the lead after the first
day of racing with two wins, two
seconds, a third and one seventh.
But problems with the wind, and
two bad races Sunday, dropped
them back into second place —
seven points behind Washington.
. The regatta was the largest ever
held at UBC with 60 participants
from 10 universities competing.
The third place club was from the
University   of   Calgary   and   the
fourth place team was from the
University of Victoria. The
University of Oregon, Western
Washington State, the University
of Puget Sound, Simon Fraser
University and Royal Roads
Military College also took part.
UBC won more races than the
University of Washington, but they
weren't as consistent. Washington
placed either second or third in
nearly all of their races.
The -women's team is holding
eliminations for the North West
women's championships to be held
at the University of Washington
Feb. 12 and 13.
Match box
FRIDAY
CURLING
Women's curling team In the Arbutus
bonspiel,   all   day,   Arbutus   Curling
Club.
GYMNASTICS
Eastern   Washington   State   at   UBC
(men's), 7:30 p.m., P.E. gymnastics
gym.
HOCKEY
University of Alberta at  UBC,  8:00
p.m., winter sports centre.
SATURDAY
CURLING
Women's curling team in the Arbutus
bonspiel, all day, Arbutus Curling
Club.
SOCCER
Richmond Inn at UBC (men's) 2
p.m., Thunderbird Stadium.
FENCING
Stephen     Lazar    Memorial    Tourna-
. ment, all day, Gyms A and B.
TENNIS
University of Washington Huskies at
UBC, 10:30 p.m., Armouries.
GYMNASTICS
Washington State at UBC, (men's),
7:30 p.m., P.E. gymnastics gym.
HOCKEY
University    of   Alberta   at    UBC,    8
p.m., winter sports centre.
BASKETBALL
UBC at the University of Lethbridge,
11 a.m., CBC television.
SUNDAY
CURLING
Women's curling team in the Arbutus
bonspiel, all day, Arbutus Curling
Club.
FENCING
Stephen    Lazar    Memorial    Tournament, all day, Gyms A and B.
SOCCER
Old Styles at UBC (women's), 11
a.m., Mclnnes Field.
HOCKEY
Surrey at UBC (jv.), 3:15 p.m.,
winter sports centre.
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
688-2481
The Collins Racquet Instructional Programme
Offers
FREE BADMINTON LESSONS
February 9 - March 10
Mon. & Thurs. 11:30 - 12:30
Wed. & Fri.    1:30 -   2:30
IN THE WAR MEMORIAL GYM
Open to students, faculty and staff —
beginner and intermediate levels.
Register at Rm. 203
War Memorial Gym
or UK I o
Lethbridge forward Perry
Mirkovich is the player the 'Birds
will have to watch this weekend.
He is eighth in league scoring with
a total of 200 points for an average
of 14.2 points per game. Mirkovich
is also consistent in the rebounding
department with an average of 8.5
—doug field photo
BLOCKING SPIKE, UBC players leap in front of shot by member of
visiting Loyola Marymount University volleyball team. Thunderbirds
beat American junior champs from Los Angeles 15-6, 15-12, 15-5-
Wednesday in War Memorial Gym. Teams meet again in 16-team
weekend tournament in Victoria.
boards per game to give him fourth
place in league rebounding.
Lethbridge is in last place in the
Canada West standings having
only two wins this year as opposed
to 12 losses. Last weekend they
dropped two games to the Calgary
Dinosaurs by convincing scores,
92-73 and 91-78. But on their home
court the Pronghorns can turn into
a real upset team. Their wins this
season have been against the two
second place teams, Calgary and
Victoria, in Lethbridge. Jan. 14 the
Pronghorns almost upset the
Alberta Golden Bears at home.
They lost the game in the last 10
seconds, 72-69.
The Saturday game should be in
front of a packed house as it will be
televised live from Lethbridge as
the C.B.C. College Game of the
Week. It will be shown at 11 a.m.,
Vancouver, time, on channel 2.
Thunderbirds
look for win
against UofA
The league leading University of
Alberta Golden Bears visit the
winter sports centre this weekend.
The Bears have defeated the 'Birds
in their four meetings to date. But
all of them have been played in
Edmonton and were very close.
TTiree of the games were decided
by one goal.
UBC is in second place, ten
points behind Edmonton and eight
points ahead of Calgary.
Thesecond place finisher will likely
represent western Canada at the
Canadian final to be held in Edmonton, Mar. 3 and 4.
Alberta is currently ranked
number one in collegiate hockey
while UBC is sixth.
Game times are 8 p.m. Friday
and Saturday, admission is free to
UBC students.
Make your great escape to Penticton for nine
days of fun and good times during this major
winter festival (Feb. 12-20)  Over 40 Events...
•Molstar Ski Challenge. 4x4 races etc	
Stage Shows	
"Jim Staflbrd'V'Stan Kenton'V'Rock Conceit" Page 16
THE        UBYSSEY
Friday, February 4, 1977
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3
Open Thursday and Friday
until 9 P.M.
556 SEYMOUR ST.
DOWNTOWN
682-6144

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