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The Ubyssey Feb 11, 2010

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Array Putting Darth Vader on our boobs SINCE 1918
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LEARN MORE ON PAGE 8
After three
years, has
the point
been made?
The third annual
Poverty Olympics had
the highest number
of attendees yet. With
the world s eyes on
Vancouver, people
everywhere are
beginning to notice the
Downtown Eastside.
MORE ON PAGE 3
It seems like people are
outsiders and are thrown
away, but you can all come
together again."
MICHAEL THIBAULT PHOTOS/THE UBYSSEY
THURSDAY^B^B
2010.02.11
WEATHER @ UBC           ^
12 LIGHT RAIN
13 SHOWERS
j^j^^v^ >^E8il]fllHBH
14 SHOWERS
5:26   .■,
SUNSET ^-WC-,
UBC BY NUMBERS
69 DAYS'TIL END OF TERM
2 UBYSSEY ISSUES A WEEK
4 UPCOMING OLYMPICS ISSUES
17 DAYS UNTIL WE NEVER WANT
TO HEAR ABOUT OLYMPICS AGAIN
NEWS BRIEFS
POT SMOKING INEFFECTIVE
AGAINST ALZHEIMERS
Using medicinal marijuana may
not be as benefitial for those
with Alzheimer's disease as previously thought.
The new study, conducted by UBC researchers, uses
mice with human genetic modification. Previous studies used
mice carrying amyloid proteins,
which is the toxin responsible for the formation of brain
plaques in Alzheimer's patients.
The mice were treated with
cannabinoids, which are more
potent than typical marijuana
compounds.
It was found that the mice
had the same density of neurons and plaque formation
as the control group, despite
having been exposed to the
cannaboids.
KWANTLEN RAISES
$4000 FOR HAITI
Kwantlen Polytechnic University
has managed to raise $4311.84
for Haiti relief in the last month.
Students from all four campuses raised $1077.96. The
Kwantlen Students' Association
matched the amount to send
to those affected by the earthquake, then the university
matched the combined funds.
UBC ALUMNUS RECEIVES
OSCAR NOMINATION
UBC Film Production alumnus
Julian Clarke has been nominated for an Academy Award.
Clarke is nominated for the
Film Editing category for his
work on Neill Blomkamp's film
District 9. He is also nominated
for awards from the American
Cinema Editors Eddies and
Orange British Academy Film
Awards.
CRIME WATCH
February 2 Mischief to Vehicle.
While parked on Student Union
Blvd, complainant reported the
front window was smashed.
February 2 Two vehicles broken into at the Museum of
Anthropology parking lot. Police
are still investigating.
February 2 Two vehicles broken into at North Parkade.
Suspect(s) smashed window of
vehicle and stole items.
Febuary 3 Theft from vehicle
from North Parkade.
February 3 Three thefts from
backpacks at Koerner Library.
February 5 Theft from vehicle.
Window had been smashed
to steal laptop from North
Parkade. UBYSSEY.CA/EVENTS/2010.02.11
FEBRUARY II, 2010
VOLUME XCI,   N°XL
EDITORIAL
COORDINATING EDITOR
Paul Bucci: coordinating@ubyssey.ca
NEWS EDITOR
Samantha Jung: news@ubyssey.ca
ASSOCIATE NEWS EDITOR
Sarah Chung: schung@ubyssey. ca
CULTURE EDITOR
Kate Barbaria : culture@ubyssey.ca
ASSOCIATE CULTURE EDITOR
Jonny Wakefield: jwakejield@ubyssey.ca
SPORTS EDITOR
Justin McElroy : sports@ubyssey.ca
IDEAS EDITOR
Trevor Record: ideas@ubyssey.ca
PHOTO EDITOR
GeraldDeo :photos@ubyssey.ca
GRAPHICS ASSISTANT
Anthony Goertz: graphics@ubyssey.ca
PRODUCTION MANAGER
Virginie Menard: production @ubyssey. ca
COPY EDITOR
Katarina Grgic: copy@ubyssey.ca
MULTIMEDIA EDITOR
Tara Martellaro : 7nultimedia@ubyssey.ca
CONTRIBUTING EDITOR
Ashley Whillans : awhillans@ubyssey.ca
Room 24, Student Union Building
6138 Student Union Boulevard
Vancouver, BCV6T lZl
tel: 604.822.2301
fax: 604.822.9279
web: www.ubyssey.ca
e-mail: feedback @ubyssey. ca
BUSINESS
Room 23, Student Union Building
advertising: 604.822.1654
business office: 604.822.6681
fax: 604.822.1658
e-mail: advertising@ubyssey. ca
BUSINESS MANAGER : Fernie Pereira
AD TRAFFIC : Sabrina Marchand
AD DESIGN : Chibwe Mweene
LEGAL
The Ubyssey is the official student newspaper of
the University of British Columbia. It is published
every Monday and Thursday by The Ubyssey
Publications Society. We are an autonomous,
democratically run student organization, and al
students are encouraged to participate.
Editorials are chosen and written by the
Ubyssey staff. They are the expressed opinion of
the staff, and do not necessarily reflect the views
of The Ubyssey Publications Society or the University of British Columbia. All editorial content
appearing in The Ubyssey is the property of The
Ubyssey Publications Society. Stories, opinions,
photographs and artwork contained herein cannot
be reproduced without the expressed, written
permission of The Ubyssey Publications Society
The Ubyssey is a founding member of Canadian University Press (CUP) and adheres to CUP's
guiding principles.
Letters to the editor must be under 300 words
Please include your phone number, student
number and signature (not for publication) as
well as your year and faculty with all submissions. ID will be checked when submissions are
dropped off at the editorial office of The Ubyssey;
otherwise verification will be done by phone.
"Perspectives" are opinion pieces over 300 words
but under 750 words and are run according to
space. "Freestyles" are opinion pieces written by
Ubyssey staff members. Priority will be given to
letters and perspectives over freestyles unless
the latter is time sensitive. Opinion pieces wil
not be run until the identity of the writer has
been verified. The Ubyssey reserves the right to
edit submissions for length and clarity. All letters
must be received by 12 noon the day before
ntended publication. Letters received after this
point will be published in the following issue
unless there is an urgent time restriction or other
matter deemed relevant by the Ubyssey staff
It is agreed by all persons placing display or
classified advertising that if the Ubyssey Publications Society fails to publish an advertisement
or if an error in the ad occurs the liability of the
UPS will not be greater than the price paid for
the ad. The UPS shall not be responsible for
slight changes or typographical errors that do not
lessen the value or the impact of the ad
CONTRIBUTORS
Uh, today we have for appetizers roules
marinieres, Samantha Jung, Sarah Chung, Boel
Moeurs, Jesse Goodall with a side of Larisa Karr,
pate de foie gras, some delightfully aged Gerald
Deo, a smattering of Keegan Bursaw, Geoff Lister,
Michael Thibault, and Sean Morrow, and of course
the Anthony Goertz. In addition to which, the usual
Beluga caviar, with Trevor Becord, optional Kasha
Chang or Austin Holm. Quite a nice little Arshy
Mann, or a Jessica Mach if that tickles your fancy.
Tart de Tagh Sira—that's the Olympic special—but
we've just run out of Justin McElroy. For the discerning palate, I might recommend a Kate Barbaria,
although the Jonny Wakefield has been getting very
good reviews, not as showy as the Bryce Warnes.
The Joanna Chiu is good with the tart amandine,
or oeufs de caille Daniella Zandbergen Kristen
Harris. Little Katarina Grgics on a bed of pureed Paul
Bucci; very delicate, very subtle, with a hint of Tara
Martellaro. The Brendan Albano is particularly good
for sharing, although the Krittana Khurana and the
Chibwe Mweene make a lovely sampler. All mixed
up together in a bucket with the Kai Green on top
V      Canada Post Sales
Agreement
Number 0040878022
Canadian    printed on^100s%
University     'reeydedpaper
Press \_AQ
EVENTS
CLASSIFIEDS
Price Reduced. 2005 Acura
TL fully loaded, 56,000 klm. 4
doors, standard, white exterior, leather interior in good condition, $21,000. Contact calvin.
magic32@gmail.com.
Men's Rugby Calendar. 12
months. 12 pictures. SIS/calendar. All proceeds go to
the UBC's men's program.
Contact benjones.eng@gmail.
com or call at 604-8386400.
ONGOING EVENTS
UBYSSEY PRODUCTION • Come
help us create this baby!
Learn about layout and editing. Expect to be fed. • Every
Sunday and Wednesday, 2pm.
KOERNER'S NIGHT • Join us for
open mic night every Monday.
Listen to the different flavours
of music, all while enjoying a
nice cold beer or a competitive
game of pool. • Every Monday,
8:30pm onwards. Koerner's
Pub.
NOON "FUN" RUN • Run for fun!
Walk for fun! Get healthy and
come run or walk the UBC REC
Noon "Fun" Run, hosted by the
UBC REC Health Promotions
Department which takes participants throughout many of
UBC's most scenic areas on a
course ranging from 3 to 5km. •
Every Thursday, 12:30pm, meeting outside the doors of the
Student Rec Centre.
MONDAY NIGHT COMMUNITY MUSIC
& MEAL • Like to play music?
Just want to listen? Looking
for a sense of community? This is for all members
of the UBC community who
want to have a good meal and
great conversation. All meals
are home-cooked and are
vegetarian-friendly. • Every
Monday,       6:30pm-8:30pm,
Chapel of the Epiphany (6030
Chancellor Blvd), more info
revnathanwright@mac.com.
VAGINA   MONOLOGUES   •     UBC
V-Day is proud to present their
2010 benefit productions of
The Vagina Monologues and
A Memory, A Monologue, A
Rant and A Prayer. • Feb. 9-13,
7:30pm-11:30pm, Freddy Wood
Theatre, $15 for either show, or
$25 for both productions.
TANTRAMAR GOTHIC ART EXHIBIT •
Regent College Lookout Gallery
presents Tantramar Gothic,
a collection of work by Dan
Steeves. • Mon.-Fri. 8:30am-
5pm, Sat. 12pm-4pm, Regent
College, 5800 University Blvd.,
runs until Monday, Mar. 1.
CHEER   ON    CANADA   CIRCLE   •
Follow the athletes on our 72"
projection screen in our special Cheer On Canada Circle.
Come with your colleagues,
bring your lunch, meet new
friends, trade pins and watch
Canada win! • Feb. 15-26,
12pm-1:30pm, UBC Bookstore,
6200 University Blvd.
THURSDAY, FEB. 11
ROBERT LEPAGE IN CONVERSATION* The UBC Department of
Theatre and Film proudly presents Robert Lepage in conversation. Lepage is one of the
world's true theatrical geniuses and a very articulate commentator on his own processes. Don't miss this unique opportunity to see Lepage up
close and talk to him about his
work. • 2pm-3pm, Frederic
Wood Theatre, free admission,
please reserve your seat at
604-822-2678.
OLYMPIC TORCH RELAY CELEBRATION
• Just one day before the 2010
Olympic Winter Games begin in
Vancouver, the Olympic Torch will
zig zag through UBC Point Grey
campus, kicking off the Olympic
experience. To mark the occasion, the UBC 2010 Olympic &
Paralympic Secretariat and UBC
Rec are planning a free campus-
wide celebration which will be open
to all students, staff, faculty, alumni
and friends. • 4pm-8pm, Old bus
loop at the corner of University
Boulevard and East Mall.
FREE HOT CHOCOLATE AT OLYMPIC TORCH RELAY • Coming for the
Olympic Torch Replay events at
the old bus loop? Drop by the
UBC Bookstore directly across
the street for a free hot chocolate.
Remember to be sustainable-
bring your own mug! We will also
have the Torch Relay Candles for
$2. Get in the spirit with our huge
selection of red, white and UBC
blue Canadian clothing! See you
there for the fun! • 4pm-6:30pm,
UBC Bookstore.
FRIDAY, FEB. 12
AMS ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING •
The AGM is a great opportunity
for you to get a glimpse of your
student union's direction for the
year to come as well as meet
and connect with other students, UBC and AMS staff, and
elected student representatives
over free hors d'oeuvres and
drinks. • 3pm-4pm, SUB 207.
BIG SCREEN VIEWING OF THE OPENING CEREMONY* Part of the More
Than Gold Westside Events, this
is the first in a series of activities
being hosted during the Olympics
ice hockey games. Watch the
opening ceremony on the big
screen for free! All are welcome.
• 6pm-9:30pm, University Chapel,
5375 University Boulevard.
ELIXIR • SUS SoCom presents the
most exclusive 19+ licensed dance
to come to UBC! A live DJ, crazy
sound system, beautiful people,
and cheap drinks galore, you better
be READY for a night to remember. Tickets will be sold at Ladha
for a LIMITED time starting Feb.
8. There will only be 200 available,
so get yours quick! • 9pm-1am,
Abdul Ladha Science Student
Centre, $5 tickets.
SATURDAY, FEB. 13
PRESENTATION SKILLS - CONFERENCE (MURC) • This workshop prepares students to present at UBC's
Multidisciplinary Undergraduate
Research Conference (MURC) although it is open to all students
wishing to learn more about public speaking. The workshop consists of four sections: principles of poster presentation, principles of oral presentations, effective presentation delivery and
handling    audience    questions.
• 11am-2pm, Dodson Room,
IKBLC.
SUNDAY, FEB. 14
LIVE ENTERTAINMENT • Part of
the More Than Gold Westside
Events, Regent College is hosting a number of activities for the
Olympic ice hockey games, including a welcome center with
an internet cafe, pin trading,
photo station, prayer room and
chapel series. • 10am-4pm,
Regent College, 5800 University
Blvd.
THURSDAY, MAR. 4
SPARTACUSYOUTHCLUBCLASSSERIES
• The Spartacus Youth Club Class
presents Class 2: Independence
for Quebec! Marxism and the
National Question. • 6:30pm,
SUB Room 224.
FRIDAY, MAR. 12
A CONCERT FOR HAITI • Come enjoy live music by unique local
artists in the setting of Green
College. Proceeds from this
event will go towards supporting the ongoing medical relief efforts by MSF (Doctors
Without Borders) in Haiti. •
6pm piano-side reception, 7:30
pm concert, Graham House,
Green College, tickets $20.
a placeof mind
THE   UNIVERSITYOF  BRITISH COLUMBIA
CAMPUS + COMMUNITY PLANNING
Teach English
Abroad
Public Open House
Thunderbird Stadium Field + Lord and Buck Fields
You are invited to attend an Open House to view and comment on site improvements
proposed for the Thunderbird Stadium Field and Lord and Buck Fields. The grass
infield at Thunderbird Stadium will be replaced with a synthetic field, and the asphalt
surface at the Lord and Buck Rugby Fields will be replaced with grass turf.
(WHOM0"**"
Dour) MM
Sports Cento
Buck
Field
Lord
Field
Thunderbird
Park |
EastlM
Meeting
Location
josJibu
Date:
Mon. March 1, 2010
Time: 4:30 - 6:30 PM
Location:
Heritage Room -
Thunderbird Stadium
6288 Stadium Rd
For directions visit:
www.maps.ubc.ca.
For more information on
this project, please visit:
www.planning.ubc.ca
Please direct questions
to Karen Russell, Manager,
Development Services
karen.russell@ubc.ca
TESOL/TESL Teacher Training
Certification Courses
• Intensive 60-Houi Program
• Classroom Management Techniques
• Detailed Lesson Planning
• ESL Skills Development
• Comprehensive Teaching Materials
• Interactive Teaching Practicum
• Internationally Recognized Certificate
■ Teacher Placement Service
• Money-Back Guarantee Included
• Thousands of Satisfied Students
OXFORD SEMINARS
604-683-3430/1-800-269-6719
www.oxfordseminars.ca
Got a sweet event
you want to advertise?
All events are free
for UBC students!
i
E-mail us at
eve nts@ ubyssey. ca. 2010.02. ll/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/3
l\
EWS
HERE ARE SOME OF THE THINGS YOU CAN EXPECT DURING OUR OLYMPICS ISSUES:
• Tagh Sira brings you coverage inside the venues                 • Taking apart the finances of the Da Vinci exhibit
• Extensive coverage of concerts and live acts                       • How the Olympics are affecting local businesses
• Coverage of protests         • A look at doping regulations    • The perils, disputes and joys of the newsroom
AND MUCH MORE!
EDITOR SAMANTHAJUNG»news@ubyssey.ca
ASSOCIATE SARAH CHUNG »schung@ubyssey.ca
Poverty Olympics attracts 500
JONNY WAKEFIELD
jwakefield@ubyssey.ca
The world saw another side of
Canada's poorest neighbourhood last Sunday, as some
500 volunteers, activists and
citizens, with and without
homes, gathered for the third
annual Poverty Olympics
in Vancouver's Downtown
Eastside (DTES).
Turnout reached an all-time
high at this year's event, which
seeks to draw awareness to poverty and homelessness in the
DTES.
The event was particularly meaningful this year, as
Vancouver will be on the world
stage in a few days' time.
Let's shift
government
priorities to a
poverty reduction
plan.
TRISH GARNER
HOMELESS ADVOCATE
"Shift your priorities from
Olympic spending," said homeless advocate Trish Garner at
the unveiling of the Poverty
Olympic torch. "Let's shift government priorities to a poverty
reduction plan."
The ten-foot tall, two-hundred-pound paper mache torch
reached its destination, the
Japanese Hall, after a cross-BC
Trek from Golden.
"I'm exhausted, but that's
nothing compared to what people have to go through on the
streets," Garner said.
The Poverty Olympic
"games," a series of skits put on
by local advocacy groups, featured a hockey match between
DTES residents and corporate
boosters, a ski slalom in which
"Gordon Campbell" repeatedly
failed to meet housing and welfare promises, and a group of
kids wresding a man dressed
as VANOC into submission.
The message behind these
skits was clear: spending on
the Games has lead to a spike
in homelessness and poverty across BC due to cuts in
social services and housing
programs. The Games are a corporate-funded party that puts
spectacle before people.
"Our message is that if
the amount of money that
were spent on the Olympics
were spent on ending poverty and homelessness, it could
be done," said organizer Jean
Swanson.
BOTTOM LEFT: Volunteers
celebrate the VANOC hockey
team's defeat.
TOP: Volunteers dressed as
Gordon Campbell and Stephen
Harper fail to hold up to their
promises   MICHAEL THIBAULT
PHOTOS/THE UBYSSEY
"This is two weeks of games.
It's more important than a
game, it's more serious,"
Swanson told Reuters. "People
die because they're poor, people die because they're homeless. It's completely unnecessary, this is a rich country."
But the event didn't just highlight problems. It showcased a
strong   sense   of   community,
as volunteers and residents
shared coffee and "cockroach
cake."
"I like the community," said
Muriel Marjorie, a neighbourhood resident who carried a
torch made out of a plunger.
"It seems like people are kind
of outsiders and they're thrown
away, but you can all come together again. You can just be a
community, and people are accepting of one another, and we
encourage one another."
There are the results
of generations of
abuse and racism
we're seeing here.
You need to
listen to us in the
community.
GENATH0MPS0N
CARNEGIE COMMUNITY ACTION
PROJECT MEMBER
Gena Thompson, a resident
who works with the Carnegie
Community Action Project and
played mascot Chewy the Rat,
spoke about the misconceptions about the DTES. "I know
thatyou see a lot of media from
the DTES. And you see really
ugly and terrifying things."
"They're not listening to the
community that's here, [the
community] that's finding ways
to deal with homelessness and
drug addiction on a large scale.
We're working on it. These are
the results of generations of
abuse and racism we're seeing
here. You need to listen to us in
the community. We're working
on solutions, and everyone's
going to need the solutions." tl
—with files from
Fabiola Carletti
INTRODUCING TAGH
The Olympics are here
TAGH SIRA
o lymp icsedi to r@u byssey. ca
Unless you have been living in a
lab on campus this whole time,
you know that something big is
happening. It might be the helicopters constantly flying overhead (even as I write this at
8am), the lack of construction
or the banners that are hanging
from every possible surface, but
the Olympics are definitely here.
Whether you think the
Games being here is positive
or   negative,   the   inexorable
truth is that they're starting
on February 12.
For me, the Olympics represents a portion of my youth.
I trained and competed in
Biathlon, one of the most misunderstood sports in the whole
Games. I remember telling people that it was my sport, and
then having to follow it up with
an explanation of what it actually involved. It's the one that
combines cross-country skiing
and rifle shooting. I'm serious.
After the inevitable injury,
which put me out for a season,
the phrase "Those who can't
do, teach" held true for me. I
coached for a couple of years
before letting biathlon fade into
the vault of random life experiences. I've been a science student, a biathlete, a pilot—and
now, I'm a journalist.
I have been given the unique
privilege to attend the 2010
Olympics as a fully accredited
journalist. The Ubyssey is the
only student media organization in the world to have a full
access pass to the games (as far
as we know), and I'll be your
eyes on the inside. So what exactly does that mean?
This intrepid
reporter will be
out at the Canada
Place Media Centre
being embedded in
the throng of other
reporters.
This intrepid reporter will be
out at the Canada Place Media
Centre being embedded with
the throng of other reporters.
At Canada Hockey Place (GM
Place), watching team Canada
make it to the gold medal game.
At Whisder, up on the hills
watching athletes ride an ice
skate attached to a board down
a track that makes the black-
hole at Splashdown look like
a baby slide. And at Cypress,
watching Shaun White and
others bring the spirit of the
X-Games to the Olympics.
I shall be your eyes, ears and
voice (I'd prefer not to taste,
touch or smell too much) at
these events and will try to cover an aspect of the Games not
normally told: "What is actually
going on at the games that you
won't see on CTV?" But more
importanfly, I will endeavour
to bring a novel point of view
to sports reporting and look at
the science involved in these
Games.
You'll have a voice in what
I cover. Right now, you can
vote whether I'll be spending my Saturday in Whisder
or Vancouver on the "Where
Tagh will be today," poll on The
Ubyssey website. We'll be doing
things like that throughout the
games, and I'll be writing plenty of stories for the website.
You'll also catch my exploits in
print twice a week.
Look for my column over the
next four Olympic issues of The
Ubyssey, and look for my blog
at ubyssey.ca. I will bring you
up-to-date tweets, blog posts, interviews and photos every day
over the next two weeks, vl 4/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/2 0 10.02.11
IUBCI      I    a place of mind
THE  UNIVERSITYOF BRITISH COLUMBIA
CAMPUS + COMMUNITY PLANNING
Public Open House
Norman B. Keevil Institute of Mining
You are invited to attend an Open House to view and comment on the Norman B. Keevil
Institute of Mining. The proposal is for a new two-storey 604 sq.m (5,697 sq.ft) addtion
on the west side of the Coal & Mineral Processing Laboratory to accomodate research
laboratories, graduate student support space, study areas and office support space.
Date: Wednesday March 3, 2010 11:30 AM -1:30 PM
Location: Atrium - Fred Kaiser Bldg, 2332 Main Mall
For directions visit: www.maps.ubc.ca. For more information on
this project, please visit the C&CP website: www.planning.ubc.ca
Please direct questions to Karen Russell, Manager Development Services, karen.russell@ubc.ca
WE'RE ALWAYS LOOKING FOR NEW CONTRIBUTORS..
HERE'S HOW YOU CAN HELP!
write a story {news, culture, sports, or ideas@ubyssey.ca)
learn layout {production@ubyssey.ca)
take photographs [photos@ubyssey.ca)
plan a fundraiser {coordinating@ubysseyca)
write a letter {feedback®ubyssey.ca)
perfect your editing skills {copy@ubysseyca)
E-MAIL US NOW, OR COME SEE US IN SUB 24!
Students in res have mixed
reaction to Games
SARAH LING
Contributor
UBC students living in residences are entering the extended reading break with
mixed emotions as they experience the impact of increased
traffic, construction and social concerns alongside excitement, freebies and national
pride.
Marine Drive resident and
avid hockey fan Jaspreet Kalsi
plans to attend the cultural
events, shows and other free
opportunities that will be offered throughout Vancouver.
"I want to experience the
Olympics firsthand, and what
better way to do that than being in close proximity to all the
events?" she asked. "I plan on
spending a lot of time just walking downtown and experiencing the atmosphere."
Other residents plan to invest their energies back into
the community. Monica Tse,
another Marine Drive resident, would leave UBC if it were
not for her responsibilites on
campus.
"I'm staying [at UBC] because I'm involved with UBC
Learning Exchange for their
reading week projects. There's
another girl in my reading
week project team that said her
reason for volunteering was to
contribute in a more positive
way than complaining about
the Olympics," she said.
I want to experience
the Olympics
firsthand...
JASPREET KALSI
MARINE DRIVE RESIDENT
Residence Advisors are required to fulfill their roles by
staying in the dormitories and
attending to the many residents
who will be staying. Janet Hong,
an RA in Totem Park, said that
residences have plans to continue to keep hosting events
during the Games.
"There are many small-, medium- and large-scale events
that RAs are planning, as we
are expecting 80 per cent of
our residents to remain on
campus during the break,"
Hong said. "This percentage
is likely to fluctuate, as many
students plan to host a friend
or family member," adding
that residents do not get reimbursed by UBC Housing
when they leave for a holiday
or reading break. The commuter student hostel at Gage
residences is not open during
reading week.
Hong also commented on the
annoyances the Games bring in
terms of transportation and the
big chance in terms of the campus atmosphere.
If Vancouver
cannot take care
of its own people,
then how can they
be ready to host
350,000 more
people in their city?
SYEDANDRABI
WALTER GAGE RESIDENT
"2010 Olympics [are] already
affecting a lot of things on campus," Hong said. "Bus lines
have temporarily changed,
there are several construction
sights to be witnessed around
the campus for the Olympic
preparation."
Some students are leaving Vancouver, and some residents are simply opposed to
the negative impacts of the
Olympics. Syed Andrabi of
Walter Gage residence is concerned with the city's rising
poverty levels.
"As much as I love the
Olympics...[they] have caused a
considerable amount of damage
to the poverty of Vancouver,"
said Andrabi.
"This event should have been
conducted in a way in which
growth and development would
have been promoted due to all
the investment which is going
to come in. If Vancouver cannot take care of its own people,
then how can they be ready to
host 350,000 more people in
their city?" tl
OLYMPICS BRIEFS
UBC CHOIR TO
PERFORM AT TORCH RELAY
The University Singers will
perform at the final ceremony
of the Olympic Torch Relay on
February 11.
According to the School of
Music's website, the choir will
perform "There's a light/cette
flamme" and "O Canada" at
David Lam Park.
The ensemble is composed
of a 32-person choir and is directed by Dr Graeme Langager.
SAID THE WHALE TO
PLAY AT TORCH RELAY
Said the Whale is set to play at
the UBC leg of the Torch Relay
on February 11.
According to the UBC 2010 website, the torch will arrive between
6pm and 7pm. Said the Whale is to
play shordy after the torch passes
through. The UBC Thunderbirds
Dance Team, Old Roger and Paul
Fliek will be playing the lead-up to
the torch's arrival.
There will be a torch-building
contest, food, concessions and
various booths set up at the site
of the relay, the Old Bus Loop
at the corner of East Mall and
University Boulevard.
STORE OWNER THREATENS
TO SUEVANOC
Mario Loscerbo, owner of
Mario's Gelato, has threatened
to sue the City of Vancouver
and VANOC, reported The
Georgia Straight.
The owner of the ice cream
shop on 88 East 1st Avenue
and Quebec Street claims that
the construction done outside his shop in preparation
for the Olympics made it difficult for clients to buy his treats.
Loscerbo's show is located di-
recdy across from the Olympic
Village.
He claims that his sales
dropped by over $1 million
last year, and that construction
crews have cracked some of
his decorative glass cubes and
damaged his neon sign.
Loscerbo says that he and
his lawyer have received no response from VANOC. tl 2010.02. ll/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/5
Sunday exams,
busy transit mark
Olympics at UBC
MINIMAL CHANGE
FORACADEMIA
Not too much has changed regarding regulations around
exams and courses in light of
the Olympics.
In 2007, UBC Senate approved a motion to extend the
reading break this year from
one week to two weeks so it
would cover the entire length of
the Olympic Games.
"It's a very robust set of academic regulations that both the
Senate and the deans thought
could accommodate whatever situation would arise during the Games," said Michelle
Aucoin, Director of the UBC
2010 Olympic and Paralympic
Secretariat.
Some in the Senate worried
about students missing out on
classes and midterms, especially during the Paralympics,
which are happening during
normal academic weeks. Geoff
Costeloe, Student Senator, defended the policy. "It quickly became unmanageable to
create an effective policy," he
said.
The final exam period contains one change: "In order
to conclude examinations by
April 30, the April 2010 examination period will include one
Sunday," said Collins.
If problems do arise, students are not left out in the
cold. Faculties and professors
themselves still have the ability
to reschedule, as per usual.
"They aren't entided to anything, but professors can manage their courses how they
want. Many of them are nicer than you think," Costeloe reminded students.
—Roel Moeurs
LIBRARIES OPEN
DURING GAMES
Most UBC libraries will continue to operate on normal winter
hours.
"I don't believe there are
difficulties. We've worked out
how best to provide service at
that point during the Olympics,
[and] we are not expecting any
impacts towards students,"
said Lea Starr, the Associate
University Librarian.
The two libraries that will
see some changes are the First
Nations Library and Robson
Square Library. The First
Nations Library will be closed
for two of the Saturdays during
reading week.
As for Robson Square, hours
will stay the same, but as all the
tables and chairs have been removed to make space for the
Olympic offices that share the
library, there won't be much
space for studying.
—Roel Moeurs
WANT TO PROTEST?
NOTIFY THE ISU FIRST
Students should not expect significant changes to their day-
to-day lives on campus during
the Olympics from security services, according to Constable
Mandy Edwards, spokesperson for the Vancouver 2010
Integrated Security Unit (ISU).
The ISU is responsible for all
Olympic venue security.
"Our security work force,
which will entail police officers
as well as the private security...
will all be inside the venue perimeter, so it's not likely they
are going to stop you on the
street or in between areas,"
said Edwards. "It's the responsibility of the UBC [RCMP] detachment for everything outside of the venue."
According to the ISU website, the most notable changes
will be road closures and security perimeters. Roads subject
to closure will remain open to
pedestrians and cyclists. Only
authorized vehicles will be able
to enter the security perimeter,
and they will be subjected to
screening.
Staff Sergeant Kevin Kenna
of the UBC RCMP detachment
explained that it would be
"business as usual" outside of
Olympic venues. "In a nutshell,
nobody is going to be stopped
randomly," he assured.
With regards to protests, he
said that "groups can protest
as long they are not impeding
traffic, [and it is] lawful." He
does not foresee the UBC RCMP
detachment confiscating any
signs or interfering with peaceful and lawful protests.
To students wishing to protest, he recommends that they
"contact us, let us know, so that
there are no surprises."
"We are preparing for the
worst and hoping for the best."
—Jesse Goodall
NAVIGATING TO
AND FROM CAMPUS
TransLink is urging students
wishing to travel to and from
UBC during the Olympics to
be well-informed of the new
TransLink schedule.
"Students should be aware of
what time an [Olympic] event is
going to begin and what time
it is going to end," said Ken
Hardie of TransLink Media
Relations.
"They should plan to be at the
bus loop at least two hours before an event and one and a half
hours after an event."
An additional 13 flex buses running the 99 B-Line route
will be provided by TransLink
during the Games to accommodate spectators and volunteers.
UBC 2010 Olympic and
Paralympic Secretariat Director
Michelle Aucoin believes that
congestion will be the heaviest around the main bus loop.
"Overall, I don't believe there's
going to be a huge difference in
the amount of congestion," said
Aucoin.
"The important thing to keep
in mind is that everyone will be
coming and leaving at the same
time."
Aucoin urges everyone to
check travelsmart2010.ca to organize their schedule around
Olympic events and to use alternate forms of transportation
such as biking or public transit.
But if driving is a must, there
are several parkades on campus that will remain open to the
public.
Drew Snider, spokesperson
for TransLink, doesn't believe
that there will be any problems with the transportation
changes.
"The biggest obstacle will involve people not being familiar
with the bus routes and not really being prepared to adjust to
the change," he said, tl
—Larisa Karr
your community I
university Village Marketplace) 604.227.S5QS
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authorized dealer
See in-store for details. No cash value. Not to be used in conjunction with any other offer. * Applicable to a new 3-yr voice & data activation with a $45 minimum monthly service
fee. Expires February 15, 2010. BlackBerry, RIM, Research In Motion, SureType and related trade-marks, names and logos are the property of Research In Motion Limited ard
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Rogers Communicat ons Inc. used under license or of Rogers Wireless Partnership. All other brand names are trademarks of their respective owners. ©2010
[UBC]     I    aplaceofmind
THE  UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
CAMPUS + COMMUNITY PLANNING
TRANSPORTATION^
CONSULTATION
HAVE YOUR SAY ABOUT BUS, BIKE AND
PEDESTRIAN USES ON CAMPUS.
In March, 2010, Campus and Community Planning will be holding a public
consultation about the future location of bus infrastructure as well as
how to improve cycling and walking on campus.
To receive information and updates about the consultation, please email
stefani.lu@ubc.ca, subject line "transportation consultation."
visit planning.ubc.ca
for more information
STAYING IN RESIDENCE FOR THE OLYMPICS?
Contribute to our four Olympics issues!
• Cover free concerts
• Question VANOC's practices
• Interview local politicians
E-mail news@ubyssey.ca ifyou're interested! Now! 6/UBYSSEY.CA/NEWS/2010.02.11
n^+ <*|' 2010.02.11/UBYSSEY.CA/GAMES/7
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PUZZLES PROVIDED BY BESTCR0SSW0RDS.COM. USED WITH PERMISSION.
CAMPUS CALLOSUM, BY PAM OLIVER (NEXUS)
ACROSS
1. Earth Day subj.
5. Soviet labour camp
10. Up and I
14. Jupiter
15. Licorice-like flavoring
16. Ray of light
17. Blunted blade
18. Scoffs
19. Commedia dell'
20. Type of cloud
23.A Kennedy
24. boy!
25. Warns
29. Excite
31. Loss leader?
32. Bran source
33. Uncertainty
37. Jute or ramie
40. Born
41. Collar type
42. Between 80-and
90-years-old
47. Before
48. Actress Charlotte
49. Stifled laugh
53. Mend
55. Dog-poweredsnowvehicle
57. Hwy.
58. Renewal
61. Public walk
64. Tropical plant used in
cosmetics
65. Roman poet
66. Wing-like parts
67. Eight singers
68. Track event
69. Be sorry for
70. That group
71. Boxer Max
DOWN
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3. Exaggerate
4. Lecherous look
5. Joke teller
6. Single things
7. Seventh sign of the zodiac
8. Between ports
9. Develop slowly
10. Demote
11. Thrice, in prescriptions
12. Chow down
13. Marseilles Mrs
21. Seine feeder
22. Bator, Mongolia
26. Defeat decisively
27. Edible corm
28. Type of gun
30. As far as
31. Affirm solemnly
34. Actress Heche
35. Narc's org.
36. Canvas shelter used on
camping trips
37. Joburg settler
38. Area of 4840 square yards
39. Pace
43. Broad smile
44. Hearing distance
45. Do repeatedly
46. Verdi opera
50. Trifles
51. Prima ballerina
52. Pay as due
54. Choreographer Alvin
55. Domingo
56. Crescents
59. PC expert
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62. Boxer Laila
63. Back muscle, briefly
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Police stake out new easy-access bait cars to catch thieves.
ENGG PAPER: VEGAS, BY TYLER \NUDR\CK (THE GATEWAY]
I
DONALD JUST FOLINP OUT
THAT DESPITE REASSURANCES
FROM SEVERAL ADVERTISMENTS
WHAT HAPPENS IN VEGAS,
DOES NOT STAY IN VESAS.
a place of mind
THE  UNIVERSITYOF BRITISH COLUMBIA
CAMPUS + COMMUNITY PLANNING
Public Open House
Pharmaceutical Science + Centre for Drug Research and Development
You are invited to attend an Open House to view and comment on this new facility
for the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Science and the Centre for Drug Research and
Development. The proposal is for a new six-storey 19,881 sq.m (214,000 sq.ft) building
to accommodate lecture theatres, teaching + research labs, and academic offices.
Date: Wednesday, March 3, 2010 4:30 - 7:00 PM
Location: Rm 1330, Life Sciences Centre, 2350 Health Sciences Mall
For directions visit: www.maps.ubc.ca. For more information on
this project, please visit the C&CP website: www.planning.ubc.ca
<-,Meet'."9      o*»™
Location       _„„
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Please direct questions to Karen Russell, Manager Development Services, karen.russell@ubc.ca
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Book your Contiki Holiday at Travel CUTS and get cash to spend on your vacation.
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that it could win a
beauty pageant.
pwd14ctioh@14bijsseij.ca. 8/UBYSSEY.CA/CULTURE/2010.02.11
THESE GUYS ARE ARTISTS
Love and Odium, hanging at the AMS Art Gallery,
is a series from Visual Arts students Alvis Chu
and Luis Lopa. It is an exhibition of contrast.
Chu's work is a set of layered charcoal etchings.
"The experience is kind of hard to see," said Chu.
"These pieces are meant to drag you in." Lopa's
paintings are splashes of almost neon colour over
pencilled ramblings. They can be appreciated from
a distance. "It reflects both a love and hate for
life,"said Lopa.
Oh, let me have just a little bit of peril?
MICHAEL THIBAULT PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
BRYCE WARNES
bwarnes@ubyssey.ca
Any of the swashbuckling romance associated with the
art of swordplay fades into
the background the moment
people start swinging blades
at each other in an honest attempt to maim or kill.
Admittedly, no one lost any
limbs at Academie Duello's
new location, which opened
Saturday night. But as steel
clashed, and the audience
applauded, it was clear that
more than mere showmanship was at play.
As Directors and founders
of the school, Devon Boorman
and Randy Packer assert sword-
play is a martial art—one with
an established history and numerous written sources to draw
from. The lessons at Academie
Duello   teach   not   only   the
appropriate movements and
mindset necessary for combat,
but the code of honour as well.
To that end, the school offers classes in longsword, side
sword and rapier, drawing
upon European martial arts
that trace their origins back to
the Renaissance and beyond.
The majority of the classes offered focus on practical combat—albeit with blunted blades
and historically accurate protective gear—and there are lessons in stage fighting available
as well.
Boorman suggests that
there is widespread interest
in Western martial traditions,
but that many potential students either don't know where
to begin or find the prospect
intimidating.
The Academie has overcome these barriers by providing all the necessary equipment
at their classes, as well as emphasizing the fitness benefits
of practice through their heavy
weapons program.
In the five years since its inception, Academie Duello has
increased its membership to
several hundred. When the
school's former location in
Robson Square became a tight
fit, students were forced to
practice swordplay on the balcony due to a lack of space.
That has changed with
the establishment of a new
ground floor location on West
Hastings, one that offers plenty of space, as well as an arms
and armour museum, along
with an equipment store.
Not only were armed duelists
in attendance, but several born
killers as well. Joanna Bendey
director of the school's falconry program, answered questions and chatted with visitors
as her charge—a full-grown gyr
falcon—shifted resdessly on
her gloved hand. Bendey has
six years experience training
birds of prey, and has achieved
the rank of Journeyman within her tradition—one that traces its roots back to the ancient
Akkadians.
"[Falconry remains] relevant to the human condition,
because [the birds] do something we cant," says Bendey. It
necessitates a connection between animal and human, a
concerted pursuit of survival.
And while the fruits of this effort—mosdy ducks and geese,
as far as the gyr falcon is concerned—may not keep the pantry stocked, that art of falconry has a contemporary application. Once trained, a raptor can
be employed removing unwanted bird species from airports
and orchards.
The enlightened practicality of both the Academie's falconry program and its weapons training may be what sets
the school apart from similar
organizations.
Co-founders Boorman and
Packer met through the Society
of Creative Anachronism, but
Academie Duello's principles
and practices stretch beyond
nostalgia, celebrating what
has been, for many years, a
lost art.
"Our goal is not to recreate
history," says Boorman, amid
falcons stirring on their perches and students strolling by in
full armour. "It is to take the
passions that inspired the past,
and live them now." tl
Need a date destination that gets
the blood pumping? Academie
Duello is offering dueling classes for two this Valentine's Day.
Q&A I JUSTIN SMALL, OF DO MAKE SAY THINK
JONNY WAKEFIELD
jwakefield@ubyssey.ca
The veteran Toronto post-rock
band came through Vancouver
last Friday for a sold out show
at the Biltmore, in support of
their new album Other Truths.
The Ubyssey had a chance
to speak with guitarist Justin
Small before the show.
UBYSSEY Other Truths is a
four-track album that's over
40 minutes long. What's the recording process like?
SMALL We usually have just
kinda sketches. Having two
drummers kind of proposes
a bit of a challenge in that we
have to have them play around
skeletal ideas. Then we take
that and layer it, cut it up, shift
it around. Sort of compose a
song after the fact. Then we
have to learn it, so it's kind of
like a cover band. We're a Do
Make Say Think cover band
(laughs).
U Is it exhausting playing
these ten-plus minute songs
live?
SEAN MORROW PHOTO/THE UBYSSEY
S I'm not a drummer, so, no
(laughs).
U Is there a story behind how
you chose the track names: Do,
Make, Say, and Think?
S The narrative is what you
want to make of it. If you find
certain meaning in it, the
that's your meaning and that's
great. We decided to call them
Do, Make, Say, Think because,
well, we only had four songs
for the album (laughs). That
was the easiest way to do it.
U How about the title, Other
Truths?
S We were trying to describe
how we felt about the way the
songs were coming about.
Eventually a certain wisdom
revealed itself and we started discussing it. It's the idea
of there being multiple angles
to one thing, multiple opinions. There are multiple opinions about me from the angles of other people as I'm sure
there are with you. People are
gonna like you, people are gonna dislike you, but you're still
the same person. That truth
is evident to only the one who
holds that belief. Me and you
can look at this piece of technology (indicating my voice recorder) and have two very different opinions on it that we
hold to be absolutely true. So
it's not Other Truth, it's Other
Truths.
U Some folks call your music
"epic." Have you done anything
particularly epic or theatrical
on this tour?
S As opposed to playing three
sets a night? That's pretty epic.
U I was thinking more of a
standing on a mountain peak
in the moonlight kind of thing.
S So something inspirational, like the Good Lord paid us
a visit at a gig? No (laughs).
Sadly, I think we are just working really hard and slugging it
out and having a great time doing it. But you find those moments within yourself under
any circumstances. Looking
out the van on a drive through
Northern California is pretty
inspiring. Mount Shasta is just
beautiful. U 2010.02.11/UBYSSEY.CA/CULTURE/9
Keeping vaginas
in good company
JOANNA CHIU
Contributor
On Tuesday night, I went to the
opening of yet another stimulating staging of The Vagina
Monologues.
If you have gone anywhere
near the SUB in the past two
weeks, you may have noticed
the enthusiastic people dressed
up in giant vagina costumes and
peddling vagina-shaped chocolate lollipops. For Olympics visitors who haven't heard of the
V-Day Movement, this behaviour may seem a little strange.
UBC V-Day has been presenting The Vagina Monologues for
the past ten years, so many
students probably know that
V-Day is an international movement that seeks to stop violence
against women. The play was
written by V-Day founder Eve
Ensler after she interviewed
more than 200 women about
their vaginas. It has been con-
sistendy popular and attracts
returning audiences year after
year.
This year, the three directors of UBC V-Day decided to
take the risk of making considerable changes to the presentation of The Vagina Monologues.
They introduced live music, incorporated the use of levels and
props onstage and designed
unique costumes to make the
show more dynamic.
For the first time at UBC,
there will be an additional play
running during the same week
called A Memory, a Monologue,
a Rant and a Prayer. Whereas
The Vagina Monologues has an
all-female cast, the new play
features monologues by male
actors that express how sexualized violence affects everyone.
"It was so good to include
men in the movement more
direcdy, and the V-Day community is enhanced because of it,"
said co-director Lau Mehes.
All the proceeds from both
plays go towards the Sexual
Assault Support Centre at
UBC, the WISH Drop-In Centre
Society and the Vancouver
Lower Mainland Multicultural
Family Support Services
Society.
Yesterday night was my second time seeing The Vagina
Monologues. The play's (sometimes shockingly frank) sex-positive and body-positive messages were very liberating the first
time I experienced the play.
This second time around, although I still found monologues
such as "The Women who Loved
to Make Vaginas Happy" hilarious, I better appreciated how
well the play addresses a wide
variety of issues related to sexualized violence.
As an audience member, watching The Vagina
Monologues can put you on an
emotional rollercoaster. One
minute, you're cracking up at
a brilliandy pissed off tirade
about scented vaginal douches,
and the next minute, you might
be crying because of a starkly honest account of a women's rape and enslavement in
the Democratic Republic of the
Congo.
Overall, however, the play
leaves the audience in good
spirits, and the cast is able to effectively entertain as well as engage so that audience members
might feel as if they are part of
an energetic and growing global movement, vl
Playing at the Frederic Wood
Theatre, February 9-13 at 7:30.
Tickets on sale at the door or
through brownpapertickets.com
for $15.
FASHION FILES
The gentrified airliner, weed-laden rucksack & gentleman caller's bag. KRISTEN HARRIS PHOTOS/THE UBYSSEY
Ditch the baggage, keep the bags
KRISTEN HARRIS &
DANIELLAZANDBERGEN
Contributors
At first glance, bags can be
kind of boring. They are also
hard to photograph, because
by the time that you actually notice someone's bag, they
have their back to you and
are on their merry way, and
we have just enough dignity to stop ourselves from running madly behind people and
pleading for pictures. But they
can also say a lot about a person. The right bag will not only
tie together an outfit, but with
a little imagination and some
over-analysis, can give the sort
of insight normally provided
by palm-reading. It's about as
fun, and just as accurate.
AIRLINE BAG/MESSENGER BAG
We all know that in Vancouver,
it's trendy to give off vibes that
you just breezed onto campus
from your run along the sea
wall, or that you are exuding
the tranquility and good karma found in a sunrise yoga
session. How better to do this
than with an airline bag? After
all, think of an airplane, and
you will be thinking streamlined efficiency and effortless speed. Not about that time
you spent   14 hours  trapped
No, this bag, with
retro red and
white graphics,
will complete
your image as the
peppy university
student, full of
life and vitality.
at YVR, waiting for your connecting flight, getting questioned by overzealous security guards. Not about the time
you watched When Harry Met
Sally, ate "chicken" dinner and
spent hours puking in a small
paper bag.
No, this bag, with retro red
and white graphics, will complete your image as the peppy
university student, full of life
and vitality. It just might disguise the fact that you probably
have no idea how to complete a
"Half Lord of the Fishes" pose.
Also, it appears large enough to
hold notebooks, textbooks and
even an aluminum water bottle
filled with your wheatgrass-in-
fused, fair-trade soy beverage.
RUCKSACK
This is your jack-of-all trades
bag, capable of tasks as versatile as fitting an amazing
quantity of weed and baguettes
when backpacking through
France to carrying multiple six-packs of homebrew to
Wreck Beach. Of course, like
the airline bag, it also holds
your everyday essentials such
as paper-bag lunch that mummy packed for you and the psychology textbook you carry everywhere but never read. We
call it the haversack. Whatever
that means, it sounds rustic
and dependable.
ENGLISH GENTLEMAN
Our first thoughts upon seeing this bag were of an English
gentleman, wearing a tweed
jacket and jauntily smoking
a pipe. He would stroll home
from the cricket match to a
study furnished with mahogany, and have tea and crumpets while listening to his
gramophone.
Stuffy allusions aside, the
bag, with its boxy shape and distinguished personality, is perfect for dashing around campus
with a twinkle in your eye, tipping your cap at everyone you
meet, tl
The Winter Games are coming to UBC.
Get Ready,
Follow us on Twitter ©UBCWinterGames
www. u bc.ca/2010
Get Involved. Get Around. Get Smart.
UBC
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a placeof mind
THE  UNIVERSITY OF   BRITISH  COLUMBIA
UBC   2010   OLYMPIC    &
PARALYMPIC    SECRETA
+*___><
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THE OLYMPICS ARE HERE
tell us what you want to
see^^
THE OLYMPICS
ARE HERE!
Bringing you the 2010
Olympics with our standard
blend of actual journalism,
unbridled sarcasm and mild
insanity since 1918.
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THE UBYSSEY
DOES THE
OLYMPICS 10/UBYSSEY.CA/IDEAS/2010.02.11
D
EAS
YOU SAID IT
IN RESPONSE TO "TOTEM VS. VANIER   [FEB. 8, 2010]":
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WRITE US A LETTER
feedback@ubyssey.ca
EDITOR TREVOR RECORD»ideas@ubyssey.ca
...Alex is an idiot. Totem and Vanier are not that different.
And we attend literally the same training programs.
Wonder if he's planning on getting his job back next
year... might be a little difficult after this!
—Totem Advisor
Hey, no one should attack Alex or question whether
he should keep his job because he agreed to an interview where he reported what he had heard from
others that he had kindly left unnamed!
—Nancy
JONNY WAKEFIELD GRAPHIC/THE UBYSSEY
EDITORIAL
AS THEY SAY, "YOU GOTTA BE HERE"
The Olympics are finally here.
Yes, it can't actually be happening, but here it is. After seven years
of waiting, hoping, building, arguing and worrying, the athletes are
here, the torch is here, and all that's left to do is to celebrate. At least
that's what we've been told. Although as you might have noticed, as
a city, we still haven't fully embraced the Games.
It's difficult to know what to think and how to react because they've
dominated our lives and our city for so long, and when something
becomes so all-encompassing, it's difficult to view it without ambivalence and resignation. It's a time for joy, but when you're keenly
aware of how much that joy has cost, it becomes less than Utopian.
There have been spending cuts and layoffs and hard times for all
people in the past 18 months of recession, and yet we're told to put
on a giant party and pretend that everything is swell.
Most of us aren't even able to afford going to any of the events
that we care about, and the only concerts and ceremonies that we'll
see are the ones which are being put on for free. In addition, those
who remain in Vancouver will continue to pay for the Olympics for
years to come.
VANOC and the IOC have been working to make these Games
happen in a way that has been undemocratic, unaccountable, frustrating, not to mention made most of us feel less than enthusiastic
about their leadership.
There are hundreds of homeless and thousands more barely
scraping by, all living right next to where billions of dollars have
been spent on highways, buildings and subways as social housing
units have disappeared.
Despite all the drawbacks of the Olympics, there's no stopping
them at this point. The Ubyssey decided long ago to continue publishing during the two-week break, and to report on everything and
anything we could for the Olympics. And despite everything we
mentioned, we're excited.
We're excited because at the end of it all, we're journalists (or at
least trying to be), and we love finding out about stories and bringing them to you. There's a giant circus going on, the likes of which
most of us will never see anything close to again—and we get to tell
you about it.
Pavilions will be filled with party-goers from across the world.
Protests by people outraged at the cost ofthe Games. Biathletes and
Norwegian hockey players and skeleton racers getting their one
shining moment. Sights and sounds and chants and cheers that
bring out the best and worst of who we are. We'll be there.
However you feel about the Games, we hope you'll be there in one
way or another, too. Hosting the Olympics is so massive in its undertaking and effects that it will continue to shape Vancouver for
years to come, and as the young and educated people of this city you
all have an opportunity to see what direction this influence will take
us. Even those of you vehemendy opposed to the Games will have
the opportunity to wave the flag of whatever causes you hold close
to your heart.
The waiting is over. The madness is here. Let the games begin, va
TOO SEXY
KASHA CHANG
& AUSTIN HOLM
toosexy@ubyssey.ca
Sun-parched readership,
What a week. Improbably,
our temperate spring-like
weather persists, sustained by
situational irony. Note that we
say nothing of the impending
Winter Games nor the hordes
of people now descending on
our fair city expecting snowier conditions. Our love for you,
gende readers, like the verdurous shoots of new plants, proliferates ever more exuberandy—
and trust us, it was pretty darn
exuberant to begin with.
But exuberance is in the air;
it's in the ground and the rain;
it's in the bones of anyone who
has ever spent a season wanting or who begins to wake from
their self-imposed sleep. It's
time to be clear with ourselves
and the world about what we
want. Which brings us to today's letter.
DEAR TOO SEXY,
My best friend turned partner
and I are doing the whole long
distance thing. For the past few
years, we've had a healthy and
communicative relationship.
So, real talk: we're comfortable
with our kinks. He's turned on
by the idea of me relieving my
sexual frustrations outside the
relationship, and I have an acquaintance in mind. (Let's skip
the tired debate about what this
means for our pure love and if
this can even be true. It is what
it is, folks. And it's sexy to us.)
So, here's the thing. I don't
want to lie to the other guy
about the fact that I'm happily
committed to my partner. I just
want to have me some sex, no
strings. Since this my first serious attempt at this unorthodox
maneuver, I'm wondering how
to swing it. Should I just ask
him straight up, or try to gauge
if he's so inclined?
-Wild Rose
Yo, Wild Rose.
We at Too Sexy are big fans
of kink. From roleplay to bondage and so on, we just love
sexy gameplay. But while being blindfolded and having to
guess what's going on around
you is fun in the bedroom, it
tends to be less so when trying
to negotiate relationships. Sex
can be great whether it's full of
games or simply straight-forward, but when establishing relationship bases even with a casual partner, you have to drop
the games. So, long story short:
you should tell this other guy
you're considering as a casual
sex partner what the situation
is right away, not just try for
subde gauge-reading.
We at Too Sexy are
big fans of kink.
First off, we're assuming based on your letter that
you don't want to form a second committed love relationship   with   this   acquaintance
in addition to the one you already have with your long-distance boyfriend. Your prospective sex-toy (sorry, acquaintance) needs to know from the
get-go that you're just there to
screw around. He may quickly develop feelings for you and
not know that those feelings
are misdirected until it's too
late. So unless you want to have
to hurt his feelings that way,
Wild Rose, we recommend full
and immediate disclosure—if
he starts getting wild romantic ideas after that, at least he's
been warned you have no plans
to return his affection.
In Too Sexys
humble opinion,
that's really hot,
but only if he
knows about it
and consents to it.
Otherwise, it's just
creepy
You also need to inform
him of your boyfriend's involvement as a cuckold fetishist. What you're saying is that
you're not interested in pursuing an emotional connection
with this guy—you and your boyfriend just want to use him as a
sex object. That's fine. In Too
Sexy's humble opinion, that's
really hot, but only if he knows
about it and consents to it.
Otherwise, it's just creepy. It's
entirely possible that he'd be
into NSA sex with you, but still
not so into having all the salacious details spilled over MSN
to fulfill another guy's cuckold
fantasies. So tell him ASAP, and
if he's not into it, then it wasn't
meant to be.
...if he's not into it,
then it wasn't meant
to be.
As with other forms of kink,
in sexually non-exclusive relationships the way in which all
parties interpret what's happening—and by all parties, we mean
everyone, not just the 'more important' actors in the committed part of the relationship—is
the key factor in defining whether what's going on is actually
healthy. To use an extreme example, in sado-masochistic power-based kink relationships, the
mental states of the actors make
the difference between a healthy
relationship of this nature, and
domestic abuse.
To interpret what's going on,
Wild Rose, your boy needs information. Even if you are just trying to find out if he'd be open to
some NSA sex, if you hold out
telling him anything he could
end up feeling used and misled,
and he'd be right to feel that way.
Thanks a bunch for your letter, and good luck! tl
Friends, lovers: send your letters to toosexy@ubyssey.ca.
STREETERS
WHAT CHANGES HAVE YOU
SEEN FOR THE OLYMPICS AND
HOW HAS THIS AFFECTED YOU?
^tA *_hr -
KEVIN BYRNE Arts 3
The new skytrain is what affects me the most...there are
lots of lights everywhere. It's
like Christmas again...I guess
people wear the Olympics
gloves too. I'm neutral on the
Olympics...I'm not going to go
out of my way to go look at the
Olympics, it doesn't really excite me that much.
VER0NICATREBESHArte2
I think with the Olympics, the
one thing that's changed the
most is the bus loop and the
new additions to that area....I
know people who have a car
and now it's harder for them
to get out of UBC now that
Westbrook is closed off...but
other than that I think the
changes are good because it's
always good to have renovations for our university.
JOCELYN ALFORD Arts 2
The road closures...it's part of
the Olympics so it's not good or
bad, it's kind of annoying, but
it's the Olympics so you just
have to get into the spirit and
accept it...I'm on the golf team
and I have to go to the golf
course. And the golf course
is usually only a five minute
drive and now it's a ten minute drive.
GLENN SELLERS Arts 1
There is just a lot of construction going on, it's kind of annoying...and the buses are really packed all the time..There
will be pretty sick partying
and it will be interesting to see
some nice curling matches...
All the money being poured
into the infrastructure will
help because after all the tourists leave we'll still have [it]...I
think in all it's a good thing
the Olympics are here.
Coordinated by Krittana
Khurana, Tara Martellaro and
Chibwe Mweene 2010.02.11/UBYSSEY.CA/IDEAS/ll
FOOD (LAWS) FOR THOUGHT | BC restaurants may display calorie counts
JESSICA MACH
Contributor
Restaurants in BC may soon be
required to display nutritional
information.
"The Ministry [of Healthy
Living and Sport] is currently
in the preliminary stages of reviewing the idea of menu nutrition labeling for foods served in
restaurants and food service establishments/' BC's Minister of
Healthy Living and Sport Ida
Chong confirmed in an e-mail.
If a menu-labeling legislation does pass, BC will be joining the ranks of Oregon, Maine,
Massachusetts and California—
as well as a slew of other counties and cities that have taken
cues from New York City, where
chain restaurants have been required to display calorie counts
on their menus since 2008.
The Ministry has not yet decided what kind of information BC
restaurants will be required to
provide under potential menu-
labeling legislation.
Dr Susan Barr, a Food,
Nutrition and Health professor
at UBC, told The Ubyssey that
the Ministry needs to give this
issue careful thought.
"I think it would be prohibitive—and likely not useful—to
list all nutrients," Barr said. "At
what point do people begin to
feel overwhelmed and start to
disregard the information?"
The Ministry is currendy deliberating which restaurants the
legislation will focus on. Menu-
labeling laws have typically targeted either chain restaurants
or restaurants whose revenues
exceed a prescribed amount
each year. In Philadelphia and
New York City, for instance,
only chain restaurants with
more than 15 outlets nationwide are required to display
calorie counts. Under Ontario's
Bill 156, only restaurants with
annual revenues of over $ 5 million would be required to label
their menus.
However, both approaches
are underinclusive, and typically cover less than half the restaurants within a given jurisdiction. A statement released
in 2008 by the New York City
Health Department indicates,
for instance, that only ten
per cent of New York City restaurants are chain establishments with more than 15 outlets. According to a Canadian
Restaurant and Foodservices
Association (CRFA) report,
chains account for only 36 per
cent of Canada's restaurants. At
UBC, chains comprise roughly a
third of the food service establishments on campus.
A 2008 study published in
the American Journal of Health
contends that targeting restaurants based on gross annual sales can be problematic as
well. Although consumers frequent fast-food establishments
far more than independent restaurants, independent restaurants tend to have higher sales
figures, due to their higher prices. Menu-labeling laws that take
an annual-sales approach, then,
inadvertendy tend towards targeting independent restaurants while exempting a great
number of fast-food establishments from menu-labeling—
even though fast-food establishments serve a greater number
of people.
Approximately a third of
chains in BC purport to be providing their information according
to guidelines prescribed by the
CRFA. These guidelines are currendy the most prominent effort
at standardizing menu-labeling
in BC. They require restaurants
to provide nutritional information for "standard" menu items.
But because there are no
means for the CRFA to enforce
GERALD DEO & TREVOR RECORD PHOTO ILLUSTRATION/THE UBYSSEY
compliance, not all restaurants
have taken on the nutritional
charge. The Sun reported that
the degree to which the CRFA's
guidelines were met for businesses in Downtown Vancouver
was "anything but obvious and
uniform."
A law enacted by the provincial government could potentially strengthen the standardization efforts initiated by
the CRFA. However, the organization has expressed opposition to attempts to legislate
menu-labeling.
The CRFA's voluntary guidelines roughly resemble those
of Health Canada for packaged
foods—both require the provision of information on calories
as well as a variety of nutrients.
However, the route typically
proposed by menu-labeling legislations require restaurants
to only display calorie counts.
The CRFA argues that this is too
simplistic an approach, since
many customers have health
concerns beyond caloric intake.
"Some [consumers] are
counting calories while others
are watching carbohydrate or
fat consumption," Stephanie
Jones, CRFA VP Ontario, said in
a press release. "As an industry we need to respond to all of
these needs."
Barr is careful not to overstate the policy's potential
virtues.
"It's difficult to know whether 'substantial benefits' would
accrue from this type of legislation. We've had nutrition labeling on food products sold in
grocery stores for many years,
and it's hard to know whether or not this has had an impact," she said. "Overall, the research literature would suggest
that simply providing information doesn't lead to behaviour
change: people need to perceive that their current behaviour is risky, decide that they
want to make changes, and
then have access to resources
that would help them make the
change." tl
NUTRITION AT UBC
At UBC, students living in Totem and Place
Vanier residences already have access to
printed nutritional information in residence
dining rooms. Most
ThinkFood and Swirl
products, offered by
UBC Food Services in
establishments such as
Pond Cafe, feature nutritional labels.
Associate Director of
Food Services Dorothy
Yip says that UBC is
working on labeling
more of its products.
"We are looking into
purchasing a program
in which it will allow us
to provide nutritional information on the majority of [our] in-house
products."
PERSPECTIVE
HAITI RELIEF DOESN'T
END WITH CHARITY
ARSHY MANN
Contributor
The display of student altruism that has grabbed a hold
of UBC in the aftermath of
the Haitian earthquake has
been truly remarkable. Not
only have groups and individuals all over campus devoted
themselves to raising money
for the victims of the January
12 quake, but students have
also been educating themselves and each other about
the unique history and culture ofthe Haitian people.
As our fervent fundraising is
inevitably replaced by Olympic fever, however, our esteemed university will pat itself on the back
for a job well done and collectively change the channel from sordid images of a broken country to
Ukrainian figure skating pairs executing perfect throw triple loops
set to "Ride of the Valkyries." Not
that there's anything wrong with
figure skating.
If our students are truly committed to helping the Haitian
people in this time of need—
and I believe that they are—then
the UBC community needs to
change gears from simply fund-
raising to advocating for real
change in Canada's policies towards immigration from Haiti.
WHY IMMIGRATION?
Haiti is the single most remittance-dependent country
in the world; this means that
money sent back from family members working abroad
is the single most important
source of income for what was
the   poorest   country  in   the
western hemisphere even before the earthquake. These
remittances have achieved
more in terms of poverty reduction than industrial development or foreign aid. And
the only way that Haitians are
able to earn enough money to
send back to their families is
if Western governments allow
Haitians into their borders.
CANADA AND HAITI
As the only other Francophone
country in the Americas,
and with well over 100,000
Canadians of Haitian descent
living within our border—including Governor General
Michaelle Jean, our de facto Head of State—Canada has
a unique relationship with
Haiti. If Canada is truly committed to helping the Haitian
people reconstruct their country, we need to open our doors
to Haitian immigrants, starting with the family members of Haitian-Canadians.
Current policy only allows
Canadians to sponsor parents,
grandparents, spouses and dependents under 18 for immigration. Brothers, sisters, uncles, aunts, cousins and adult
children are all excluded. By
expanding the family class for
Haiti, we will not only be giving thousands of people the
opportunity to escape destitution, but will be reuniting families in the wake of tragedy.
Canada has risen to the occasion before. In 1979, Joe Clark's
briefly-lived Conservative government accepted 50,000
'boat-people' fleeing chaos in
Southeast Asia. The effects of a
similar measure today for those
affected by the earthquake would
be enormous, both for those
who arrive in Canada, and for
the Haitian nation as a whole. If
we were to allow the same number of Haitians into our borders
today, not only would we be providing those people with a new
life, but they would contribute
to the short-term and long-term
development of Haiti in ways
that eclipse foreign aid. If these
Haitians remit like previous immigrants have in the past, this
would result in $87 million of
aid to Haiti every year. That's
roughly equivalent to the onetime commitment that CIDA has
pledged in the aftermath of the
quake.
WHAT WE CAN DO
While you're cheering on the
women's hockey team or bemoaning the absence of the
Jamaicans from this year's
bobsleigh competition, take
some time to write to your
Member of Parliament. Clubs
that two weeks ago were organizing bake sales and putting
together fundraisers should
show the same kind of enthusiasm for the admittedly less
sexy activity of collective advocacy. The Help Hear Haiti coalition, which was formed from
a broad spectrum of student
groups, would be an excellent
vehicle to spearhead such initiatives. But we have to act now.
We can help bring about substantive change, but we'll only
be able to do it when people are
still listening. tl
LETTER
IN RESPONSE TO "THE QUEST
FOR SEASONAL PRODUCE &
PERFECT PIZZA" [FEBRUARY 8,
2010]
Hello,
I was watching your video on
local pizza after reading the
article and I was wondering
why more emphasis was not
put into making a proper crust
given that this article was in a
culture section. I would like to
correct you on a few subjects
on which any good pizza maker should know.
First, and perhaps most
grievous, of infractions to making a proper pizza was in that
you added brown sugar. No pizza should contain anything but
flour, water, salt, and maybe
yeast. The sugar is non-traditional, and completely useless,
and I have no idea why it was
added.
The next infraction to making good pizza dough was that
the pizza was rolled out directly after it was mixed. The dough
should be made at least five
hours before it will be used,
and left to rest. Preferably this
would be six hours.
Finally, the oven temperature
prescribed was 450 degrees
fahrenheit. This is much too
cool. A pizza should be baked at
as high a temperature as is possible which is 500 or 550 for
most ovens though higher for
some. In reality, a pizza should
be baked at 905 degrees F for
about 60-90 seconds. All of this
information can be found on
the internet and a proper guide
has been published by, but you
must remember that these principles are incredibly important
and that if you do not make a
proper dough you should not
be putting this pizza in a culture section.
I'll agree it looks tasty and
I'm glad it's local but I hope
that next time you will research
what you are doing a litde more
before you put something into a
culture section because the only
culture that was in that pizza
is North American, it is really
only very vaguely Italian in that
you have a non-Italian dough
with nothing close to Italian
toppings. Thanks for the tasty
pizza toppings but I don't think
this [article] deserves [to be in]
the culture section.
Sincerely,
—Alistair Norman International development
is complicated,

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