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The Ubyssey Jan 21, 1972

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Array Alternate Straight hits streets
By SANDI SHREVE
The Georgia Grape will be on
the streets by 9 a.m. today.
The paper is being published
by collective staff members of the
Georgia Straight as an alternative
to their regular paper.
The collective staffers occupied
the Georgia Straight publishing
office at 56 A Powell Street
Wednesday morning to oppose
owner Dan McLeod's refusal to
forfeit his ownership to give the
paper a legal collective status.
McLeod published the regular
Georgia Straight as usual
Wednesday night.
Printing of the alternate paper,
which was scheduled to appear
Thursday, was delayed because
McLeod warned College Printers
co-owner Dave Nelson,
Wednesday night if he published
any paper bearing the name of the
Georgia Straight, without
McLeod's written authorization,
he would have to face a lawsuit.
The result was a two day
search by collective staffers for
someone to print the alternate
paper as a regular Georgia
Straight.
"Horizon Printers have decided
to print our paper tonight
(Thursday) but we have to change
the names of columns such as
Quebec Notes and Tribes, the
column authors and the paper,
because Horizon is afraid of being
sued," collective staffer Peter
Burton said Thursday.
College Printers agreed to print
the alternate paper if just the
paper's name was changed but
"they would have to do it Friday
morning and the paper could not
be on the streets until 3 p.m.
Friday," he said.
"We  are printing at Horizon
because of the time factor," he
said.
"But just in case things don't
work out we have booked time
for tomorrow morning at
College."
Burton said the collective
would continue to occupy the
office until negotiations between
themselves and McLeod and his
supporters were arranged.
The collective is composed of
the major writers for the Georgia
Straight and includes about half
the entire staff.
The McLeod supporters
include  distribution, advertising,
GEORGIA STRAIGHT staffers ponder the future of their occupation of the paper's Gastown offices, now in its third day of protest against
editor Dan McLeod's refusal to turn the paper into a legal collective.
WE UBYSSEY
Vol. Llll, No. 40       VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, JANUARY 21, 1972
228-2301
Frat development near
By MIKE SASGES
A Vancouver contractor who holds options on two UBC
fraternities has an architect working on development plans for the
land.
The contractor, Frank Stanzl, refused Thursday to name the
architect.
He said his company, Frank Stanzl Construction Ltd., has paid
almost half of the $130,000 on the options for two Wesbrook
fraternities, Phi Delta Theta, 2120 Wesbrook Crescent, and Phi
Gamma Delta, 2130 Wesbrook Crescent.
Title to a third frat at 2140 Wesbrook and the vacant crown
land at University Boulevard and Wesbrook would give him control of
160,000 square feet.
"We will acquire all that land," said Stanzl. "Since we've made
two deals we intend to follow them through."
"However I think the third fraternity doesn't want to deal with
us," he said.
Directors of the third frat, Beta Theta Pi, have said their
fraternity, unlike the other two frats that sold to Stanzl, is in good
financial condition.
University Endowment Lands manager Robert Murdoch said
Thursday Stanzl has made no application to gain title to the crown
(provincial government owned) land.
(Murdoch is responsible for recommending zoning changes to
lands and forests minister Ray Williston needed before Stanzl can
build on the property.)
Stanzl told The Ubyssey he is especially interested in housing
the permanent staff of the planned health science centre.
"The housing will definitely be of an innovative nature," said
Stanzl.
"It will be different from the high rise going up behind the
Village."
(An apartment complex appears to be shaping up on land by
Grosvenor International Ltd. behind the three Wesbrook frats.)
Stanzl has until April 15 to pay up the full option price on the
two fraternities.
Any construction on the Wesbrook development, said Stanzl,
would not start until 1973.
"I don't want to start this spring because our labor unions are
coming up for their new contracts," he said.
layout    and   some   front   desk
workers.
The Thursday issue of the
Georgia Straight mentioned the
possibility of McLeod obtaining a
court order to confiscate the
office equipment from the office,
said Burton.
"But we're not even worrying
about that right now," he said.
McLeod supporter Pat Tripp,
said McLeod told the collective
staffers at a Monday meeting they
could "use all the office
equipment and files to begin their
own paper" but that the collective
. "flatly refused" the offer.
Burton said they refused
because they lacked the financial
resources to start another paper
and because they did not want to
compete with the Georgia
Straight.
"The equipment used by the
Straight is owned by everyone
who works here," he said. "We
have a legitimate right to use it
and work here."
He also said it would be
difficult to start a new paper at
this time of year because it is
"hard to sell on the streets in
winter."
The collective is demanding
that McLeod give up his legal
ownership so the paper can work
as a collective with no one having
power over anyone else, Straight
business manager David Mole said
Wednesday.
He said the collective is against
McLeod having the power to
make final decisions about what
should or should not be included
in the paper.
McLeod supporter Mitzi Gibbs
said Thursday that McLeod did
.not want to give up ownership of
the paper and share it with the
collective supporters because "a
large number of (McLeod's)
staffers do not have faith in
them."
She said those who work with
McLeod already work collectively
and do not need to change the
staff structure.
She said McLeod and his
supporters favored the collective
idea in principle but not in
practice, alleging "they (the
collective) have beautiful dreams
and schemes and plans but in
practice they are oppressive."
Tripp said the mail and
telephone lines were diverted
from the Straight offices because
"we needed to use them to
publish the regular edition of the
Georgia Straight.
"We are not trying to prevent
the collective from putting out
their paper."
She said the mail was cut off
"because money arrives in the
mail and we need it to pay our
debts. If we allowed it to go to
the office the collective would
take it."
But by Thursday afternoon, all
Georgia Straight mail was received
at Le Chat Noir,95 Powell Street,
"where all staffers have access to
it", said collective staffer Jeff
Marvin.
"The regular telephone lines
are still cut off but the collective
is now using a private line from
the office," he said.
The regular Georgia Straight
was produced at a McLeod
supporter's Kitsilano home and
printed at College Printers
Wednesday night. It appeared on
the streets Thursday morning. Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 21,  1972
'Eye-in-the-sky start
of economic espionage'
By JOHN SYDOR
Future talk of Canadian
economic independence may be
purely academic, electrical
engineering grad student Jim
McEwen told The Ubyssey
Thursday.
On March 22 the United States
is planning to launch an
eye-in-the-sky satellite to mark
the beginning of a project code
named ERTS (for Earth
Resources Technology Satellite).
"If Canadians allow another
nation to develop a superior
computer and satellite inventory
of this country's natural
resources, then future talk of
asserting Canadian economic
independence may well be purely
academic," McEwen said.
"Last year the Canadian
government signed an agreement
with National Aeronautics and
Space Administration assuring our
co-operation and participation in
the program," he said.
"It now appears that the
Canadian government may have
given tacit approval to a program
of economic espionage on an
unbelievable scale."
ERTS-A is the first satellite in
the ERTS program, and if
successful will be followed by
ERTS-B in one year, and then by
a manned space station called
Project Sky-lab.
The ERTS-A satellite will orbit
about 500 miles above the earth.
"Every 17 days cameras will
thoroughly scan the entire surface
of the earth between 81 degrees
north and 81 degrees south
latitudes," McEwen said.
"These cameras have a
resolution of up to 300 feet,
meaning, for example, that a
major freeway could be
identified."
McEwen said that in one year
the satellite will be able to
produce about 10 cloud-free
resource information pictures of
every square mile in Canada.
"Data from the satellite will be
processed in Ottawa in an attempt
to identify various forest, mineral
and water resource areas," he said.
Canada, however, has no
control over the operation of the
satellite, and no control over who
receives data from the satellite as
it passes over Canadian territory.
"Maps show that the U.S.
stations will be able to receive
data from over 90 per cent of
Canadian territory," he said.
"This data, together with
classified picture processing
techniques already developed for
high altitude aerial reconnaissance
in Vietnam, could enable the U.S.
to make a far more accurate
identification of our potentially
rich resouce areas than Canadians
themselves would be able to do.
Money for students
Wednesday night's UBC senate
meeting provided some good news
for money-hungry UBC students
as six scholarships worth more
than $5,000 were approved.
The largest individual
scholarship is the annual Dr.
Joyce Hallmore Scholarship for
$1,200 awarded to a student
showing high proficiency in the
field of German literature and
language.
Medical students will be
eligible for a total of $2,800 in
bursaries or scholarships to be
used to aid their study and/or
research in the field of surgery.
The number of medical
scholarships will vary with the
amount of need indicated by
students.
The Stanley Drug Products
Company has kicked in with a
scholarship of $500 to be awarded
to a graduate student in the
faculty of pharmaceutical
sciences.
Students enrolled in the
chartered general accountants
financial management program
will    be    eligible   for   a   $250
scholarship awarded by the
Certified Accountants'
Association of B.C.
And the Fred W. Nesbitt
Bursary of $250 will awarded to
an undergraduate of good ability
who is need of financial
assistance.
The geology department has
announced a scholarship of an
undisclosed amount to be
awarded to second or third-year
students in that faculty in the
memory of Dr. A. C. Skerl.
Elections loom
Students will consider the
relative merits of 1972-3 Alma
Mater Society executive
candidates Feb. 2 and 7.
Candidates for the offices of
president, secretary, internal and
external affairs will be elected on
the earlier date. The positions of
vice-president, co-ordinator,
treasurer and ombudswoman will
be contested a week later.
First-slate nominations opened
Wednesday and will continue until
noon Thursday. Forms are
available at the AMS offices.
"Using advanced computer
systems data from the resource
satellite could easily give the
resource hungry Americans a
constantly updated inventory of
the world's mineral wealth," he
said.
"Americans have purchased in
foreign countries, lands containing
mineral riches based on
information furnished by
photographs from satellites for
the study of terrestrial resources.
"This would also explain the
unbelievable success American oil
companies have had in their
explorations in North Africa and
the Middle East — zones which no
one had considered important,"
McEwen said.
HEAR
Derril Warren
B.C.'s
Prog. Conservative
Leader
MONDAY, JAN. 24
12:30
SUB Party Room
at
919 Robson St.
1032 W Hastings
670 Seymour
4560 W 10th.
duthie
BOOKS
YOUR PRESCRIPTION . . .
. . . For Glows
for that smart look in gloom ...
look to
Plescltytion Optical
Student Discount Given
WE HAVE AN OFFICE NEAR YOU
MUSSOC PRESENTS . . .
LIVE ON STAGE!
Tiddler ^
ontheDpof
February 3rd — 12th
8:30 P.M.
OLD AUDITORIUM
Tickets $2.50, $3.00
at Vancouver Ticket Centre and Outlets
Special Student Rates: $1.50
February 7 & 8 and
Matinee Thursday February 10th — 12:30
Tickets available Main Floor of S.U.B.
OFFICIAL NOTICE
Alma Mater Society
SENATE ELECTIONS SPRING 1972
Elections will be held on Wednesday, February 16, 1972 for three
student senators. There shall be one senator elected from each of
the following constituencies:
1. EDUCATION    (Faculties   of   Education   and   Physical
Education)
2. COMMERCE AND  LAW (Faculties of Commerce and
Business Administration and Law)
3. SCIENCE   (Faculties  of  Science,  Dentistry, Medicine,
Pharmacy, and Nursing)
Nominations will open at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, January 26th
and close at 5:00 p.m. on Wednesday, February 9th.
All students interested in running in these elections should pick
up nomination and eligibility forms from the AMS General Office
or from the AMS Secretary, SUB 248.
It is a trip much worth taking.
Not since '2001' has a movie
so cannily inverted consciousness
and altered audience perception.
Time Magazine
-*,>•.>
-.:■£■■-,- v-
THE
HELLSTROM
CHRONICLE
Science Fiction? No. Science Fact.
Dlnrc    ARBUTUS AT 16th AVE.   evening 7:30, 9=30
RIDGE   738_6311  FREE PARKING mat. sat., sun. 2=00 Friday,  January 21,   1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Tenure in psychology 'puzzling'
In a written statement to The
Ubyssey Thursday, psychology
graduate students called for the
establishment of an objective
system of evaluating junior
faculty.
The students also called for
departmental reconsideration of
the cases of psych professors
Carol Marx and Mike Humphries,
whose contracts were both turned
down for renewal
The fight between grad
students and department head
Edro Signori became public this
week when students decided to
appeal to the university
community after a series of letters
to Signori failed to open up
communications on the issues.
The text of the grad student
statement follows:
In Tuesday's Ubyssey an article
appeared revealing a problem
which is currently unfolding in
the psychology department. The
problem involves the now familiar
issue of contract renewal in the
faculty of arts, and, in particular,
the failure to renew the contracts
of Drs. Carol Marx and Michael
Humphreys.
Because decisions of contract
renewal affect students in arts, we
are pleased that The Ubyssey has
drawn these two cases to the
students' attention. At this time
we would like to outline the issues
raised by graduate students in
regards to Drs. Marx and
Humphreys.
The failure to renew the
contract of Dr. Marx appears to
be based on an arbitrary criterion
— that her local residence in
Bellingham (where her husband is
employed) would prevent her
Seepage 12: STUDENT
—garry gruenke photo
FOLKSINGERS Ann Mortifee (left) and sister Jane entertain the standing-room-only-crowd Thursday noon
in the SUB auditorium, with songs from The Ecstasy of Rita Joe. Ann wrote the music and sings in Ecstasy at
the Queen Elizabeth Theatre nightly until Sunday.
Need for paths
on campus roads,
cycle study shows
By DAVID SCHMIDT
An independent study of cycle facilities at UBC has called for
the creation of six-foot wide cycle paths along Southwest Marine
Drive and along University Boulevard.
More than 2,000 students regularly cycle to and from campus,
the report said, and their number could double with improved
facilities. The most important facilities are bicycle paths on University
Blvd. and Marine Drive and adequate lockable and covered parking.
"Cyclists are being ignored on this campus," said Gordon
Bisaro, UBC Cycle Club president.
"We're a very political club. We'll blow this campus apart unless
we get something done," he said.
The club has sent the report to the police, the university, the
endowment lands and the department of highways.
"We've exhausted every possible legal channel and still got
nothing done," Jim Piers, law 2, said.
The endowment lands recently declared the south sidewalk
along University Blvd. a cycle path and put a sign up to that effect.
"That thing is too narrow, and the snow hasn't been cleared off.
You can't ride on a cycle path if it's not usable. That path isn't even
usable," Piers, a member of the cycle club said.
"Besides, there are still people walking along that path," he said.
University Endowment Lands administrator Robert Murdoch
said: "Anything we do would be paid for by the ratepayers and
wouldn't be used by them."
"We appreciate the problem but there just is not a simple
answer to it," he said.
"If the present cycle paths aren't adequate, it is up to the
R.C.M.P. to come to us."
However the R.C.M.P. is not even enforcing the use of the
present cycle path. ,
An R.C.M.P. spokesman told The Ubyssey it was not restricting
pedestrians or cyclists to any single path.
"We just try to keep them off the roads," he said.
"I suggest you talk to someone in the U.E.L. office."
Whafs up, doc?
x»^V^.! A$3»t* -k <ex#?mh!},
Iinus Pauling, winner of Nobel Prizes
in physics and chemistry, broke into the
medicine biz in 1970 with his book,
Vitamin C and the Common Cold. What
he recommends, in brief, is that everyone
take one to five grams of Vitamin C every
day to ward off colds, and up to 15 grams
to treat a cold. Roughly speaking, this is
20 to 100 times the minimal daily
requirement every day and 300 times the
daily requirement to treat a cold.
Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) is needed to
build connective tissue; deficiency causes
scurvy, whose symptoms are
hemorrhages, loosening of teeth, poor
wound healing and so on.
Pauling's views have received wide
publicity in light of his scientific renown.
However, the widely respected Medical
Letter, an independent doctor-financed
review of drugs and therapeutics, found
little evidence to support Pauling's views.
For one thing, most of Pauling's
conviction stems from personal
^testimonials. "I took piles of Vitamin C
and haven't had a cold for eleventy-one
years."
Personal testimonials are also available
for Christian Science, witch doctors,
herbal remedies, Lydia Pinkham's
Vegetable Female Tonic, hot buttered
rum, frequent sexual intercourse,
Scientology and Perkins' Metallic
Tractors, which, when drawn over painful
parts of the body, draw out the pain.
Perkins sold thousands of them in the
late 1700s and collected thousands of
enthusiastic testimonials.
You see, to PROVE the usefulness of a
remedy you have to select a random
bunch of people, give identical looking
pills so that neither the doctor nor the
patient knows what he is giving or getting
(use a fake sugar pill and the drug being
tested), have an outside investigator
decide who has a disease and who
doesn't, and finally, have a good
statistician design and evaluate the study.
Not one study, either in Pauling's
book or in any scientific literature on the
subject, meets these criteria.
In some, the patients themselves
announced whether they had a cold. In
some, the "colds" lasted only one day. In
some, allocation of patients to one group
or another was not random. In some, no
fake pills were given ... etc. etc.
When analyzed by Medical Letter
consultants, the studies quoted by
Pauling earned such comments as "totally
inadequate" and "should be ignored as a
serious scientific contribution."
Pauling himself writes that "So far as I
am aware, no large scale study, involving
several hundred or thousand subjects (and
that's what it takes, Martha) has been
carried out to show to what extent the
regular ingestion of ascorbic acid in large
amounts is effective in preventing or
ameliorating the common cold and
associated infections."
"In the light of this statement," says
the Medical Letter politely, "it is difficult
to understand his going to the public with
recommendations that are bound to be
widely accepted."
By the way, the side effects of large
doses of Vitamin C are:
1) diarrhea.
2) acid urine. This can cause kidney
stones   if  you   have   cystinuria   or   a
tendency to gout. Cystinuria has no
symptoms, generally, so you don't know
if you've got it till you wake up with a
kidney stone. They say you can get
burned, bashed and kicked in the crotch,
but you don't know anything at all about
pain till you've got kidney stones.
3) false negative tests for sugar in the
urine. If you're a diabetic you'll be
amazed how long your doses of insulin
seem to last...
4) potentiate the side effects of
sulfonamides, causing renal damage.
5) precipitate sickle cell anemia crises.
6) interferes with effects of warfarin, a
drug given to slow down blood clotting.
Very commonly prescribed to folks with
heart trouble.
As we say in the mid biz, the safety
and efficacy of large doses of Vitamin C
for colds have not been demonstrated in
well controlled trials, and its use cannot
be recommended.
Incidentally, after I started doing a lot
of dope, my grades went up and I became
a respectable member of the med biz.
You don't suppose ... Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,  January  21,   1972
Piece by piece
It's really going to happen you know.
Those mammoth housing and high-rise
developments around the corner of Wesbrook and
University Boulevard are really going to be built.
Plans for frat row development caused
somewhat of a stir last year when they were
revealed by The Ubyssey under the title of The
Great UBC Land Grab.
THE UBYSSEY
JANUARY 21,  1972
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays
throughout the university year by the Alma Mater
Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions
are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the
university administration. Member, Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a
weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's
editorial offices are located in room 241K of the
Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2301, 228-2307; Page
Friday, Sports, 228-2305; advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Leslie Plommer
People practising for the animal acts expected this
weekend created quite a ruckus and even disturbed Mike
Sasges who did nothing but bitch all day. Poor Berton
Woodward and Sandy Kass put up with it, but Jan
O'Brien's reminder about the frolics to come kept all in
happy spirits. Spirits were lacking Thursday, but it's
hoped they won't be at the Saturday seminar (2 p.m.) in
the office. That will be a fun afternoon, remarked
Vaughn Palmer as Gary Gruenke and Gord Gibson
hummed stalwart tunes in his ear. David Schmidt said he
was waiting for the antics Saturday night at the abode
on the bulletin board, and Mike Gidora agreed.
Jim Joly said he didn't like boards, but spirits were
all right. Dick Betts saved 'tween classes and Lesley
Krueger saved the copy, which put them both in the
mood for drinking. Paul Knox drank his sorrows away
with Sandi Shreve who couldn't stay drunk for being
sober. Pat Fitzgerald and Kent Spencer scoffed.
Since that time there has been some shuffling
in the corporate back rooms and a development
behind frat row has also come to light.
Now we are faced with the fact that two
developments are organized and well in the
works.
The Ubyssey has two principal objections to
the proposed schemes, aside from the fact that
almost every housing and high-rise complex in the
Lower Mainland gives evidence to land
developers' total inability to produce anything
but outright eyesores.
Our first objection is that the Wesbrook
schemes proposed so far are not likely to provide
housing for members of the university
community who need them most: students and
married junior faculty members.
We would have no particular objection in
principle to the idea of providing more housing
near UBC for the people who need it, but the way
the developers have been talking to date, it's not
the people who need the housing that they plan
to cater to. (We can't pay enough, see.)
Our second reason for opposing the schemes
is that they are a prime example of the piecemeal
way university endowment land is being
developed.
If housing is to be built in the area around
UBC, it must be part of a scheme of over-all
development.
To date, we have seen no plan for a
comprehensive scheme, and we fail to see how the
governing bodies responsible for the endowment
lands can proceed blindly without one.
Until    such    time    as    a    comprehensive
development plan is produced, we will continue
to oppose the cement edifices planned for the
Wesbrook-Boulevard corner.
The corporations involved and the
management of the endowment lands would do
well to take note of student views on this matter
— that is, if they've learned anything from their
colleagues' experience with a certain small area at
the Stanley Park end of Georgia Street.
The Man
The editorial in Dan McLeod's Thursday
Georgia Straight has enough contradictions in it
to baffle even the most befuddled of walkie-talkie
Jesus freaks.
Predictably, the editorial whines over the
politics of the take-over collective, hoping to
scare us by implying its members are a bunch of
Kremlin-hatched preachers, out to rob the
bead-swinging counter-culture of its political
virginity.
But even more amusing than this transparent
attempt to freak the freaks by the mention of
Marxism, is the statement that McLeod is running
to court to get 'his' office equipment back, and is
ready to sue any printer who publishes another
newspaper bearing the Straight name.
Is this the same Dan McLeod who since 1967
has constantly fought judicial harassment of the
Straight?
Yup, it's him all right, true colors and all.
In fact, McLeod may have coined a new
slogan, custom made for hip capitalists: "If you
don't like the police, the next time you need
help, call a judge."
—The Chevron
Letters
Fascism
Up until now I placed some
confidence in The Ubyssey's staff.
Your heads seemed to be fairly
open, not bound in dogma and
such truck. So now you have
taken it upon yourselves to
support the "collective" grabbers
of the Straight office.
Incredible, when people
become fascists overnight.
Incredible, that a paper which has
traditionally protested power
tripping will support them.
Haven't you looked closely
enough to realize that behind this
facade of collective spirit is
rampant, narrow egotism? Aren't
we too young to have our own
unshakeable shibboleths?
Elaine Bougie,
Arts 3.
We feel we cannot publish your
letter without some comment.
The people you call "grabbers"
of the Straight office are, in fact,
a substantial number of Straight
staffers. We have looked closely
enough to determine to our
satisfaction that they are neither
"fascists" (a term you obviously
do not understand, or you would
not toss it off so glibly) nor
"power trippers" nor "narrow
egotists".
Indeed, it seems to us that Dan
McLeod's continued efforts to
maintain ultimate one-man
control over the Straight come
far closer to coinciding with the
labels you place on the Straight
collective, than do the actions of
the collective so far.
And by the way, you might be
interested to know that The
Ubyssey (which you say you have
had some respect for until now)
runs on the basis of a modified
collective, with no one person
holding final authority.
Really
Just what do you wish to
imply in mentioning Liary
Bongie's French department in
your Jan. 18 editorial about
corruption and incompetence in
the faculty of arts?
After all, Liary Bongie saved
many a rich taxpayer's dollar by
replacing two-thirds of the
graduate teaching assistants in
French with a handful of
imported full-time lecturers at a
mere $6,000 a year.
Criticize Belshaw and Jordan if
you wish, but realize and
recognize that Liary Bongie is a
flesh-and-blood monument to the
very   machinations   which   have
made this big university mediocre.
Really!
Dean Nestersnoph,
Honeret de Spanns,
Fellow Travellers
Non-Faculty Teachers' Union.
Slavonic
The omission of a semi-colon
in the letter from the Slavonic
studies students in Tuesday's
Ubyssey resulted in a
mis-apprehension.
The real reason that an
assistant professor in our
department has been demoted to
instructor is not "budgetary
considerations" but, so other
faculty members assure us,
because it is in "his own best
interests".
Concerned students
of Slavonic studies.
Notice
This will serve as official notice
that the Medical Undergraduate
Society held a referendum for a
fee levy of $15 for third and
fourth-year medicine.
Out of the faculty, 43 per cent
voted, 81 were in favor, 23
against, no spoiled ballots. The
referendum was held Jan. 19.
Mark Szasz,
Second-year V-P,
 AMS representative.
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Letters should be signed and, if
possible typed.
Though an effort is made to
print all letters received, The
Ubyssey reserves the right to edit
for clarity, legality, brevity and,
taste. Page Friday
A WORKER READS HISTORY
Who built the seven gates of Thebes?
The books are filled with names of kings
Was it kings who hauled
the craggy blocks of stone?
And Babylon, so many times destroyed?
Who built the city up each time? In which of Lima's
houses,
That city glittering with gold, lived those who built
it?
In the evening when the Chinese wall was finished
Where did the masons go?  Imperial Rome
Is full of arcs of triumph. Who reared them up?
Over whom did the Caesars triumph? Byzantium
lives in song,
Were all her dwellings palaces? And even in Atlantis
of the legend
The night the sea rushed in,
The drowning men still bellowed for their slaves.
Young Alexander conquered India.
He alone?
Caesar beat the Gauls.
Was there not even a cook in his army?
Philip of Spain wept as his fleet
Was sunk and destroyed. Were there no other tears?
Frederick the Great triumphed in the Seven Years
War. Who triumphed with him?
Each page a victory.
At whose expense the victory ball?
Every ten years a great man,
Who paid the piper?
So many particulars.
So many questions,.
Bertold Brecht The following poem by Vancouver poet and former Ubyssey editor
Tom Wayman tells of picketing during the grape boycott against Safeway
supermarkets.   The   Safeway   chain   was   implicated   in   the   California
grapeworkers' strike by virtue of the fact that it possesses holdings in grape
farms. The poem takes relevance once again in light of the Kraft boycott by
the United Farmers Union of Canada in an effort to get fair prices from the
Kraft   monopoly   for  dairy   products.   'Picketing  Supermarkets'   is  from
Mind-Scapes — ed. by Ann Wall.
The following is a labour song written by
labour martyr and poet Joe Hill.
PICKETING SUPERMARKETS
WORKERS OF THE WORLD, AWAKEN!
Because all this food is grown in the
Workers of the world, awaken!
store
Break your chains, demand your rights.
do not take the leaflet.
Cabbages, broccoli and tomatoes
are raised at night in the aisles.
All the wealth you make is taken
By exploiting parasites.
Milk is brewed in the rear storage
Shall you kneel in deep submission
areas.
Beef produced in vats in the
basement.
From your cradles to your graves?
Is the height of your ambition
-
Do not take the leaflet.
To be good and willing slaves?
Peanut butter and soft drinks
are made fresh each morning by
-
store employees.
If the workers take a notion,
Our oranges and grapes
are so fine and round
that when held up to the lights they
They can stop all speeding trains;
Every ship upon the ocean
cast no shadow.
They can tie with mighty chains;
Do not take the leaflet.
Every wheel in the creation,
And should you take one
do not believe it.
Every mine and every mill,
Fleets and armies of the nation
This chain of stores has no
Will at their command stand still.
connection
with anyone growing food someplace
else.
Join the union, fellow workers
How could we have an effect on local
farmers?
Do not believe it.
Men and women, side by side;
We will crush the greedy shirkers
Like a sweeping, surging tide.
The sound here is Muzak, for your
For united we are standing,
enjoyment.
But divided we will fall;
It is not the sound of children crying.
There is a lady offering samples
to mark Canada Cheese Month.
Let this be our understanding -
"All for one and one for all."
There is no dark-skinned man with
black hair beside her
wanting to show you the inside of a
Workers of the world, awaken!
coffin
Rise in all your splendid might;
You would not have to look if there
Take the wealth that you are making,
was.
And there are no Nicaraguan heroes
It belongs to you by right.
in any way connected with the
No one will for bread be crying,
bananas.
We'll have freedom, love and health
When the grand red flag is flying
Pay no attention to these people.
In the Workers' Commonwealth.
The manager is a citizen.
All this food is grown in the store.
Page Friday, 2
THE  UBYSSEY
Friday,  January  21,   1972 Bootleg
Prizes
Bootleg records may soon
be a thing of the past, because
they've become too good for
their own good. Last year, the
production and sale of illegal
recordings finally came of age.
New bootlegs materialized with
mind-boggling frequency, with
sometimes four or five a week
hitting the stands. Existing
laws had proved ineffective,
and in major cities like London
and L.A., bootlegs were sold
openly, often blatantly.
The   situation  was  getting
out    of   hand.    The   record >
companies    were    receiving
(gasp!) competition. One
loud-mouthed British
bootlegger named Jeffrey
Collins, for example, told the
newspapers that he was making
a 200% profit on each album.
He also blabbed that he was
about to retire, having made
half a million pounds on
bootlegging. Others, less vocal,
have been doing as well.
Bootlegging had become a
subterranean industry.
As a result, the record
companies have begun to get
tough. They have boycotted or
sued retail record stores which
sell bootlegs. On occasion,
strong-arm tactics have been
used, with hired thugs being
sent around to "bust up"
offending stores. The
mammoth capital resources of
conglomerates like Kinney,
CBS, and Polydor have put
concerted pressure on
legislators. New laws have been
passed in America and are
being considered in England
which will stiffen the penalties
imposed on convicted
bootleggers. Beginning
February 15, an American
record pirate can get a $1000
fine or a year in jail.
There are many arguments
against bootlegs, not the least
of which is the poor quality
production which so often
obscures the clarity of their
sound. Many record buyers
have been stuck with bootlegs
which hiss and crackle like
frying bacon or echo like an
abandoned   mine   shaft. Also,
bootleggers, who once played
modern Robin Hoods by
ripping off the fat-cat record
companies and selling their
product cheap have, with a few
exceptions, become as
capitalist as the capitalists.
People like Jeffrey Collins have
gotten rich by beating the
system at its own game. And
artists have only occasionally
been paid for their stolen
music.
To music-lovers, bootlegs
are important because they
often add new musical
dimensions to the work of
particular artists. Some
bootlegs are so badly recorded
that the music becomes
virtually unrecognizable.
Others are well-recorded, and
quite worthwhile musically.
Some, like "Liver Than You'll
Ever Be" and "Sky High", are
excitingly first-rate, and have
become real classics. Below is a
partial list of the best of the
available bootlegs. None are
available in Vancouver because
of record company pressure,
but if you get to San
Francisco, L.A., or London,
you might pick up couple.
Bob Dylan: Black Nite
Crash — fair to good record of
early acoustic Dylan. Live New
York concert 1964, plus solo
half of Dublin concert 1966,
with an incredible, poignant
version of "Visions of
Johanna".
24 - demos, 1962-64. Good
quality, fine selection includes
"Percy's Song".
Waters of Oblivion - 14
good "basement tapes" made
with the Band.
Forty Red White and Blue
Strings — rejected takes from
"Highway 61" and "Blonde on
Blonde", with Bloomfield and
Kooper. Includes a rough
"Visions of Johanna" with
slightly different words. Some
songs     duplicated     from
"Freewheelin' " on side 2.
In 1966 There was. .. one
of the best of the bootlegs.
Live (and how!) with the Band
at the Albert Hall, 1966. Eight
fine tracks, including "Like a
Rolling Stone" and "Tom
Thumb's Blues".
Jimi Hendrix: Wow! — side
1, Monterey performance, side
2 , ' ' Red House " .
"Star-Spangled Banner",
"Purple Haze", and
instrumental jam from
Woodstock. Good quality
recording, mind-searing guitar
work. Good if you want to
avoid the Woodstock hype and
just get Hendrix.
Live at L.A. Forum
(double) - with Mitch Mitchell
and Billy Cox, 1970. Guitar
comes through well, but bass,
drums, and vocals are muffled.
Sky High - jam at "The
Scene" club, New York, with
Johnny Winter, Rick Derringer,
and Buddy Miles.
Excruciatingly heavy. Miles
lays down a pounding, animal
beat, and Hendrix reaches new
heights, playing unbelievable,
howling guitar. Jim Morrison
screams drunkenly for a few
bars on side two. Good quality
recording which builds to
amazing peaks.
Hendrix Flier — reportedly
a good acoustic set, well
recorded.
Live at the Isle of Wight
(double) — 90 minutes of the
135 minutes set. With Mitch
Mitchell and Billy Cox. Up and
down quality recording, badly
edited in places. Still, powerful
album, very atmospheric, with
several memorable cuts. Again,
avoid the "pop festival" hype.
Rolling Stones: Liver Than
You'll Ever Be — Deservedly
one of the best-known
bootlegs. Recorded in L.A. and
Jutra et I'oncle
Mon Oncle Antoine, directed
by Claude Jutra, featuring
Jacques    Gagnon,    Jean
Duceppe and Claude Jutra.
Jutra's Uncle Antoine is a
compelling account of the life
of a small town in the Quebec
asbestos mining country
during the Duplessis era. The
realities of sex, death, work,
and survival are largely seen
through the eyes of a teenage
boy, Benoit, whose uncle
runs the town's general store,
doubling as the community
undertaker.
The basic style of the film
is social realism (in a tradition
that begins with Zola), and
the politically-minded will no
doubt see in this film an
exposition of the conditions
of life that have historically
led to the political situation
that now exists in Quebec. In
fact, a filmed version of
Vallieres'   White   Niggers  of
America might not look too
different from the world
Jutra gives us.
Although the political
implications are present — in
the father who has only two
choices: working in the mine
or in the logging camp, and
who hates both; in the mine
owner driving through town
in his horse and sleigh flinging
cheap Christmas stockings
filled with candy onto the
steps of the workers' shanties;
in the economic hopelessness
of the place — despite all this,
Jutra's intention is more
extensive.
For under the realistic
portrait, there is a powerful
undercurrent of droll black
humor, and Jutra's interest is
'the human comedy' rather
than an impassioned plea to
redress social wrongs.
Into the playing out of
town gossip — the romances,
deals, stirrings and longings
that make up relationships,
and Benoit's initiation into
the sacred and farcical
mysteries of sex and death —
Jutra weaves a metaphysical
fable that moves in and out
of the town's preparations for
Christmas. With a sharp and
affectionate eye, Jutra draws
us slowly into a
dream-phantasy-mythic world
that finally crystallizes in a
chilling finish.
The film is strikingly old
fashioned (although some will
no doubt see in it
resemblances to 400 Blows),
but its virtue is in the simple
starkness with which human
relationships unfold, and
Jutra's appreciation of the
eerie explosiveness, deep
solidarity and macabre humor
of the people he's portraying.
—Stan Persky
Oakland, 1969. The ultimate
Stones album, much better
than Ya-yas. Good quality
recording, sizzling guitar work
by Taylor and Richard, Jagger
at his most savage. Fantastic
live version of "Gimme
Shelter", and a wild, anarchic
"Sympathy for the Devil".
Oakland side builds to an
apocalytic climax through
"Honky Tonk Women" to
"Street Fighting Man". A
monumental recording.
Live at Detroit, 1969
(double) — Ya-yas tracks plus
"Satisfaction", "Prodigal Son",
"You Got to Move", and
"Under My Thumb", but bad
recording reduces it all to sonic
mush.
Stoned in Europe 1970
(double) and Live at the
Roundhouse 1971 — further
variations on the live tour, but
quality unknown.
Donovan: Live '70 — good
quality, has some original songs
like "Reedy River", "Giggle in
a Bubbly Bath", and "The
Ferryman's Daughter".
Captures the atmosphere of
live Donovan better than the
official "In Concert" album.
Crosby, Stills, Nash, and
Young: Wooden Nickel - good
quality live recording, better
than 4-Way Street, which was
brought out to counteract its
sales. Good Neil Young songs,
including "Birds" and "Down
by the River".
Other bootlegs: Simon and
Garfunkel: "Chez", Led
Zeppelin: "Live at Blueberry
Hill", Jethro Tull: "My God",
The Band: "Live at the
Hollywood Bowl", Santana:
"Dead or Alive", Cream: "Top
of the Milk", Elton John, Leon
Russell: "Watercress", The
Who: "Live", Frank Zappa:
"200 Motels", Jefferson
Airplane, The Byrds: "Live at
Buddy's", C, S, N, and Y:
"Ohio", Neil Young, James
Taylor, Carole King, Rod
Stewart and Faces: "Plynth",
Rolling Stones: "Gimme
Shelter" (soundtrack).
- Bill Storey
Friday,   January  21,   1972
THE  UBYSSEY
Page Friday, 3 ^    rr »»~ . «
*<* **»*
DEPARTURE BEFORE DAWN
The cocks crow once, the night is not yet over.
Slowly the moon climbs up the autumn hills
In company with the stars, but now the traveller
Who journeys far is already out on the road;
His face is beaten with icy gusts of wind.
■X&* :^0"-
,#1
!/ -.-
,     • -•        *,•» '*s»i-^- < -.' Ii  •*»*> •;** A 3***
«!<>
Page Friday, 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January  21,   1972 Friday, January  21,   1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 9
Treaty not a bad deal'
By JIM JOLY
The major problem of the
Columbia River Treaty was its
failure to allow for inflation, civil
engineering professor Samuel
Russell said Thursday at an
Academic Activities Committee
seminar.
Russell said in the SUB clubs
lounge at noon the money B.C.
received for its 60-year sale of
Columbia River down-stream
water benefits to the United
States is not as valuable today as
it was when the treaty was
concluded in 1961.
"It's like a house," he said. "I
may sell my house to my neighbor
for what seems to be a fair price
at the time, but, because of
inflation, I may buy the same
house back again five years later
for twice as much."
Canada didn't drive quite as
good a bargain as it might have,
Russell said, but added that, in
the main, the treaty was a fair
deal from which Canada did
reasonably well.
Russell     said     the     main
achievement of the treaty was
that such a complicated
agreement was even signed.
He said the Columbia River
agreement is a good example of
big projects that are difficult to
stop once they get cranked up.
"After the treaty had been
agreed upon, whether it might
have been made better or not
didn't matter," he said.
"After so many people have
committed some part of their lives
on a project such as this, there is a
natural human tendency to want
to see it go ahead successfully as
decided."
One member of the 30-person
audience said that all the money
B.C. has obtained from the
agreement has gone into building
dams for American benefit. Even
though the money is now
depleted, there are still more
projects to build as set out in the
treaty.
Russell said he thought the
bargain was a fair deal at the time
it was signed.
"Inflation caused many of the
later problems," he said.
X-Kalay wants teachers
The X-Kalay foundation is inviting UBC faculty and students
to "teach the course you always wanted to."
"X-Kalay is in the people business and our whole trip is taking
people who have completely broken down and fixing them up,"
director Geraldine Berner said Wednesday.
"We would like UBC people to teach courses in psychology,
the humanities or any other subject."
"The kids here are very enthusiastic, like to participate and get
caught up in a learning experience, and anyone who would like to
get away from the university structure and really get down with
people will like it here," Berner said.
The X-Kalay commune is a group of adults and teenagers,
most with prison backgrounds.
Many of the commune members are employed in a job
program including the X-Kalay gas station, ad company and other
services.
The educational program "would jazz up our community a bit
and make it more stimulating," Berner said, and would be an
extension of the present program in which the members teach each
other grammar, typing and other technical skills.
She said anyone is welcome to teach any subject, at whatever
time and using whatever method they wish.
The commune has plenty of space and supplies and video
equipment is available.
Further information may be obtained from the X-Kalay foundation at 879-0661.
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SHOW TIMES: 12:10, 2:30, 4:45, 7:15, 9:30
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CAMiiiaj nth Tickets for Tonight's Performance
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Another member of the
audience said even after the
60-year agreement runs out, there
is a provision in the treaty which
calls on Canada to provide flood
control whenever the U.S. needs
it.
The flood control clause isn't a
very serious matter, Russell said.
"When your neighbor's house
is on fire, you're going to try to
put it out without worrying about
trouble or expense. Then later,
you can hope for some kind of
remuneration," he said.
Russell's talk was the first in a
series of AAC seminars planned
for this term on the U.S. influence
on Canada.
SUB FILMSOC presents
CATCH 22
with Alan Arkin
50*
FRI. & SAT. — 7:00 & 9:30 SUB
SUNDAY — 7:00 THEATRE
Starring
JANE FONDA
MICHAEL SARRAZIN
SUSANNAH YORK
GIG YOUNG
BONNIE BEDELIA&
RED BUTTONS
HEBB
THEATRE
UBC    7:30 & 9:30 p.m.
FRI., JAN. 21
SAT., JAN. 22
admission 75c
CHARTER FLIGHTS
VANCOUVER—LONDON—VANCOUVER
Return Flights    $225.   UP
ONE-WAY
$145 Vancouver to London
$120 London to Vancouver
We have numerous return and one-way flights each month
to and from London. Ring our office for information and
free list of flights.
GEORGIA TRAVEL
AGENTS LTD.
1312 -925 W.Georgia, Van. 1
687-2868 (3 lines)
REAL BLUES
S3ni9 1V3H
PURE FOOD & DRUG ACT
Harvey IViandel - Sugarcane Harris
PNE GARDENS
SUNDAY, JAN. 30, 8:30 p.m.
TICKETS AT S.U.B. $3.50 Adv.
After all, how else
are you supposed
to know the ins and
outs of diamonds.
Thats our business,
Our pleasure
though is passing
along every facet
of this information
so you can choose
the bridal set you'll
treasure happily
ever after.
ENGAGEMENT RINGS
FROM $100
LIMITED
Granville at Pender
Since 1904
REGISTERED JEWELER
AMERICAN GEM SOCIETY
r Page  10
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,  January  21,   1972
Hot flashes
Have a Nice
vacation
Want a Nice vacation?
The University of Toronto will
be offering degree courses in Nice,
France, July 6 to August 18.
Credit courses in English, fine art,
French, history and political
economy will be given by
professors from the universities of
Toronto and Nice.
Cost is approximately $750
including round trip, tuition for
one course, room and board.
Anyone wanting further
information may write to
Toronto-Nice Summer
Programme, Division of University
Extension, 119 St. George St.,
Toronto 181, Ontario.
Have a nice time.
Free bread
The Mackenzie King Travelling
scholarships are available for
graduates of any Canadian
university wishing to pursue studies
in the field of International or
Industrial relations.
Five scholarships of $2,500
each will be available for study in
the fall of 1972. The
post-graduate studies will be made
in either the United States or the
United Kingdom.
The MacKenzie King
scholarships are one-year awards
of $3,000 each offered for
full-time post-graduate studies in
Canada or elsewhere in any field.
For additional information and
applications, write to the
Scholarship and Bursary Office,
Buch. 207.
See China
A delegation of 15 Canadians
has returned from a month long
trip to the People's Republic of'
China.
They have a wide collection of
slides showing factories,
communes, and other aspects of
life in China that they would like
to share with schools,
associations, and groups.
mi
Anyone interested in meeting
with members of the delegation
can contact Earl Willmott, 3515
West 39th Ave., Vancouver 13.
Humans meei
All Human Government caucus
members, friends and supporters
are welcome at a planning meeting
tonight at 8 p.m. in Brock 300.
"Refreshments are also
welcome," spokesman Svend
Robinson said Thursday.
Coffee house
Friday evenings at the Campus
Lutheran Center have been
changed into coffee house nights.
Patrons may play chess as well
as enjoy live entertainment.
Tonight there will be two
groups performing a collection of
Newfoundland songs.
Admission is 25c at the door
and coffee is sold for a nickel.
Everyone is welcome.
'Tween classes
*'.*
TODAY
CLASSICS CLUB
P.   Rumball   and   J.   Humphry  will
speak  on  "Turkish  Delight", 4049
West 11 Avenue at 8 p.m.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
General     Meeting.     All     welcome.
12:30 International House.
PRE-SCHOOL WORK
Speaker from  the Crisis Centre at
noon in SUB 105B.
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Tariq Ali, Pakistan revolutionary,
speaks on "The Liberation of
Bangla Desh" in the SUB
auditorium at noon.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Two showings of NFB film City of
Gold narrated by Pierre Berton at
Lassere 102 at noon.
COFFEE HOUSE
Folk singer Frank at Lutheran
Campus Centre, 9 p.m.
SATURDAY
UBC SKYDIVERS
Chilliwack  Airport   (Upstairs),  first
jump training for VOC
Whistler Cabin Reunion Party in the
evening.
SUNDAY
VST & SCM
Two films, "To See and Not to See"
and "The Challenge of Change" at
Trinity House."
TAEKWON-DO CLUB
New class starts at Winter Sports
Centre, 6-8 p.m. at gym B.
LUTHERAN CENTRE
Worship   and   discussion   with   Don
Johnson on A Community Lutheran
Centre, 10:30 a.m.
Fireside   with   the  Catalysts   7:30
o.m. at the Lutheran Centre.
UBC FENCING CLUB
Pre-tournament practice, all should
come to Gym B 2-4 p.m.
MONDAY
ELCIRCULO
Spanish  Melas can  be purchased at
IH 402 at noon.
UBC CONSERVATIVE CLUB
Oerrill Warren, leader of the BC
PC's will be speaking in the SUB
Partyroom at noon.
TUESDAY
UBC-NDP
W.W. II propaganda film 'Nazi
Stike' will be shown in Bu. 106 at
noon. Price 25 cents.
WEDNESDAY
UBC-NDP
"Nazi Strike" shown in Bu. 106 at
noon for 25 cents.
UBC FENCING CLUB
Final pre-tourney practice; car pools
will be set up at 8-10 p.m. in new
Gym B.
GERMAN CLUB
Organizing    for   Jan.    ski   trio   at
International House, 402, noon.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Canadian poet George Bowering
reads in SUB Art Gallery, noon.
THURSDAY
UBC BICYCLE CLUB
Organize party for cyclists, come all
to SUB 213 at noon.
UBC-NDP
W.W. II propaganda film "Battle of
Russia" in Bu. 106, noon. Price 25
cents.
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people
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• TEN YEARS AFTER  • SLY & THE
FAMILY STONE • JOHN SEBASTIAN
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11
PARMER'S   FROLIC   JAN.   22   SUB
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Special Notices
15
WELCOME TO CAMPUS Churches
on Univ. Blvd. Sunday Services
"—St. Anselm's Anglican, Holy
Communion at 8 a.m. Morning
Prayer at 11 a. mi University Hill
United — Morning Worship at 11
a.m. — Church School at both
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RED VOLKS: I LEFT TURQUOISE
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Also carry Sony, Dual, Akai and
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growth, Gestalt Awareness Groups.
$12 month. Contact Allan Cohen,
224-5445 or John Mate, 922-4481.
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Zen Centre, 139 Water St. T. Th.
7:30   p.m.   Sat,   morning   8:00   a.m.
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8627   Granville   St.   at   10th
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18
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Utopian, January 1970 to January
1972.  Phone 874-8849.
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
1954   CHEV   2   DR.   SEDAN
mechanical   and   body   $195
1976;  228-4301.
GOOD
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24
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for  '62  Renault,  for cash  or  new
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RECORDS — WE HAVE THE
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We also have leathercrafts. Drop
in and listen to the music or play
a game of scrabble. Joy Music
Sanctuary 6610 Main (at 50th)
11 a.m. - 7 p.m.
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40
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Neat, Accurate Work. Reasonable Rates.  Phone 263-5317.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
THE GREATER KAMLOOPS
Aquatic and Summer Swim Club
are currently accepting applications for Swim instructors for the
season May-September, 1972. Applicants are requested to submit
qualifications and two written references by January 31, 1972.
Salary is presently open to negotiation. Applications submittable
to: Chairman, Personnel Committee, Kamlops Aquatic Club, 249
Bestwick Court West, Kamloops,
B.C.	
FULL ROOM AND BOARD PLUS
remuneration for 2 or 3 days
weekly assistance incl. driving
paraplegic working woman. Dunbar.   733-2819   (Eves.)
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Music Instruction
61
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62
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63
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71
PUREBRED PEKE PUPS — 7 WK.
male — Black Sable. Phone 872-
1447	
BARGAIN SALE FROM TURKEY!
Lambskin embroidered suede
coats, sheepskin lining and Angora trim. Selling fast in SUB's
AMS Co-op Store.	
215 METAL'S WITH BINDINGS,
$45. Antique pump organ, offers,
Phone  Barrett,   731-9753.
RENTALS 8c REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
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private entr. Near gate — now
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COMFORTABLE ROOM SEPA-
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Phone   733-5772.
Room & Board
82
IT'S NEW — STAY AT THE DKE
House. Large spacious rooms;
semi-private washrooms, color TV,
complete laundry facilities and
excellent food. 5765 Agronomy Rd.
224-9691.
Furnished Apts.
83
WANTED IMMEDIATELY — 1
roomate to share 2-br. furnished
suite in West-End, Bar, Shag,
TV, Luxury view. 687-4271 after
6  p.m.   Prefer  mature  student.
Unfurnished Apts.
84
Communal Houses
85
Houses—Furn. & Unfurn.
86
4TH GIRL TO SHARE 4 BDRM.
house Feb. 1, $60. 224-3166. Dunbar
at   29th.
Use Your
Ubyssey
Classified Friday,  January 21,   1972
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 11
SPOR TS
'Birds faltering
By MIKE GIDORA
It's time to re-evaluate the
UBC basketball team.
In recent years, while the
football team, or the hockey team
has been lept upon and crucified
by angry newspaper hacks, the
basketball team has somehow
managed to retain the aura of a
sacred cow.
They were just not critizied.
Admittedly, they were usually the
best team on campus and as such,
were the least vulnerable to
criticism.
But, this year the 'Birds are
limping along with a record of 8
wins 8 losses and are in real
danger of losing out to Alberta for
the league title.
Even more distressing is that
they have lost eight of their last
10 games, culminating their slide
with a generally listless and
uninspired Monday night loss to
SFU in the Buchanan classic.
The once high-flying 'Birds
were humbled, not by SFU, but
by themselves.
The 'Birds of two and three
years ago lost basketball games.
They were not invincible, but
they didn't lose games in the
manner that Monday's game was
lost. .
True,   the   'Birds   once   had
people like Terry MacKay, Derek
Sankey and Bob Molinski wearing
the blue and gold, but no-one can
say that Stan Callegari isn't as fine
a guard as Alex Brayden or that
John Mills isn't as tough beneath
the boards as Molinski or Sankey.
That's not the problem. This
year's team expects to win.
But they don't show the hustle
and crispness that has
characterized past UBC squads.
In short, they're not hungry
enough.
And the prairie schools have
been improving. The University of
Alberta Golden Bears prove that.
They have beaten the 'Birds three
times this season and are currently
battling »P8C for first place in
their league.
Alberta was to have played at
UBC this weekend, but due to the
transportation tie-up as the result
of the air traffic controllers strike,
this series has been postponed.
This may be to. the 'Birds'
advantage, because once you start
losing, it's very hard to stop.
This delay in the
confrontation, welcome or not,
will hopefully put the 'Birds in a
better frame of mind when they
eventually do play the series. The
talent to produce a winner is
definitely there, but is the desire?
Women's hoop tonrnej on
After a year's absence, the
UBC Women's Invitational
Basketball Tournament has
returned to campus.
Sixteen Junior and Senior B
women's teams from throughout
the province will compete starting
at 4:30 p.m. Friday continuing to
10:30 p.m., and again Saturday
starting at 9:30 a.m.
All the games will be played at
the gyms in the new P.E.
complex.
When the tournament was first
held in 1960, it encompassed
women's senior A teams. In 1969,
the tournament was changed to
women's senior B teams because
the Thunderettes were becoming
too heavily committed to
intercollegiate action.
As a result, the Thunderettes
do not compete in the
tournament. Instead, Lake
Cowichan, Simon Fraser, Western
Washington, Kelowna, Vancouver
City    College,    B.C.I.T.,    the
Swimmers win
The UBC swim team
completely swamped their
opposition from Lewis and Clark
University of Portland in a dual
swim meet last weekend.
The team picked up 17 first
place finishes as the women
scored 86 points to Portland
State's 23 and Lewis and Clarke's
6. The male 'Birds won 56-32 over
Lewis and Clark.
The big winners were Jane
Rogers and Mike Stanhuis, who
each won three races. UBC got
two wins from Dianne Rogers,
Rhonda Ross and Chris Hanna.
The team is off to Tacoma,
Wash, this weekend for a meet
against Highland College and
Pacific University.
Vancouver Rovers, and the UBC
Senior B team will fight for the
trophy.
This week is national
basketball week in Canada, and
the 50th anniversary of the
Canadian Amateur Basketball
Association, and this tournament
should help promote women's
basketball in the province.
Air strike
stops games
The current strike by air traffic
controllers has caused the
cancellation of most the the
WCIAA sports events for this
weekend.
UBC assistant Athletic Director
"Buzz" Moore said that both
men's and women's week-end
basketball games with the
University of Alberta had been
cancelled. They will probably be
played Feb. 9-10, Wednesday
night and Thursday noon.
The hockey series with Calgary
has also been postponed and
instead UBC will play the
University of Victoria this
Saturday and Sunday at the
Esquimalt Arena in Victoria.
Game time Saturday is 1:30 and
Sunday at 2 p.m.
Thunderettes
split games
The UBC Thunderettes
basketball team lost their first
game of the season last weekend
as they bowed to. the Victoria
Maplettes in Victoria, Saturday.
Led by Angie Radanovich with
14 points, the Victoria team put
forth their best effort of the
season to beat the UBC women
46^4. Terri McGovern led UBC
scores with 11 points while Bev
Barnes added 10.
The Thunderettes got their
revenge on Sunday as they beat
Victoria 46-33. Centre Janice Gee
led the scorers for UBC with 12
points.
The team now has a record of
7 and 1 in the City League play,
and retain their 6 and 0 record in
the Collegiate league, good for
first place in both leagues.
Intramurals
WRESTLING competition
begins Monday at noon in the War
Memorial Gym.
Weekend Action Box
Date
Jan. 21-22
Sport
Swimming
Jan. 21-22      Wrestling
Jan. 22
Jan. 21
Jan. 22
Jan. 22
Jan. 21-22
Jan. 22-23
Hockey JV
B'tball JV
B'tball JV
Judo
Basketball
(Women Sr.B)
Hockey U
Opponent
Highland College
Pacific U.
Oregon State
U. of Oregon
BCIT
BCIT
Van. City Col.
Steve. Tourney
Tournament
of Victoria
Place
Tacoma
Corvallis
Eugene
UBC
BCIT
UBC
Richmond HS
UBC
Victoria
Time
8:00 p.m.
TBA
TBA
12:45 p.m.
8:00 p.m.
6:00 p.m.
noon
TBA
1:30 p.m.
ROYALBANK
THE HELPFUL BANK
CANADA STUDENT LOANS
GENERAL BANKING SERVICES
University Area Branch — Dave Stewart, Mgr.
10th & SASAMAT 224-4348
WESTERN PROMOTIONS PROUDLY PRESENTS
INCONCERT
B. B. KING
THURSDAY, JANUARY 27
Q.E. THEATRE
8:30 P.M.
$4.00, $5.00, $6.00
Tickets: Concert Box Office, 680 Robson — 687-2801
Outlets: Rohan's, Thunderbird Shop, Grennan's,
Totem Music (Lougheed Mall)
iJjF     ^lOth & ALMA "#/>
SALE   SALE   SALE
LEATHER GOODS   •   PIPES   •   JEWELLERY
COLLAGE TABLES   •   PATCHWORK PILLOWS
2619 ALMA
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• Pocket Books • Magazines
• Largest Selection of Review Notes in Vancouver
BETTER BUY BOOKS
4393 W. 10 Ave.
224-4144 - open 11-8 p.m.
SUB FILMSOC presents ...
CATCH 22
with Alan Arkin
50*
FRI. & SAT. — 7:00 & 9:30               SUB
SUNDAY — 7:00                       THEATRE
SUMMER 1972
CAREER-ORIENTED
SUMMER EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM
IN THE FIELDS OF: Administration, Biological, Chemical, Life
and Physical Sciences, Engineering, and Applied Sciences,
Economics, Social Sciences.
ELIGIBILITY: AU full-time university students in the
above fields who intend to return to university in 1972-73.
Canadian citizens have statutory preference for
appointment.
TO APPLY: Submit a UCPA application form (available from
your University Placement Office) and a list of courses taken, to
the:
Public Service Commission of Canada Regional Office
203-536 Thuriow Street, Vancouver 5, B.C.
Apply before JANUARY 31,1972
TRIUMF
CUPE
WILL YOU?
The Canadian Union of Public Employees Page 12
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,  January  21,   1972
Student sees real world with Marx
From page 2
from making a long-range
commitment to the department
here in Vancouver.
We do not know what such a
commitment would entail, but
apparently the senior faculty (the
body responsible for contract
renewals, tenure and promotions)
feels that it is directly related to
the proximity of one's residence
to the psychology department.
If one accepts this criterion,
two points should be noted. Dr.
Marx maintains a separate
residence in Vancouver. Second,
the department was aware of her
Bellingham residence when she
was hired.
In terms of criteria other than
residence, Dr. Marx's performance
appears to be quite good. She has
received excellent evaluations
from students enrolled in her
courses, and she has established
contact with over 100 community
agencies in order for these
students to observe psychology in
the "real" world.
Needless to say, these contacts
should prove useful in training
both undergraduate and graduate
students whose interests lie
outside of "academic"
psychology.
The case of Dr. Humphreys
appears to be as puzzling as that
of Dr. Marx.
The failure to renew Dr.
Humphreys' contract was based
on alleged inability to teach large
first and second year courses.
This allegation appears to be
unsubstantiated.
Investigation by the graduate
student committee found there
was not sufficient evidence
available to justify the decision
concerning Dr. Humphreys.
In addition, Dr. Humphreys'
research ability appears to be
excellent, and his service as a
resource person to both students
and his faculty colleagues has
been invaluable.
The most important finding of
the graduate student investigation
Classroom, Report
By VAUGHN PALMER
Walter Gage told visitors to his 11:30 a.m. Math
100 lecture in Bu. 100 Jan. 14 to "please sit on the
stairs. Give the seats to my own class, or 111 have to
ban all guests."
The lecture, delivered to the packed classroom,
was a well-prepared working out of examples of
mathematical integration and anti-differentation.
Working quickly but clearly from memory Gage
filled one board, then another, stopping only for
exchanges with the class such as:
Student: Excuse me, sir, but shouldn't that be
x2 rather than x?
Gage: Why, you're quite right. You're really on
the ball today Larry. Say, you're a nice fellow Larry
— just like man's best friend. You know who man's
best friend is Larry?
Student: A dog.
Gage: Is that right? I'm sorry Larry, no offence
taken I hope. You're a nice fellow Larry - I like
you.
Later on in the lecture Gage asked: "Any
questions? It's so hard to get students to ask
questions."
His presentations are clear even for one such as
I who took Math 12 over two years ago and
questions are seldom necessary.
Gage proceeded at a rapid pace, covering as
much material as any lecturer, yet providing time
for folksy humor, puns and quick exchanges with
those in the front rows.
The lectures are great stuff, part of the folklore
of the quaint master of the one-room schoolhouse,
who teaches math, runs a university, and most
important of all, can remember the name of
everybody he meets.
Of course anybody who has been in one of
Gage's math classes will tell you that they loved
every minute of it. If you browbeat one of these
groupies he/she will also tell you that Gage reminds
one of one's sainted mother, greatly missed here at
the big university.
There are lots of worse ways of learning Math
100, and if you can stand being part of UBC's great
public relations experiment, then Gage's math class
is for you.
He gives two exams, some in-class assignments,
marks easy, gives you all the help you need, lends
money and if pressed will even remember your
name.
Math 100, section 27, starring Walter Gage,
meets at 11:30 a.m. Tuesday, Wednesday and
Friday in Bu. 100.
If you plan on visiting the class, remember, give
the seats to his own students and sit on the stairs or
else hell have to ...
Sure he will!
A very special offer!
GRADUATION
PORTRAITS
in
NATURAL
COLOR!
Select from a series of 8 poses
taken in natural colour. We
will finish:
o One 8" x  10" portrait in
natural color (one person)
$21.95
• One 8" x 10" portrait in
natural color (group)
$24.95
Ask about our special
reduced prices on additional
'portraits ordered at the same
time.
o Complete selection of Caps
and Gowns available.
*r
campbell
studios
2580 BURRARD STREET,
VANCOUVER 9, B.C.«
736-0261
INTRODUCING
The
Underground
Railway
with Rosalind Keene and Darren St. Clare
EVERY Friday & Saturday
MEMBERSHIP DISCOTHEQUE
Open Daily From 10 P.M. 685-5015
Sun.-Thurs. - 75c ($1.00 Before 10:30)      Fri./Sat. - $2.50
in the psychology department is
that criteria for the evaluation of
junior faculty are not made
explicit and little attempt is made
to gather objective data.
This finding is not surprising in
view of data from tenure and
contract-renewal disputes in other
departments.
What is surprising is the failure
of the department head to
respond to letters requesting the
reconsideration of the cases of
Drs. Marx and Humphreys.
The immediate goal of the
graduate students is twofold.
First we seek the
establishment, within the
psychology department, of an
objective system for evaluating
junior faculty.
Second, we seek
reconsideration of the cases of Dr.
Marx and Dr. Humphreys. We
hope that the fulfilment of these
goals will alleviate future contract
controversies.
We appreciate the support of
The Ubyssey in our present
dispute and we desire the
continuation of this support.
However we do wish to clarify a
few issues raised in Tuesday's
Ubyssey.
First, the reference made to
the Patterson and Douglas
Shwartz letters implied that
nothing has been done to correct
deficiencies in graduate student
curriculum and procedures used
to evaluate graduate students.
In fact, since the circulation of
those letters, student and faculty
concern has led to some changes
in curriculum and evaluation
procedures, and the changes
appear to be a forward step.
Second, the article implied that
last August a substantial number
of graduate students demanded
the removal of Dr. Signori as
acting head of the psychology
department.
At that time only a minority of
graduate students endorsed
Signori's removal. However, at
present it appears that a much
larger number of students are
dissatisfied with the power
structure of the psychology
department.
The growing concern of
students and The Ubyssey can be
regarded as a basis for optimism.
The next step in our attempt to
re-open the cases of Drs. Marx and
Humphreys should be to arrange a
meeting with the faculty.
We hope that we can work
towards the establishment of an
objective system for evaluating
junior faculty and to consider the
cases of Drs. Marx and
Humphreys within this system.
But for now we await a reply
from Dr. Signori.
PANGO-PANGO (UNS) -
Crisis struck this island kingdom
today as fourteen members of the
National Brotherhood of Goat
Blowers staged a work-to-rule
campaign.
"When the final whistle blows,
so do I," one goat-blower was
quoted as saying: "I think the
company sucks.
"We've got to get in there and
grab the horns by the teeth."
The move was directed against
chief goat hear Rip M. Off who is
described by his workers as being
as popular as a pterodactyl in a
hen roost.
ita-MBHHi
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JAPANESE & EUROPEAN CARS
All Repairs Guaranteed — 4000 Miles or 90 Days
Student Special: 20% Discount off Labor Charges
4305 W. 10 Ave. at Discovery • 224-7212
SUB FILMSOC presents . . .
CATCH 22
with Alan Arkin
50*
FRI. & SAT. — 7:00 & 9:30                $UB
SUNDAY — 7:00                       THEATRE

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