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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Nov 28, 1972

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 Meeting to decide strategy
By GARY COULL
A general meeting of
students to further consider
student voting power at all arts
faculty levels, will be held
noon, Thursday, in Buch. 106,
arts undergraduate president
Brian Loonies said Monday.
The meeting will elect
students to an ad-hoc committee on student representation in the arts faculty.
The committee was set up at
last Thursday's informal
student-faculty meeting.
Besides electing the three
men and three women to form
the committee, the meeting
will discuss student reaction to
last week's faculty meeting
and plans for the future, he
said.
"The faculty-student
meeting was dominated by the
faculty. Now it is time for the
students to meet and take their
own initiatives," he said.
Loomes said they will know
by Thursday whether Kenny
will call an emergency faculty
meeting to deal with student
demands.
"We sent a letter to him on
Friday asking him to call the
meeting within one week. We
also tried to meet with him but
he was too busy. We finally got
one for 2:30 p.m. Tuesday."
He said after meeting Kenny
the AUS will know where
students stand and then can
take their position to the
Thursday meeting.
"After the people are elected
on Thursday students can give
the representatives some guide
as to what structure they
should follow."
Kenny has been unavailable
for comment since the last
faculty meeting. His only
comment after the disruption
was the next faculty meeting
would be called in due course.
However, someone who
wishes to remain anonymous
reported Monday that Kenny
will call a faculty meeting
shortly and allow Loomes to
bring a small delegation to
speak.
This, the source claimed,
will be what Kenny will tell
Loomes during their meeting
today.
Loomes said two petitions
are being circulated: one for
the faculty to sign urging
Kenny to put this issue on the
agenda of the next faculty of
arts meeting and one for
students to sign pressing for
the same thing.
Loomes hopes the meeting
on Thursday will break into
groups  to  discuss  specific
WE UBYSSEY
K.
Vol. LIV, No. 22     VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 1972
48    228-2301
changes   in   grading,   course
load and new programs.
"Since we are getting to the
point where we have the
power, it's time to use our
imagination," he said.
Since the student disruption
of the faculty meeting last
Thursday two groups on
campus have voiced support
for the student demands.
The Alma Mater Society
student council executive has
unanimously approved the
AUS' desire for student
representation on faculty
decision making bodies.
In a resolution issued
Monday, the AMS executive:
"urges the faculty to proceed
at the earliest possible time to
consider the matter."
They also urged the
provincial government to
amend the Universities Act to
allow students the right to vote
at faculty meetings.
The release notes this has
been achieved in many
faculties at the university but a
change    in    legislation    is
required   to   give   it   official
status.
The AMS intends to discuss
the question of student
representation at their
meeting 7 p.m. Thursday, in
Totem Park.
Keith Richardson, AMS arts
rep, called the AMS executive
release "belated".
"It's about time — nothing
more — that's the official
position of the AUS," he said.
The other group to officially
come out in favor of student
actions is the UBC-NDP club.
During a meeting Monday
the group unanimously passed
a motion strongly supporting
the AUS in their fight for
student representation. They
also urge Kenny to call an
emergency faculty meeting to
deal with this issue.
The chairman of the senate
committee on student participation, Philip White, is on
vacation until Dec. 13, the day
after classes finish for the
year.
Grad studies senator Allan
Robbins, a member of the
committee, said Monday it
looks as if the committee will
not meet again before next
year.
"We are far from a final
agreement," he said.
-'*%6u I'«■#&"*:
>a*W» .'	
'^^!nmmm.rsz^^
BIZARRE PHOTO of SUB came ;about accidentally when ace Ubyssey photog Leticia
Lenscap held the camera upside-down while shooting through a piece of licorice. The
camera, a Znosko Brovosky 23TL was developed along with the film in Microdol-Z for
one hour to produce high-contrast reverse.
Memorial students beat administrators
ST. JOHN'S (CUP) - Students at
Memorial University have virtually
won their fight over the checkoff of
student union fees, following a 10-day
non-violent occupation of their administration building.
A tentative agreement was reached
early Friday following negotiations
between student representatives and
representatives from the university
board of regents. But the agreement
must still be ratified by the board of
regents Dec. 14 and by the students in a
referendum.
The student referendum will be
supervised by the university faculty
association, but no date has yet been
set.
The agreement stipulates the
university must collect the $8 student
union fee each semester, but student
union membership will not be compulsory. However, the student union
will be given all the money collected
and individual students must decide if
they consider themselves student union
members.
Until the referendum, the administration will collect the $8 fee.
The occupation, which began Nov. 14
with about 1,500 students, followed an
announcement Nov. 9 by university
president and vice-chancellor Lord
Stephen Taylor that the administration
would not collect the student union fees
as of Dec. 31. He claimed the board of
regents was concerned that half the
$140,000 collected for the union was
spent on administration. $42,000 of it on
salaries.
Most student union budgets reveal a
similar breakdown and about 80 per
cent of most university operating
budgets cover salaries and administrative costs.
Until Thursday, Taylor had refused
to negotiate unless students ended their
occupation of the building. But the
threat of a student strike (scheduled
for last Thursday and Friday but never
held) and possible intervention by
premier Frank Moores, apparently
forced Taylor to the negotiation table.
Students from the negotiating
committee called Moores because the
government had taken no official stand
on the issue.
The students did receive support
from most of Newfoundland's large
unions, including the province's largest
one — the loggers union — and the St.
John's trade council.
The Memorial faculty association
voted Nov. 20 not to support the
students by 70-50 with 100 abstentions.
Students thought more pressure could
have changed the vote in their favor.
Many faculty members are upset
with Taylor's behaviour. In fact   on
Wednesday a conservative faculty
member began circulating a petition
calling for Taylor's resignation.
Following the negotiations, students
decided to end their occupation and
clean the building before they left.
Representatives of the board of
regents agreed no reprisals of any kind
will be taken against any student and
the senate will be asked to consider the
situation for students who may have
academic difficulties in the up-coming
Christmas exams because of their
participation in the occupation.
The students were happy with their
apparent victory. Bob Buckingham
one of the four student negotiators, said
they decided to stick to one issue in the
negotiations, although they had many
grievances about the attitudes and
decisions of Taylor and the administration. Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday,   November  28,   1972
Fee sfrike undecided
TORONTO (CUP) — Only
minutes after an Ontario
Federation of Students'
Saturday general meeting had
broken up in indecision,
disagreement and executive
resignations, an emergency
executive meeting decided to
go ahead with plans for a
January fees strike to protest
last spring's detrimental
changes effecting Ontario post-
secondary education.
The executive will write
member student councils
asking them to ratify the strike
decision, as well as suggesting
other action such as student
picketting of university fee
offices and a one-day January
class moratorium to organize
teach-ins and further opposition to the education
cutbacks.
Delegates had earlier voted
to hold the fees strike by eight
votes to five with four abstentions. But after four
executive members had
resigned and four delegates
were chosen in their place,
some representatives wanted
to reconsider the fee strike to
permit more discussion and
provide more of a show of
solidarity.
Delegates voted narrowly to
reconsider and an irate James
Marsh, who represented
summer students at Lakehead
University and is also editor of
the student newspaper there,
thought he could quash the
motion by demanding a
quorum count. The assembly
fell one below a quorum and
was forced to disband, leaving
the fee strike officially undecided, and waiting to be
reconsidered.
Following the original strike
yote, delegates voting "no"
had indicated they would do as
much as possible to make the
withholding a success.
Before the motion to
reconsider, four members of
the executive had resigned,
blaming "frustrations flowing
from today's meeting".
Quitting were OFS secretary-
treasurer Eric Miglin from the
University of Toronto, Susan
the
by
un-
a
Geason for U of T's association
of part-time undergraduates,
Ross McGregor from the
University of Western Ontario
and Yvon Lachapelle from
Laurentian university.
McGregor claimed the whole
idea of a fees strike was
"political suicide", considering the province-wide
lack of student support
evidenced, he thought, by the
split vote for the strike. Miglin
said he didn't feel enthusiastic
about the OFS position and
claimed he was doing
federation a favor
resigning.
The two had earlier
successfully proposed
"symbolic province-wide
withholding of tuition fees until
Jan. 31", repeated demands
there be "no further" fee increases without consultation
and that there be no further
hike in the Ontario student
award program loan ceiling.
The strike motion was
supported by delegations from
Queen's, U of T, Lakehead's
winter and summer student
councils, Windsor, Western,
Carleton and Glendon. It was
opposed by Ryerson,
Laurentian, Waterloo, Trent
and York. Abstaining were
APUS, Brock, Guelph and
Fanshawe College.
APUS abstained because its
members are required to pay
fee., before registration.
Ryerson, Waterloo, Guelph
and Fanshawe did not support
the motion at least partially
because, as institutions on the
semester system, their
students would be denied
registration if they failed to
pay their fees.
Informally, Laurentian,
Trent, York and Brock indicated they would go along
with the action because the
delegates had decided on it.
After the strike motion
passed, a Trent-Waterloo
motion was carried by a large
majority resolving: "that OFS
call a province-wide
moratorium on post-secondary
education  in  the   next   term
Students need
to know Canada
A motion requiring all university undergraduate students to
demonstrate some knowledge of Canadian history and politics
will be made at the Dec. 13 UBC senate meeting by student
senator Allan Robbins.
Robbins, a PhD student and teaching assistant in the
political science department, said a student could demonstrate
knowledge of Canadian history and politics by successfully
completing an exam or two compulsory half year courses in
those subjects.
"A lot of people come to the university with an idealized
concept of the state," Robbins said. "High schools do not do
their job on these particulars.
"When students see how the system really works they get
turned off," he said. "If they had a more realistic idea of how
the system worked they would be more motivated to take part
and would be more effective."
Robbins stressed that the courses, as he envisions them,
would involve student and faculty co-management.
"The point of the thing, ideally, is to have students make
their own course," he said. "In making up the reading lists
students would have to decide what's important. That's a good
exercise."
Robbins said he doubts the motion will be passed because
"it involves tampering with the autonomy of various faculties."
It is up to the individual faculties to decide what constitutes
education for their particular students, Robbins said. There is
not enough consideration shown for an overall education:
"The university should be more concerned with trying, at
least for the first two years, to articulate some kind of program
of general education."
Students interested in attending the senate meeting should
contact Francis Medley at university local 2951.
following release of the
COPSEO (Wright) report",
with teach-ins, rallies and
conferences to be organized on
that day to protest cutbacks,
that administrations and
faculties be asked to cut
classes on that day and that
OFS encourage public
discussion of university
budgets."
Much of the discussion at the
meeting centered around the
legal and practical position of
students and university administrations concerning
Ontario student award
program grant cheques.
Only Queen's and U of T
appear to have been given
assurance by their administrations that the cheques
will be released. Elsewhere,
administration responses vary
from "maybe" to "no".
The possibility of OSAP
cheques being withheld is seen
as a primary impediment to
a successful fees strike. At
some universities a large
majority of the students are on
OSAP and are in no position to
continue their studies without
the cheques.
tr— rr
Export A
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3010 West Broadway
Phone:  736-7833 Tuesday, November, 28,  1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
Women's studies approval put off
By STEVE MORRIS
The proposed women's
.studies program must be
approved by the arts department before Jan. 5, if it is to be
accredited by senate for next
year.
Final  senate  curriculum
committee approval of all next
year's courses will be granted
Jan. 17, and all proposals
submitted to the committee
have to be considered by
senate first. The last senate
meeting before the committee
meeting is Jan. 5.
Arts faculty approval has to
be granted first, and the
disruption of the Nov. 23
faculty of arts meeting by
protesters demanding student
representation on faculty
committees has held up
procedures.
"The disruption has pretty
well destroyed our plans,"
history professor Jean Elder, a
member of the women's
studies curriculum committee,
said Monday.
"As it now stands, our report
will be discussed at the next
faculty meeting, whenever
that shall be," Elder said.
UBC is one of the few major
universities left which does not
offer accredited women's
studies courses. The
Universities of Saskatchewan,
Toronto, Waterloo and Simon
Fraser offer such programs.
The program was developed
last winter by members of the
Alma Mater Society sponsored
women's studies program, and
submitted for approval to the
arts department in the spring.
The faculty of arts committee then asked Elder to
convene a committee to
organize the program. Iq
March notices were sent
asking interested faculty
members and grad students to
participate. It wasn't until the
summer that the plan for the
program was finalized.
English instructor Hilda
Thomas, a member of the
curriculum committee, said at
first the committee failed
because it was composed of
people who were not actually
concerned with the program,
so interest quickly waned and
some members left.
A small group of people
remained to do most of the
planning including anthropology profs Dorothy
Smith and Helga Jacobson,
assistant English prof Kay
Stockholder, assistant
psychology prof Meredith
Kimball, grad student Ann
Petrie, Elder, Thomas and
several others.
Elder said the women's
studies program will be included under the departments
of English, anthropology and
psychology.
It will offer from three to six
units of credit.
The courses will present
multiple perspectives on the
role, function and expression
of women Elder said.
Enrolment will be limited to
small numbers of students.
"The problems women face
in society have never been
discussed in an unbiased
manner," Petrie said.
"The courses should be
accredited. There's no reason
why it should be done in other
universities and not here as
well.
"Women have been studied
only from the male point of
view. It's time that should
change," she said.
:fev*#£J
—sucha singh photo
SOMEDAY WHEN ALL these newspapers are sold I shall rule the world muses scheming Grape vendor in
SUB foyer. Actually he was trying to act nonchalant after being discovered juggling 27 oranges and a food
services cup full of goat bile.
Awards deadline near
The deadline for nominations for the 1972-73 master teacher
awards is Dec. 1.
Nominations for the two $2,500 awards which have been
provided for the past five years by former board of governors
chairman Walter Koerner, may be made by students, faculty
and alumni.
Nominess should have been teachers of undergraduates at
UBC for the past year, and in addition should meet certain
broad criteria including comprehensive understanding of and
enthusiasm for the subject, well-preparedness for lectures,
ability to arouse interest and encourage high standards, accessibility, rapport and ability to communicate effectively.
Anyone knowing of super people meeting these criteria should
submit nominations to the chairman of the selections committee, Robert Clark, at his office in the administration
building, main hall, or phone 2721.
Once all nominations are in, Clarke's committee of 12 alumni,
students and faculty members, will begin evaluating, and will
reach a decision about February, Clark said Monday.
Exposure
By ART SMOLENSKY
Following is a copy of a letter addressed to the head office of the Super-
Valu grocery chain.
Dear Sir:
People dislike being mislead by
advertisements attempting to convey
sincerity. Your advertisement in the
Vancouver Sun, November 20,1972 was
very dishonest.
Point one suggests wages are a
large ratio of food costs. That point is
valid.
Point two states that not all of the
increased costs are passed on to consumers and quotes figures supposedly
supporting this claim. The figures used
in this context mean absolutely
nothing. Written as they are, is a lie;
since they do not establish any proof.
For example — if labour was 50 per
cent of total cost, and labour costs
increased 30 per cent then food costs
would only have to increase 15 per cent
(50 per cent of 30 per cent) and ALL of
the increased labour costs are passed
on to the consumer.
Your third point continued and
compounds the deception. How can you
compare carrots and bananas? You
certainly can't compare restaurants
and supermarkets without including
more data. The data here implies that
labour costs may be a higher
proportion of total restaurant costs,
than of supermarket costs. This doesn't
prove supermarkets pass on less of
their cost increases.
Your fourth point is the most
misleading. Of what value is a profit
rate measured as a return on sales?
The rate you compute and use in your
business decision making is of the
form!
Net profit   or   net profit + interest
equity assets
Your ratio conveys nothing. Let's face
it Super-Valu's profit rate (net profit is
well over 10 percent). If it were less
than 8 per cent you could sell all your
stores and invest in Canada Savings
Bonds. Why do you mislead us? Why do
you lie?
Why don't you go back to quoting
prices in your advertisements so that
we can compare them. At least that is a
form of competition, more than the
advertisements lying before me.
Yours truly,
Philip Halkett
* * *
Just how locked in to the American
economy are we?
"I note that in the structure and
membership  of  your  organization
L North American securities administrators] you make no distinction
between United States and Canadian
administrators. This reflects the
economic realities of North American
capital markets."
—Robert Andras, minister of consumer and corporate affairs.
*      *      *
Someone in the bookstore must have
a bad sense of humor, placing Kate
Millett's Sexual Politics in the middle
of the science fiction section.
*      *      *
RETRACTION
In the Nov. 21 issue of The Ubyssey
we published some false and
misleading statements about former
University of Victoria president Bruce
Partridge. We wish to retract those
statements and to set the record
straight. The facts are:
Partridge earned an honors degree
cum laude in physics; and later earned
two law degrees, one of them a doctorate, through bona fide correspondence study;
As members of the University of
Victoria board of governors have stated
publicly in the past, they were fully
informed of all the circumstances
relating to Partridge's formal
education before they offered him the
appointment as president. The fact that
he had earned two degrees through
correspondence study had no direct
bearing on his decision three years
later to resign from the position.
We apologize to Partridge for
having published the false and
misleading statements.
Art Smolensky
John Andersen, editor
Jan O'Brien, editor Page  4
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday,   November  28,   1972
Frankly
this has'
been my
FINEST year
as a
president!
I've got the
BOARD OF
GOVERNORS
eating out of
my HAND!
I've got the
teachers
DIVIDED and
STALEMATED
on the
question of
SALARY
DEMANDS!
My speeches
are quoted
VERBATIM in
the local
PRESS!
COMMUNITY
LEADERS
back me
RIGHT down
the LINE!
I've got the
LABS, TEACHING
MACHINES, GYMS
POOLS and TV
HOOK UPS
clicking over
like one
perfectly
tuned
machine!
If I could
just figure a
,/vay to get
these damn
KIDS the hell
out of here,
the place
would run
ike
a DREAM!
—from this magazine is about schools
People!
This editorial is about apathy. Every newspaper
should print one occasionally.
This particular apathy editorial is addressed to the
approximately 19,800 students who saw fit not to attend
the arts faculty meeting Thursday to support demands for
adequate student representation at all levels of the faculty.
The 200 who did attend can go have a back-patting session
somewhere.
To begin, apathy is a capitalist plot. Apathy is also
found in authoritarian regimes masquerading under the
name of socialism or communism. We add that so you
don't get the idea we're biased, or something.
To continue, apathy is found where people do not
have control over their lives. People do not have control
over their lives at this university. This university is an
apathetic place. There is a connection between these facts.
There is a connection because when people feel they
have no control over their lives, they feel it is not worth
the bother to try and change their situation. And this
allows tyrannies, petty or otherwise, to maintain their
holds on people. One affects the other.
This directly affects the individuality of the people
involved. It stifles them by denying them the free choices,
as opposed to options, in which they can best express
themselves. They become less of human beings for this
denial.
The present situation demands that the individuality
of people be attained through collective action. This action
may at first consist of signing a petition. It may lead to
other things. But it is only through collective action that
the rights of individuals can be attained. If enough people
decide to act together, these rights can be won.
COMMERCIAL: There is a meeting Thursday noon
in Buchanan 106 to discuss what steps should be taken to
gain adequate student representation at all levels of the
arts faculty. Come to it. If you're not an arts student, still
c0me tp it. Your help is needed. It's your decision.
Bouquets
Congratulations to the 1,500 students at Memorial
University in Newfoundland who decided to regain some
control over their lives. They won.
Letters
Turheys!
As a qualified Ubyssey gutter
journalist, misquoter, taker of
words out of context and general
distorter of the truth, I relish the
chance to cry foul in connection
with The Ubyssey's coverage of
Thursday's alternate press discussion.
tative", it is reluctant to permit
differences of opinion in its own
pages. Since its reporters are employees working for wages they
have as a rule no influence when
newspaper policy is made, although they are closer to the real
world of events than those who
do. Internal dissention is not
shown in the pages of the paper
for fear it will damage credibility
and thus damage circulation.
The alternate press is also concerned with credibility, but in
general believes it is more likely to
be established by allowing the
readership to understand, and in
some cases participate in, the process of establishing editorial policy. This is why when reading the
Grape or The Ubyssey we must
always keep in mind their continual, creative and usually democratic re-examination of goals and
methods — something that the
commercial press by its nature
cannot hope to attain.
The Ubyssey's story also identified me as a Ubyssey staff
member, and the cutline under
the accompanying picture as "a
big time Ubyssey politico". Big
time I certainly am, a politico I
maybe,anditispossible to extort
from   me   the   confession  that I
have on occasion fraternized with
Ubyssey staffers and even penned
vile utterances for inclusion in the
rag. But as 1 took the trouble to
point out Thursday my opinions
were strictly individual and did
not represent either the staffs
position or the result of any staff
discussion.
Paul Knox
grad studies 7
Democracy
As some of us tried to point
out at the recent meeting of students and faculty in the arts — but
found little response — the question of student participation in
decision making at the university
is often put in a too narrow
context. I should like to draw the
attention of all those, who care to
think and act in this matter that
we have to see this controversy in
the more general frame of reference: the relationship of the university to the community. Community may mean the city, the
province, or even the whole of
Canada — but a relationship between the university (as an institution) and the community can be
best built by starting in the university (as a community) itself.
KNOX ... incredibly ugly
Contrary to the story in Friday's Ubyssey, I didn't say that
"the people writing in the daily
press haven't changed their views
'in 40 years'." Obviously the opinions held by any group of people
as such change over time. What I
said was that the reason the commercial papers exist — to make a
profit -- and the reason people
write for the commercial dailies —
to make a living — haven't changed in 40 years. Because the
commercial press is money-
oriented and, as a consequence,
concerned  with   being   "authori-
I   TMUBYSSIY
NOVEMBER 28, 1972
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year by
the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial
opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the
university administration/Member, Canadian University Press. The
Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review.
The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room 241K of the
Student Union Building.
Editorial  departments, 228-2307; Sports, 228-2305; advertising
228-3977.
Co-editors: John Andersen, Jan O'Brien
The last chance for voting for representatives to the Christmas CUP
conference is Thursday which is, as you ail know, the last press day this
year, and the cause for a big fin de siecle party. Today's elves were John
Andersen, Kent Spencer, Jan O'Brien, Linda Hossie, Vaughn Palmer, Steve
Morris, Gary Coull, Art Smolensky and Sandy Kass. A big happy eleventh
birthday to Mike Sasges said Kini McDonald. Tuesday, November, 28,  1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters
This, of course, implies that not
only administrators and teachers
but students, technical and other
staff members and workers at
UBC should have a say in the
.questions pertaining to them. It is,
I believe, a futile exercise to try
sorting out the issue's pertaining to
the one or the other group: all
issues basically touch upon the
lives of all of us. In practice,
specialized committees or subcommittees may be" constituted
from particular groups, but that is
not the most urgent question to
be settled.
Karl Burau and myself spoke
about our recent experiences in
European universities. And, as we
pointed out, German universities
are leaving us far behind in building a new, democratic structure,
appropriate for our age and for
the tasks we are facing. North
American universities had good
reason to be proud of their democratic character: they were, in
general, accessible to a much
wider part of the society than
European colleges and universities
used to be. But in the past decades, not least owning to the
vocal and sometimes violent demands of students and workers in
Berlin, Paris and London this
comparison began to shift. I
attended recently a series of public (!) interviews conducted at the
University of Bremen (German.)
for filling a teaching post. The
candidates were asked to present
their views on scholarly and educational matters (e.g.  curriculum
development) to a panel consisting of equal numbers of university
teachers, students and staff members. The discussions were on a
very high level and not only the
presence of an interested public
ensured that no "old school-tie"
games or the like will be played. It
was the nearest to what I can
easily imagine as community participation: the staff members were
particularly aware of the interests
ofoinionized workers (both at the
university and beyond), the students represented the viewpoints
of those learning under the guidance of the new teacher (present
and future students), while the
professors acted as guardians of
scholarly eminence. Actually, the
roles were much less rigidly assigned: the best theoretical questions
were asked by a grad student and
the most interesting discussions
about teaching methods and aims
were conducted with one of the
mechanics on the board. The ensuing public (!!) discussion on the
merits of the candidates was even
more impressive: serious intellectual and political considerations
were presented by every member
and the unanimous vote assured
that the best candidate was
chosen. This was my feeling too.
But how often is such a thorough
procedure followed in our
institutions of 'higher education'?
I am afraid, the traditionally
democratic North American
academic community has to go to
school to the formerly rightfully
regarded "feudal" universities of
continental Europe.
I would like to urge my friends
and colleagues, embarking now on
a new discussion of democratization here at UBC to consider the
lessons offered by others. Our
university's senate has recently
turned down flatly the admission
of any representative of the
people working in other qualities
but as professors — at UBC. It was
a decision in the very same spirit
that wishes to conduct endless
investigations into student participation beyond the present token
level. The modern university consists of more than wandering
magisters and their devoted (or
less devoted) disciples; its proper
functioning in a society with a
high level of distribution of labour
is only assured if all, who contribute to it have a voice in the
decisions. This would constitute a
great step towards breaking down
the barriers between the glass-'
concrete-tower of UBC and the
community it is supposed to
serve.
Janos M. Bak
associate professor
history
Crabs
sound
This is to serve warning to
anyone who uses the cans on
campus. There are indeed crabs
lurking there as I can testify.
When I discovered that I did
indeed have crabs, I was naturally
interested where I had picked
them up.
After fully investigating, I
came to the conclusion that I had
picked them up in one of three
cans: the Ponderosa, main library
or Woodward library.
V*
Crab country
Now the only way you can get
crabs from a toilet is if someone
has picked them off and left them
alive on the floor. Crabs can live
off the body for some time and
latch onto anything coming in
close contact with them They do
live and breed in areas outside the
pube region, but show a definite
migration towards the pubic
region. To anyone who does not
suspect they have crabs, they are
often infected before they fully
realize it. There are creams and
shampoos which will get rid of
them in jig time, so let's not have
anyone picking them off in a
public can, as everyone does not
have to suffer the surprise and
uncomfort of discovering that
they do indeed have crabs. Besides
it's a fucking ignorant thing to do.
I do not wish my name to
appear on this. Sign it,
Pissed right fucking off
Mountains
During the past several weeks
various people have voiced in The
Ubyssey their opinions of our
proposed 50-meter covered swimming pool. Most of these letters I
have agreed with. However, what
concerns me most is not the fact
that it will add another $5 onto
our already unwieldly AMS fee,
but that we plan to put our new
, pool right next to the old pool,
and right in the middle of the
campus. I can hardly appreciate
how anyone who is daily confronted by such triumphs of planning and architecture as the Buchanan tower and the Walter Gage
residences, could possibly vote for
a proposal for yet another large
building in the same area.
Such a situation brings to mind
the sad case of the University of
Alberta at Edmonton. I am told
that when it was founded the U of
A had about as much land as we
have here now, but unforeseeingly
they sold most of it for housing
developments around the campus.
And today, woe are the students
at Edmonton for they must walk
on narrow canyon like trails that
See page 12
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PHONE 682-6144
OPEN THURSDAY AND FRIDAY UNTIL 9 P.M. Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  November  28,   1972
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f 511 Howe at Pender (downtown Vancouver)
Indian half-way I
no longer go all
By LINDA HOSSIE
Originally Indian half-way houses were for Indians. Now they have become a white man's game
with the traditional structure: white people on top
and Indians underneath with no power to make
decisions.
White people have the education, money and
hence the power to dominate the Indian people, and
inevitably, in the case of the half-way houses and
Indian hostels, the white man's organization has
turned the emphasis of the houses away from the
needs of the Indians and towards the organization for
its own sake, or for the sake of some individual administrator's hunger for power.
One of the first half-way houses in Vancouver,
Synalla House, was designed by Indians in the
penitentiary for the use of convicts coming out of
prison and trying to re-adjust to society. The inmates
are the logical choice to do this kind of planning
because they will use the house, and they know from
experience the kinds of problems they will have to
face on the outside.
Synalla is an Indian word meaning "moving
ahead together". It turned out to be a romantic
conception for a half-way house.
For the house to be able to collect money it has to
be registered under the Societys' Act and it has to
have a board of directors. More often than not the
board is composed largely of white non-convicts who
can't possibly understand the needs of the Indians
living in the house but who are given the job because
the foundations and organizations the house depends
on for grants and support respond more favorably to
white people than to Indians. This is where the unity
of the house starts to break.
Most of the people I interviewed for this artiele
are either inmates of the B.C. Penitentiary or out on
parole. Because it will affect their paroles or chances
for parole to give information about the half-way
houses they wish to remain anonymous. I will call
them George, Dan and Frank.
George, a convict, and one of the assistant
directors of Synalla House, blames the existence of a
board of directors for the problems encountered in
running Synalla House. The house was originally
designed, as the name suggests, to be run like a
family home, with no structured rules, and no one
ruling authority. This concept broke down, George
says, because having a board of directors "was
phony in itself" in that type of situation.
George says the house fell apart because of
personality clashes with the board. There were too
many ideas about how the house should be run. The
board and the residents of the house could never
reach an agreement about programs and rules, and
eventually the Indian people living in the house just
started to drift away.
This is becoming a familiar pattern with the halfway houses. The board either becomes too
patriarchal or too removed from the needs of the
Indians. Either way it loses the respect of the
residents, and consequently loses the communion
that would make the house work.
X-Kalay is another half-way house that was
planned by the members of the Indian and Metis
Educational Club inside the penitentiary. By 1966 the
club had set up basic concepts for the house (that it
would be self-governing and self-supporting and that
no grants or donations would be accepted unless they
were absolutely free of conditions) and they approached the Company of Young Canadians for help
in starting the house.
Dave Berner, a white man who still runs X-Kalay,
was the CYC member who worked with the Indians.
They rented a place and set up what was called the
Indian Post Release Centre.
Dan was one of the organizers of the Indian and
Metis Educational Club and one of the planners of the
Indian Post Release Centre. He told me the story of
the development of the centre after the house was
rented and the centre started.
"At this point somebody handed Dave Berner an
idea about a drug addiction centre in California
called Synanon," says Dan. "He fell madly in love
with this and he was encouraged by the John Howard
Society to implement these ideas within the Indian
Post Release Centre."
The centre was then registered as a society.
According to Dan, Berner and the CYC were supposed to leave once this step had been accomplished,
but they refused to obey their contract.
■"  ">' *"- r      #F'
'A totally Indian house was never alio
happen," Dan says.
"Berner   kept   electing   dough-heads
president, who he knew couldn't handle t
When they failed he would bring in someone e
was just as bad. Finally he became presii
arranging his own nomination.
"Then he started bringing in white peopl
started laying their problems on the Indian
Attack therapy, which is ridiculous becausi
had attack therapy all our lives."
Attack therapy is a kind of group therapy
that X-Kalay members call "the game". It i
putting an individual rule-breaker, or somec
has committed some offence in the eyes of th(
on the "hot seat" and having the rest of th
members yell at him, and verbally abuse hi
couple of hours. The idea behind this type of
is to tear out old ideas and replace them w
ones. George calls it "a kind of brain-washinj
calls it two hours of hate.
"You don't walk all over people and expect
any good," he says. "If you do you're sick. 3
is a white man's game. We don't want to be
on."
Eventually, Dan says, there were no Inc
any positions of authority in X-Kalay. Dave
and another white man, Pete Kagis, ran the
An Indian, Earl Allard, was appointed a
director due to pressure from the Indians in;
penitentiary, but he had no power. He receive
instructions from Berner, Dan says.
Berner works through the parole board
residents for the X-Kalay house. Dan s
believes Berner "got the parole board ovei
side — pro Dave Berner and anti-Indian —
petrating the traditional picture of the Indi.
drunk; incapable of helping himself.
This meant that Indians inside the penil
would only be paroled if they went to the 3
house. Once there, they had to obey Berner's
go back to jail.
Dan describes some of the rules:
"You can't make love or go with a girl unl
get permission from Dave Berner. You c
outside unless one of his flunkies is with you
disobey any of Berner's rules they cut all yc
off.
"Finally no Indian people would go to th<
People would rather stay in the penitentiary
to X-Kalay."
Dan says Berner kept power in his own h
appointing a series of inexperienced Ind
directors. "A guy who doesn't know how to us
abuses it," Dan says.
When this happened Berner gave the
position to someone else. This way he ensured
one ever really took power away from him
I tried to contact Berner to hear his side o
Kalay story, but he wouldn't talk to me. A wc
the office told me he had instructed her to
"anything I wanted to know" about X-Kala
From this description of the X-Kalay hoi
obvious the house has failed to serve the pur]
which it was designed. If the people who plan
house for ther own use can't stand to go the
then the usual kink has happened in the proj
the house from design to reality.
George says all that was needed for a li
work, in his experience, was five or six
people. This means, especially, sincerity on I
of the parolees, but this type of sincerity wi
have a chance to develop as long as the Indiai
feel they are being used.
People such as Dan and George resent ha1
power to develop their own houses taken aw;
them by white people. As long as they feel t
no half-way house run by non-Indians is g
satisfy them. If the half-way house can't sat
Indians that have to live there, and take par
life style and programs of the house, then it o
be "half-way". It is back at the level of a prise
While X-Kalay was going through its
Margaret White, an Indian woman who h;
active in Indian affairs in B.C. for years, was
similar problems with Indian girls' co-of.
homes.
The first house White founded was called t
Enders. She organized the house with the hei
Anglican Church. The board was complete
Indian. Tuesday, November, 28,  1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
ouses
he way
The house lasted a brief six months before White
was accused of discrimination. The board felt the
house should not be restricted to Indian girls.
"It was the sole purpose of the house to help Indian girls," White says.
White resigned as house mother of the East
Enders and in 1960 started the Indian Women's Coop.
This house was designed to provide a home and
some training for Indian girls who had come to the
city and through "lack of education, unfamiliarity
with urban life or racial discrimination" had turned
to prostitution, drugs or alcohol.
The house offered educational training, personal
grooming and counseling. The girls were not forced
to accept any particular life style. They paid a
certain amount of rent out of their welfare checks,
were responsible for the maintenance of the house
and obeying house rules, and after that they were
free to govern their own lives as they pleased.
The co-op was sponsoredby the Canadian Union
of Students at UBC. They also comprised the board
which was totally non-Indian. They thought White
was too much of a disciplinarian — she enforced
rules like no drugs, no alcohol and a curfew for girls
going to school — and wanted the girls to run the
house themselves, without White's leadership.
White says she believes the girls didn't mind the
rules. It was the university students who objected to
them, she says. She had no choice but to resign and
the house broke up a month later.
This kind of interference can be critical for the
Indian people involved in the houses. Some of the
girls trom White's co-op had only a month of school
left when the house broke up. They were never able
to finish and they had nowhere to live so many of
them ended up back on Skid Road.
Now White is involved in the management of
Nasika Lodge, a co-operative house that has become
a psychiatric treatment centre.
Originally, the lodge, provided a house for Indian
girls to live in and manage. White and the board tried
to find jobs for the girls. It is only over the last year,
due to the decisions of the white majority of the
board, it has become a treatment centre.
"They give the impression that all Indians need
psychiatric help," White says of the board.
"It would be fine if non-Indians would stay on the
financial end of it and leave the social problems up to
us, but they think they know what's best for us."
White says the programs at the house now are
mostly occupational therapy programs. The girls
"cut out squares of leather", sew and do other crafts.
"This is their concept of teaching the Indian
culture," White says.
All the people involved in the centre have to attend group sessions with a psychiatrist. This includes
the board of directors as well as the girls. The
psychiatrist is paid $50 a session or $200 a month for
something that in White's opinion is "still not serving
the purpose".
White said the board has no understanding of
what the Indians are trying to do. There are a few
Indians, including White, on the board but they are
outnumbered.
"It's hopeless to try and push any Indian-oriented
programs through," she says.
White also objects to the head of the board being
non-Indian when "there are enough qualified Indians
to take the job.
"I could run it from home over the phone," she
says.
White has raised this issue at meetings, and
applications for the position of executive-director
have been received from Indians, but they are never
answered. They are received by the executive-
director who "puts them aside", White says.
White intended the house to help girls coming out
of prisons and other institutions. The board of
directors, however, has other ideas.
"They won't take girls from the prisons," White
says. "They just want nice little well-mannered
educated Indian girls so they won't have to face the
problem."
Again, the organization has organized itself into
impotence. White feels that as it stands now, Nasika
Lodge does little more than provide jobs for the
administration.
"They're not going to come out and say that they
need the job so they're going to use these poor un-
Kilter whale designed by Ray Wesley from the Native Voice
fortunate people  to  keep  their job,"   she says.
"They're not going to say that."
The Indian residents of the original Allied Indian
and Metis Society house — the precursor of the one
now existing on Clark Drive — tried to avoid the
recurring conflict with boards by firing theirs and
taking over the management of the house them-'
selves. Dan, who was part of the house, says the
decision was made because the board was too
removed from the "real happenings". He, like
Margaret White, felt the white people had no conception of what Indians are trying to accomplish.
The National Parole Board, which is composed of
white officers for the most part, has a 66 per cent
failure rate with Indian parolees, Dan says this
means that 66 per cent of the Indians who go out on
parole come back to prison either for breaking
parole or for committing some new crime. While the
AIMS house ran itself without the help of a board of
directors the failure rate for Indian parolees staying
in the house was only 12 per cent. This was over a
two-year period, Dan says.
The AIMS house got rid of the board they felt were
holding back their progress but they came up against
the organized distribution of funds for half-way
houses.John Webster of the John Howard Society
was given $12,000 by the federal government, and it
was up to him to distribute the money to the various
half-way houses. Because the breakaway house
wouln't do what he and the John Howard Society
wanted they weren't funded out of the money and the
house had to fold, Dan said.
Dan believes now that the concept of a totally
Indian house, as it was originally developed by the
Indian and Metis Educational Club, is impossible due
to the prejudices of the white population in general.
The existing AIMS house on Clark Drive is
directed by the board that was fired from the original
AIMS house. The house has room for seven or eight
people but only three parolees are living there right
now.
Alvin Anderson has been executive director of the
house since Oct. 1. For the five months preceeding
October he was house parent. Jack Robinson has now
taken over the job.
Both men are Indian, and both have worked as
prison guards in Canada. Anderson worked for six
years at Oakalla. He told me the experience he
gained while working in the prison gives him "an
edge" on running the house. He says he believes he
has a better understanding of the 'criminal type' due
to his experiences as a guard.
Anderson says many of the men coming into the
house are "con-men".
"You give them your shirt and get nothing in
return," he says.
The Indians in the penitentiary feel differently
about having a jail guard as a director in their halfway house.
Frank, who is a member of the Indian and Metis
Educational Club, says: "The personal things I know
about him — in Oakalla he leaned on Indian guys
more than white guys — makes it (the appointment
of Anderson as executive-director) the worst thing
that could happen."
Frank said that when he walks in to the AIMS
house it feels "for some reason . . . just like another
jail."
Anderson didn't seem, to me, to be the kind of
man who will make a success of the half-way house.
He has no programs in operation, and no real idea of
what is going to develop in the way of programs
except the future project of building a recreation
room in the basement and the vague promise to
"work with individuals and what we can afford".
Apparently Anderson has never looked into the
programs and management of other half-way houses
in Vancouver. When I asked him what he thought of
the X-Kalay group sessions he said he was not
familiar with them. He says he is thinking about
trying group therapy in the AIMS house but he has
never bothered to look into the record of success or
failure that this program has had in its previous
application.
Lynn Musgrove, a former UBC education student
of Indian education, says an Indian who lived in the
house until recently made himself unofficial house
parent and organized meetings and programs for the
house members.
"When Chief lived there he got a program going
on boxing. He had AA meetings in the living room.
He got people coming from Matsqui prison and
talked to them about getting straight. He talked to
them just as a person who's trying to make it. And
he's the one who went around and got people to
donate the records and the television."
Finally, according to Musgrove, Chief just "got
frustrated and left".
She says many of the Indians felt Chief's
motivations were selfish but that in her eyes he got
more going in the house than Anderson. Everytime
she visited the house while Anderson was house
parent she saw him only for a few seconds, if at all.
Most of the time, she said, he was out painting
houses. Anderson is a professional house painter.
Anderson has done some things for the house. He
has loosened the rules about drinking downtown
because, as he says, he can have no way of controlling what the parolees do downtown. He doesn't
allow liquor in the house, but he doesn't try to enforce
rules about outside drinking.
He also, according to Musgrove, gave some of the
parolees jobs helping him paint houses. However, he
is not being paid by the board to paint houses. He is
being paid to direct the AIMS house.
Frank's words echo my own impressions of Anderson.
"As far as imagination goes, this guy is a blank,"
he told me. "He's an ex-bull, so as far as programing
goes, he has an institutional approach."
Frank thinks the three essential qualities for
anyone working in a half-way house are imagination,
sincerity and integrity: an emotional openness and
an acceptance of the people and problems the house
tias to deal with. Anderson, in Frank's opinion, has
none of these qualities.
He described Anderson's attitude toward the
Indian parolees as being "I've made it so why
haven't you."
When I asked Anderson if he felt the reason many
of the Indians didn't come to board meetings was
because they were frustrated by the white members'
power to out talk them and run down their arguments
by sheer rhetoric — a science most Indians have
never had the opportunity to develop — he told me a
story about applying for the job at Okalla.
See page 12: ACTION Page 8
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  November  28,   1972
immsHsaflgsawmsHBKSWigams^^
M^!^m^!^!^mS«!^m^!^!»3^BS!^^^!»S«ttK!
I
I
I
I
8
8
CHRISTMAS COMES TO
with gift suggestions for the whole family
VISIT Oil SECTION OF
SPECIAL GIFT BOOKS
GIVE THE GIFT THAT IS ALWAYS WELCOME — A BOOK FROM OUR
SPECIAL CHRISTMAS SELECTION
8
8
8
scents*
8
CHILDREN'S BOOKS
GRIMM'S FAIRYTALES     4.95
JOHANN'S GIFT TO CHRISTMAS  3.95
HOW THE GRINCH STOLE CHRISTMAS  3.95
12 DAYS OF CHRISTMAS     4.35
POOH'S LIBRARY (SET 4)      14.75
KATE GREENAWAY TREASURY  11.50
FRENCH FAIRYTALES     4.25
OWLS IN THE FAMILY  1.15
THE DOG WHO WOULDN'T BE 75
LULLABIES & NIGHT SONGS  8.00
HIGGLETYPIGGLETYPOP      5.70
BABAR THE KING     2.50
CHILDREN'S HISTORY OF THE WORLD      7.95
ADVENTURE OF SPACE FLIGHT      2.75
BOYS'TREASURY OF SEA STORIES      2.25
ANIMAL BOOKS
THE PICTORIAL ENCYCLOPEDIA OF THE ANIMAL KINGDOM      6.25
THE SHARK-JACQUES-YVES COUSTEAU SERIES     10.25
BIRDS     3.95
TROPICAL FISH-SETTING UP AQUARIA      4.95
BIRDS OF THE EASTERN FOREST H2  22.50
ANIMALS OF THE WORLD- AFRICA     ,,  4.95
BIRDS OF THE NORTHERN FOREST  20.00
CHAMPION CATS OF THE WORLD  18.00
AUDUBON ANIMALS      8.95
THE NEW DOG ENCYCLOPEDIA             24.95
ENCOUNTERS WITH ARCTIC ANIMALS    16.95
GREAT GAME ANIMALS      27.95
THE WORLD OF PONIES  4.95
ALL COLOR BOOK OF HORSES  2.95
THE LIFE HISTORY AND MAGIC OF THE CAT  11.95
PIPPA'S CHALLENGE  10.95
LAST OF THE CURLEWS      4.00
COOKBOOKS
TIME-LIFE INTERNATIONAL COOKBOOKS 7.95-8.95
CLASSIC DISHES MADE SIMPLE  6.95
COOKING FOR EVERY OCCASION     4.95
JOY OF COOKING  . 7.95
NEW YORK TIMES HERITAGE COOKBOOK        ' 14.95
LAROUSSE GASTRONOMIQUE     12.50
ENCYCLOPEDIA OF WORLD COOKERY  2.95
CASSEROLE COOKERY      3*95
FRENCH COOKING FOR PLEASURE   4.95
FAR EASTERN COOKING FOR PLEASURE      4.95
INDIAN COOKING FOR PLEASURE      4.95
ITALIAN COOKING FOR PLEASURE      4.95
GARDENING BOOKS
ALL COLOUR GARDENING BOOK     9.95
FLOWER ARRANGING  3.95
PICTORIAL ENCYCLOPEDIA OF PLANTS & FLOWERS      E95
BOOK OF ROSES  5.95
HQUSE PLANTS, CACTI, AND SUCCULENTS     4.95
HOBBIES & CRAFTS
CLOCKS & WATCHES  495
CLOCKS         '  2 95
PICTORIAL ENCYCLOPEDIA OF ANTIQUES     6.95
COINS & COIN COLLECTING              ' 495
GLASS           295
BRONZE            ['_  2 95
TARTANS  2 95
SPORTING GUNS " '  2 95
FIREARMS  Z95
TRICKS OF RALLY GAME  m60
STAMP COLLECTING         '_" 3^95
WORLD OF TOYS                       495
SHELLS "[ 2.95
WORLD OF MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS . . . . . 4.95
GRAND PRIX CHRONOLOGY      6.40
MOTOR CYCLE RACING  3 95
PICTORIAL ENCYCLOPEDIA OF RAILWAYS        ." ' &95
SHIPS THROUGH THE AGES  4.95
SECRETS OF ORIGAMI            .   3.95
MINERAL KINGDOM   .] . . 8.95
SAILORS WORLD     . . . . 16.50
PRINTMAKING  m95
FURNITURE TREASURY  . ' ' ' 20^95
LAROUSSE ENCYCLOPEDIA OF MUSIC  . 19.95
WORLD ARCHITECTURE     12.95
WINES & SPIRITS OF THE WORLD      24 95
EARLY CARS    ^95
MODERN BUILDINGS  . . .[ 450
PICTORIAL ENCYCLOPEDIA OF FASHION  &95
WORLD OF BALLET & DANCE      4.95
RAKU, ART & TECHNIQUE      14.95
GENERAL TITLES (Hardbound)
THE WORD    9.25
COACHING HOCKEY  6.95
MUSEUMS & WOMEN           7.95
STUDY OF HISTORY  26.95
CLOSE-UP  . 7.50
PETER PRESCRIPTION     6.95
DEATH OF HOCKEY     5.95
WHEELS     8.75
SWINGING HEADHUNTER         6.95
CIVILISATION     19.00
KLONDIKE  10.00
8
SPORTS WEAR
$2.69 - $9.49 S
A complete line of
• sports shirts   • fee shirts   • sweat shirts
8
8
i»>»a»a*»«»B«»»«B<g«B«M««g^
Season's Greetings from the bookstore
SW! iday, November, 28,   1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  9
hi; bookstore
ART SUPPLIES
for Your Painting  Needs
* ^pM^^,.        Liquitex Color Painting Sets |
r.A■ yH ^'\ '*-y *r^r$ \       No-1037BasicTubeSet $7-50    $
lillil\\'\    t   \   I N°"    392 Molded Plastic Sketch Box     11.75 K
11    ]    j    1111 4   il Mo.   342 Molded Plastic Sketch Box     20.00 &
Fine Water Color Sets f
No. WT12 Reeves        $1.98 g
No. WS27 Reeves           3.25 "
No. WB12 Reeves           4.98
Make someone happy this Christmas
— send them <i Hallmark greeting card
Counter cards 15c-$1.00
Boxed Christmas    $1.50-$3.50
And a large selection of ribbons and gift wrap.
CRAFT KITS
Kit Hits '72 from Cunningham an impressive selection of complete     j
"star quality" kits ... in an entertaining variety line-up. i
Candle Craft Kit  6.98, 9.98 j
Swinging Purse Kits     18.95 j
Jewelstone Kit    34.95 j
Batik It Kit    32.95 j
Weave Rite Fabric Kit      32.95 >
Stitchery Kits 9.95-19.95 |
Fun Film Kit (Liquid Flowers)          4.98 |
JEWELRY KITS
Moke it Today, Wear It This Evening
— jewelry creations $1 .75 - $7.50   j
GIFTWARES
Incense Burners Stoneware Soup Mugs
Stoneware Mugs Stoneware Bud Vases
Stoneware Tea Pots        Stoneware Ash Trays '
Crested Pewter Mugs  . $12.95-$19.95
Crested Ceramic Mugs        4.85
Give something to treasure for a lifetime
— a personal university ring by Josten's
— 10k white gold or 10k gold.
ADULT GAMES
Challenge yourself - a full range of games from $4.55 and up. Jigsaw Puzzles -
$4.95.
PRENTICE HALL OF CANADA LTD.
1870 Birchmount Road, Scarborough, Ontario
PARADOX — Trudeau as Prime Minister
ANTHONY WESTELL
Offers  the   reader  'Behind  the  Scenes'   story  of 4  of the most
controversial and exciting years in Canadian history.
Westell   describes   the   personalities   envolved   with   Trudeau   and
highlights his analysis of the man with numerous anecdotes.
Hardbound 6.96
How To Make lit On The Land
RAY COHAN
This book is aimed at the growing number of people — young and
old — who feel the need to escape from the city. An all-inclusive
source book explaining everything you will need to know.
How to clear brush,pull stumps, draw maple syrup, raise bees, milk
cows, preserve fruits and much more.
A chapter is devoted to where and how to obtain cheap (even free)
land in Canada. Softcover 4.50
McGRAW-HILL RYERSON,
330 Progress Ave.,
Scarborough, Ontario
^!^!e«KW3»^^!^m^!^^mm!»m^£«i2«!B*E«
g The Western Publisher
' J.J. DOUGLAS LTD.
Johann's Gift to Christmas
Written by Jack Richards, illustrated in colour by Len Norris.
This book makes a delightful Christmas present for children of
all ages. Also available in a French edition.
Hardcover 3.95
8 Strong Medicine
A fascinating account of medicine through the ages on the
B.C. Coast. Written by Dr. R. McKechnie an honorary lecturer
in history of medicine & science at UBC.
THESE BOOKS ARE AVAILABLE
IN THE BOOKSTORE
INSTANT FRAME
-Apsco
8
I 'sse   Itoo packages      $
Distributed and Guaranteed by (      __ MtakA -**■**-**. £wab««^        S
ApscoProducts '  maKe one Trame   |
The sectional framing that   |
available at the snaps together in an instant i
BOOKSTORE a
CHRISTMAS GIFT SOGGESTIONS      I
AVAILABLE AT THE BOOKSTORE I
S
• DECORATED   PANORAMA  CEDAR  TRAYS  -   Indian  and |
floral designs     $7.95-$9.95 S
s
• REPLICAS OR ORIGINAL INDIAN WOOD CARVED TOTEM |
POLES - From the West Coast by Thorn Arts  $2.00-$4.00        |
3
• BLACK SIMULATED ARGILLITE TOTEM  POLES -  Large |
assortment available        $1.95-$11.95 a
|
• CLEARLITE,   SCENTED,    LONG   BURNING   CANDLES   -
Available in hexagon, round, square and oval shapes. Priced from
 $2.25-$4.95
• ASSORTMENT   OF   DESK  ACCESSORIES  AND  ADDRESS
BOOKS FOR THEAIEW YEAR! Page  10
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday,   November  28,   1.
Hot flashes
Free,
UBC plays
A free program of four original
one-act plays will be presented
noon Thursday in the Frederic
Wood theatre.
The plays are Bushed by Margaret Hollingsworth, The Crossing
by Charles Lillard, A Show of
Hands by James McGinnis and the
Extra Long Sleeve by John Carrol.
All plays are written and directed
by UBC students.
The program is jointly sponsored by the theatre and creative
writing departments.
Composer
American composer-conductor
Aaron Copland gives a special
guest lecture 8 p.m. Thursday in
the music building recital hall.
Limited complimentary reserved seating is available on
request at 228-3113.
activist Clarence Dennis, Aid.
Harry Rankin, who represented
the Fred Quilt committee at the
second inquest into Quilt's death,
and native singer-dancer Len
George.
For   further   information   call
873-2228.
Rational
A rational energy policy for
Canada is the subject of a physics
department colloquium led by
G.M. Griffiths of UBC, 4 p.m.
Thursday in Hennings 201.
Peace
Vigil
A memorial vigil will be held
Thursday for Chilcotin Indian
Fred Quilt who died Nov. 30,
1971 amid accusations of RCMP
brutality.
Speaking at the 6:30 p.m.
meeting at the RCMP barracks,
33rd and Heather, will be Indian
Bob Sims, executive secretary
of the Vietnam Action Committee, speaks on the possibilities
of peace in Vietnam, noon today
in SUB 215.
Sims' talk is sponsored by the
UBC student mobilization committee.
Volunteers
Dr. Eva Schindler-Rainman,
behavioral scientist, and consultant to voluntary organizations,
will speak on new approaches to
working with volunteers at a seminar, 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.,
Wednesday and Thursday in the
Jewish community centre, 950
Wesi41st.
'Tween classes
TODAY
UBC PRE-DENTAL SOCIETY
Meetings cancelled until Jan. 5.
PRE-MED SOCIETY
Dr.   Bennett   Wong   on   psychiatry,
IRC no. 1, noon.
GERMAN CLUB
Guest speaker, IH 404, noon.
WOMEN'S STUDIES
Statements from women in prisons,
SUB ballroom, 7:30 p.m.
SCIENCE FICTION SOCIETY
General meeting, SUB 216E. noon.
NEWMAN CLUB
Workshop at noon, SUB  117, Bible
discussion, St.  Marks College,  6:30
P.m.
WEDNESDAY
ANGLICAN UNITED
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Morning liturgy, Lutheran campus
centre chapel, 9 to 9:15 a.m., also
Friday.
VARSITY DEMOLAY
General meeting, beverage room,
Blue Boy Hotel, 8 p.m.
DEAN OF WOMEN'S OFFICE
Freesee Civilization film, SUB auditorium, 12:35 and 1:35 p.m.
NEWMAN CLUB
Meeting, SUB 105B, noon.
ONTOLOGY
Conrad French speaks, Bu. 216,
noon.
THURSDAY
CCF
Bible games, SUB 211, noon.
CAMPUS CRUSADE
Special speaker,  Place Vanier, main
lounge common block, 8 p.m.
GAY PEOPLE OF UBC
General meeting, SUB 213, noon.
SIMS
Introductory     meditation     lecture,
Ang. 410, noon.
rushant
** CAMERAS    *
4538 W.10 224 5858
DISCOUNT PRICES
ON SPECIAL
CHINESE
"COMBO"
PLATE
Reduced to
75*
Until the end of Nov.
11 a.rrt — 2 p.m.
Auditorium Snack Bar
Free Chinese Tea to all Chinese
Food Customers
VOTE HANDJA
ALDERMAN
13th
YOUR VOICE Let it be me.
INDEPENDENCE Will assure you
of an impartial view
No Party Or Sponsor to answer to.
JUST YOU The Elector
Thank You.
Joseph A. HANDJA
for Alderman
Res.: 733-9319      Office: 255-1545
Contact the centre for continuing education, sponsors of the
seminar, at 228-2181.
School board
Candidates for school board
from all civic parties participate in
a panel discussion noon Monday
in education 100.
The discussion is sponsored by
the education students association.
Prison women
Women's studies '72 features
statements from women in prison,
7:30 p.m. today in the SUB ballroom. Admission is 25 cents.
Freedom
Beyond B.F. Skinner; freedom
and dignity? is this week's Vancouver Institute lecture, 8:15
p.m. Saturday in Buch. 106.
Psychology department head
Peter Suedfeld lectures on the
controversial behavioral scientist,
and author of Walden Two and
Beyond Freedom and Dignity.
Lost, found
The first SUB lost and found
sale of the year will be held noon
Thursday in the SUB foyer.
Proceeds of the sale will help
support a Filipino family.
FRIDAY
PRE-SOCIAL WORK CLUB
Guest   speaker from centre for disturbed   children,  SUB 105B, noon.
GAY PEOPLE OF UBC
Social evening will be held after all,
Arts I blue room, 8 p.m.
MONDAY
GSA
Informal   general   meeting,   Garden
room, GSC, 8 p.m.
. .. John SthlcinncrV. Him
IMov.30
"Sunday/
Dec. 3
Bloody Sunday"   SUB
Glenda Jackson Ffeter Finch A U D.
MurrayHead 50c
TUTORIAL     SUB   22*6792
CENTRE
HELP
Register Now! . . . 12:30-2:30
SHIPPING OVERSEAS?
Complete World-Wide Service
ALL       SHIPPING       DETAILS
INCLUDING   DOCUMENTATION
AND INSURANCE
ALLWORLD SHIPPING LTD.
355 Burrard St.
Vancouver 1, B.C.
(604) 684-2261
Telex 04-55 339
THIS WEEK AT HILLEL
Wed.- Nov. 29 12:30 BET CAFE
PERSIAN-STYLE
THURS., NOV. 30 - 12:30
ISRAEL'S MELTING POT:
THE INTERNAL CRISES OF ISRAEL
DR. M. ROSHWALD
PSA, Simon Fraser University
All events open to campus community
INTRODUCTORY LECTURE
ON THE
TRANSCENDENTAL
MEDITATION of
Maharishi Mahesh Yogi
A Trained Teacher Will
Explain How T.M.:
* EXPANDS AWARENESS
* DEVELOPS CREATIVE INTELLIGENCE
* PROVIDES DEEP REST THUS RELIEVING  Maharishi Maharit Yogi
THE SYSTEM OF STRESS AND STRAIN
THURS. NOV. 30 12:30 P.M.
ANGUS 410
ALL ARE WELCOME - INFO: 733-3588
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Campus — 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional tines, 25c;
Commercial - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional tines
35c; additional days $1.25 & 30c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is lh30a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241 S.U.B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
Greetings
12
Lost & Found
13
CASH FOUND NOV.   23rd.  PLEASE
see Mrs. Rumley—Geophysics Bldg.
Rides & Car Pools
14
Special Notices
15
rTAIR SHAPING PROFESSIONALLY
done at UBC Beauty Salon, 5736
University  Blvd.,   Tel.   228-8942.
UBC BARBER SHOP (NEAR CAMPUS). Open Mon. to Sat. 5736 University Boulevard.
DOCTOR BUNDOLO'S PANDEMO-
nium Medicine Show gets it all
together this Wednesday, Nov. 29,
at 12:30 in the old Auditorium. It's
Free! !   Be  there! !
1973 LIBERATION CALENDAR —
Africa—"Middle Cadres: Heart of
the Revolution"; drawings, photos:
attractive, informative. $3.00. "A
Vitoria E Certa!" Greeting Cards
original drawings of cadres. 10—
$1, 100—$9. Proceeds go to MPLA,
Frelimo and PAIGC. Available
from Liberation Support Movement, Box 338, Richmond, B.C.
$75 FOR 75<
40 Bonus Coupons In This
Year's Bird Calls
AVAILABLE   NOW
BUY   YOURS   TODAYI
Bookstore and SUB
Travel Opportunities
16
ASSOCIATION     OF     STUDENT
Councils    Travel    Service,    Room
100-B,   SUB,  224-0111.
Wanted—Information
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
Automobiles—Parts
23
USED   SNOW   TIRES   (STUDDED)
mounted   for   '70   Toyota   and   '67
VW. 263-6354.
Motorcycles
25
BUSINESS SERVICES
Photography
35
Scandals
37
WE SELL ANSWER MANUALS
for texts used in CHEM: 103, 110,
120, 230; PHYSICS: 105, 110, 115,
219, 220, 251, 300, 301. Limited supply. Phone now! EASY TUTORING
732-0659.
"THE GREATEST CANADIAN
comedy show since the 1st federal
election"—Daily Bugle. See Doctor Bundolo's Pandemonium Medicine Show this Wednesday, 12:30,
in   the   old   Auditorium.   FREE! ! !
Typing
40
IBM SELECTRIC TYPING SER-
vice. Theses, Manuscripts, Term
Papers, etc.  Mrs.  Troche,  437-1355.
EXPERIENCED TYPIST— ESSAYS,
theses,  etc.  Mrs. Brown,   732-0047.
TYPING — FAST, EFFICIENT^-
Essays, Papers, Theses. 41st and
Marine  Drive.   266-5053.
ESSAYS, THESES, ETC. EXPERI-
enced. Elec. typewriter, carbon
ribbon.   Reasonable rates.   738-8848.
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING,
my home. Essays, theses, etc. Neat
accurate work. Reasonable rates.
263-5317.
ESSAYS AND THESES TYPED
Experienced Typist
 Mrs. Freeman — 731-8096	
YR. ROUND ACC. TYPING FROM
legible drafts. Phone 738-6829 from
ten a. m. to nine p.m. Quick service
on short  essays.	
ESSAYS TYPED 40 CENTS A PAGE
call  224-0632  any  time.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
Work Wanted
52
DON'S MOVING & HAULING, 2636
West 11th Ave. 738-0096. Serving
Kerrisdale, Dunbar & Greater
Van.   area.  24 hr.   service.  Insured.
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS
Tutoring Service
63
Tutoring
64
iVANTED: COMMERCE GRAD OR
third year student to coach first
year commerce student. Ph. Grant
733-4497.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
DISSATISFIED WITH YOUR Accommodation? Very comfortable
single bed-sittingroom-study now
vacant. 'Phone to view. 228-8352
or 228-0582. <__
CAMPUS. DOUBLE ROOMS IN
former frat. house. Beautiful place
—only $60 /month. Phone Frank—
224-9549.
Room 8c Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD FREE. SEP-
arate bedroom, bathrooom, study.
10 mins. UBC. Require responsible
student for babysitting two or
three nights weeke. Contact Curt
or Diane,   263-8629.
Unf. Apts.
84
3ELUXE ONE B.R. S/C QUIET,
non-smoking couple, $150 only. W.
49th betweeen Granville & Arbutus.
263-9072  or  732-9345.
Houses—Furn. & Unfurn.
86
Use Your
Ubyssey
Classified Tuesday, November, 28,  1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  11
In rugby:
UBC out-hustled! out-sloshed
By PETER MacQUEEN
Rugby coach Donn Spence
worked very hard last week to
keep UBC eligible in the
Vancouver League, but on
Saturday Ex-Brits did all the
work and beat the Thunderbirds 16-9.
The 'Birds got off to a slow
start as they defended their
BILL MACKIE, defending Canadian all-round champion gymnast,
placed third for UBC in the all-round and tied for second on the
parallel bars in a meet held Saturday in Eugene, Oregon. UBC
coach Arno Lascari won the parallels.
In soccer:
Gorge nets
two for tie
A two goal UBC advantage in
Pacific Coast League soccer
play Saturday was quickly lost
in the second half as Victoria
Gorge popped in two goals for a
2-2 final score.
Joe Poulton and George
Hyne of Victoria Gorge rubbed
out Thunderbird goals by Eld
Soltysik and Greg Harrod.
The 'Birds just couldn't
locate the goal on their attempts to get a winner which
would have moved them up the
league standings into fifth
place.
UBC goalie Greg Weber
should receive praise for his
efforts in recording an outstanding game against the
aggressive   Gorge   forwards.
In his most spectacular save
during a breakaway, Weber
left his goal line and met the
surprised forward thirty yards
out from the crease. He
stopped the shot and the
free kick awarded for the
handball didn't affect the game
score.
The 'Birds play 2 p.m.
Saturday at Thunderbird
Stadium against North Shore
United. The North Shore team
has recruited several students
from the campus, including
Jim Sator and Robin Elliott
still at UBC and also Rick
Gunn and Chris Bennett,
previous players for the 'Birds.
With four of North Shore's lineup originating at UBC the
competition in Saturday's
game should be a good one.
Game results
BASKETBALL
Friday
SFU 61, Portland State52 UB
faturday
Portland State 108, Victoria 71
HOCKEY
Saturday
UBC 6, Victoria 3
Sunday
UBC 10, Victoria 1
UBC 80, Victoria 70
SFU 56, UBC 55
Whaf's wrong with
the football team
By BRIAN MURPHY
One of the.very few bright
spots of the football season was
the post-season selection of
Brian Westell as an all-star in
the western conference for his
efforts at defensive end.
Despite some other fine
individual performances, both
on and off the field, the rest of
the football record is not so
pleasant. The team got
whomped in league play with a
2-6 win-loss record, for the
second year in a row.
The poor showing was a
direct reflection of the
problems which beset the
team:
1. The lack of speed, size
savvy, and experience.
2. The injuries to several
important players.
3. The many players who
could have filled in but quit the
team for personal reasons.
4. The dissension on the
team because of player
animosity toward specific
members of the coaching staff.
5. The insufferable lack of
desire for league supremacy.
While the solution to the
football demise is quite difficult, two of many concrete
suggestions to possibly improve the situation could include :
1. The re-organization of the
coaching staff.
2. The re-institution of a
junior varsity team to develop
and give experience to young
players and induce those not
quite good enough to stay.
Perhaps with the above two
changes plus a myriad of more
minor ones the team could,
within the near future, produce
a more competitive football
squad on campus.
half of the field for the first 15
minutes. But once wet, they
played very aggressively
winning almost every ball and
scoring nine points. Spence
McTavish scored a try which
Mel Reeves converted, and
Reeves got a penalty goal as
well.
After the second half kick-
Forestry wins
By SIMON TRUELOVE
Enthusiastic curlers struggled all day Saturday and Sunday
as the foresters grabbed yet another intramural crown.
In the A event John Kelvin (skip), Mel Scott, Larry Huber,
and Doug Conn, all foresters, beat the Gage Towers foursome of
Ken Smith (skip), Wayne Smith, Bill Reid, and Stan Coxby by 9-
6.
The B event was a three-all cliff-hanger in the sixth and
seventh ends but commerce got four in the final end to beat arts
7-3.
An all-frat rink in the C event led by Terry Brown of
pharmacy soundly thrashed the engineers' second team
Gord Blankstein, Alma Mater Society vice-president, and
the rest of his aggie team finished third in the A event.
off the 'Birds were never out of
their own 25 yard line. When
they won a ball from a set
scrum or a line out, they would
inevitably lose 10 yards.
On the other hand the Ex-
Brits seemed more at home in
the conditions and pressed the
'Birds with some good ball
handling and aggressive
tackling.
The Brits back row kept the
'Bird backs completely
hemmed in and would hardly
allow them to kick the ball to
touch.
Winger Kirk Templeton
finally got the Brits on the
score-board with a fine try
after 30 minutes of play in the
second half and five minutes
later they scored again and
converted for a 10-9 lead.
The fired-up Brits stormed
back to score another converted try before the final
whistle for a well-deserved 16-9
win.
Women
hold
party
Well, all you female,
jockesses, lift up your straps
and let's go! Wednesday night
we're going to have a few on
the rocks, sweep a little dirt
under the carpet, and
generally have a gay old time.
Mind you, men are invited too.
The ecstatically sensational
feat of the women's intramurals efficient body this
week is . . . you guessed it... a
knock-em-down, roll-em-over
[in the clover?] exciting
broomball, skating, and
lounging around party!
Only interested and good
looking guys are invited
(George — stay away!] to
entertain the gorgeous belles of
women's intramurals. There
will be a good supply of
referees on hand to break up
any fights and to generally
keep things under control.
As an added feature, all the
groovy little chicks will be
running around in their newly
acquired intramural T-shirts
which their efficient managers
will have picked up early next
week.
They will be labelled, so
there's no use trying, to steal
one off the girls. Besides, they
are all well trained in black
belt judo.
If you feel like making this
groovy happening, make your
presence felt Wednesday at the
hour of seven and a half. The
only requirements required
will be status as male or
female and be a willing participant or friend of the intramural program.
In case you're wondering
where this get together is
coming off, you have a choice
between the skating rink and
the lounge in the Thunderbird
Winter Sports Centre 7:30-9:30
p.m.
Any queries can be directed
to the women's intramural
office in room 202 War
Memorial Gym.
Learn To Play Tennis
Recreation UBC
equipment and lessons included
in $3.00 card.
Further Information 228-3996; Rm. 203 Mem. Gym
RECREATION UBC
Free Time
Between Classes?
Memorial Gym Open
1:30 — 4:30
Mon. — Fri.
ACTUARIAL
MATHEMATICS
STUDENTS
<&L EXCELSIOR LIFE
OFFERS FULL-TIME OR SUMMER
EMPLOYMENT IN LIFE ACTUARIAL
OPERATIONS AT HEAD OFFICE
IN TORONTO.
CONTACT THE STUDENT SERVICES
OFFICE REGARDING INTERVIEWS
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 8 Page   12
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday,   November  28,   1972
Letters
From page 5
zig-zag between the vertical walls
of buildings.
Fortunately here at UBC we
still have acres of endowment land
and there are still open places near
the middle of the campus and you
can still see the sky and the
mount ... Well, you used to be
able to see the mountains!
Steven Earle
science 2
Strategy
On Thursday, about 200 students went, uninvited, to a meeting
of the faculty of arts. The decision to go to that meeting was
made after other more conventional methods had failed to move
arts dean Doug Kenny to do
something positive about the issue
of student representation in the
faculty. Naturally, the action of
the students antagonized and/or
intimidated some members of the
faculty. Nevertheless, it was a
necessary step to take, and many
faculty members sympathize with
the frustration of those students
who have been trying to do something concrete to improve this
university, and who have been
continually stalled or put off.
Students certainly should have a
voice in making the decisions in a
university, and it is clearly in the
interest of every student to commit himself or herself to the fight
for adequate student representation. Less clear, however, are the
tactics by which we should
achieve this goal.
On Thursday, there will be
another student meeting, and we
will be discussing our future
course of action. Doubtless, you
will hear from students whose
views are very different from
mine. I feel that we should again
try working through existing
channels to convince/pressure
dean Kenny to put our motion
before the next faculty meeting.
Then, we should put our trust in
the faculty, and hope that they
will carry the motion. If we fail,
or if the faculty fail us, then we
should consider other methods to
achieve our goal.
There is no sense in plotting
revolution for the sake of excitement or to fulfill some longing to
become a "student activist".
There are faculty members who
are as much for student representation as are the students, and
there is no reason to unnecessarily
antagonize them. It is very easy to
speak in terms of "we" (who are
right, of course) and "they" (who .
are wrong), but very immature.
While we criticize those faculty
members who adjourned Thursday's faculty meeting because
they refused to listen to us, let us
not give them cause to say that we
refused to listen to them (misguided as they may be).
None of this should have to be
said to a university student with
any intelligence. So go to the
Thursday meeting, because it is
important, and decide what you
honestly believe is the best course
of action. But be honest with
yourself.
Vivien Bowers
arts 3
God again
In recent issues of The Ubyssey
there have been items (God!,
More God!, and Christianity on
campus) boasting the glories of
religion. I am disgusted by the
publication of such ignorance.
Religion assumes the existence
of "God". This can be neither
proven nor disproven. You have
no right and it is false to believe in
something not yet proven. You
may not disagree when I say the
basis of religion is illogical, but
you will point to the benefits of
religion and ask why shouldn't
you believe in it? You, are of no
consequence, you have abandoned
religion and are deluding yourself,
and/or others, into believing
that you still believe it. People
should not be encouraged to share
your delusions and false logic.
We of this university are
seeking to learn the truth through
logical processes, it would be an
illusion to assume that religion is
an alternate means of attaining
this truth.
Ziff House
geology 2
Action fragmented
From page 7
Anderson says he was kept waiting four hours longer for an
interview than any of the other applicants. The interviewer told
him he didn't think he could handle the job, but Anderson took it
anyway and kept it for six years. If everyone gave up at the first
sign of opposition, he says, no one could get anywhere. Because
he had made a success of his job, he expected all other Indian
people to be able to do the same.
At this point in the interview I jotted down in my notes that
Anderson has a condescending view of Indians who hadn't been
as tough or as successful as himself. It was only later that I
found Frank's similar opinion.
"We want to get a guy in there (the AIMS house) who's really
honest rather than being on a power trip or just in it for the
extra money," Frank says.
The Indian and Metis Educational Club wasn't informed of
the decision to give Anderson the executive-director's position.
All such appointments are supposed to be approved by the club
but it was only after the appointment had been made that any of
the club members were made aware of it.
Margaret Cantryn, one of the Indian directors of the board,
said: "These decisions are made at board level. If we have time
we notify the boys (in the penitentiary).
This is not the first time decisions have been made without
the Indian club being informed or given the full facts. Cantryn
mentioned another incident when she hired commissionaires to
guard the house while some renovations were being done,
because Indian people were "just crawling in there and
sleeping," and some things had been stolen the week before.
None of the other board members were informed of this
decision.
It is this kind of fragmentation of philosophy and action that
is defeating the half-way houses. Many of the Indian board
members and Indians in positions of authority in the houses
have become as insensitive as the non-Indians to the needs of
the Indian parolees. The people who originally devised the ideas
behind the various houses have been forgotten in the tangle of
red tape that encompasses the setting up of organizations.
Right now there is a hopelessness in the Indians' attitude
toward their own future. Until they are allowed a major hand in
directing that future they will continue to feel like Dan:
"We fail to educate the people first. Youi!re always
dependent on society for certain things and society is so mixed
up and anti-Indian that we can't get past first base. Some of us
get to second base and we linger there"for the rest of our lives."
.hnVhk.inu.r'. Film
Nov. 30
"Sunday/^
Dec. 3
Bloody Sunday"   SUB
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224-3536
Shahy
Re: Ubyssey Hot Flashes,
Tuesday, Nov. 21, p. 8.
Re your flash on the "State of
Trade". Undoubtedly many of us
would like to attend Ed Lawson's
lecture, but your statement: "No
admission to the lecture" hurts us
deeply, and leaves many of us
wondering why in hell you bothered to announce his presence on
campus in the first place.
This is an example of your
shaky grasp of, we assume,
English composition, and if you
could at least clearly define your
statements, then possibly you
would not continue to masturbate
the English language. We refer you
to Sheridan Baker's Practical
Stylist, especially the section
dealing with clarity in composition.
Bill Longstaff, arts 4
Frank Riddell, arts 2
WHITE TOWM PI21A
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REAL ESTATE?
Ph. Mrs. Joan Bentley
224-0255
RUTHERFORD-McRAE
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B.C. TELEPHONE COMPANY
requires
1973 GRADUATES — COMMERCE
ARTS (economics, psychology)
SCIENCE (math)
FOR OPPORTUNITIES WITHIN THE BUSINESS
ADMINISTRATION AND OPERATIONS DEPARTMENTS
A prescreening announcement is posted at the Student Placement Office
indicating that personal resumes should be postmarked and forwarded to
the following by January 9, 1973.
MR. D. G. NORDIN
Management Recruitment Representative
856 Homer Street
Vancouver 2, B.C.
All Candidates will be notified regarding selections for campus interviews to
be held January 22, 23 and 24, 1973. Company information is available at
the Student Placement Office.

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