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The Ubyssey Oct 30, 1987

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Array THEUBESSEY
By James Powlik,
First prize
Head count
The wind had changed direction, blowing a thick covering of fog up the cliffs and onto campus, bringing
the rotting smell of beach detritus and the pulp mills upwind.
Gabriel thought the night smelled like a paper bag full of wet
cabbage, and wrinkled his nose as he quickened his pace across
the plaza towards the Student Union Building.
Gabriel shouldered his
i\&
way into the Pit and paused
for a moment to let the pub's
warm, smoky atmosphere
burn away the clammy envelope of air his duffle coat had
drawn in from outside. He
unwound his neck-scarf and
sidled his way through the
throngs of Saturday night
merrymakers towards a
rather boisterous table near
the back of the room, toting
his oversized track bag protectively behind him.
The three occupants of
the table equally noted
Gabriel's approach. Michael
enlisted an empty chair from
nearby, Georgie curled his
bony fingers around a pitcher
of draught and began filling
an empty glass, while Tom
drained the last of his beer
and clanked his mug down
loudly in salutation.
"Well, well—the medicine
man cometh," Tom smiled
and extended a beefy hand. "I
take it your presence with us
tonight means that midterms are nearly over?"
"Two down," Gabriel
sighed and pointed thumbs
down. "Hiroshima and
Nagasaki." He pulled off his
coat and stowed the track bag
deftly under his chair.
*Teah? And how many to
go? Ten? Twelve?"
' 1   ■ o I detect a hint of
_L_# gloating from Mister
Softball four-oh-two?" asked
Georgie. He passed Gabriel a
drink and whinnied his usual
squeaky laugh, showing too
many teeth amidst the Zit-Of-
The -Month Club: anxiety,
caffeine, and a lack of sleep
had combined to give his face
about the same consistancy
as rancid cottage cheese. Gabriel had always thought Georgie was oddly out of place in
this group, sitting between
the musclebound Tom and
the impeccably LaCosted Michael. No one really remembered how Georgie had come
to tag along with them, or
even why they inevitably
allowed him to, except to buy
every fourth round. Gabriel
guessed it might be how
personal experience allowed
Georgie to overlook his
friends' shortcomings in
patient understanding of
their true nature — a formidable trait on nights like this
one.
om was far less immune to criticism.
"Who's gloating, funny man?"
He poked Georgie's red
melton jacket. "Can your precious calculators figure out
how many engineers it's
gonna take to get one of you
laid?"
"Gentlemen," Michael
intervened, always the
diplomat
"Need I remind you of the
whole purpose of this little
soiree this evening? To forget
the pressures of mid-terms
and re-establish the social
and fraternal bonds between
us, neglected in recent weeks
by the requirements of this
fine academe."
"Well, here's to it,"
Gabriel smiled wearily and
clinked glasses with the
group.
Georgie swallowed hard
and resurfaced from
his beer, a little more flushed.
"As I was saying, before
Gabby interrupted, was that
this whole disappearance
story is just a prank, cooked
up by The Ubyssey
for Halloween."
Michael shook his head.
"I doubt it. They've been
dragging it out for a month
now—-kind of an elaborate
prank. Besides, all the papers
are carrying it."
"That's right," Tom said.
"Isaw her picture in the Province—what a Power-babe."
"Pretty and rich," Michael
added. "Her father's apparently a local shipping magnate. A meds keener like
Gabby, too. I guess she had
everything going for her.
Then one night;—bingo!—she
just vanishes, no suspects, no
clues. Halloween's the perfect
excuse for the media to keep
it under grisly speculation."
IV
•V****
"I say she just couldn't
hack med school," Tom commented. "And she couldn't
face daddy with the prospect
of flunking out, so she took off
to Mexico with her boyfriend
and the rest of her tuition.
Pity it wasn't me."
"Did you know her,
Gabriel?" Michael asked.
"Susan was in most of my
classes," Gabriel admitted.
"She was going in for Brain
Surgeon as well. Sure, I knew
her, but not as well as I
would've like to. I guess you
might say I had a bit of a
crush on her. Even after I
killed her."
"You killed her!" Georgie
blurted. He looked as if he
had been slapped.
Gabriel nodded. "I killed
her, and I know where the
body is."
"Sure you do, buddy,"
Tom said. "No offense, but I
just can't see the Party
Animal of the Petri dish
pulling himself away from his
microscope long enough to
meet—let alone murder—a
beautiful co-ed." His massive
forearms pushed back from
the table. " "Scuse me, boys.
Nature calls."
M
ichael turned his attention to the more
entertaining prospect of
MTVs Hallow-Rockin'-Eve on
the giant screen, but Georgie
continued to study Gabriel intently from across the table,
watching his
face with the
interest he
might give a particularly juicy
physics problem.
Gabriel had his captive audience. He took a long pull on
his beer, drinking-in the
smell of the room along with
it. The mixture of spilled
liquor and stale cigarettes
was somehow a tantalizing
aroma this night. A good
smell, a friendly smell, giving
him strength and pleasure all
at once. He drew a deep
breath and began his tale:
"We both worked late in
the lab the night she 'disappeared', and I offered to walk
her back to her car since it
was so dark. I took the opportunity to speak my mind: that
we should—or could—be
studying together more."
* W   ■ nly for the benefit of
\**r science, right? You
dog." Michael mused.
"Sssh," Georgie said impatiently.
Gabriel continued: "We
got to her car and talked
some more, then she went to
write down her phone number for me. She dropped her
pen and it rolled under the
car—I moved to get it, but
she was already down and
groping after it. When she
pulled herself back up, she
struck her external occipital
_,    see page 12; Head count
Volume 70, Number Xo
Lb
Vancouver, B.C., Tuesday, October 30,1987
"}UX}^\ BETWEEN
CLASSES
TODAY
Le Club Francais
Le Club se rencontre chaque
jeudi et vendredi a 12:30-1:30 a
International House. II y a aura
une soiree d'Halloween samedi le
31 a International... venez nous
voir pour plus de details. 261-
8268 Sandy.
Muslim Student Association
Friday lecture and prayers. Note
time change due to daylight
savings. International House,
1:40 p.m.
Amnesty UBC
Biir Garden - music and videos.
3:30 - 7:30 p.m., SUB Plaza
North.
Graduate Student Society
Beer Garden, 3:30 p.m. Ballroom, Grad Centre.
Gays and Lesbians of UBC
Beer Garden - everyone welcome.
3:30 - 7:00 p.m., SUB 212.
SATURDAY
UBC Law School Women's
Committee
Conference on women in the
legal profession. See "Hot
Plashes?
C.I.T.R. FM 102
Thunderbird Sports Broadcast
Double-header. Hockey: UBC vs.
Univ. of Calgary, 5:00 p.m.
Football: UBC vs. Univ. of Sask.,.
7:30 p.m. ,
Orthodox Christian Fellowship
Vespers, 5 p.m., St. Andrew's
Hall, 6040 Iona Drive.
Ayn Rand Club
Taped Lecture #6: "What is
Rationalityr 7:00-10:00 p.m.»
SUB 212a.
Science Students Association
Hallowe'en Ball - prizes for
costumes. 8:00-12:30 pjn.*
International House, 1783 West
Mall. For tix go to I.H. or phone
228-5021.
SUNDAY
Orthodox Christian Fellowship
Divine Liturgy, 9:30 a.m. St
Andrew's Hall, 6040 Iona Dr.
Lutheran Student Movement
- Communion Service. Former
Chaplain C. Robert Pearson
preaching, 10 a.m., Lutheran
Campus Centre.
- Evening Service: Former
Chaplain Donald Johnson
preaching. 7:00 p.m., Mt. Zion
Lutheran Church, New Westminster.
- 25th Anniversary Banquet, 8:00
p.m., Mt. Zion Lutheran Church,
New Westminster.
East Indian Students' Association
Drop-in volleyball. 5:00-6:30
p.m., Osborne, Gym A.
Graduate Student Society
Hallowe'en Dance, doors 8:00
p.m. Fireside Lounge, Grad
Centre. Free.
Pacific Rim and Japan Exchange
Hallowe'en Costume Party, 8:00
p.m. Asian Center Auditorium.
United Church Campus Ministry
Hallowe'en Costume Party: come
dressed as a biblical or theological character. All welcome. 8:30
p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
Arts Undergraduate Beer Garden
Buchanan Lounge, 4:30 - 7:30
p.m.
Those interested in forming a
Mature Students' Club
Opportunity for social conversation, information exchange,
mutual support and relaxation.
Grad Centre Lounge, 3:30 p.m.
MONDAY
Nursing Week Begins
«    Health Fair in SUB concourse
from 9-3.
UBC Liberals/NDP/Social Credit
Forum on education. See "Hot
Flashes" for details.
AMS German Club
Meeting - was bin ich? Noon,
BUCH Penthouse.
Graduate Student Society
Video Night: "John and the
Missus" and "Hannah and Hei
Sisters? 5:30 p.m., Fireside
Lounge, Grad Centre.
UBC Film Society
"Citizen Kane? directed by
Orson Welles. SUB Theatre,
Student Union Building.
UBC "Sports Car" Club
General Meeting; all welcome.
7:00-8:30 p.m., SUB 211.
International House
Movie Night: "I Heard the Owl
Call My Name." 8:00 p.m.,
upstairs in Gate 4 Lounge at
International House, 1783 We;
Mall.
TUESDAY
Inter Varsity Christian Fellowship
"Ten Myths About Christianity
10:00 a.m.-2.00 p.m., SUB
Concourse.
CLASSIFIEDS
Rates: AMS Card Holders - 3
lines, $3.00, additional lines 60
cents, Commercial - 3 lines
$5.00, additional lines, 75
cents. (10% DISCOUNT ON 25
ISSUES OR MORE)
Classified ads are payable In advance. Deadline Is 10:00 a.m. on the day before publication. Publications Room 266, SUB, UBC,
Van., B.C. V6T 2A7
05 - COMING EVENTS
SINGER SONGWRITER Gary Cramer, former member of Brain Damage, will be appearing in the Fireside Lounge at the Grad
Centre on Wed. Nov. 4 at 8:30 p.m. Drop by
free.
ATTENTION GRADUATE STUDENTS!
Monday video night double bills will be held
at 5:30 p.m. starting Nov. 2. See Tween
Classes for this week's lineup.
St. Anselm's Anglican Church
University Blvd.
(across from Golf Course)
Sunday Evening, Nov. 1, 7:30 p.m.
Choral Evensong
Following workshop:
Bach, Brandenberg Concerto 6
Alice Waterman, Lisa Moody - Viola
Piano Continuo
20 - HOUSING
CHINESE NEUROSURGEON on study
fellowship with family needs furnished 2-3
bdr. housing, Feb., Mar., Apr., May 1988.
875-4142 9-5 Mon.-Fri.
COUPLE RENOVATING OWN HOME
need house/apt. Dec.-Mar./Apr. Prefer West
Side. Refs, N/S, plants, animals welcome.
Call collect 932-3660.
FEMALE WANTED for 4th roommate in a
large, splendid 4-bdrm. Kerrisdale home,
$300/mo. (incl. utilities). Ph. 263-3885.
4-BEDROOM HOUSE, pleasant, close to
UBC, avail. Nov. 1 or 15, $1000 per month.
876-3628, leave message on tape.
SMALL ROOM IN UBC VILLAGE, shared
accommodation, on bus route, $200, util.
included. 327-0425 for Nov. 1st.
20 - HOUSING
RENTING OVER XMAS Dec. 18-Jan. 20,
beautiful house, Kits, 2-bdrm., lv., dining'
view, utils. incl. $1200. Ideal relatives or
profesBor. Call 731-3886 a.m./eves.
30 - JOBS
75 - WANTED
WORK WITH GREENPEACE to preserve WANTED: Female guitar player with vocals
the planet through non-violent action. Pos. for Motown band - regular bookings. Call
avail, on our Outreach/Canvass staff. PT & Sheilagh 435-0926.
FT Eves. Cate 736-0321.
P/T TELLERS and steno required for casual
on-call work. Recent Canadian Bank exp.
preferred. Apply in person to CIBC, 4th &
Yew, Vancouver.
CHILDCARE WANTED for 3 yr. old in my
home, Tues. and Thurs., flexible sched., good
wages. 734-1244.
PART-TIME (Weekends and few hrs. duri ng
week) help. Male or female for help with
light carpentry. No exp. nee. $7.50 per hr.
228-4387 or 731-5488. Start immediately.
SALES POSITION AVAILABLE IMMED.
Must be motivated, professional, articulate
and well-groomed. Contact David 643-8977.
80 - SERVICES
TEMPORARY TATTOOS: completely safe.
Great fun for Hallowe'en and other occasions. Call Roger « 224-9431.
85 - TYPING
TYPEWRITING - MINIMUM NOTICE
SERVICE, essays & resumes, scripts, proofreading, writing/research help. 327-0425.
ACCURATE REPORTS.
Broadway and Granville.
732-4426. Student rates available.
40 - MESSAGES
To the Alpha Phi Pledge Class of'87 - hope
you had a blast at P.O.P.! You are the best!
JUDITH FILTNESS, 3206 W. 38TH AVE.
263-0351. Experienced and accurate; student rates available.
50 - RENTALS
11 - FOR SALE PRIVATE
AIRLINE TICKET, male, Van. to Castlegar
rtn. Departs Dec. 22, rtn. Dec. 28. $100 only.
Serious callers call collect (604) 595-0876
after 5:00 p.m.
1981 SUZUKI JEEP, excel, cond., extras;
new paint; fun to drive; $2995 OBO.
1973 AUDI 100, $1200 OBO, 4-dr., Automatic, good condition, needs work, good
tires. Call 266-5963.
RETURN AIR TICKET Vancouver-Toronto
dep. Dec. 15, ret. Jan. 16, $365 OBO. Female. Call 733-8346.
FOR SALE - BLUE SKI JACKET, excellent
condition, 70 percent down. $125. Phone
Scott at 224-4405 after 7 p.m.
FOR SALE - 3 yr. Gold's Gym membership.
Worth $1020, sell for $300. 736-7851, mornings or after 7 p.m.
HONDA CIVIC, 4-dr., green, AM/FM cassette, excellent condit. $3700 OBO. 922-
1167.
:_|a|MjH||HjjMHk, «%____   "
1N^
JEEVA'S WORD PROCESSING, 201 - 636
W. Broadway (Micom & IBM PC), $2.00
($2.25/pg. for Laser print) dble. spaced text.
Equations & Tables: $16/hr. Photocopying
876-5333. Visa/Master.
WORD PROCESSING, Mac Plus, Editing.
Experienced, accurate. Call Jack, 224-0486.
0
iTR Mobile Sound
228*-3©I?-»SUB Rm 233
WORD PROCESSING SPECIALISTS - U
Write, We Type. Theses, resumes, letters,
essays. Days, Eves., Wknds. 736-1208.
WORDPOWER- Word processing- I.B.M. &
Macintosh laser printouts. Student discounts. 222-2661.
ACCESS COMPUTER RENTALS - 255-
7342. We rent IBM PC and compatibles. All
types of printers, daily, weekly, or monthly
rentals.
60 - RIDES	
NEED 2-WAY TRANSPORT to Kelowna for
Xmas. Will share expense. Call Jim at 224-
0136 after 6 p.m.
65 - SCANDALS
TO WILLIAM GRIGSBY McCORMICK: "I
wait here ... till you outs with your grievances and I reply; in the meantime, your
black spot ain't worth a biscuit. After that,
we'll .>tx.\" - Samuel Eells.
70 - TUTORING
WANT A FIRST CLASS
GRADE?
An articulate and well organized essay,
report, or thesis earns a top mark. Haveyoui
work edited and learn essential writing
techniques to meet highest academic standards. An experienced Writer-Editor-Tutor,
Social Sciences graduate, will provide expert instruction and counselling. Full range
of academic services available from research
and proof reading to typing and creative
writing instruction.
CALL A & A TUTORIAL SERVICE
687-5277
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST, 30 yre. exp.
Word proc. & IBM typewriter. Student
rates. Dorothy Martinson 228-8346.
ADINA WORD PROCESSING: Student
discounts. Laser & letter quality printers.
10th & Discovery 222-2122.
ESSAYS EDITING AND TYPING:
freelance writer and ex-executive secretary
will edi t and type essays for a perfect presentation. Louise 921-8735.
WORD WEIVERS still on 41st Bus line.
New location #101 - 2258 W. 41st Ave. at
Yew St. Excellent student rates for quality,
custom word processing, aussi en francais.
Tele. 266-6814.
KER WORD PROCESSING SERVICE.
Using IBM-XT with WordPerfect. #1 -1581
E. 10th Ave. Call Kerry 876-2895.
TYPING QUICK BY UBC, $1.25 a page, all
kinds. Rob 228-8989 anytime.
TYPING? Experienced & reasonable. Spelling & grammar no problem, APA a specialty.
Discount rates, min. notice. Kits area - June
-738-1378.
WP TERM PAPERS, theses, mscrpts, essays, incl. reports, tech. equa., letters, resumes. Bilingual. Clemy 266-6641.
TYPING SERVICES: Fast, accurate typing
on W.P. Thesis/manuscript specialist. Call
Nancy at 732-4490.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING by UBC Grad. -
IBM Selectric, high quality paper, spelling
check, fast and efficient service. $1.25/pg.
734-3849.
PROFESSIONALLY TYPED term papers,
essays, etc. $1.25/pg. (double-spaced).
Phone 734-4340.
B.A. ENGLISH will assist with editing/typing essays, $15/hr. 261 -0590.
The Great Vancouver Limousine Race
November 8/87
THE MOST FUN YOU'LL EVER HAVE!!
The wildest, wackiest thing you could ever do on a
Sunday. A Vancouver Classic!
Start times: 12:00,1:30 & 3:00. (Early entrants may
pick start time)
The idea is simple. We provide you with a
chauffered limousine, a camera, champagne and
glasses, and a list of oddball items to have your
team's picture taken with. We'll set you loose
for 2 hours and then return you to race headquarters
to tally up the points and enjoy an awards banquet.
The rales are few: You can sign up individually
or enter a team of 6. Costumes optional. Lots of
prizes!!
The Cost: For all the fun, including the
banquet is $60. per person. Teams $330.
Members $5 less/person
• Self Serve copies
• We Serve Copies
Typewriter Rentals
Cerlox Bindings
LOW LOW PRICES
AND MORE
AT THE UNIVERSITY VILLAGE
2nd (1, 2174 W. Parkway
Vancouver, B.C. Tel:  224-6225
, Mon-Th 8-9, Fri 8-6, Sat-Sunll-6.
For information & Free Newsletter
Call tonight 683-3660
or write: THE SINGLE GOURMET
SUITE 1400-1500 W. GEORGIA ST.
VANCOUVER, B.C. V6G 2Z6
r   p
the single ^
Ross Mclaren hits 25
October 31? Happy
Birthday from -ne
 Ubyssey	
I HOT
I FLASH
FORUM ON EDUCATION
A public forum on Education in
B.C. will be held on Monday,
November 2, at 12:30 p.m. in
SUB Auditorium. Socred MLA
Kim Campbell, NDP MLA
Darlene Marzari, and B.C.
Liberal Leader Gordon Wilson
will be discussing their philosophies and policies on the present
and future direction of Education
in B.C. The forum will be
moderated by Vancouver School
Board Chairman Ken Denike. All
are welcome. Sponsored by the
UBC Liberal, NDP and Social
Oredit Clubs.
Ill
PS
It was incorrectly reported in The Ubyssey,
October 27, ("Sikhs
boycott Indian consul") that Dr. Daniel
Overmeyer lied to the
president of the Federation of Sikh societies. The Ubyssey regrets any harm this
statement has caused
to Dr?Overmyer. The
reporter and city editors have been sent to
the Golden Temple for
further education.
Page 2
THE UBYSSEY
October 30,1987 Youth prison is no
solution, say activists
.. . «.j«-i>_ — im^     _ _^*a v-v-kv a _l 1 -» _. -_-*r_« 11 1 1    _C 	
VANCOUVER (CUP) — A
"new and improved' youth prison
being built in northern B.C. will
only be one more notch in an already costly and inhumane system, says a prisoner rights activist.
Clair Culhane, of the Prisoner
Rights Group, says the new maximum security youth prison in
Prince George is a waste of tax
dollars, while counselling services have been cut back across the
province over the last year.
"There's no sanity to anything going on in this government," said Culhane, "If there
was dien they wouldn't be shutting down the. counselling system."
She said the government has
shut down at least one youth
shelter in Vancouver, and only
postponed the closing of a downtown alcohol detoxification
centre.
Aspokesperson for the Elizabeth Fry Society, a partially government-funded group which
provides support and outreach
services to prisoners, says cutbacks only put more stress on
overloaded case-workers.
"there are never enough
(shelter) beds," said B.C. executive director, Sandy Simpson.
"Cutbacks put more pressure on
staff. Those are the given facts in
B.C.," she said.
"(But) what we think and
what wiB happen are far apart,"
she added.
Hie Prince George prison
wiH be the province's fifth 'secure
use jail? fer youth, and will cost
roughly $10.5 million just to
build, according to Regional Corrections Branch director, Ben
Stobbe.
Stobbe says the jail will hold
48 male and female prisoners,
mostly between 15 and 17 years
Biker with a mohawk in mad melvin's mountain bike challenge. You'll
never call him Rfi again
UBC unscathed
by market crash
By John Boehm
AMS and university investment funds have not been affected by the recent stock market
crash, said the AMS business
manager and UBC's director of
financial services.
"Since our funds are in relatively low risk investments, the
market swings have had no real
bearing on the value of our
council's investments? said AMS
business manager Charles Redden.
"We invest in Schedule A
banks? Redden said.
UBC's director of financial
services, Terry Sumner, said
stocks or groups of stocks are not
at present a part of the current
investment portfolio of the
university's base operations
fund, or day to day operating
budget.
Instead, additional revenue
within the fund have been obtained by investing in low risk,
short-term safe Vehicles,' which
are not directly subject to stock
market fluctuations, said Terry
Sumner.
Besides the base operations
fund, two other pools of funds -
the general pension fund and the
endowment principle fund, comprise the remainder of financial
investment at UBC, said
Sumner.
The pension fund is broken
down into two main areas.
The first area is reserved to
make basic pension payments to
campus employees. The university can invest the money from
this account but must pay back
into the fund any losses incured
in investment.
A second portion involves a
potential source of income set up
through voluntary contributions
over and above the regular pension plan additions, and may be
affected by market swings.
There was no investment
income from the Endowment
principal fund in either 1986 or
1987.
old, sentenced and "on remand"
for charges inlcuding robberies,
assaults, murders and repeat offences.
He said the new prison will
save taxpayers money by cutting
the cost of sending prisoners from
the north to jails in southern B.C.
But Culhane disagrees. She
says Canada's roughly 250 'correctional facilities'cost the public
$1 billion annually, and that the
estimated average cost per cell of
$150,000 will make the prison's
operating costs soar.
"If we have $10 million to
build a prison, then why don't we
have money to keep people from
entering them," she said.
"Ifs our tax dollars and
relatives...that are going to end
up in these joints."
A prison abolitionist, and
author of two books on the subject, Barred from Prison (Pulp
Press, 1979) and Still Barred
from Prison (Black Rose, 1985),
Culhane says another prison will
only allow authorities to target
more poor and underprivileged
youth instead of dealing with the
roots of their problems.
"Ninety-five per cent of
people in prison are poor, period,"
she said. "Prisons are for keeping
poor people off the streets," adding that between 40 and 60 per
cent of prisoners are native.
Culhane said students, as
young people, should also be concerned about the issue, as common practices like smoking marijuana, driving while imparled, or
political activity may get them
arrested.
She said she is getting calls
from middle-class parents who's
children are being arrested for
the first time.
Culhane says prisons must
not be seen as unique in an increasingly authoritarian society.
She says that a generally
accepted estimate is that 85 per
cent of prisoners could be phased
out of the prison system, and that
even the federal Commissioner of
Penitentaries admits that 40 per
cent of prisoners don't need to be
in jail.
"Prisons are for control," she
said, "They're not only for sex
offenders and bank robbers —
that's a front.
"Law and order philosophy
only exists for people in power.
Once you realize that then you
know which side you're on," she
said.
Stobbe says the new facility
is aimed at moving away from the
outdated, barbed-wire fence image of youth prisons like the one
in Chilliwack, by offering schooling and skill programs, and encouraging individual responsibility.
"The idea is to have a more
humane setting for kids while
they're in jail," he said, adding
that prisoners will have access to
their own laundry and cooking
facilities.
"It's still a prison. We're
trying to change, but we can't risk
security," he said
Not only do youth prisoners
face the same horror as those in
adult prisons — such as sexual
assault, solitary confinement,
boredom and mental stress—but
once released, they also have
problems finding and keeping
steady work, said Culhane.
Engineering report to
decide fate of concerts
By Victor Chew Wong
It will be another week before the final-cost estimate on
structural repairs to War Memorial Gym is released, but revenue
from concerts has already been
lost according to AMS programs
director Bruce Paisley.
Paisley said shows like The
Fabulous Thunderbirds, Helix
and Haywire, Mr. Mister, and
Oingo Boingo have been
cancelled because of the delay in
the report.
"Each show is worth $5,000
3 in student labor, and between
t $3,500 and $5,000 to the AMS
| depending on pop and shirt
£ sales? said Paisley.
2 And net revenue the AMS
S   receives from all campus concerts
°   has been increasing over the past
few years, said director of finance
Don Isaak.
In 1984-85 there was an
$8,800 loss, 1985-86 showed a
$1,600 loss, and in 1986-87 the
books showed a $13,200 profit up
to the discovery of broken support
beams under the floor following a
UB40 show and the subsequent
ban on concerts.
The broken beams were discovered in January while the
physical plant was investigating
water damage resulting from a
clogged eavetrough.
"It only appears that the
damage was due to the (UB40)
concert? said War Memorial facility manager Justin Marples.
"It could have happened over a
period of time - it was only noticed
after the concert?
Nowhere in the first engineering report is the damage attributed to one particular concert.
Lome McLean of the engineering firm Choukalos, Woodburn, Mckenzie, Maranda ltd.
said an estimate on the cost to
strengthen the gym's support
beams will be released to the
University on Monday.
Paisley said he is urgently
waiting for this report as it determines the future of large scale
rock concerts like Billy Idol and
UB40.
"If they say $20,000 we'll say
fix it tomorrow. If they say
$100,000 we'll say no," said Paisley.
"We've been waiting for this
report for two months? said Paisley. "It (the delay) means there
will be no gym concerts for this
year?
The athletics department is
concerned that aside from structural damage to the floor, the
unique 'springy* quality of the
War Memorial surface may be
jeopardy if concerts continue.
But McLean said they were
informed by the supplier of the
permacushion, Harwood Milling
Company, that "the resiliency of
the floor would not be affected by
the temporary weight of the stage
and sound wings during a concert?
Dare to lose — unidentified losers join the fastest growing club on campus
Losers9 club helps hopeless cope
If you feel out of place at
UBC and your classmates don't
meet your social expectations,
the AMS Losers' Club is for you.
The Losers' Club is for those
striving for mediocrity. Accord
ing to vice-president Dave Wilton, "without us, ne one would be
above average "
The club, which threw its
first beer garde* yesterday,
extends its membership U> any
one in the bottom quarter of
anything.
"We are all Yuppies that
missed the boat and we are
treading water in the seaoflife?
said Wilton.
October 30,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 3 THAT'LL STOP YOU
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Page 4
THE UBYSSEY
October 30,1987 Critics and proponents
clash in free trade debate
By Dean Crawford
The effect of free trade on
Canada's future sovereignty and
standard of living was debated by
a panel Monday evening, in a discussion sponsored by UBC's International Relations Students Association.
Free trade critics said differences in Canada's system of medical care, taxation and foreign policy from those of the U.S. will produce a great deal of tension.
And there will be a movement
to harmonize those areas with
American policy, said Sue
Vohanka, an     executive
assistant for the Confederation of
Canadian Unions, putting Canadian sovereignty at stake.
"We have a'way of life which is
worth protecting. To me, protection isn't a bad word? Vohanka
said.
But Conservative MP Robert
McDermid, parliamentry secretary for International Trade Minister Pat Carney, said the importance of cultural industries to
Canadians was made clear to the
Americans during the free trade
negotiations. The agreement
makes clear that cultural industries will not be affected by the
deal, he said.
"Anytime two countries sign
an agreement they give up some of
their sovereignty...We've lived
next to the Americans for 120
years and if they had wanted to
take over Canada I think they
could have. They wouldn't unless
we asked them to? he said.
"If it weren't for voluntary
exchange, we'd still be living in
caves? he said.
Gordon Wilson stated his own
concern that the opening up of the
American defence industry to
Canadian contractors will link
Canadian companies with the
American Strategic Defence Initiative, commonly referred to as
"Star Wars? Such involvement
should be decided upon its merit,
not financial considerations, he
said.
Wilson, the soon-to-be Liberal
leader (he is the only candidate in
this weekend's leadership convention), admitted he supports free
trade in principle, but in the same
way as he supports world peace.
The question, he asked, is if free
trade will be obtainable under the
tentative agreement. The answer
is no, Wilson declared, since the
dispute-mechanism process
agreed upon is not as sound as the
Conservative government makes
it out to be.
Rugby team suffers first loss
by Donald Jow
Late Wednesday afternoon
at Wolfson Fields, with darkness
descending in the late stages of
the game, the UBC Thunderbird
rugby team lost its first game of
the year, the Boot Cup, and BC
university bragging rights, 25-
22 to the UVic Vikings.
In a game that saw lead
changes and tied scores nine
times, the Vikings beat UBC
with crafty leadership and 13
points, including the winning
drop goal, from Canadian international Gareth Rees. According
to UBC coach Barry Legh, the
"Vikings outhustled the *Birds to
the loose ball?
The teams traded penalty
goals early. Fifteen minutes into
the game, a Pierre Duey up-and-
under kick with pressure from
four UBC backs earned possession deep in Victoria territory. A
Viking player was penalized and
Bruce Jordan made the score 6-3
UBC.
Duey fielded the ensuing
kickoff, passed to Scott Stewart
to Evan Scholnick who broke
through the Viking defence to
ramble downfield to the UVic 22.
The "Birds rucked well with
Duey swinging the ball out to the
backs lor Owen Wa Ish to score on
the overlap.
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Jordan's convert gave UBC
the largest lead of the game at 12-
3. Near the end of the half, a
knock-on by Gavin Dry at the UVic
goal-line robbed the "Birds of a
chance to extend that lead.
Only two minutes later, the
ball was deep in UBC's end. The
Vikings kept the pressure on and,
with a centre scissoring in, scored
under the posts. Rees converted
and, at the half, the score stood
UBC 12, UVic 9.
Quick scores started the second half. Less than a minute after
the kickoff, UVic scored a converted try, running through a listless UBC defence.
A minute later, UBC went
back the other way only to be
stopped by a high tackle. Jordan
missed the penalty kick but UBC
was back shortly, this time to
score. Walsh picked off a UVic
quick lineout throw-in and, when
tackled at the goal-line, popped
the ball back for prop Scott Shepherd to score the try.
The convert was missed and
UVic came roaring back to score
an unconverted try of their own
only two minutes later. The score
was now UVic 19, UBC 16.
Though the 'Birds had good
possession several times, they
couldn't maintain it. The loose
play wasn't continuous; the 'Birds
would carry the ball into a ruck
but were then unable to produce
it for second phase attack.
Injuries also took their toll.
In one play, Bruce Gray and
Stewart were badly cut and left
the field. They were replaced but
when Jeff Knauer went off with
an injured knee, the 'Birds had
to finish the game with only 14
players.
A Duey drop goal and an exchange of penalty goals knotted
the score at 22. Rees aided his
penalty goal by rolling the ball
forward four yards before the
kick while the referee attended
to an injured UBC player. The
protests of the crowd were ignored and the ball cleared the
cross-bar by only a few feet.
Four minutes into injury
time, a Rees drop goal put UVic
into the lead for the final time.
Three minutes later, UBC had a
chance to tie it up again but the
kick was short and the game
ended shortly afterwards.
At the junior varsity level,
the UBC Braves defeated the
UVic Norsemen 38-14. In junior
play, the UBC Frosh dropped a
12-3 decision to the UVic Jutes.
The UBC Rugby Club travels to Richmond this Saturday to
play their second interlock
games of the year.
AUDITIONS
AUDITIONS
AUDITIONS
TIMES:
A FLEA IN HER EAR
by Georges Feydeau
(to be presented March 9-19)
AUDITIONS
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 3 6:00-10:00 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 4 6:00-10:00 p.m.
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 5 6:00 -10:00 p.m.
PLACE: Frederic Wood Theatre, Room TBA
(OPEN TO ALL U.B.C. STUDENTS, FACULTY
AND STAFF)
Audition material available in Room 207
Frederic Wood Theatre or Phone 228-3880
to arrange an audition appointment.
AUDITIONS       GET INTO THE ACT       AUDITIONS
OTIg-8-§AIU&
tragus
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705 West Broadway at Heather
TRUE CHROME AT THIS PRICE!
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EXTRA 10% OFF
WITH AMS CARD I
/AWARENES
CASE OF 10
$25
2053   WEST  41st   AVE.
VANCOUVER
263-0878
October 30,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 5 Gauguin movie trite
By Carolyn Sale
Gauguin: The Wolf at the Door presents
two years in the life of the nineteenth-
century French painter, Paul Gauguin, years
spent in Europe trying to gain recognition for
the paintings he produced during a two-year
stay in Tahiti.
Gauguin (Donald Sutherland) returns to
Europe full of confidence that his vibrant,
powerful paintings of Tahiti and Tahitiian
women will overwhelm the Parisian art
critics, and bring him the fame and monetary
reward he believes he deserves. Unfortunately, Gauguin underestimates the narrowmindedness of the critics.
In a hackneyed scene, he overhears a critic mindlessly dismiss his work. The only
person present at the exhibition who has any respect for his work - and is sufficiently
impressed to purchase a painting - is fellow painter Edgar Degas. Degas turns upon
the critic who is haughtily stating right to Gauguin's face that his work is 'uninteresting'. "He paints like a wolf? Degas says.
"What did he mean by that?" asks Judith Molard (Sofie Braboel), his landlady's 14
year old daughter who falls in love with Gauguin, and believes there is hope that he
may love her when he tells her that his 'wife' in Tahiti was only 13.
Gauguin recounts to her the story of the dog who was leading the wolf home to his
owners so that they could look after him as they did for the dog.
When they are on the doorstep, the wolf notices the collar around the
dog's neck, and decides to decline the offer of a comfortable home,
choosing starvation over what he perceives as bondage.
And with that, The Wolf at the Door is off to a wooden start.
Ifyou enjoy being banged over the head with a literary mallet,
you'll enjoy this movie. It has many one-line zingers that are
intended to leave you breathless, and thinking what a clever man
that Gauguin was (and screenwriter Christopher Hampton, ifyou
caught the credits). I can't help feeling that Hampton culled pithy
comments of Gauguin's from various biographies and tried to write a
screenplay around them. The film smacks of artificiality.
The polarization of the characters of Gauguin and Swedish playwright August Strindberg is especially frustrating. Gauguin is set
up as the enlightened good guy, a broadminded, noble soul who
defends native peoples, claiming that the so-called savages are more
civilised than Europeans, for they haven't forgotten what Western
civilisation has - how to control negative emotions like jealousy and
possessiveness so that they can live in harmony with one another.
The film is full of such trite truisms.
Strindberg, played by Max von Sydow who puts in the film's finest performance, is
intended to stand for that narrow-minded bad guy, Western man, masquerading as the
European intellectual. He's portrayed as misogynistic. "Who are these women?"
Strindberg demands when he sees Gauguin's paintings. "It is difficult enough to form
an idealized conception of woman from European woman. How much more so with an
inferior version."
Sutherland has a difficult time giving us a sympathetic Gauguin. Besides a couple
of vehement speeches to Strindberg and a verbal thrashing of the Minister of Colonial
Affairs, there is not much that is noble about Gauguin. That must have presented a
great difficulty to the filmmakers who appear to have been trying to make a film about
the nobility of the artist who prefers to starve rather than paint according to the
strictures of a society he abhors.
WE CANT BLAME IT ALL ON THE WEATHER.
MORE THAN 8 OUT OF 10 CAR
ACCIDENTS ARE
CAUSED BY DRIVERS.
Weather, plus road and vehicle conditions, are
factors in about 20% of accidents in B.C.
But the other 80%? They're caused by people-.
by human action and human condition
Accidents in 1986 resulted in a record-breaking
539,000 Autoplan claims. About one every 60 seconds.
In 1987, we're breaking that record.
Factors in 1986 accidents:
Human action
Human condition
(alcohol, inexperience, etc.)
Environment
(weather, road condition, etc.)
Vehicle Condition
What's ICBC doing about it?
We're working to reduce the number of accidents
through traffic safety education. And by promoting
the use of safety belts.
As co-sponsors, with the Ministry of Attorney-
General, of the Counter Attack Against Drinking Driving,
we're striving to cut the number of alcohol-related
accidents and deaths in B.C.
ICBC also works with school children and educators, the police, safety councils and civic governments
on continuing "grass roots" traffic safety programs.
At ICBC, we're doing what we can. But the real
solution lies with the individual motorist.
 And what can you do?	
Obey the rules. We all know them. Stick to the
speed limit. Use your turn signals. Don't run yellow (and
especially red) lights. Come to a complete stop at stop
signs. Don't drink and drive. These are the "human
actions" that prevent accidents. In any weather.
ACCIDENTS HURT H l_PD_P
EVERYBODY. U ll_>Dl_>
Gauguin's brother-in-law
sums it up quite well when he
tells Gauguin, "I've grown quite
fond of your paintings? and
leaves unsaid - but I could never
grow fond of you. His sister is
just one of the several women in
Gauguin's life that he treats
badly.
He abandons his wife - his
jailor, he calls her - and his
children. He refuses to commit
himself in any way to his French
mistress and his child by her
He treats his Javanese mistress,
Annah (Valerie Morea) like a toy,
painting her, fucking her
dressing her up, out never
exhibiting any emotion to her
whatsoever.  It takes him awhile
to step to Annah's defense when
the other mistress shows up, and
discovering Annah there, starts
Film
Gauguin: The Wolf at the Door
The Bay Theatre
slapping her around in a bout of
misplaced aggression.
Worst of all is his callous
attitude toward Judith. He
encourages her infatuation with
steamy glance after steamy
glance but when she finally
confronts him with a tiny
present of a snip of her pubic
hair and the plea to take her
with him to Tahiti, he brushes
her off.
This movie is polished and
sophisticated but flatter than
any of the canvasses Gauguin
painted on. On the technical
front, there are a few jolting, and
thematically unjustifiable, cuts
between scenes, and more than
one odd moment when a character suddenly reveals himself in
an unsupported burst of emotion.
The movie does not reflect any
unified vision of Gaguin's life on
the part of producer Henning
Carlsen and crew.
All the acting, especially von
Sydow*s and Graboel's, is fine.
With the notable exception of
Sutherland's. His Gauguin is
boring. His long fixed looks with
his dispassionate pale blue eyes
are not sufficient to capture the
intense, powerful personality
that Gauguin was reputed to be.
He certainly is not the enigmatic
center of the film that he should
be in the title role.
This portrayal of Gauguin's
life comes nowhere near capturing the powerful emotion that
lay behind Gauguin's own work.
Page 6
THE UBYSSEY
October 30,1987 GnWKKNKKKHKKk
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Vancouver galleries invite you
to play footsies with the artsies
By Laura Busheikin
i
A
4
v
rtwalk...is it a new dance? The
latest fitness fad? A trendy new
band? Is it something only flamboyant
artsy types can do? Something foreign,
maybe?
No,no,no,no, and no. Artwalk is the
name of what can only be termed an Art
Event which will be held this Sunday between 11:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Fifteen
Vancouver art galleries are participating
in a collaborative open house; the idea is
that you walk from gallery to gallery and
emerge with an enhanced awareness of
the range of artistic talent in Vancouver.
So it could be seen as a potential
fitness fad—you can stretch your legs and
your aesthetic sensibilities at the same
time.
But it's not only for flamboyant artsy
types. Everyone is welcome. Indeed, the
event was conceived primarily as an exciting and inviting way for people who don't
often go to galleries to sample a smorgasbord of the city's art.
"We wanted to do a community event
to get all the galleries in communication
with the public. We're hoping Artwalk
will integrate the public with the galleries? says Susan Jackson of the Wade
Gallery, one of the organizers. However,
she is also expecting lots of local artist to
attend, since they're always keen to see
what other artists are doing.
The range of art should be exciting.
"Curators are trying to show a cross-
section that will give a sense of the kind
of work they usually show?says i
Jackson, "You'll see everything - local art,
contemporary Canadian, historical
Canadian, and even South American (at
Threshold Gallery). And expect a full
range of styles, from traditional to avante
garde."
Artwalkers can start and finish anywhere on the route. The galleries will
serve coffee, and gallery personnel will be
around to answer questions. The atmosphere will definitely be informal, says
Jackson.
Artwalks have been held in Calgary
and Edmonton with great success. This is
the first Artwalk in Vancouver, but the
organizers are hoping to hold another one
in the spring, and then hold them on a
regular basis two or three times a year.
"If it becomes a raging success then well
be able to fund a shuttle bus to take
people from gallery to gallery? said
Jackson.
Indeed, it may not be easy to walk
the whole way around the Artwalk, since
it actually takes place in two different
areas of town. In the South Granville area
ten galleries are involved. The other five
are in Downtown and in Gastown.
Brochures, listing the galleries and
featuring a map, are available around
SUB building. For further information
call 732-1116.
Maurice passionless
Lush film
lacks
substance
By Steven Chess
Maurice is the long-awaited collaboration of one of today's most
acclaimed and popular filmmaking team,
director James Ivory and producer Ismail
Merchant. Like their last film, Room with
a View, it is based on a E.M. Forster
novel.
Maurice Hall has the great misfortune to be gay at a time when the homosexual act is, both in theory and in
practise, a crime punishable by law. Even
at the great institution of Cambridge,
Plato's Symposium may be studied only so
long as references "to the unspeakable
vice of the Greeks" are omitted. Despite
this environment, a love affair between
Maurice and fellow undergraduate Clive
Durkham blossoms. Finally, though, the
feelings of guilt, of repression, and of fear
induce Clive to end the three year
platonic affair.
The latter part of the film sees Clive
become a married country gentleman and
follows Maurice through abject misery to
a physical relationship with the under
grounds keeper at Clive's country estate.
This relationship, which smashes all class
barriers, is not only improbable, it
provides a ludicrously happy ending for
both the novel and the film. Forster
himself acknowledged the technical
weakness anc^implausibility of this happy
end but felt strongly that the novel must
not, like the majority of its precursors,
imply inescapable disaster and misery for
the homosexual.
Fair enough.
But in forcing the young men,
Maurice and Alec, into a contrived resolution, the film loses integrity. Devoid of
emotional tension and passion, Maurice's
second relationship is not only improbable, it is laconic and dull. Somehow, Merchant and Ivory have lost the vitality of A
Room with a View while maintaining its
style and form.
Some fault for the film's lack of
warmth and affectiveness lies with Hugh
Grant and James Wilby, the actors who
play Clive and Maurice. They lack the
subtlety and sureness of more experienced
actors who might suggest the frustration,
anger and tension that rent Clive and
Maurice apart. These lustreless performances almost shine, however, in contrast
to the film's supporting characters.
FILM
Maurice
at The Vancouver International
Film Festival
Now on general release at The Fine
Arts Cinema
As usual, this Merchant/Ivory production is beautiful and opulent in its sets,
costumes and scenery. On matters of
style this film cannot be faulted. And it
must be commended as well for dealing
openly and sensitively with homosexuality, and for showing the alienation and
fears suffered by any misunderstood
minority, in any sociey, at any time. As a
film, however, Maurice lacks the dynamism and passion that could make it a
great screen adaptation.
La
Boheme
lights
flame
by Anya Waite
The curtain^opens on a cold garret lit
with grey winter light slanting
through smeared panes: suddenly the
audience is thrust into the harsh reality
of abject poverty in 19th century Paris.lt
is against this bleak setting that Puccini's
soaring melodies open a vista of rich
human emotion.Here, Rodolfo and Mimi
meet for an intense and all too brief flame
of passion that forms the story of La Boheme.
In their production, the Vancouver
Opera remains true to Puccini's intended
contrast of grim realism and high melodrama. Michael Teargan's beautifully designed sets have been carefully bled of all
color;the costumes are for the most part
grey and threadbare; the actors huddle in
cold light — one can literally feel the cold.
This puts the score at its most effective
and evocative: sumptuous music set
against bleak poverty of scene. The
orchestra gave one of the most consistent
performances of all, with fine clean sound
and broad dynamic range.
OPERA
La Boheme
Sat. Oct. 24
Queen Elizabeth Theatre
There were some fine individual performances. Dennis O'Neill, as the impoverished poet Rodolfo, sang with a
rich,broad intensity—not quite managed
by Frances Ginzer as his lover Mimi.
Though her voice bloomed beautifully in
the high registers, her intermediate range
was weaker, and in some of the long
rising lines, especially in the duets near
the end of the first act, she did not match
O'Neill's smooth lyricism. Katherine
Terrell, as the audacious.flirtatious girlfriend of Rodolfo's friend Marcello, sang a
strong and vivacious Musetta.   As with
the Canadian Opera Company, one of the
Vancouver Opera's strengths is the
excellent acting—especially crucial in
making an Italian text understood to a
largely English audience. Ginzer's acting
was particularly good, as was that of
Terrell.
As the opera unfolds, the warmth of
Mimi and Rodolfo's passionate meeting in
the garret in the first act contrasts with
the fiery jealousy between Musetta(now
married to a rich old man) and Marcello
in the second. The second act reaches its
climax with Musetta's wild aria atop a
table in a cafe,where(to attract Marcello's
attention)she boasts of her power over
men and finally runs off with him.Terrell
was brilliant here, singing with real high-
spirited flare.an irresistible bravura.
The second scene begins immediately
on a more sombre note. Both couples split
apart in raging jealousy. Mimi's consumption is debilitating her. Winter
has set in. Again the set worked well, a
dark.snow-covered courtyard as a backdrop for cries of rage in the biting cold.
The final scene softens again. It is
spring(good acting and nuances in the set
make the audience immediately feel
warmth in the air. The lovers reconcile —
but too late. It is not long before Mimi
dies her quiet death, and Rodolfo writhes
with an anguished cry at her side.
In this last scene, O'Neill truly unleashed his voice. His was the real power
that drove the scene to its tragic and passionate conclusion.
And indeed, in La Boheme, it is right
that the music transcend the setting. In
the pith of Puccini's sordid realities, the
spirit shines through.
October 30,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 7 STUDENT COUNSELLING
& RESOURCES CENTRE
prGSGnts
A SERIES OF FREE WORKSHOPS
HOW TO LOOK FOR A JOB - A SERIES OF SEMINARS FOR
THE FUTURE EMPLOYED
An opportunity to examine your present methods of seeking
employment with the objective of improving your skills in this
area.
Three consecutive Tuesdays starting November 10 - 12:30 -
1:30 p.m.
Nov. 10 - Marketing Yourself
Nov. 17 - Resume Preparation
Nov. 24 - Interview Skills
i STUDY SKILLS
A workshop series that will examine your present system of
! studying and provide alternative methods aimed at increas-
' ing efficiency.    .
Four consecutive Fridays starting November 6 -12:30 -1:30
I p.m.
Four sessions - Tuesdays & Thursdays starting November
10-12:30- 1:30 p.m.
Nov. 6 or 10 - Time Management
Nov. 12 or 13 - Note taking
Nov. 17 or 20-Reading
Nov. 19 or 27 - Exam Preparation
PROCRASTINATION: BEYOND TIME MANAGEMENT
This two session workshop is designed to help students
identify, challenge and overcome procrastination in both their
personal and academic lives.
Two Thursdays starting November 19 - 12:30 - 2:30 p.m.
IT'S NOT TOO LATE TO GET ORGANIZED!
Learn how to manage your time both on and off campus.
Time management is stress management. An introductory
workshop designed to help you get control of your time.
One Thursday - November 26 - 12:30 - 2:00 p.m.
All workshops have LIMITED ENROLMENT.
Register by student number at:
STUDENT COUNSELLING
& RESOURCES CENTRE
ROOM 200 BROCK HALL
I
Hot flicks at the film fest
Fine fare will return to local theatres
By Steven Chess
Deaf to the City
This Canadian film is based
on a novel by French Canadian
writer Marie Claire Blais and
captures perfectly the author's
unremittingly somber outlook on
life. This look at a world without
pity, as seen through the eyes of
a woman resolved to commit
suicide, takes place in a rundown boarding house run by a
world-weary yet optimistic
woman named Gloria. This film
is highlighted by the
extraordinary performance of
Guillaume Lemay-Thivierge as a
boy suffering from a terminal
illness. The depths of understanding and maturity that this
little boy can covey are truly
amazing, and are alone worth
seeing this movie for.
High Tide
The plot of this Australian film
revolves around the
unintentional meeting of a
mother and the daughter she
abandoned to a mother-in-law
many years before. What could
easily be a contrived tear jerker
becomes, under the expert
directorial hand of Gillian
Armstrong, (My Brilliant Career)
a moving, believable emotional
odyssey of a woman who must
finally face the responsiblities of
her life.
Jan Adele as the mother-in-
law is excellent and Claudia
Karvan as her grand-daughter is
charmingly natural. This film
uncovers the bittersweet beauties of life and of its simpler
pleasures without ever becoming
maudlin.
Sammy and Rosie get
laid
Directed by Stephen Frears
and written by Hanif Kureishi,
the same people who brought us
My Beautiful Laundrette, this
film offers a similar collection of
racial, sexual and familial
tensions set against the backdrop of London's urban decay.
Though less subtle than My
Beautiful Laundrette, Sammy
and Rosie get laid is an affecting
examination of values that have
become as decayed as the strife-
ridden streets of London.
Highlighted by fine performances all around, this film is a
piercing social critique that
provides affirmation of the
goodness and strength of some of
its characters.
Film poses absurdist riddle
By Lisa Doyle
Peter Greena way's latest film, The Belly of an
Architect, lives up to Greenaway"s reputation
as a filmmaker who is willing to jeopardize the
verity of his films for the sake of taking risks in
storytelling. His firms' meticulous structure allow a
     riddle to unfold slowly.
Film
The Belly of an Architect
Vancouver International
Film Festival
You are so eager to find
out what's next that
you accept impossible
and absurd events un-
questioningly.
Stanley Kracklite (Brian Dennehy) is an
architect who has come home to fulfill his lifelong
wish, an exhibition of the long-misunderstood early
twentieth century French architect Etienne-Louis
Boulee. Kracklite, like Boulee, has completed only
six and a half buildings in his career, and has
always identified with Boulee, believing that they
are both avant-garde geniuses.
As Kracklite begins to identify more and more
with Boulee, his personality changes. He becomes
obsessed with his paunchy belly, comparing it to
xeroxes of well-defined bellies from Roman statues.
Eventually Kracklite completely loses his grip on
the exhibition as his personal life goes awry.
The set of Rome is an integral part of the plot,
as the characters set and work against the monumental backdrop of several styles of Italianate
architecture. Greenaway uses Roman mythology
and the architecture as metaphors, giving The
Belly of an Architect an extra dimension often not
seen in films today. Thus the film a work of art
rather than mere entertaiment. It is as a means of
expression, rather than as a measure of reality,
that the absurdities and crazy plot twists are
acceptable.
Like his previous films, The Draughtsman's
Contract, and A Zed and Two Noughts, this film
leaves one with the feeling that life is indeed
absurd and inexplicable. Yet with The Belly of an
Architect, Greenaway has finally found his match
in its (twice-removed) subject Boulee, a fellow
visionary.
1
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Floyd had a plan "fb guarantee
graduating at the "fop of his class.
Page 8
THE UBYSSEY
October 30,1987 Redd Kross
grows up
Neurotica tour
rocks Graceland
By Barry Davis
In 1981, Redd Kross was a
painful sounding thrash-
band made up of 14 year olds.
The following year, they released
their first album, "born innocent", which features exciting
songs such as Kill Someone You
Hate.
Their only subsequent
releases were on compilations,
up until this year, with their new
LP, "Neurotica". During the long
period between, albums, they obviously learned how to play their
instruments. This album is
much more psychedelic, and
features songs about love rather
than hate.
MUSIC
Graceland
Redd Kross
Tues- Oct. 29
On Tuesday, they played at
Graceland. They wear flared
pants and they look satanic, with
very long hair and eyes that
could kill. But their songs are
about love and peace with the
sole exception of Charles
Manson's Cease to Exist.
Redd Kross cosists of the
three McDonald brothers, Roy,
Steven and Jeff, and Robert
Hecker. Roy, the drummer, sits
in front of a bass drum with
Gene Simmons' picture on it,
while he transforms his cymbals
into wire
scraps. The
others run
about the
stage
playing good,
tight guitar
parts, and
take turns
singing.
Atone
point, Jeff
exchanged
his guitar for
a set of
bongos and Robert played
acoustic guitar and sang their
mellow song, Love is You. Of
course it was not long before they
were back to their original loud,
distorted sound.
The audience cheered wildly
as they left the stage, and booed
when Graceland's typical disco
tunes took over. When the band
ran back in, Jeff screamed "We're
Guitarist jumps out of time machine
gonna play some real
rock'n'roll—the inaudible kind!"
The audience began laughing as
they realized the next song was
the theme to the Partridge
Family.
Redd Kross are great entertainers, no matter what your
preference in music, and they
played one of the finest performances I have seen this year.
-.\°V idfa
mr*imw
&
ov <f?
<^>y
4?
271 E. 2nd AVE., VANCOUVER, B.C.. NEAR MAIN ST.
Montenaro dance
inspires despite flaws
By Martin Dawes
Have you ever been to the Firehall Arts Centre on East Cordova? Strange things happen there. Things like Montanaro
Dance's The Theory of Everything.
With each of the artforms being streched to its limit, artists are
now experimenting with various combinations of the arts (eg. MTV).
Montreal's Montanaro Dance combines offbeat choreography, theatre
and video art with an original electronic pop soundtrack supplemented by live synthesizer and vocals.
This show is about Everything: in short, our quest for the
meaning of life, symbolized here by a certain much sought-after
briefcase. Multiple briefcases appear amidst all the intrique, confusing and deceiving the players, who find themselves capable of doing
anything to get at the real briefcase.
On the video screen a man with briefcase struggles up an
embankment, plunges into an ocean, climbs out of a swimming pool,
walks out of the screen onto the stage; he is murdered, the briefcase
is stolen; eventually a girl reacts and dials a huge red telephone,
summonning none other than Superman... and it goes on, with all
sorts of unexpected and hilarious digressions like "when it thundered, my mother told me not to worry, it was just God - bowling?
Tnis was never boring, but occasionally one sensed a cluttered
incoherency hinting that perhaps Mr. Montanaro's conception was a
bit too ambitious. __
 The choreography was
imaginative and often playfully
childish, with dancers tossing
each other about like toys, but it
didn't always manage to hold our
      interest due to the almost
constant presence of the entire
ensemble.
These dancers gave off an air of the underground - perhaps because they lacked the perfect proportions and technique demanded
by the more classical forms of dance. Mr. Montanaro evidently places
the emphasis on creative expression rather than formal beauty.
As for the music, co-written by Mr. Montanaro and Edmund
Eagan, it was annoying and repetitive - even if the noises fascinated
- and the final song, "Can You Imagine That?", was a David Byrne
clone all the way.
Nonetheless, this bizarre art-event entertained and inspired, for
not only did it receive a standing ovation, but most of the audience
went home and stood on their heads, screaming and hurling gobs of
paint at the walls of their apartments - and surely a work which
arouses such creative frenzy may safely be considered successful.
DANCE
Montanaro Dance
Firehall Arts Center
Oct. 21-24
At University Golf Club...
WE'RE OPEN ALL YEAR!
University Golf Club is your year-round golf, games and relaxation centre. Come and take
advantage of our Winter Program features!
Great Prices on Winter Golf .
New Winter rates are in effect starting November 1 st. The course is in excellent condition so come out and play!
Green Fees — Monday to Friday — $14.00
Students —    Monday to Friday — $9.00
Weekend Rate — $18.00
Drive Away!
The outstanding Driving Range facility at
University Golf Club remains open year
round featuring:
• 80,000 square feet of grass tees
• 10,000 square feet of bunker
• "100" compression golf balls
• Fully covered & lighted facilities
• CPG Pros available for
lessons
Driving range open
v<>   8 a.m. — 11 p.m.
(*i   daily
Thunderbird Lounge and
Grill.
Relax and enjoy a delicious snack
or full course meal at the Thunderbird Lounge and Grill. Try our exciting new "live action" electronic
football and baseball games — QB1
and Diamondball. For the first time,
you can interact with "live" action via
satellite — as it happens!
Win a Trip "Down Under"!
Each time you play a round of golf
or purchase a menu entree at our
restaurants, you'll receive an entry
form for a chance to win a trip for 2
to New Zealand!
Draw date: March 31,1988.
COMPLETE CONTEST DETAILS
AVAILABLE AT PRO SHOP AND
THUNDERBIRD LOUNGE AND
GRILL
4701 University Boulevard,
C0lJ^    University Golf Club ESS
224-1818 or 224-7513
October 30,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 9 High tech hitch
The Vancouver city police recently purchased a radar machine which automatically
photographs every speeding car and records the
speed, license number, time and date on film.
Every single speeding car.
The equipment is based on the belief that the
only thing that stands between us and a crime-
free society is the ability to gain enough high
tech equipment to capture every single criminal.
But Vancouver police have forgotten or ignored a basic tenant of our justice system.
Our society is held together by peoples'tacit
agreement to uphold a certain set of principles,
enacted as law, and society has empowered a
group of people to enforce these laws.
Our system of law puts the onus on individual citizens to follow the laws, because of the
belief that we can't and shouldn't have a police
officer on every street corner and a government
video camera in every bedroom.
Increased policing or better tools to capture
criminals will not result in a safer society, but in
a police state.
Society should instead be encouraging its
members to follow laws through dissemination
of information. The positive results of recent
"Drinking and Driving" information campaigns
have taught us the benefits of reform through
education.
Unless people see safe driving as a responsibility and not a dictate from the government,
their behaviour will not change.
Trick or treat
Every year, around this time, parents send
their kids out to engage in a little bit of that
ol' fashioned primitive capitalist accumulation. They're training them to be little imperialist capitalists, but no one seems to mind.
"Trick or treat!" That's a threat if we've ever
heard one. Scale that up, and you've got
Reagan sending the U.S. Navy into the Persian Gulf, saying to the Iranians "Let us have
our oil, or we'll play a nasty trick on you."
Instead of machine guns , the little brats
carry fire crackers to scare the hell out of the
old curmudgeon that lives on the block. Instead of carefully prepared statements, the
little brats are straightforward: "Trick or
Treat". Instead of five-inch shells,, they
throw dog-shit at his windows. So simple. So
satisfying.
Hmmmm. Maybe someone should send
Ron some fire-crackers and dog-shit.
THE UBYSSEY
OCTOBER 30,1987
The Ubyssey is published Tuesdays & Fridays throughout the academic year by the Alma Mater society of the
University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are
those of the staff and not necessarily those of the
university administration, or of the sponsor. The Ubyssey
Is a member of Canadian University Press. The editorial
office is Rm. 241k of the Student Union Building. Editorial
Department, phone 228-2301; advertising, 228-3977.
"Tell me about the rabbits, George!", drawled Martin "Lenny" Dawes, drooling. No
one answered. Corinne Bjorge stared at him coldly. She was in no mood for any of
Martin'B tomfoolery, because she'd just come out from under the anaesthetic and
discovered that Lisa Doyle, Barry Davis, and Anya White, to whom she had entrusted
her surgical transformation into Whitney Houston, had accidentally cut off her arms
andreplacedthemwithWhitney'Blegs. She now had four legs and no arms. "What's
a poor girl to do?" commiserated Laura Busheikin. "Why didnt you stick with the
Michael Jackson image?" gaBped Ross McLaren. VictorChewWongstarted to laugh.
"Wanna buy a pair of shoes, he guffawed. Ross Ostrom, Deanne Fisher .and Jody
Woodland hovered in a comer of the room, mumbling malevolently about the
"presence of that freak." ChriB Wiesinger, on the phone with Someone Important,
snarled viciously "I don't care if you're the President — get me someone who knows
what's going on, Ron, like that ugly little poodle you always drag along to Camp
David!" Evidently the answer was not satisfactory, because ChriB proceeded to eat
the phone, handle and all, growling insanely all the while. "D*you want some fries
with that?" asked LaurineDane, shyly. "Or some melted wa_f?" offered Steven Chess,
in an off-hand way. Robert Beynon frothed at the mouth: "Write sumthin' about set...
like, edible undies, an' ... an' Waffles, an* oatmeal, or ... or ..." "Or computer
programs?" asked Carolyn Sale, lewdly. Everyone stared at her with misgivings. It
had been done before, but not without problems. "Computer programs?" Steve
Preece asked, suspiciously. Everyone stared at him, with a not unnotdceable degree
of hostility. "Ifyou don't know what we do with computer programs up here, you ..."
Dean Crawford started, "...you mu6t be a Socred Thought Inquisitor!" Bpat Victor
Chew Wong, his eyes gleaming at the prospect of exposing another Socred plot.
Patrick Kirkwood spewed a stream of obscenities at the collective. Everyone turned
to look at him. Steve Preece was immediately forgiven, as another target had exposed
itBeif. "Uhh... juBt practicing.", smiled Pat, weakly. "Oh, gosh ... you're forgiven,
Patrick. Weknowyou'renotaSocred.'gushedLisaLangford, warmly. And everyone
joined hands and sang. And it was good. And even God, rummaging through Sub
Cafs garbage because some pious asshole in Heaven had started a restraint program
(Was it Calvin, we wondered?) Bmiled up at them.
LETTERS
Fact finding
faulted
I don't understand why
you published an accusation against me by the Federation of Sikh Societies
without checking with me
fir st. I thought good journal -
ism meant confirming all
the facts before publication.
I did not lie to the Sikh Federation about the fact that
the University had invited
the Indian Consul-General
to our dinner on
Monday,October 19 in
honor of our new endowed
position in Punjabi language and literature and
Sikh studies. Your October
27 article by Elynn Richter
is simply incorrect. The
Consul-General was invited
as a simple matter of courtesy and protocol. We would
do the same in any such
situation. The University's
approach in such matters is
absolutely non-partisan
and non-political.
The issue of our inviting
the Indian Consul-General
was never discussed by me
with the Sikh Federation
until its President called
me on the morning of October 19 to ask. I responded
immediately that we had
invited Consul-General
Sharma, and explained
why. After several telephone calls, to our regret,
the representatives of the
Sikh Federation decided not
to attend. They missed a
good dinner.
Daniel L. Overmyer
Professor and Head
Dept. of Asian Studies
Sikhs demand
apology
The recent boycott of
the Sikh Chair dinner at
UBC by the Sikh community clearly illustrates the
poor judgement of the UBC
administration.
The purpose of the ceremony was not to honor and
please the government of
India, but to honor the Sikh
community's contributions
in the establishment of the
Sikh Chair at UBC along
with the Ministry of Multiculturalism.
Th* Ubyssey welcomes letters on any Issue. Letters should be as short as possible and may be edited
for brevity as we* as for sexism, racism and homophobia. Bring them In person with your ID to the
Ubyssey Office, SUB 241k.
Preinsperg's organ exposed
__**rdncellje Ubyssey
of Kurt Pnansperg's Wei-
tan&chauung, we have
" been the wscspjeats of a
brilliant *h_w moral
phitegophyvW* have
learned hem Mr, Prein*
sperg fflpftascxdated his
name by dropping tbe
"e^howh^js titillated by
Wreck Beach society and
recently <<k£__% htm to
conduct sexual experiments ia the Aquatic
Centre whirlpool- Mr-
Ftmmpeegs _»w found
sexuality ia a marvel to
behold for the general
public, not juat for a dozen
privileged partners per
year. FartherBtorfr, we
have learned that Mr.
Preins|»rg>83aiat«!igsfecst**
egy is entirely compatible
with a» wiooatrived respect for the prirtcipies of
Feminism m long as one iff
sensitive* Vulnerable «»d
has a philosophy degree-
However, I wonder Jf Mr.
Preinsperg is not making
what Ryte called a "category mistake* thatiSi the
attribution of something
to an Inappropriate semantic category, Ryle
Used this term in the context o£ discussion of the
mind/body question. In
particular, Mr. Preinsperg seems to confound
Eros with intellect, ifeaf
thatMr< Preiaspergislike
the dinosaurs whose sac-
rat ganglia, governing the
organs of generation, were
larger than their pea-
brains, the seat of dinosaur philosophy.
Paul Camming
Graduate Studies
in Neuroscience
Even though 85 per cent of
the people of Indian origin in
Canada are Sikhs, the Government of India opposed
the establishment of the
Sikh chair at UBC and did
everything in its power to
delay as well as stop this
project. This clearly illustrates the Indian
Government's discriminatory policies towards the
Sikhs as well as Indian
Government's interference
in Canadian affairs. The
UBC administration was
perfectly aware of all these
attempts by the Indian
Government to suppress
and discredit the Sikh Community. Despite this,it invited the Indian Consul-
General to that ceremony.
Larry Sproul, director of
UBC's International liason
office , defended the
administration's decision by
saying that it is "regular
protocol" to invite the Consul-General of the particular country. Would he also
consider it "regular protocol" to invite the South African Consul-General if a
ceremony was held to honor
Nelson Mandela?
This clearly illustrates
the lack of common sense by
the UBC administration.
Instead of honoring the Sikh
Community, the administration insulted the whole
Sikh community. I believe
that President Strangway
owes the Sikh community a
public apology for this insult
on behalf of the UBC administration.
Amritpal Singh Shergill
Sikh Students Assoc.
of UBC
Loony left
lambasted
Mark Fornataro, who
seems not to be a UBC student, must have a photocopier. His frothings of last Friday are a longer version of a
vitriolic letter in The Province two weeks ago. Both
letters show no sign of honest research. Instead, Fornataro relies on the standard cliches of the Loony
Left: anyone who dares disagree with his preconceived
prejudices on South Africa
he loftily dismisses as "underlings" and "apologists".
This is the kind of stilted
jargon he has heard from
ideologists who share his
prejudices, and Fornataro
automatically copies it.
Fornataro fails to mention that Robert Moss was a
Latin America correspon-
dant for the respected British magazine The Economist. Relying on secondhand
accusations, Fornataro
shows no sign of having read
Moss' articles, which in reality are far more calm and
rational than Fornataro's
Left-McCarthyism   allows.
Moss' articles on Chile 15
years ago were objective,
well-researched, and included quotations straight
from President Allende.
As a result of his firsthand experience (which
Fornataro lacks) Moss
wrote an excellent book,
•Chile's Marxist Experiment The book enraged
North American leftists who
were trying to peddle Chile
as they try to peddle Nicaragua now. Moss showed that
Allende was not the reformer he was cracked up to
be. Naturally, North American leftists were enraged
and so began the slander of
Robert Moss. Fornataro
dutifully repeats them.
When Fornataro pretends that the January
12,1977 lead editorial of the
New York Times attacked
the CIA for concocting books
(of which Moss' is supposed
to be one), he merely parrots
a demonstrable lie taken
from Fred Landis' work. It
would take Fornataro less
than five minutes to look up
the editorial page as I did. In
doing so.he would have discovered that the entire edi-
torila page for that date
makes not one reference to
books, the CIA or Robert
Moss. When this "editorial"
turns out to be a fraud, one
can easily guess how discredited must be the other
phony sources that Fornataro cites without bothering
to confirm.
I  heard  Fred  Landis
speak at Robson Square and
I read part of his Ph.D. thesis. Both lack all credibility.
Greg Lanning
Lawl
Student asks
why
On September 25,1987,
I paid my tuition fees for the
school year. Included in
those fees was a $5.50 increase in the athletic fee
levy. With about 27,000 students enrolled at UBC, that
should have meant a
$150,000 injection into
UBC's athletic program. As
of now, I have seen no sign of
the money at work in the
intramurals program.
As a current employee
of UBC intramurals, and a
former varsity athlete and
Big Block winner, I have
seen athletics at UBC from
both sides. While I recognize
see top of page 11
Page 10
THE UBYSSEY
October 30,1987 the important role that varsity
athletics plays in life at UBC, I do
not believe that intramurals deserves its role as the poor second-
cousin. Why should the 60 or so
men and women involved in varsity soccer be given access to the
spacious and well maintained
Todd fields, while the 1000 participants from the 95 intramural soccer teams are given access only to
the cramped and dangerously
unkept sand traps known as
Maclnnes and Osborne Fields?
Why are we at intramurals
told the first aid kits in the War
Memorial Training Room are only
available for 'athletic teams'? Why
are these kits available for high
school volleyball teams involved in
a tournament in War Memorial
Gym, while UBC students (who financed these kits with their fees)
must go without?
There is obviously a serious
lack of fairness in the athletic
program at UBC and it is about
time that things changed. It is up
to us, the students, to demand
more of a say in where our money
goes. Why should the majority
have to pay for the extravagances
of a few? If you feel the same way
as me, please let someone involved
with UBC athletics know. Help us
prove that the thousands of intramural athletes are the equals of
the handful playingvarsity sports.
Let the administration know that
intramurals is a vital part of campus life that must be given a larger
piece of the monetary pie.
Bruce Anderson
Science 4
Nasty
cowpokes
harass sleepy
slowpokes
I realize that since the university has gone off the parking decal
system, life must be pretty borin'
down at the old ranch. Now that
they've installed these newfangled automated gates, there is
nuthin' for you good-ol-boys to do.
Not like the old days, when
you used to go ridin' into B-lot a-
whoopin' and a-hollerin' to give us
city slickers a taste of Southern
justice. Why, I still remember the
many poor souls without decals
that you ticketed; those were the
days.
Well, it seems that the other
day one of you wranglers decided
to relive old times. I had parked in
the through-way of B-lot three,
along with at least fifty others, just
like I had since day one of the
school year. Only on that fateful
day we all received a little blue
ticket tucked neatly under our
wiper blade. Now granted, we
were parked in the through-way
and not in a stall. And granted we
entered the lot after it was full.
But ifyou want to get into the lot
legitimately you must be there by
8 a.m.
Look, we all know that enrollment is up. There is simply not
enough adequate parking anymore. A debt-plagued student does
not need the headache of a $15.00
parking ticket. We don't deserve
this!
There are people parked in
lanes, road-sides and embankments as well as the through-ways
of B-lot. I would like to know just
who is offended by this? We take
great care to leave sufficient room
at the edges of the lots to allow
others to exit easily. When we
leave we all pay our quarter (most
of us). What's the big deal? We're
not getting in anyone's way. Why
don't you j ust let us park wherever
we can find space, as long as we're
not obstructing traffic? This ticketing spree is in ridiculous. Ifyou
would leave well enough alone,
you would get more quarters and
we could park our cars. Sounds
fair to me.
Offence No. 278435
J. Howard
Logic, please
The proposal for a free-stand
ing abortuary in Vancouver will,
no doubt provoke an outcry from
religious groups opposing its construction and an equally loud
clamour from its supporters keen
to strike a blow for "Choice".
The "Pro-Choice" group takes
its argument from the principle
that those who see nothing wrong
with abortions should be able to
exercise their rights: just as those
who want to practise artificial
birth control should be allowed to
do so, k>ecause for them, such action is neither harmful nor immoral.
This argument would be fair
enough if abortion were essentially a private concern. If people
with cancer in their feet were not
allowed to have the offending
parts amputated for their own
safety because of the arguments of
Christian Scientists, then of
course, one would say that they
were being denied the power to
make a choice affecting their own
bodies. That they should have the
opportunity to make, and act
upon, such a choice is clear to any
fair-minded person.
However, in this case there is
a third party involved; doctors
agree that the unborn child has all
the characteristics normally understood to be the necessary conditions of humanness. This third
party is directly affected by a
"choice". Thus, any analogous
arguments concerning rights to
choose are invalid. Women are
free to/nake such a choice but the
choice to abort, at any time during
a pregnancy, is morally and logically indefensible on the grounds
of the "pro-choice" platform. If
"Pro-choice" advocates care Co
admit that the wishes of the third
party are immaterial, then we are
involved in a quite different discussion. A little logic please.
Peter Barlow
Campus Prolife
BRAINS &
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For the first
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players here and nationally
by anticipating live
quarterback plays.
MONDAY
NIGHTN.F.L.
FOOTBALL
LIVE AT
6:00 PM.
Also remember
Sunday, all day
football on the
big screen.
#?«,- %
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£).       (.<-   'CO
%.ovj*^
University Golf Club
5185 University Boulevard
Vancouver B.C. V6T 1X5
224-7513
IT
OOPb; T?he Oct. 23 article by Anya Waite
'"A Vigorous Vioim". mistakenly opened with
"Robert McDufBe -tnded   " nstead of "Robert
McDuffie strode..     ?his was iot Anya'*; fault;
rather, it was the result uf an **diionn   -rshao
at 3:00 A.M.  he morning before pres*     ^
bleary eyed editor -iidn't notice.  When ..sjteu
about the misprint, she said "Oooh fuck!* So
there. She's sorry. Special apologies to Anya,
who deserves better.	
A STORY OF LOVE, TENDERNESS,
HUMANITY AND HOPE.
"Aching with love and bitterness, it is meant
to break your heart". London Guardian
"It came across like a thunderclap. It was
extraordinarily affecting, beautifully done".
BBC Radio 3
"A gentle, funny and moving work",   wrc-tv
"Pertinent and courageous".     Washington Post
WHEN
THE WIND
BLOWS .
PEGGY ASHCROFT
..DAVID BOWIE
AS HILDA    THE VOICE OF
FILM SCORE BY
JOHN MILLS.
ROGER WATERS
executive producer IAIN HARVEY   PRODUCED Bv JOHN COATES   DIRECTED bv JIMMY T MURAKAMI   WHEN THE WIND BLOWS
additional MUSIC BV | GENESIS 1. PAUL HARDCASTLE. SQUEEZE AND HUGH CORN WELL   MUSIC SUPERVISOR RAY WILLIAMS
A MELTDOWN PRODUCTION made in ASSOCIATION with NATIONAL FILM FINANCE CORPORATION.
FILM FOUR INTERNATIONAL. TVC LONDON ANO PENGUIN BOOKS
PAPERBACK BY PENGUIN BOOKS  nnfooiBY
* MUSIC AVAILABLE ON VIRGIN RECORDS & 1APES    RELEASED BY NEW WORLD MUTUAL PICTURES
Opens on October 30 at the
11   rto/a Centre in Vancouver
DONALD SUTHERLAND AS
Ca**J
••'II*
INI
THE WOLF AT THE DOOR'
"The vibrant over-extended
passions of Gauguin rage
..fine performances by
Sutherland and Von Sydow"
"Donald Sutherland
Is never less than brilliant"
"Lively as well as intelligent
...a succession of witty and
ribald scenes"
"The acting Is uniformly terrific"
■WOMEN'S WEAR DAILY
-LA DAILY NEWS
"Mr. Sutherland gives his all and that's a lot, a
sensitively shadowed portrait..."
WriW Goodman, NY TIMES
"Donald Sutherland's performance Is of Academy
nomination callber...a gem of a film"
-McNAUGHT SYNDICATE
"Donald Sutherland gives one of the best performances
of his career"
-Jaffmy Lyom, SNEAK PREVIEW/INN
DONALD SUTHERLAND in "THE WOLF AT THE DOOR"
STARRING
JEAN YANNE   SORE GRABOEL GHITA NOERBY MERETE VOLDST-
EDLUND and FANNY BASTIEN
JOERGEN REENBERG HENRIK LARSEN LUIS REGO
I «no MAX VON SYDOW as strindberg I
phTc£S5>£ MIKAEL SALOMON   ^^fcHRISTOPHER HAMPTON
sTor^sy JEAN-CLAUDE CARRIERE . HENNING CARLSEN
MUSby ROGER BOURLAND
""SSSSdT HENNING CARLSEN
AN   l—A—m  INTERNATIONAL FILM MARKETING RELEASE
©1966 DAGMAR FILM PRODUCTIONS. APS
SUBJECT TO
CLASSIFICATION
NOW PLAYING AT THE
BAY THEATRE
•**-t
October 30,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 11 Head count
continued from page one.
protrusion on the edge of the
open car door."
"Her external what?"
Georgie asked.
"Occipital protrusion—
the bony notch at the base of
the skull—caught on the
inside bolt of the door lock.
She uttered a small moan and
just collapsed."
"But you said you killed
her." Georgie looked disappointed. "It was an accident
that you happened to see—
like watching her slip in the
shower."
Though probably not as
invigorating," Michael mused.
"I knew I was innocent,
but there I was, all alone in a
dark parking lot with a dead
girl in my arms, and I just
panicked. My car was parked
a few stalls away, so I
dragged her over and loaded
her into the back seat. Then I
drove off campus and just
drove around, wondering
what I had gotten myself into.
Waiting for—hoping for—
Susan to regain consciousness. She didn't."
Tom returned to the
table. "What's Doctor Jekyll
up to now?"
"He says Susan died from
a knock on the head," Michael
explained. He reached over
and tilted Georgie's greasy
head forward, indicating the
top of the nape. "Right there.
Smacko."
"Oh, sure," Tom said. "It
doesn't take much. It's a basic
combatives maneuver: direct
a boot-heel or a similarly
solid object to the base of the
skull with just the right force
and the headll pop off the
spine like a cap off a bottle,"
He snapped his finger dryly
for effect. "Instant death."
Gabriel downed the rest
of his beer, then refilled his
glass. There was no doubt
she was dead, but as I drove I
began to see what a fortuitous situation I was in. Not
only did I have sole possession of a girl I could easily
have been in love with, but
also a physically perfect
cadaver to study."
"I told you not to mix
business and pleasure,
Gabby-boy," Michael joked.
"I drove her back to my
basement suite. My landlady
is out of town, so I brought
Susan in and set her on the
floor. Even in death, I was
taken with her beauty.
Working day and night,
working on my hands and
knees until my back ached
and my fingers grew numb, I
performed a complete dissection.
"I cut off her head intact,
then examined her internal
organs and fed the soft parts
to my landlady's dog bit by
bit. I stripped her bones clean
and buried them out at the
Steveston landfill site one
night. I put the rest of her
flesh in the deep-freeze, for
myself."
"Man does not live by
Kraft Dinner alone," Tom
said.
"Jesus, man, that's sick,"
Michael said. "Why are we
even listening to this?"
"Ah, let Georgie have his
Halloween spook story," Tom
said. "He sure as hell doesn't
need any more zit food."
"But what did you do with
the head?" Georgie gibbered.
"I kept it. As a memento
of her beauty, and of my
realization that I can never
be a brain surgeon. When it
really came down to it, I
knew I couldn't destroy her
loveliness with my barbaric
techniques in a full brain
dissection."
Michael could deadpan
this nonsense no longer: "wise
move, Gabby: quit while she
was a-head!"
"Yeah," Tom said. "But at
least you found a girl you can
respect for her brain!" The
two burst into raucous
laughter.
Gabriel waited, then
solemnly continued. "Eventually she lost her beauty, even
in my eyes. Repeated thaw-
ings of the head took their
toll: the smell of rotting flesh
permeated my suite. Her hair
began to fall out. The freezer
burned her skin, her eyes
sagged and withered in their
sockets as her face decomposed beyond recognition—"
That sounds like your
usual dates," Tom commented.
"—so I even risked
disposing of the head in the
trash, but the dog went nuts
over the smell so I had to put
it back in the freezer. I even
considered using acid to
dissove the horrible evidence
against me."
"So, what changed your
mind?" Michael giggled.
"She left him for some
guy with a body!" Tom said
and the two howled again.
"Last night. As I lay
awake for the umpteenth
hour in the last month,
struggling with my deed, I
became aware of a faint
rasping noise. Lake scratching, but softer, like a tree
bough on a window, or raindrops on a tin roof. I got up,
found a light, and tracked th»
incessant sound around my
apartment. As I approached
the freezer, the sound got
louder, the stench of her
remains grew stronger. I
stood there for a long time,
not wanting to look inside. I
thought about what I had
done, how my marks have
plummetted since I killed her.
I thought about turning
myself in. Then f heaved the
freezer lid open. There on top
eyes open, was Susan's head.
The cellophane I had
wrapped her in was frozen
crisp, and rasped quietly up
and down, up and down,
riding on her breath. She
smiled at me.
"'Murderer'," she said.
Michael's patience was at
an end. "Okay, enough trick
or treat martyrdom, Gabriel.
Everyone has bad exams,
man. You don't have to make
up psychotic excuses for
them."
"Don't sweat it, though,"
Tom encouraged. "Ifyou
flunk out of med school, you
can always give Stephen King
some competition."
Georgie didn't say anything for a long time. His eyes
bulged slightly, and he
cowered behind his beer mug,
gripping it with colorless
knuckles. "What are you
going to do?" he finally stammered. "What are you going
to do with the head?"
Gabriel retrieved his
track bag from beneath his
seat and set it on the table
between them.
"You tell me," he said.
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Page 12
THE UBYSSEY
October 30,1987

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