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The Ubyssey Feb 18, 1969

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Array Vol. L, No. 44 VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 1969
Respite
Three days from today, we'll all be away, for
a whooppee holiday. Dear readers don't pray,
there's just no damn way, The Ubyssey will lay, in
the doorways that day. After meeting today, the
staff will away, and study for a change. §
What your BA's worth to them
by ERIK BRYNJOLFSSON
"I'm here to get an education."
That's an arts student speaking, of course.
Most students in other faculties are here
for a future in some profession. But the
arts student who believes that the bachelor
of arts degree is a guaranteed ticket to a good
job has been misled.
Of the 250 grads from 1967 registered
at the downtown office of Canada (Manpower,
175 are arts grads. That's 70 per cent of the
, unemployed. Yet the arts faculty usually
makes up 25 per cent of the total grad class
at UBC.
Only 13 per cent of the university graduates
employed by three of B.C.'s largest employers
are arts grads.
I surveyed the arts students in my first and
second  year  courses   and   only  one   student
out of 15 said she felt liberal arts education
would be of use in a future career.
"I'm going to be an English professor," she said.
All 15 agreed they would have to continue
at the university to make their education
worthwhile for future employment. A
survey of the grad class of 1964
by the UBC office of student services showed
that 25 per cent of the class went into grad
studies; 33 per cent entered a professional
training school;   13  per  cent joined
the ranks of the unemployed, world travellers,
-.or housewives; and only 29 per cent
managed to find jobs following graduation.
"BA gets you nowhere"
There   are   probably  about   20*  BA's  registered
in Vancouver's business schools, (training
for secretarial work, interior decorating, etc.)
I could get only an estimate from the
.receptionists at the schools and a comment
that  "the  BA gets  you nowhere."
At one school I was told that five students
held arts degrees, but more had dropped
out of university arts programs early
to take business training.
Although many students are aware
of the lack of opportunities for the arts
grad, some students and even employers
believe that there must be a future for
an "educated" person.
In a questionnaire I sent to major B.C.
employers, I asked what course a student
should take in university if his end is gainful
employment.
One of the answers (which fairly represents the
opinion of the other firms) was:
"He should try to accommodate his education
with his own nature rather than with
an employment opportunity which an
employer might have in four or five years."
The unemployed arts graduate has
a  different  idea.
"Students go through arts not knowing
what they want and then they graduate
still not knowing what they want"
Last week I met a UBC '68 grad who
had just taken a menial job at the university
("A person's got to eat").
I refer to her in this story as Mary.
She asked me not to give her name
because she didn't want to appear
ungrateful for the job she was given.
"But I know of others who have been
forced by the unemployement problem to
take this kind of job, and I wanted
to call attention to the situation," she said.
The  only other job  she's had since  graduation
was at the post office during a Christmas
rush for $1.25  an hour.
"The  story  that  there  are  lots  of jobs
around if only you're willing to work
to get one is a myth," she said.
"Just look how many graduates there
are who are unemployed."
She criticized the idea that students
should study what they want rather
than what they think an employer
would want them to study.
"Students go through arts not knowing
what they want and then they graduate
still not knowing what they want.
This leads directly to unemployment," she said.
Often, the degree is a hindrance to the
job seeker. There are many jobs that
don't require a university degree, but employers
are hesitant about hiring a graduate
to  take them.
Brian Bagley, a personnel manager for B.C.
Telephone Co. Ltd., hold me his company
doesn't want to give a person a job that
doesn't offer enough challenge.
"We want to put our employees into
the jobs that suit them the best," he said.
"They have another reason as well," said
Mary. "One employer told me he knew
I wouldn't be satisfied with the pay and
the work, and when I found something better
I would quit."
"What he didn't realize is that it's not likely
that there will be something better," she said.
Mary worked in a factory before coming
to university.
"I thought that a university education
would help me find a career," she said.
"Now the Manpower people tell me
that if I'm lucky, they might be able to
get  me  a  job  back  in  the  old factory."
There's one thing about her job at the
university  that   gives  Mary  a  little
bit  of comfort.
"Before I got this job I was starting to
wonder whether or not there was something
wrong with me," she said. "But when I found out
there were others in the same boat I
realized  there  may be  something wrong
with the system."
'The situation is getting desperate"
Mary is thinking of getting together all
the people at the university who are
in the  same  situation  to  see  what they
can do about the problem.
"If we  can  call  attention  to  the problem
and explode some of the myths about a
university education, or even if all we can
do is let others know they're not
alone, it should be worth it," she said .
"The situation is getting desperate,"
she said. "In another two months there
will be another graduating class of
over 900 arts students."
Gambler loses shirt;
gamblers lose tables
By NATE SMITH
Ubyssey Academic Reporter
Shrouded in cigarette smoke, the players intensely study
the cards, place their bets and stare each other down in the
' finest Mississippi riverboat tradition.
No, Diamond Lil, that isn't the back room of Irving's candy
store or even the front room of the Sands in Las Vegas. It is,
or was, the SUB games area.
Incensed at the sums of money changing hands in our
luxurious office building cum casino, the SUB management
committee took decisive action last week.
They removed the tables.
Co-ordinator Rod Ramage said Monday gambling was only
one reason for the action. "The people using the tables
consistently showed no respect for the surroundings," he said,
referring to the wide assortment of coffee stains and cigarette
*burns on walls, carpets and tables.
Ramage said gambling, which is expressly forbidden in the
SUB rules and the Alma Mater Society constitution, was
prevelant in the basement games area. "We couldn't stop it
because there was no money on the tables," Ramage said. "All
we could do is make them find somewhere else to play."
One habitue "of the card room reported that an
unfortunate soul lost $400 in a game last week.
~*       The removal of the tables is not the end of the matter. An
unidentified bridge player, unwilling to suffer for the
transgressions of the poker sharks ("a lesser breed of card
players"), liberated one table from another part of the building
LjWonday morning.
STUBBORN CARDSHARKS just keep on doling out the marked cards and raking in the
clams even though SUBureaucrats have taken away their tables. Do they care? "We're
gonna stick around down here and set up our own ruddy tables/'said one dirty dealer.
"And tahell with them rules about hiding money anymore. As long as I make a profit
everyone benefits-anyway . . . we got that learned  to us in economics, ya know." Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 18, 1969
U.S. deserters  dumped
OTTAWA (CUP)—Canadian immigration
officials are refusing landed immigrant
status to American armed forces deserters
despite an immigration department policy
that deserters and draft evaders are to be
treated no differently than other immigrants.
The border discrimination was discovered
Saturday when five York University students
were turned away from four separate border
crossing after they impersonated American
air force deserters.
The ruse, which kept immigration
minister Allan MacEachen's phones busy all
Monday, clearly showed that border guards
were violating two precepts of Canadian
immigration policy. First, they were not
treated as normal immigrants. Also, border
officials transmitted the information that
they were "deserters" to their American
counterparts—a practice expressly forbidden
by the immigration department.
DISCRETION  ALLOWED
In response to a question in the House
of Commons Thursday, MacEachen said
immigration officials are allowed "certain
Elections approach
in arts, commerce
The faculty of arts and the faculty of
commerce undergrad societies are bracing
themselves for election-time.
Running furiously for arts undergraduate
society are Dick Betts, arts 2, Robert
Spence, arts 2, and Craig Meridith, arts 3..
Running for vice-president are Nick Orchard
and Bret Smiley, both arts 1.
Linda King, arts 2, is the only nominee
so far for treasurer. No nominations have
been received for secretary.
The election is Feb. 28, and nominations
close Wednesday. Nominations should be
forwarded to Box 57, SUB.
The commerce undergrad society will elect
a president today and tomorrow. Nominated
are Brent Bitz, comm. 3, and Barry
Milavsky, comm. 3. A second election for
first vice-president, second vice-president,
external affairs, secretary, treasurer, and
sports representative will start Feb. 28.
Nominations for these positions can be
forwarded to Jim Swanson at the Comm. US
offices.
* Straight's trial
hot excitement
A Vancouver magistrate's court,
John Lexton and the Georgia Straight
obscenity trial combined to produce one
of the hottest show's in town this week.
Appearing for the defense, Laxton
read extensive, and explicit, sections of
Lady Chatterly's Lover to support his
contention that the Straight's Acidman
cartoon was not obscene when judged
>    by contemporary standards.
* He claimed that publications such as
Playboy and Esquire were at least as
frank about sex as Acidman and that
these publications were sold on almost
every newsstand in the city
There cannot be two community
standards, he said, one for Playboy
and similar publications, and the other
for the Georgia Straight.
He said community standards are
based on what people actually read
and that the Straight, and the Acidman
cartoon, clearly fall within contemporary standards.
The prosecutor argued that the case
should be judged strictly on its own
merit and in accordance with the
obscenity laws. He said the magistrate
should not consider other publications,
just the Sla-aight.
"Playboy is not on trial here," he
stated.
Magistrate Darrell Jones reserved
s    until Wednesday his decision in the
'<►**■•«
xx-
discretion" in dealing with deserters who
apply for landed immigrant status.
The five planned their sortie carefully
for two weeks.  They showed up at different
border stations bearing photostats of
identification papers of a legitimate deserter
now living in Canada, William John Hentzel-
man. They had draft cards, certificates of
future employment in Canada, Canadian
letters of reference—in short, all that would
establish that they were deserters and that
they had sufficient qualifications under the
immigration law to allow them landed
immigrant status.
'DOESN'T APPLY'
All of this despite a statement in
Parliament, July 12, 1967, by John Monroe,
then parliamentary secretary to the minister
of immigration, who said: "An individual's
status with regard to compulsory military
service in his own country has no bearing
upon his admissibility to Canada, either as
an immigrant or as a visitor. Nor is he
subject to removal from Canada because of
unfulfilled military obligations in his country
of citizenship."
MacEachen said the new guidelines did
not apply to draft evaders.
The point test, which requires potential
immigrants to score at least 50, in each of
the five cases added to more than 65. Points
are distributed for items like amount of
money, languages spoken, job guarantees,
recommendations, educational background.
TAKES DIM VIEW
MacEachen said Sunday he took "a dim
view of the impersonation tactics" used by
the students but confirmed his department
was investigating why nearly all deserters
were turned away at the border.   He said his
department hopes to make it easier for
deserters to get into the country.
The five students charged official
directives were the reason for their rejection.
Three said they met sympathetic border
officials who turned them away because
they had been instructed to, not because of
a personal view of deserters.
One of the students, Chris Wilson, was
asked immediately what his draft status was
and when he informed the official he was a
deserter, was told there was "no way" he
could get in and not to bother applying.
GIVEN RUN-AROUND
The others were given similar run-a-
rounds though two were rejected after
hasty conferences between border officials
and their superiors.
One was told: "So you're on the run, we
can't let you in."
And when they were rejected, all were
immediately seized by American immigration
officials who already knew they were
deserters. Apparently, they were told that by
the Canadian people.
The immigration department requires the
Canadian border to inform its American
counterpart of a rejection of immigrant
status but it is not permitted to explain the
circumstances.
All five had destroyed their American
documents before returning to the American
side but the border guards called them by
the name on the American draft card and
knew the circumstances of their return. One,
Graham Muir was refused his right of
attorney by the Americans.
'UNDER INSTRUCTIONS'
Muir had earlier been told he was
rejected because "there's a difference
between evaders and deserters. We're under
instructions not to let deserters in."
All were threatened with arrest until
they were able to substantiate their claim
to being Canadian citizens. They were
hassled for at least a half-hour and
threatened with action by the RCMP when
they returned to Canada.
The border crossings involved were
Windsor, Queenston, Niagra Falls and
Buffalo.
Part of the problem is an agreement
among all NATO members (Canada is still a
member of NATO) that no deserters from
fellow members countries' armed forces
would be allowed to emigrate to any of the
others. And since Canada does not allow
extradition for desertion, the government is
apparently not letting deserters in at all.
DEBATE
Resolved That
SOCRED EDUCATION
POLICIES ARE A
DISASTER, NOT A MIRACLE
NDP vs SOCIAL CREDIT
WED. 12:30 BU 100
UBC READING
IMPROVEMENT COURSE
Increase your reading speed,
comprehension, study skills.
V   6 weeks, starts Mar. 10 #2 classes per week
•   Use of Reading  Lab all year,  no  additional  charge
SPECIAL STUDENT RATE $35
NON-STUDENT $55
CONTACT
Extension Dept., East Mall or Phone 228-2181
DAY
M & W
T 8, Th
T & Th
CLASS SCHEDULE
TIME SECTION                   ROOM
3:30 - 5:00 1             119 University Students
3:30 - 5:00 2              119 University Students
5:30-7:00 6              118 University Students
REGISTRATION  FORM
U.B.C.  READING AND STUDY SKILLS COURSE
Students Fee $35
Section
Name  (Mr.  Mrs.  Miss)           —- 	
Surname Given names
Address   Phone	
Student . . .  Faculty  Year 	
Please make cheques payable to The University of British Columbia, and forward together with this form to Education-Extension Department, Van. 8, B.C.
No telephone reservations — your  cheque holds your place  —
NOTICE
TYPEWRITERS
From the Vancouver School Board
now being sold to the Public
WHOLESALE
Late model Smith Corona,
Underwood, Royal and
Remington Standard typewriters in like new condition. Pica and Elite type.
—FULLY RECONDITIONED
—NEW MACHINE
WARRANTY
—NEW PRICE $275 and up
Must Clear — Prices Slashed
New Portables from. . $ 49.50
Recond. Cort's. from . $ 35.00
Standard Models from $ 29.50
Brand New Standards. 20% OH
New Electrics from.. $179.50
Reconditioned IBM's . $174.50
Adding Machines from $ 29.50
Electric Adders from. . $ 59.50
Brand New Adders. . . $ 89.50
Automatic Calculators $149.50
New  Calculators  from $295.00
YOUR CHOICE
Except (Underwood Med.
TM Five, $120.00)
Trade-ins accepted
POLSON TYPEWRITERS
2163 W. 4th LTD. Ph. 731-8322
Open Daily and Saturdays 9-6 (Friday 9-9) Tuesday,   February  18,   1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 3
18,000-ft.road'to prevent erosion
By   JOHN   TWIGG
Vancouver parks board officials George
Puil and Stuart Lefeaux faced the music over
the proposed road around the Point Grey tide-
line at a meeting Monday night, but the music
they heard was mostly sarcastic laughter and
derisive hisses.
Puil and Lefeaux presented the parks board
viewpoint on why such a road was necessary.
The road is in the first stages of construction.
It is to be an extension of the Spanish
Banks road now at beach level, and will
extend roughly 18,000 feet all the way around
to the mouth of the Fraser River. This would
mean virtually all of UBC's virgin beachland
would be encircled by a 200-foot breakwater
and roadway.
PURPOSE TO PREVENT EROSION
The purpose of the road, according to the
parks board, is to prevent erosion of the sandbanks on which the campus sits.
Two studies have been done by Swan Woost-
-   er, a Vancouver-based engineering firm. They
reveal some steps must be taken to prevent
gross erosion of the UBC cliffs.
There are three main causes of erosion
according to the studies — runoff, seepage, and
sea action. Of the three, sea action is by far
the worst. More than 1,200 cubic feet of sand
collapses into the sea every year.
The building of a  breakwater,  announced
-^   in Sept.  1968, was to cost $5 million and include a road.
Puil, at the Monday meeting, said the road
was included in the project "to keep costs
down." "To build a breakwater you have to
carry the fill to the desired spot and by far
the least expensive way is by road."
Also included in the plans are a marina
and rowing course. But the majority of the
150 people at the meeting were worried about
what a road would mean to UBC's beaches.
-=• They are concerned about too many people
crowding the beach and how the road would
alter the ecology of the beach.
QUESTIONS IGNORED
For the most part Puil and Lefeaux seemed
to ignore questions from the floor, or else
answered in a deprecating manner.
Lefeaux started his speech with a reference
to how honored he was to have "three boys"
come down to his office this afternoon.
(Lefeaux  is  a   member   of  UBC's  senate.)
Occasionally Puil and Lefeaux were caught
up on what they had previously said.
Lefeaux said early in the meeting the road
was  necessary because  "we  have  to get cars
to the boat marinas."
*-*- -"^yy
— vitser photo
It was suggested from the floor that a
vertical road be built down the 200-foot cliff
below Totem Park residence to service the
marina and the rest of the breakwater be made
a  walkway.
Lefeaux implied it was impossible from an
engineering point of view to build a road down
the 200-foot cliff. "You have to take a long
swipe at the marina," Lefeaux said.
Then about 20 minutes later someone
asked Puil what his reaction would be if private interests paid for a seawall instead of a
road.
He replied, "I would be happy to see no
road around to the marina."
"How would one get to the marina?" he
was asked from the crowd.
"I'd build a road down the cliff," replied
Puil.
"But you said before a road down 200
feet couldn't be built," replied several audience
members derisively.
Puil sheepishly said, "I think any problem
can be solved — it's a matter of money."
MAIN PROBLEM IS MONEY
So the parks board's main problem is
money.
They can't afford to pay for a sea wall, so
they have to accept free fill from Vancouver
and Point Grey contractors.
"The cost of the Stanley Park sea wall was
approximately $50-$100 per foot," said Lefeaux. "A similar sea wall around Point Grey
would probably be more expensive."
Puil and Lefeaux estimated the project
would take at least two years to complete.
And after that sand would have to be dredged
up to the roadway at a ten degree incline to
avoid erosion of the roadway.
This dredging would create a beach "similar
to Spanish Banks". But when the audience mentioned the dangers to swimming in strong currents, Puil and Lefeaux could only agree and say
they were "looking into the problem".
Regarding   financial   problems,   Puil   said
erosion is a provincial responsibility and the
parks board is trying to get money from the
To Page 7
See: BEACH
*4i
Rosario Beach ■   Hard rules govern at SGWU
weekend open)  CUS regrets destruction
By ROBIN HARGER
As before, this year from Feb. 1© to 21
the Academic Activities Committee of the
AMS will hold its annual symposium at
Rosario Beach, Washington.
The purpose of this symposium is to
draw people who are engaged in the
process which trains them to become
"scientists" together with those who have
paused long enough to question their
existence to the extent that they realize
the implied meaning of the question.
To this end about ninety students and
faculty members will live together in a
place where sea, rock and trees find their
expression in the realization of the mind
comprehending.
The topic under consideration is the
relationship of "values" in respect to that
particular product of human activity known
as "science".
The symposium will take the form of
presentations by a number of invited
speakers followed by discussion and
extension of the ideas.
Why not get involved yourself? The
possibility exists that you might actually
learn something—or, if you know from
whence that which you identify as good
originates, perhaps you could help by
passing it on.
Students $9.00, Faculty $12.00, catering
provided, bring bedding only. Busses leave
SUB at 5:00 p.m. Wednesday.
MONTREAL (CUP) — A hard line on
University security was announced by Sir George
Williams administration  Thursday  night
as the 97 people arrested there Tuesday
were transferred to city jails to wait out the
five day until preliminary hearings.
Students were hit with an emergency
set of seven regulations to  govern the  campus —
and breach of any of them means
suspensions or  expulsion.
They include:
—establishment of the university's right to
check identification  cards of anyone
in the building, unauthorized people will
be   ejected.
—there are to be no "unauthorized
occupations" of space or facilities of the
university.
—no  "unauthorized"  person is to attempt
to stop anyone from access to any of the facilities
of the school.
—there are to be no disruptions of
activities  or  events
—no one is to destroy university property
—there are to be  no  threats of violence
or any violence to "any person"
—there  is to  be no prevention of the
"legitimate movement" of any "authorized
person"
Perry Anderson, target of racial
discrimination   charges,   was reinstated
Wednesday by acting principal Douglass
Burns Clarke. His suspension Monday,
ostensibly for his own protection, was
one action that stiffened faculty
resistance against the students and let to
their rejection of a compromise proposal just
four hours before the violence erupted.
However the reinstatement did not affect
a decision by his department head
to resign in protest.
Dr. C. F. MacLeod announced his
resignation Thursday to protest Anderson's
suspension. Anderson had been suspended
supposedly  for  his  own protection.
The  administration has  not yet  commented
on  the   resignation.
In a press release Friday, the Canadian
Union of Students said they saw the recent events
at Sir George Williams as a tragedy.
CUS  warns it  is  a  mistake to view the
damage done to the computer centre as an
isolated act of destruction rather than as
a final action coming after ten months of
frustration  and   escalating  distrust.
"The University belongs to the people.
Students are no more justified in destroying
the university then is the corporate elite
justified in controlling the university and
subjecting it to  its own minority interests.
"We seek not to destroy the university;
we seek to make the university the
servant of the people, not the servant of the
elite.   We  seek  to use  the   univrsity  to
overcome war, poverty, and racism.
"The tragedy of the problems is
matched by the tragedy of the university's
inability to deal with them and with itself.
The poverty of the institution is revealed
not just by the violence done to property but
also by the violence of racism.
"We regret the destruction at Sir George —
for the University belongs to the people.
We call for the reconstruction of the
University to place it at the service of
the   people." Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February  18,  1969
^       Tear/u/ Tess eats all alone
J  Hg Qp    ^0 ^Mf Q Smf Qkj (j  J By JACK EMBERLY workers and enjoy her noon meal.
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year by the
Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those
of the writer and not of the AMS or the university administration.
Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey also subscribes to the
press services of Pacific Student Press, of which it is a founding member.
Ubyssey News Service supports one foreign correspondent in Pango-
Pango. Authorized second class mail by the Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes
Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 228-2305;
editor, 228-2301; Page Friday, 228-2309; sports, 228-2308; advertising,
228-3977.
FEBRUARY 18,  1969
Benifit dance raises some cash
The Georgia Straight Defence Fund will grow by $130.65
as a result of Monday's benefit dance in SUB, despite a poor
turnout.
Straight managing editor Bob Cummings said donations and
benefits have raised about half of the $1500 necessary to pay a
fine levelled on the paper for criminal libel.
More money is needed. The fine must be paid by March 27,
or the paper will fold.
Further donations can be brought to The Ubyssey office in
SUB or sent to Georgia Straight Defence Fund, 217 Carrall St.,
Vancouver 4.
By JACK EMBERLY
Tess is a secretary on campus. She and
some of her 800 fellow office workers say they
badly need a lunchroom of their own.
Tess (she won't let us use her real name)
says some of her friends often eat in the washrooms to avoid the long student queues at
cafeterias or the loneliness of faculty-staff
lunchrooms.
Tess likes it at UBC. She loves the faculty
and even the students but she's afraid of that
mysterious body, the administration.
"It's nice here, you have lots of extras. You
can stop work and talk. In the big downtown
offices you have to stop at coffee break and
have your 15 minutes.
"The thing that bothers us is we have nowhere to eat our lunch and there is no place
just for office workers where you can go and
talk."
Most office workers (secretaries, stenos, accountants, clerks and machine workers) are
allowed to have lunch between noon and 2 p.m.
Tess says if she can't get away within this
time she must eat in the washrooms.
She would love a centralized lunch building   where   she   can  meet   with   other   office
workers and enjoy her noon meal.
No complaint of Tess' kind has ever been
brought to the attention of Mrs. Ramsay, directors office personnel at the placement building.
She said Tuesday the girls should mass together and make a recommendation to their
respective department heads. The office workers are not unionized.
She thought the idea of having to eat in
washrooms was ridiculous.
"Most buildings have a small lounge of some
sort for the staff. The office workers can go
to the Ponderosa cafe, or SUB, or Hut A7 which
is a staff hut for lunch break.
"Hut A7 isn't the Penthouse but it looks
nice and clean and there's a woman in charge
there who serves coffee, tea and soup.
"I don't think they should need to eat in
washrooms with all the accommodation around.^
If that's the case, we'd like to know about it."
Mrs. Ramsay said it would be difficult to
find a centralized location for all of the 800
office workers on campus.
Tess is an office worker on this campus.
She often finds life lonely here and thinks a
lunch room for staff only would bring her into
contact with her own group. She doesn't like
washrooms as places to eat her lunch.
Academic  week
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir-
One of the most exciting UBC
activities held in previous
years were the occasional out-
of-town week-end symposia.
The annual UBC Academic
Symposium in February was a
landmark in the academic year,
but there were others as well:
Last year as many as half
a dozen such symposia centering around broad themes took
place. They brought together
in a relaxed, informal and intimate atmosphere, away from
the divisions and pressures to
which people are subjected
every day on campus, students
and faculty of varied interests,
playing thereby a vital role
which no on-campus activity
can replace. The symposia were
not necessarily all successful,
but I am sure that those who
participated last year in the
Academic Symposium at Shaw-
nigan Lake in February and
the Education Symposium at
Loon Lake in March will remember how well they were
able to communicate with each
other and enjoy themselves.
One would have thought that
with the world-wide student
revolt of 1968 and all the earth
shaking developments, people
would search for more such
opportunities to meet, discuss
and relate to each other, and
that there would be no shortage of themes. Instead, the reverse has happened: never has
this campus been more dull and
apathetic; not even the annual
Academic Symposium, which
was such a regular feature, has
been held. A few weeks ago
I called up various persons in
the AMS, including David Zirnhelt, to ask whether there was
going to be a symposium or
not: they did not even seem to
know what I was talking about!
Where is the academic activities commission? What's happening? It seems that the AMS
bureaucracy has entombed itself in the SUB pyramid erected to its everlasting glory.
yours sincerely,
RENE GOLDMAN
(Ed. note: Academic symposium will be held this week at
Rosario Beach. Further information from AAC office in
SUB. See story page 3.)
LETTERS TO THE  EDITOR
Ubyssey  lacking?
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir;
I was astounded at the lack
of local coverage and general
lack of news in Friday's paper.
You ask us for more money
and then all we read about is
Sir George Williams University. Either start shitting or get
off the pot.
LEO TOSCANELLI
Irate Taxpayer
Dear Leo:
The trouble is not with us,
but with you. The size of each
paper is determined by how
much we can afford, depending on our advertising income
for each issue and our grant
from the AMS.
We have just hired three students to help us recruit ads,
which have been steadily increasing over the last several
years. But as you know, our
grant from the AMS has been
steadily decreasing for the last
six years.
Last Friday we had enough
money to pay for 16 pages.
Eight of these went to Page
Friday, two to sports, three to
ads (including want-ads), leaving only three for news.
Even though four of our senior staff members were in Winnipeg for the Western Regional
Canadian University Press conference, we still cooked up the
following stuff which was
shelved for later or forever for
lack of space: Reports on three
speeches from arts week; pictures on Valentine's day, the
beach road, and the bed-race;
stories on the bed-race, manpower, and a student trapped
in skimpy attire in a women's
washroom; several CUP news
stories; a 1500-word analysis
of Sir George and five letters
to the editor.
If you want a newspaper,
you're going to have to pay for
it.
We ran the long CUP story
on Sir George Williams because
we thought it was an excellent
story (CUP reporter Elly Al-
boim was the only reporter
allowed in the occupation center and students should know
the  story   from   a   non-Pacific
Press point of view.
We decided not to circulate
a petition and ask for a referendum for a non-discretionary
(not at the discretion of students council) per capita grant
because our chances look better if we ask the treasurer for
a higher discretionery grant
next year.
This does not mean a fee increase for you, Leo, just different allocation of your funds.
The new treasurer is the esteemed Charles (Chuck) Campbell, who is not in first-year
engineering, as we so stupidly
said in Friday's issue, but is a
studly chap in fourth - year
economics.
—Ed.
Poor  show
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir;
I'd like to voice strong disapproval to those parties responsible for the Tuesday, Feb.
11 edition of The Ubyssey for
publishing what appeared to
be a smear campaign against
one of the first slate AMS candidates on the day of advance
polls.
Aside from the fact that I
personally question the facts
by Carey Linde in his article,
I consider it to be pretty dirty
pool when an article like his,
written by a supporter of another candidate, is printed on
the day of open polls.
Further more, I was also
pissed off at The Ubyssey's
poor timing in printing, on
the same day, its claim that
Les Horswill's poster photos
and format were plagiarized.
Such a criticism could quite
easily have been printed in the
previous edition as I'm sure I
recall seeing Horswill's posters
up around campus before then.
In addition to the actual
date of publication, to the extent that whether the aricles
were true or false, printing
them on the last day as was
done didn't give Les Horswill
any chance to answer to what
were serious criti&isms.
In all I think that the whole
mess was a bloody poor display
by a few small minds. I only
hope that its not indicative of
what   we're   to   expect   from
those who benefited from it.
A former Hodge supporter.
Ken Lefever, arts 3
(Ed. note: The responsibility
for publishing the article lies
solely in The Ubyssey. Neither
Hodge nor Linde put any pressure on us lo print the article,
nor were we supporting either
candidate.)
No  more  money
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir;
Most of us, I am certain
would agree to an increase in
the AMS athletic grants if the
money was to be used for activities which are of benefit to
the general body of this university, such as the further development of individual and
intramural programs.
Yet, from available sources
of information it would appear
that the athletic department,
in its wisdom, is not seeking the
additional funds to remedy this
or any other of the intolerable
situations which exist; but
rather only seeks funds to send
a few amateur golfers to sunny
California, or so that some
wrestlers can find other gorillas to compete with in some
distant province.
In short, the physical education department seems more intent upon setting up and maintaining a select group of proficient individuals than it does
upon serving the university.
If we continue for long upon
this path we shall soon even
find Dr. Mullins' beloved Athletic Scholarships in full force
along with all the horrors they
would entail.
This is not to degrade our
athletes for in all fairness to
them they appear to be a very
dedicated group, and seem to
do a lot of for themselves and
for their particular sport; however, until the department accepts its obligations to us poor
slobs who are supporting them;
until "we receive assurances
from them that at least a reasonable portion of the increase
in grants will be spent on the
general welfare; we should
have no alternative except to
refuse any of their requests for
additional sums of money.
STEVEN MORRISON
Non-committee
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir;
On Dec. 5th the chairman
of the Senate Nominations
Committee sent a letter to the
AMS asking them to select students to sit on various senate
committees: Curriculum, New
Programs, etc.
On Dec. 24, Dr. McDowell,
the chairman of the Senate
Nominations Committee received a letter from the president of
the AMS (Dave Zirnhelt) stating that the AMS will select
students for these committees.
On Jan. 10, a notice appeared
in The Ubyssey stating that the
Senate wants students to sit
on various senate committees.
At the following AMS meeting a selections committee was
reluctantly, but jokingly set
up. The councillors thought
this to be of such importance
that they were going to appoint
two absent members; but the
wisdom of Dave Zirnhelt came
through and a selections committee was established. The*-
members were: Dave Zirnhelt,
Tobin Robbins, Jennifer Johnston, and Ken Newcombe.
A meeting of this committee
was to occur that week. It
didn't. In fact it hasn't been
held yet, in spite of the meeting being called almost a
month ago.
Now   it   is   well   over   two.
months since AMS received the
invitation from Senate.
I'm sure that Dr. McDowell
feels that there is lack of student interest concerning such
committees. I would like to
make it clear to Dr. McDowell
and others concerned that students have responded but the
AMS has done nothing. Furthermore, I would like to know
why.
RON  CAMPBELL
EDITORS:
Co-ordinating     Al   Birnie
Managing  ... Bruce  Curtis
News    John  Twigg
City   Alex Volkoff, Peter Ladner
Associate    Paul  Knox
Wire      Irene  Wasllewski
Page Friday   Andrew Horvat
Sports   Jim Maddin ,
Photo       Fred   Cawsey
Ass't News   John Gibbs
Gigantic staff meeting Tuesday noon
to decide on banquet, pins, next Monday's stories, and ponder memoes frmo
God about murmurings from the reporters. Working today were Charlie
Hulton, Nate Smith, Jack Emberly, Paul
Knox, Peter Kennedy, Nick Orchard,
Robin Harger, Hugo Tohelle, Frank
Flynn, Maurice Bridge, Dirk Visser,
Tony Gallagher, Rik Nyland, Tom
Howard, and Ulf Ottho. Tuesday,  February  18,   1969
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
Reaction grows in Montreal
(A letter from Our Generation, a Montreal-based
magazine.)
This is a hurried note on what is happening in
the wake of the events in the last few days. You
cannot imagine the hysteria that grips the city of
Montreal. The mass media have wiped up public
opinion in an unprecented fashion — moment by
moment radio and t.v. (especially private), and the
press report their lamentations on the loss of property in the form of the Sir George computers in a
shockingly hyprocritical manner. Just a few minutes
ago a CBC reporter was interviewing two Sir George
^administrators about 'their 303, and their 409' as if
these were napalmed children in Vietnam. Public
attitudes are not even as refined as those after Watts
or other ghetto 'riots'. All attention is focused on
the student violence and hardly anyone is talking
about the issues or about the role of provocation
of the administration and faculty. There is no
attempt being made to understand the situation.
While commentators work up hatred for student
radicalism over the loss of property, on one has
mentioned the $8000 bill in liquor and food consumed
by the administrators during the 13 day occupation
at the Mont-Royal hotel as they were working out
'a compromise'.
The liberals and reactionaries have joined hands
in this city in the same way as they did after such
events   as   the  murder  of Martin   Luther  King  —
grotesque, self-righteous, sanctimonious revoille.
The most vulgar racism has come to the surface,
on the buses, in the subways, posters at Sir George
calling for "Kill the nigger", "Gas them and hang
them", references in the press to "foreigners", "draft-
dodgers and deserters". The hysteria is not only
against the Sir George action, but against student
radicalism in general. The tide is overwhelming.
Alex Springer would be proud of the mass media.
97 militants were arrested, 49 whites and 41
blacks, (from reports inside the jail, we have been
told that black boys and girls have been separated
from the whites), seven juveniles including French-
Canadian supporters. In an unprecedented move, no
bail has been granted to anyone, 363 charges were
laid, with sentences pending from five years to life
imprisonment.
We have reports from parents today that their
sons and daughters were beaten in the cells, and
they have (the parents) been treated in the most
humiliating manner by the police.
Maximum security by the special security riot
squad rings the court house, and the students have
now been moved, into a penitentiary.
Very cleverly the McGill administration announced on the same day of the Sir George action, the
firing of Marxist lecturer Stan Gray.
Meanwhile the Sir George administration announced that the accused racist Prof. Anderson has
been re-instated and the student newspaper (which
supported the take-over of the Computer Center),
the Georgian, has been suspended.
Your help is vitally needed. Simon Fraser students have already taken the initiative by sending
messages of support. This has received some coverage locally. You must do the same. We enclose a
list  of those arrested.
*Send your position statements to: (a) LA
PRESSE, rue St. Jacques ouest, (b) MONTREAL
STAR, rue St. Jacques ouest, (c) LE DEVOIR, rue
Notre Dame est, (d) MONTREAL GAZETTE, St.
Antoine ouest. Send copies to all the arrested at
their home addresses. Send copies to the OUR GENERATION office for further publicity.
We disagree with the final action of the Sir
George militants, but we wish to generate a wider
understanding why things happened the way they
did, what are the concrete issues and what is the
relevant critique to be made The idea is to have
support petitions which attempt to re-focus the issue
as it should be.
Our task is to analyze, expose, repudiate and
take direct action against the violent institutions that
poison our society at home and find their natural
extension and intensification abroad.
(A petition is being circulated at UBC asking
for support of ihe Sir George students in their
fight to end racism, in the university.)
Ages were
mutilated
By KIM CAMPBELL
On Tuesday of last week I
decided to exercise my franchise (it was getting a little
^flabby) and so I approached a
polling station in SUB and prof-
erred my AMS card so that It
could be punched, thus assuring that I wouldn't vote twice
(a safeguard against too much
exercise).
When my card was returned
to me I almost fainted at the
sight of such mutilation. Where
once the year of my birth had
■been so clearly indicated there
was now a great gaping hole.
"Wench," I cried, "you have
obliterated good old '47  from
,  my  card. How could you do
such a foul and heartless deed?"
"That's -what  it  says in  the
instructions," she replied primly. "So I have to do it."
y Now I will admit quite frankly that I have not been asked
to prove my age in a pub since
I was 18. In fact, now that I
am the ripe old age of almost
- 22, bar waiters have taken to
assisting me to my seat before
the first drink.
But   what   of   those   young,
nubile 21-year-olds whose faces
„ do not have 'character', (i.e.
crows' feet and wrinkles)? For
them, if they voted in this sordid . election, one perfectly
good piece of ID has been
ruined.
Why couldn't the card have
been punched in say, the upper
left-hand corner? For the sec*-
ond slate, the upper right-
hand corner would have sufficed. That would have left
i two virgin corners which could
be used in the by-elections
when those people elected on
the first two slates resign. Having run AMS elections myself,
I know whereof I speak. Card-
punching must be uniform —
nothing more.
■v All I want to know is, who
is responsible for this cruel deflowering? I'd like to give him
a punch. And I don't mean in
\_the AMS card.
-*k       1fc:**fflfci    ?
Great Britain
4k'I*. "Iw° free books on Britain.
^^H^-Jliii-i One, special for students: accommodation,
M^MBHHpi low rates, useful facts. Two, 48 pages
jg,    ¥ r     about Britain. Send to British Travel, PO Box 320,
Terminal A, Toronto, Ontario.
"I
j City
11	
Province Page .6
THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 18, 1969
SMILE!
Have your teeth cleaned, polished and fluoridated by dental
hygiene students at the Faculty of Dentistry on campus at
a modest cost. At the same time you will be instructed in
the proper care of your teeth.
Because of limited facilities il may be necessary to
restrict the number of patients accepted for this treatment. If you are interested, please telephone for a
screening appointment at:
228-3623
or see Miss J. Faulafer in Room 122, John Barfoot McDonald
Building, Faculty of Dentistry.
CARIBBEAN STUDENTS ASSN. PRESENTS
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8:30 p.m. - 1:30 a.m.
Place—
STUDENTS' UNION BUILDING BALLROOM
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Admission $2.00 each-Tickets from I. H. 224-3545
REFRESHMENTS -  50c EACH
BEST COSTUME PRIZES ! I SEE YOU THERE I
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this year it may
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Copyright 1968
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GPANVILLE
Candidates' statements
For external affairs
Fred Buckwold
Fred Buckwold will be a new face in the
AMS.
Active in science, Fred has demonstrated
his capability and revealed the idealism and
dedication to those issues stated in his campaign platform.
The election of Fred Buckwold will add a
reasonable yet progressive voice to council.
Those of us concerned with a better quality
education and a "relevant" student council
will cast our votes for Fred Buckwold for external affairs.
FRANK FLYNN
science 4
There are two main priorities facing next
year's council: making the AMS relevant to
the student body and launching a large-scale
campaign for public support for education.
The AMS can be made relevant through
student involvement. I believe that the elected
officrs should try to maintain the type of stu-
den contact that is attained throughout the
campaign   weeks.
The campaign for support of education
must come about by the co-ordinated activities
of the internal and external affairs officers.
We must first strengthen the existing lines of
communication — radio, TV and the press. We
must also arrange for more contact between
students and the public.
FRED BUCKWOLD
science 2
Mike Doyle
I recently spent a week with Mike Doyle
on the high school visitation tour and found
him very capable and knowledgeable in communicating with students in high schools and
regional colleges. He attended Notre Dame
University in Nelson and has a good grasp of
the many problems facing university students
in this province. I know Mike recognizes the
need for and value of the B.C. Union of Students in improving the quality and scope of
higher education throughout the province.
Mike Doyle will make a competent and effective external affairs officer. I urge you to
support him.
KEITH MOORE
commerce   4
Students!
THESE ARE THE ACTIONS I PROPOSE:
• support for a federal union of students
as a national lobby for:
(a) lower interest rates on loans;
(b) financing for student housing;
(c) lobbying for reduction of student unemployment;
• grassroots communication with the peo.
pie of the province to indicate needs of higher
education including:
a) regional colleges, interior university,
technical institutions;
(b) student voice in academic planning at
all levels;
• student involvement in securing revenue
for the university;
• to support president-elect Fraser Hodge
in his desire for communication both inside and
outside the university.
THIS IS MY DESIRE:
To work in these areas with a constructive
and  realistic  attitude.
I  ask  for your  support.
MICHAEL DOYLE
arts 3
Bob McKee
I support Bob McKee for external affairs
officer because he will provide an opposition
to the clique now controlling the AMS.
His campaign stresses politics since it is
naive to think that the AMS can remain apolitical when university finances are controlled by
political powers.
He believes that socialism is the only alternative to the present system. As external affairs
officer he will support that alternative. On that
basis, I urge you to vote for Bob McKee.
JOHN ANDERSEN
science  2
1. Universal accessibility — no limited enrolment; more universities to provide education
for all who need it.
2. Defend the 114 who fought for a better
educational system in B.C. Keep the cops off
campus.
3. Student-faculty control over the election
of the university president. End big business
control through the board of governors.
4. End the big business Socred government
which fails to meet the social needs of B.C.
working people. Replace with a government
representing the working people, the NDP.
Vote Bob McKee. Vote Socialist.
BOB McKEE '
grad studies
The National Shakespeare
Company presents
TAMING
SkSHREW
One Performance Only
Monday, February 24
8:00 P.M. - OLD AUDITORIUM
UBC Students $1.00-All  Others $2.00
Tickets at - AMS Office in SUB
English Dept. Off ice (4th Floor Buchanan)
- English Dept. Office (4th Floor Buchanan)
- At the Door - Feb. 24
NO RESERVED SEAT LOCATIONS Tuesday, February  18,  1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 7
COUNCIL JOLLIES
Candidates expound to 37
on CUS, communication
By JOHN GIBBS
Ubyssey Council Reporter
Thirty-seven people, including campaign
organizers, turned out to the all candidates
meeting Monday.
The meeting, held at noon in the SUB auditorium was the second slate of the Alma Mater
Society elections, for which all posts but one
have been filled by acclamation.
The three candidates for external affairs
are Mike Doyle, Bob McKee, and Fred Buckwold.
Buckwold called for a public education
program, the reform to CUS to the role of a
co-ordinating and communication body, and
implementation of Carey Linde's constitutional
reforms.
Doyle backed the education program proposed by AMS president-elect Fraser Hodge
and the reform of the Canadian Union of Students to a national union including French-
Canadian colleges. He said if this could not be
done, UBC should lead the way in establishing
an alternative.
McKee, campaigning as a socialist, called
for support of the 114 arrested during last fall's
Simon Fraser University occupation, student-
faculty control of the choosing of the next
university president, and student mobilization
on labor and anti-war drives to unite with
those groups of similar interests.
Doyle, in opposition to McKee and Buckwold, spoke against the occupation of the SFU
administration building calling it an "apolitical
act" in that hasn't solved anything.
"I can't accept in any way physical liberation," he said.
McKee spoke against the public education
program both of his opponents had endorsed
sayng talk was not sufficient. "Pressure is
needed," he said.
"Look what happened to the Back Mac
campaign," he said. "Nothing."
McKee later told The Ubyssey that if
elected his main job would be that of an opposition on council. He said it would be useful
to have diverse opinions among the executive
members.
Divided AMS accepts invite
By JOHN GIBBS
Ubyssey Council Reporter
Divison over prestige and money wracked
the Alma Mater Society students' council
meeting Monday night.
The council was divided over what basis
to receive the board of governors' invitation
to seat four students on a committee of 21
that will advise the board of governors about
a new administration president.
ZIRNHELT  DISSATISFIED
AMS president Dave Zirnhelt said only
three categories should be represented: students, faculty, and the public.
The invitation listed several classifications
of faculty (including senate members and deans)
and the public (BoG and alumni).
"I see no reason for these distinctions," he
said, "when students are classified only once.
"I'd like to protest the way this committee
is set up."
But the vocal council members didn't agree.
Leading the opposition was forestry president
Frank Gregory. "It's time we stopped talking
about pie in the sky student involvement," he
said, "let's get down and get involved."
OFFER ACCEPTED
The AMS in the end passed two motions of
acceptance  and  defeated   one   describing  the
BoG offer as "dubious."
They accepted the offer, with the students
appointed by the AMS executive, and also a
motion directing the president to "inquire about
the rationale" behind the committee.
Council was then divided into jocks and
non-jocks as the UBC athletic committee asked
for AMS endorsation of a referendum on a
proposed athletic fee increase. It would boost
the current $5 athletic fee to $11.
Zirnhelt   said   AMS   priorities  are  rapidly
changing, in response to a charge that the AMS
has been ignoring athletics.
FEE INCREASE  DEBATED
Council was also considering a $3 fee increase proposed by treasurer Donn Aven. The
money would go in equal amounts to a public
relations campaign on the image of students,
additional publications (including three issues
a week and off-campus distribution of The
Ubyssey) and campus activities including student-run housing.
Council decided to send both questions to
a committee to report back by March.
In addition a motion was passed to sponsor
a dance to pay the damages for the faculty
club visit by 2,000 students in October.
Two weeks ago they had turned down all
responsibility for the faculty club schmozzle.
BEACH ROAD
From
provincial government for the proposed break-
..    water.
Vancouver city has a 90-year lease from
the provincial government on all land below
Marine Drive to the low-water mark. The lease
was signed in 1930.
Puil added the marina is a federal and
civic responsibility and that there is federal
legislation saying the federal government will
match any amount put up by the city for such
projects as marinas.
Puil is counting on this to ease the financial
burden of the project.
**,   ALTERNATE PROPOSALS
Several alternate proposals were presented
at the meeting but none were accepted by the
parks board officials.
One tangible proposal was to build a road
just from the Fraser River to the Marina, but
that  idea  was  "too expensive  as  a  sea  wall
would be needed  all the  way to Spanish
-*,   Banks."
Another suggestion involved getting a bulldozer to push fill already at the tide-line into
the shape of a breakwater and forget the road.
Lefeaux agreed this plan was feasible, but
*"   said the thing wrong with it was it didn't include a road. The crowd immediately chorus-
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sed, "but we don't want a road."
The audience was almost unanimously
against construction of a road but the parks
board officials weren't too responsive. Lefeaux
replied to another question with "I realize
the problems, my boy." However, he didn't
convince the audience of that before he and
Puil left.
After they left, chairman Fred Boehm
called a meeting in the same room to discuss
plans for the future.
The main protest the group will voice will
be at the Feb. 25 city council meeting. The
parks board will present its side of the argument at the same meeting.
Boehm and his cohorts hope to obtain the
support of such groups as the B.C. Civil Liberties Association, the B.C. Wildlife Federation
and homeowners' groups. These groups will
not be contacted until this morning.
GATHERING TODAY
Also at 10 a.m. this morning there will be
a gathering at Spanish Banks where construction has already started.
If you want to voice your opinion of the proposed road, contact the Vancouver city parks
board, or show up at city council Feb. 25.
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THE        UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  February  18,   1969
INTERNATIONAL JEWRY MUST BE CONDEMNED FOR
IMPERIALIST WAR-MONGERING AGAINST THE DEMOCRATIC FREEDOM-LOVING PEOPLE OF ARAB NATIONS
DEBATE?
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Will speak on
"EDUCATION IN A CYBERNATED ERA"
at the BAYSHORE INN
Thursday, February 20 at 8:30 p.m.
SPECIAL STUDENT RATE $1.00
Tickets at Door or UBC Extension Dept., East Mall
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TRIED TO PROTECT STUDENTS
Prof jailed in New Orleans
In the early hours of Monday, Jan. 27 UBC
assistant professor A. H. Cayford was arrested in
New Orleans.
Cayford, attending a mathematics convention in
the southern city, attempted to persuade a cop to
stop beating a student who was being arrested.
For this insurrection against the forces of law
and justice, Cayford was busted for resisting arrest and drunk and disorderly conduct, among
other  charges.
The accompanying interview with Dr. Cayford
took place Jan. 29, but was not released until
Friday, pending approval of his lawyer.
Ubyssey: What were you doing in New
Orleans last weekend?
Cayford: I was at a mathematics convention. There were about 5,000 mathematicians
there.
We saw an arrest being made by plain
clothes police on a kid. My view was they
were treating him a little more roughly than
they  really  needed to.
(I realize now that Bourbon Street is a
pretty rough district. It's kind of like a touristy
version of east Hastings.)
We saw this happening and we walked
across the street just as they were putting him
in the back of the patrol car. They had managed to get a hammerlock on him and cuffs
on him and they were slamming the door on
his legs.
Then I said "take it easy, will you" and the
policeman said that I should mind my own
business   and   move   along.
Then I said "Okay, but just kind of take
it easy, will you, it's not that bad" and then
I walked up on the curb.
He said, as I started to walk away, "You
can't stand in the middle of the street in New
Orleans. Move along." So I went over to the
curb. My friends were on the far corner and
he was on the far corner doing something else.
He was dispersing a large crowd of fairly
drunken people who had gathered around.
We were not in any sense drunk. We were
just coming back from Preservation Hall. We
had listened to old time jazz musicians there.
As I walked back to that corner he looked
me in the eye and I looked him in the eye and
stopped for a minute. We just looked at each
other and he said "Okay, that's enough trouble
out of you. Move on along the street."
I started to go and then he said something
like "No, . . . we're going to take you in."
He grabbed me and put me up against the
patrol car. Then I sat in the back of the car.
I was there until they made a rights of arrest
statement to me. They had to send away for
that. Then he took my ID and wanted to see
my licences and where I worked and after
that they put me in the back of the paddy
wagon where this kid was. I talked to him and
discovered he was a second year engineering
student from Kansas State who was blowing
off steam  after  his   exams.
They booked me on $650 bail and him on
$1100 and they came up with all kinds of
charges against me, like resisting arrest, and
speaking obscenely to a police officer and creating a disturbance. Those are the serious ones.
Another one was being drunk in a public place.
For the student they had minor battery.
Two mathematicians from here tried to get
me out. By the afternoon of the next day they
had persuaded a judge to release me on my
own word. So I was out and I was encouraged
to get a lawyer. That lawyer went into night
court and has both of our trials for the twenty-
first of March for the municipal charges. He
will appear for me if I have to pay a fine.
The state charges will be taken care of
later. He's going to talk to the district attorney
to see if they think they have enough evidence
to prosecute.
Ubyssey: Did you have anything at all to
drink   that  night?
Cayford: We had wine at dinner and some
brandy.  Dinner was about eight.
At eleven we left by cab and went to
Preservation Hall- They don't serve anything
there so we took a beer in with us.
We were there until 12:30 a.m. I was arrested   about   1:30   a.m.
Ubyssey: Are those charges that you gave
us earlier all of the ones being put against
you?
Cayford: I don't know what the situation
will be. I'll have to wait until I'm told.
Ubyssey: Do you have any afterthoughts
about  that  night?
Cayford: There are two sides to this thing.
I can kind of see their side.
There were a lot of drunken college students and lots of people on the street. It's a
tough  district.
They were making an arrest and I didn't
see why. I really had no information on what
had gone on before that.
When I came up and began to talk to him
it was sort of an organized response.
You've organized and focused a lot of
action without really meaning to. With very
little effort suddenly I can, become the leader
or focus of opposition to this policeman's activities. When it's 500 drunks to two policemen I
can see  their point of  view.
He had already had three murders that
night. He was a homicide detective. He said
that the average was about seven a night. Maybe that sort of takes the human goodness out
of your soul.'
Columbia students'
censures scratched
NEW YORK (CUPI) — The discipline committee at Columbia University has ceased all
punishment taken against students involved in
the Columbia revolt last spring.
It ended probation terms and erased censures of individual students.
Though Students for a Democratic Society
hailed the action as "amnesty", one of their
demands during the revolt, the committee said
it was stopping all discipline because of "inconsistent punishment and delay in processing
cases."
Many of the students were subject to the
discipline of the department heads of deans and
the committee said these officials had not acted
consistently. One committee member said "serious inequities" had occurred. The committee
is composed of seven students, seven faculty
members and three administrators.
In addition, the committee ruled that student, now under suspension may re-apply for
the coming session and that evaluation of their
application be based on "the student's conduct
during the period of suspension and his willingness to rejoin the university's community".
This group includes Mark Rudd, SDS chairman and leader of the spring action.
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Papa Bears Medicine Show
Appearing nitely thru Sun.
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would  you  believe,  from  Seattle,
next week:
The Floating Bridge Tuesday,  February  18,   1969
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 9
ARTS  WEEK LECTURES
PANGO PANGO UNS —
Chartreuse, blanque, and pubic-haired blorgs overcame with
' pleasure the threat of an onslaught of commo, pinkie, en-
dippies bearing three metre
gifts.
PAREKH VS. ROWAN
'School not democracy
Are students too ignorant to run a university?
Politics prof Bikhu Parekh says no.
Philosophy prof Bob Rowan says yes, and
"if that sounds ugly, I'm very sorry, but only
the misguided would think it was."
The two squared off Thursday morning at
an arts week debate asking "Does the concept
of democracy apply to universities?"
"To claim that ignorance, goodwill and
energy are enough to administer our complex,
ongoing modern institutions is mistaken,"
Rowan said.
"The university is a school, and a school is
not a democracy."
"If students know enough to answer the
how's why's and what's of teaching, they
shouldn't be here," he said.
He said students come here to be moulded
in a "moral" way, until they eventually reach
the goal of equality by gaining the wisdom,
understanding and appreciation of the faculty.
Parekh agreed "an authoritarian element
is inherent in any type of teaching," but he
argued for student participation in administration in administration and in what he called
"devleopmental spheres."
"At the administrative level, the student
has an important view to convey, an important
interest to protect, and should have a say in all
decisions."
In examining the role of the university
(the development sphere), he said: "If the student has a different perspective and an important insight to convey, there should be a
place where all students can get together with
the   administration  and   faculty."
He added that student involvement at the
level of planning curriculum and hiring and
firing should be minimal.
Rowan said students would only be highly
manipulated and could only do harm if they
became involved in academic decisions because
they lack the ability to judge such things as
the quality of a professor's mind.
'Universities in spotlight'
The biggest thing to happen to universities
in recent years is their shift into the public
spotlight, according to the former president of
Queen's University.
James Corry, who is now dean of law at
McGill University, said the public has moved
from indifference to a widespread and almost
breathless concern with what universities are
doing.
Speaking at one of the "Five Days on the
Idea of a University" talks last week, he said,
"The fall of a sparrow in one of them is frontpage news."
He attributed this change to the number of
students who are now attending universities
compared to numbers in the past. "The universities for a long time rested in a backwater,
touching only the lives of a tiny fraction who
were students," he said.
"With the 1950's when the post-war generation of young people arrived at the doors of
our institutions many things became clear. The
multiplying demand for higher education for
a complex society and the cost of meeting these
demands need no elaboration," he said.
He described universities today as "industries affected by public interest" who have
"joined the scramble at the public trough and
are crowding other ravenous feeders such as
health, welfare and highways."
He warned that universities must show good
reason to stay autonomous to avoid government regulation.
"The universities must meet the collective
needs of the community and not spend time in
quarrelling between different factions on campus," he concluded.
SECRET SEX
'Orgazm' threat to our boys
KINGSTON (CUP) — Soldiers can do It but
but they're not allowed to talk about It.
Last week, cadets at the Royal Military
College here were not allowed to attend a
Queen's University teach-in on sex because
officials feared a breach of security.
The cadets were told by a fourth year deputy wing commander, D. Trousdel, that their
attendance at the teach-in ("Orgazm") would
be considered a breach of military security and
Mimes return
The San Francisco Mime Troupe is coming
back — for a benefit performance for the 114
students arrested at Simon Fraser University.
The group that grossed, goosed and gesticulated here last October under the umbrella of
satiric political humor will perform Saturday
night at 8:30 p.m. in the old auditorium.
The 114 will be appearing in court next
month to face fines of up to $500 and a possible
six months in jail.
Admission to the performances will be
$1.50 for students and $2.50.
would be punishable by "DND charges" (Department of National Defence.)
A DND charge means a permanent entry
on a cadet's record and can have adverse effect
on promotion. Cadets consider it a very serious
threat.
Lieutenant Colonel Pickering, Director of
Cadets and Military Training at the college
said: "Cadets are encouraged to take advantage
of every suitable opportunity to further their
knowledge and broaden their outlook.
"This, however, was not a suitable opportunity," he said, "the reason being that the
nature of the talks and the presence of the
cadets could have been exploited by the press
and other media in such a fashion to bring
embarrassment to the Canadian Armed Forces."
He said lectures on "touchy" subjects were
attended by cadets but behind closed doors on
the grounds of RMC.
Cadet reaction to the ban was generally
passive. "By now we are used to it," said one
cadet. One group of cadets approached Pickering to have the ban lifted but was told that
was out of the question.
Students at the near-by Canadian Army
Staff College and servicemen from the Canadian Forces base Kingston were not forbidden
to attend the teach-in.
Vbur roommate
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THE     UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 18,  1969
STUDENT TRIPPER brought down by a mean road.
Chancellor: a real bumper
For all you speed freaks, Chancellor Boulevard is going to be a bump trip for at least
another month.
Although highway crews are doing minor
patching, no major work can be done until
more crews are available and the base conditions of the road are a little better, according
to a B.C. department of highways official.
Frost boils, not to be confused with boils
or corns of the feet, have caused the road to
crumble under heavy traffic. Not much can be
done until the temperature at night stops dropping below freezing.
The official said another factor in the delay
is the lack of crews.
"The recent slides at Porteau have taken
many of the crews who would normally do
this  work,"   he   said.
BCUS to stage conference,
wont contest B.C. election
The British Columbia Union of Students
decided last weekend to sponsor a "high power
conference" on education next September, including boards of governors, administrators,
faculty, BCUS department of education, supervisors of regional colleges.
This "high" conference is being held to
discuss the recommendations of the Percy Commission on Inter-University Relations.
(The Alma Mater Society sent a brief to
this commission about a week ago, three weeks
before its final report is due.)
The union said communication with government is already at rock bottom, and can only
be improved by such a conference.
BCUS is a federation of student councils
formed by the executives of the eight member
institutions of higher education. They meet
once a month on the different campuses with
the president of the host council as chairman.
It is financed by student funds at the rate of
10 cents a semester; UBC has paid $1800 to
BCUS for this semester.
In a statement issued Sunday the union
said regional colleges must for their own survival  be  able  to  operate efficiently  and  for
this reason must be free from local school
board control.
Referring to the gafaffist at Sir George
Williams University, BCUS said: "There are
legitimate means of redress and we feel they
must be used. If they do not exist or are not
successful, we must create new ones within
the system or stage non-violent protest to obtain public sympathy or to firmly announce
student concern.
"We feel such destruction of property was
unwarranted and it served no purpose as it
alienates students even further from the opposing university bodies and the public at
large."
BCUS also expressed its extreme dissatis-
action with the performance of the academic
commission members from B.C. on the Canadian Commission for Community Colleges."
The BCUS is disappointed with the CCCC
for not listening to student grievences and for
not appointing a student to the commission as
was allowed for.
BCUS intends to be politically active but
it decided against running candidates in the
upcoming provincial election.
HELD OVER!
Hie Connection
A drama of drug addiction
Thurs.-Fri.-Sai.-Sun. 8:30 p.m.
Sunday matinee 2:30 p.m..
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MALCOLM  X
MEMORIAL  MEETING
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U.B.C. v-neck sweaters cut $7.95 30% off
U.B.C. striped sweatshirts slashed $4.95 30% off
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U.B.C. Gym Bags souled $5.95 10% off
Vi yard of ale glasses bargain $1.99 30% off
All regular coffee mugs ..  $.63 & $.37 20% off
Peter Black bags     _     must sell 10% off
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THE     UBYSSEY
Page 11
PANGO-PANGO (UNS) —A
survey of the deizens of this
paradise showed that they want
their national sport on an international competition level.
National sport is cabbage eating.
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Hockey Birds split pair
beat collegiate champions
Given the opportunity of playing any collegiate hockey
team in Canada with the condition that the game is played at
UBC, the Thunderbirds would be odds on favourites to win.
Even though they split the games the Birds showed that
when they are flying they strike fear in the heart of the opposition. This time the victims were the Golden Bears who are the
Western Canada Intercollegiate Athletic Association hockey
champions (and also defending national collegiate champs).
But you can't take anything away from the Alberta club.
They showed why they are the champions as they fought an uphill battle on Saturday to pull off a victory.
In the form of true champions they dominated the overtime
period, had ten shots on goal to the Birds' one, potted one goal
and won a come from behind game 5-4.
In Friday's contest the Birds came out in their usual home
form as they skated, passed well and out-hustled the much surprised Golden Bears.
Mike Darnbrough, playing his best games of the season in
place of the injured Jack Moores, opened the scoring with a
low point shot. Wayne Wiste replied for Edmonton to make it 1-1.
Rookie Joe Petretta and Dwain Biagioni scored in the second
period to make it 3-1.
With Tom Wilkinson off for hooking, Wayne Wiste scored
at the two minute mark of the third period to put Edmonton
back in the game. But the sensational Wayne Schaab scored a
picure goal as he stickhandled past the defence, pulled the goalie
on the short side, skated behind the net and neatly pushed the
puck into the open net.
Schaab scored again as he intercepted a pass an let go a
slap shot that goalie Bob Wolfe didn't even see. Final score 5-2.
On Saturday Edmonton scored first before the Birds' Laurie
Vanzella,  Doug Buchanan,  and Barry Wilcox replied.
Playing a man short Edmonton's Gerry Braunberger came
in on a pair of UBC's defenceman, gave them a beautiful fake
and walked in by himself. Result 3-2.
Starting the final period UBC's Mickey McDowell potted a
UBC wrestlers win
now travel east
rebound to go ahead 4-2.
Again the Bears fought back as Milt Hohol scored from a
quick face-off, setting the stage for the dramatic comeback.
Under intense pressure Edmonton came through with three
quick passes and the puck was in the wide open net.
Alberta finished conference play with a 17-3 record while
UBC is 9-9 with two games remaining this weekend in Saskatoon against the University of Saskatchewan Huskies.
Soccer Birds still flying
at top of their league
The Soccer Birds retained their slim hold on first place in
the Pacific Coast Soccer League with a convincing 3-0 win Sunday over Eintracht at Callister Park.
As it was their first game in two months the Birds didn't get
untracked until the 25 minute mark of the first half when Ash
Valdai scored on a beautiful shot after being set up by Jim
Briggs.
The defence, led by tenacious Barry Sadler who raised his
league-leading shutout total to ten, kept the Birds in the lead
until Tony Mayor's two second-half opportunity goals.
Singled out for good performances, by Coach Joe Johnson,
were Colin Atkinson and John Haar who saved the Birds in
many defensive situations.
The Birds play Firefighters this Saturday at the Thunderbird stadium starting at 2:00. Admission for students is free.
Tracksters steal limelight
In Western Intercollegiate
Canadian Athletic Association
wrestling action over last weekend, held here on campus, two
UBC wrestlers qualified to
compete in the Canadian Championships, to be held in Montreal.
Bob Laycoe had two especially tough fights, his first
match was against Schumm
from Calgary who is a good
but very tough fighter. Bob
won. He then faced a 242
pound  prairie  bruiser  named
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Reg Stroder who according to
wrestling coach Paul Nemeth,
had no moves but lots of
weight, and won in a walk
away  13-3.
Burgener won all his matches
but Nemeth said that he must
improve his techniques if he
wants to win the national championship.
Bob Ormond who was tied
for first place in his 167 pound
category in a desperation move
to win his match, pinned himself, thereby losing any chances
of qualifying.
In 1967 the western conference lost to their eastern
opponents in the team competition, but this year it will be different,    says   Nementh.    "This
see page 12 UBC wrestlers
UBC athletes turned in some
of the best performances at
the recent Achilles International  indoor  track meet.
The UBC "A" and "B" 4x800
meter relay teams did extremely well with the A team winning the event, missing the
Canadian record by a mere 5
seconds.
The "A" teatr composed of
Dave Main, Ken I"lmer, Boh
Tapping and Dave Aune did
not run to their full potential
in their win, so their coach,
Lionel   Pugh   feels   that   they
should have no trouble breaking the Canadian national record when they find suitable
competition.
Other good performances
came from Ken Elmer who
won the novelty, "Devil take
the hindmost", mile. This event
was an 11 lap race were on
each lap after the second, the
last person had to drop out.
Ken completed the course in
4:22.7  seconds.
In women's competition, Pat
Mills easily placed second in
the woman's one mile event.
Intramurals
Due to a lack of funds, and some weather problems, the
intramural program has had to drop its Rugby and Field Hockey
programs.
Volleyball starts Feb. 24 at noon and Soccer will go starting on March 3 again at noon.
Basketball, division one finals will be Monday night Feb.
24 at 7:30 in Memorial gym, with the Engineers meeting Education.
Wrestling has started and Wednesday Feb. 19 competition
will be from 12:30 to 1:30 and that night from 7:00 to 11:00. The
Championship matches will be at noon hours both Monday, Feb.
24 and Tuesday Feb. 25.
Weekend action star
TOM FRAINE
The UBC rugby team has an international
player in their midst and they know it because he always plays solidly
At twenty-three years of age, the guy's
name is Tom Fraine. He weighs in at a T.-ry
tough 170 pounds and has a long history of
important rugby matches behind him.
He has represented Canada in a g,me
against England, he has three times :x-*en
chosen to play on B.C. sides including r,he
game that B.C. played against New Zealand.
He played against the Australian national
team that played and beat a UBC side here
two years ago.
This appears to be his last year, as he
is in his fourth year of commerce, and both
players and fans will be sad to see Sim
leave, not to say anything of his coach.
Tom and his mates easily walked ove*
University of Washington on the week
scoring nineteen points and having .
scored on them.
The team will be leaving for a tor.
Oregon over the mid-term break. They
play both Oregon State University and
University  of  Oregon.
ae
?.d,
ne
of
ill
he Page  12
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 18,  1969
TODAY
PRE-DENTAL   SOC
Dr.    Yorsch    speaks    on    Hynosis   in
Dentistry, Westbrook  100, noon.
PRE-MED   SOC.
Hynosis    and    healing    talk    by    Dr.
Yorsh,   today.   Nominations   for   next
month's executive.
cvc
Chinese Student conference. International House. Tues., 8:00 p.m. All
Chinese   students   welcome.
'tween
classes
KARATE   CLUB
Meeting, 7 p.m.. Ballroom.
SLAVONIC  CIRCLE
Meeting, noon. 105B, SUB.
UBC  FLYING  CLUB
Movie "All Systems Go", noon, room
102 Geology  building.
T-BIRD   MOTORCYCLE   CLUB
Club meeting.  SUB 211, noon.
UBC  LIBERAL CLUB
B.C. Liberal leader Dr. Pat McGeer
speaks in the SUB party room, noon.
Free coffee, doughnuts.
CHINESE   VARSITY
Conference   tonight   8:00  p.m.   at   International   House.   Topic:   "Are   you
disOriental?"
EL   CAFFE
Meeting  Wed.   noon,   Rm.   402,   International   House.   Venite   a   ballare   la
tarrantella.
ONTOLOGY SOCIETY
Ron  Polack   speaks   on  "the   Expert-
ence    of   Real    Sanity",   room   115C.
SUB,   at   12:30.
WEDNESDAY
VARSITY de-MOLAY
Meeting and' refreshments Wednesday
7:30 p.m.   SUB 230.
PRE-LIBRARIAN   SOC.
Tour of Asian Studies Library, meet
at card catalogues. Wednesday, noon.
HILLEL  HOUSE
Theodore Bikel speaks on "Tradition,
tradition",   Wednesday,   noon,   Hillel
House. Adm. 25 cents.
T-BIRD M.C.
Meeting Wednesday. SUB Room 1 to
finalize plans for weekend ride.
SIMS
Party at Cecil Green Mansion. All
meditators welcome. Wednesday, Feb.
You're invited for:
HOLY PANCAKES!
A Cost Supper Sponsored by L. S. M.
TUESDAY (TONIGHT) FEB. 18th
5:30 p.m.
LUTHERAN CAMPUS CENTRE
5885 University Blvd., UBC
B.C. Liberal Leader
PAT McGEER
mm HOT SEAT
SUB PARTY ROOM
YUES. NOON
STAFF PHARMACIST
Modern 750 bed hospital requires
the services of a pharmacist. Responsibilities Include clinical
pharmacy, drug information services, in-patient and out-patient
dispensing, sterile and non-sterile
manufacturing and participation in
educational    programs.
Excellent working conditions in
modern pharmacy and generous
fringe  benefits.
Apply to:
DIRECTOR   of
PHARMACEUTICAL    SERVICES
St.   Joseph's   Hospital,
50 Charlton Ave. E.,
Hamilton 20, Ontario.
lVoVhlttW
of CKNW'S
5 DAY SKI TRIP
Big White
Peter Moloney
Totem Park Residences
and
Joe Mar key
Totem Park Residences
NW/98
See You al Mardi Gras Next Year
0. B. ALLAN ANNUAL
Spring
WATCH SALE!
LADIES' AND MEN'S STYLES
Vi. V» OFF!
A Wide Selection of Ladies' and Men's Models
. . . Some Nationally Advertised Brands
Hurry for Best Selection
Sale Priced from
1800 to 15000
n
REGISTERED JEWELLER, AMERICAN GEM SOCIETY
Granville at Pender Since 1904
19,   7:30   p;m.. No   group   meditations
Thursday.   Daily   meditations  7:30-9:30
a.m., 1:00-5:30 p.m., SUB 213.
ENGINEER US
Campus lovelies are invited to a mixer
with the engineers, Wednesday, 9 to
1 in the SUB ballroom. Only 25 cents.
MISCELLANEOUS
STUDENTS   CLUB   COMMITTEE  —
"THE   PIT"
Watch    for    membership    survey   in
SUB.   The   Pit  is   open  Tuesday   and
Wednesday nights from 4:30 to 11:00.
GERMAN   CLUB
German Club ski trip is cancelled.
ARTS  US
Arts election nominations close this
Wednesday. Send nominations to Box
57, SUB.
COMMERCE US
Seminar. March 1, from 11:30 a.m. to
3:30 p.m. at SUB. $1.00 ticket includes lunch, is available at 8th
floor general  office,  Angus.
UBC Wrestlers
continued from page 11
year the west has a damn good
strong team," he said.
The Championships will be
in Montreal, and in the final
analysis, Nemeth said, "We can
bring home one and possibly
two Canadian Champions this
weekend."
OFFICIAL  NOTICES
Alma  Mater  Society
Elections - Slate 11 - Tomorrow
Elections are your business — PLEASE VOTE.
Conference on Canadian Affairs
Applications are now being received for delegates to
attend this conference on Canadian affairs at the university of Winnipeg from Feb. 27 - March 1. Cost per
delegate will be $20.00. Guest speakers will include:
Gilles Gregoire, Joe Green, Rene Levesque, Jean-Guy
Cardinal.
Application forms to be submitted to A.M.S. secretary,
Room 248 SUB before  12 noon February 19.
Please state qualifications and reasons for interest in
conference.
CLASSIFIED
RATES:  Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75-S, 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00, 3 days $2.50.
Rates for larger ads on request
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and
are payable in advance.
Closing Deadline is 11:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publication Office: 241 STUDENT UNION BUILDING,
UNIVERSITY OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
MOCK DUCK AND SPRING IN
Dance and Concert at Pender Auditorium, 339 W. Pender, Fri. Feb. 21.
9-2.   $1.50. 	
GIRLS! MIXER WITH THE ENGI-
neers Wed. nite, Feb. 19 in S.U.B.
Ballroom 9-1.  Girls only 25c.
Lost  &  Found
13
LOST: ONE GOLD SCHAEFER
Fountain Pen on Tuesday night,
11th. Finder please phone Peter.
224-7696   —   Reward.
LOST: ONE BROWTST FUR HAT.
Wed. afternoon TH. 330 F.W. Theatre. Finder please . . . please phone
738-4416.
Rides   &   Car  Pools
14
RIDE WANTED TO VERNON FOR
one, two or three at mid-term.
Phone  732-8283.
Special  Notices
15
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance premium? If you are age 20
or over you may qualify. Phone
Ted   Elliott.   299-9422.
THE STEPHENSON PAINT SHOW-
ing will be postponed until Fri. 21st
of  Feb.
MOCK DUCK AND SPRING RE-
Revival Dance and Concert at Pen'
der Auditorium, 339 W. Pender. Fri.,
Feb.   21,   9-2.   $1.50.  	
CHINESE DISORIENTAL? COME
discuss the role of the Chinese student. All Chinese welcome. Coffe
and informal discussion. International  House.   8:00  p.m.
NATIONAL SHAKESPEARE COM-
pany: Taming of The Shrew, Feb.
24, 8:00 p.m. Old Auditorium. Students $1.00. Others $2.00. Tickets at
AMS and English Dept. 4th Floor
Buchanan.
Travel Opportunities
16
ARE YOU READY TO PICK-UP
and go mid-term? Get your youth
fare card now and fly half fare, $3.
Good on most airlines in North America. Valid until 22nd birthday. Call
Deirdre for yours. 738-1678 evenings.
GLOBE     TROTTING     BY     MOTOR-
vehlcle.   Interested   males.   731-9542.
TROUBLED BY BALDNESS? FLY,
fly Into the Cosmic Womb. Yea
even Into Chimera. Feb. 21. Bring
your favorite aunt. (Pender Auditorium is really a disguised Venusian
vessel).
Information Wanted
17
WOULD THE PERSON WHO WIT-
nessed the hit-and-run accident In
visitors parking behind Brock on
Thurs. night please phone Fred
Buckwald,   261-7627.
Wanted Misc.
18
STAMP      COLLECTION      WANTED.
Phone 263-6485 after 7 p.m.
AUTOMOTIVE
Automobiles For Sale
21
'51 CHEV. SEIZED UP. PARTS OR
offers. Tires windows etc. Phone
228-8614.   Any   time.	
'62 ACADIAN. EXTRA GOOD CON-
dltion. 6-Standard. $650 or best
offer. Ph. 224-9691, Rm. 2.
52 AUSTIN. EXC. CONDITION.
Runs on fumes. $150. Phone Dave,
224-6431.
FOR SALE 1962 CORVAIR. NEW
clutch. Excellent running condition.
Winter tires.  224-9017.
1939 PLYMOUTH COUPE. RUNS
well, looks great. Original condition.   $300.   Phone   after   5.   874-2996.
Autos Wanted
22 Misc. For Sale—Cont'd
Automobile—Parts
23
Miscellaneous
33
Rentals—Miscellaneous
Scandals
36
37
WILL THE GIRL I EMBRACED
briefly in the Toronto train station
August 29th, '68, please call Patrick
at   298-0926.  Hurry!
DOGS WHO WISH TO INCREASE
only their Reading Speed not accepted into UBC Reading Improvement Program. Extension (228-2181).
TAMING OF THE SHREW BY NA-
tional Shakespeare Company, Monday, Feb. 24, 8:00 p.m., Old Auditorium. Tickets at AMS and English
Dept.
Sewing & Alterations
38
Typewriters-Rental & Rep.
39
RENTAL   SPECIAL
Excellent   &   near   new  typewriters   &
adding   machines   at   low   rates   with
option   to   purchase   avail.
WEST POINT PRINTERS & STNR'S.
4514 W;.  10th Ave. Ph.  224-7818
Typing
40
EXPERT   IBM    SELECTRIC   TYPIST
Experienced essay and thesis typist.
Reasonable   Rates —  TR  4-9253
TYPING—PHONE   731-7511—9:00-5:00
after   6:00,   266-6662.
EXP. TYPING, REAS. RATES,
quick service, from legible drafts.
Phone 738-6829 after 10 a.m. to 10
p.m.	
TYPIST AVAILABLE FOR EFFICI-
ent essays, reports etc., in my
home,   North   Vancouver.   988-7228.
Help  Wanted—Female
51
NUDE    MODELS    WANTED.    WILL
pay.   Call  George  224-7438.
Help Wanted—Male
52
Help Wanted—
Male or Female
53
Work Wanted
INSTRUCTION
54
Music
62
HUGE GUITAR  SALE!
10^.. to 30*54  off most stock.
Classics,   Steelies, Electrics.
BILL   LEWIS   MUSIC
3645   West  Broadway 738-0033
71
FUNKY P.A. AMP 30 WATTS PLUS
two 15-inch speakers. Excellent for
guitar.   Call Dave 263-3010.
'53 METEOR. STAFF PARKING
sticker. 738-8510. Good transportation.   Offers.
SKI BOOTS. LADIES. SIZE 8-9.
used only one season. Like new.
$20.00.   228-8341.
WEIGHTS AND GUITAR FOR SALE.
Details Allan 224-9866. No money.
Excellent condition and 93 lbs. re-
spectively.	
FOR SALE $90. FRAMUS GUITAR
& case etc. Phone Jim 327-7533 after  6.
CANVAS — BURLAP — TOWELS —
remnants. Drapery Material. Western
Company, 3594 W. 4th Ave., 731-
8770.
BIRDCALLS
UBC    STUDENT
TELEPHONE    DIRECTORY
Publications
Office
241—SUB
75c
AND   BOOKSTORE
RENTALS  &  REAL  ESTATE
Rooms
81
REASONABLE ACCOMMODATION
available for two students. Close
UBC.   Call 224-4294.
Room & Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD ON CAMPUS:
$85.00. a month at Delta Upsilon
Fraternity House; Good Foods, short
walk to classes, quiet hours, Phone
228-9389  or 224-9841.
ROOM AND BOARD OR ROOM AND
breakfast in private home in Kitsilano   District.   Call   738-3988.
LIVE ON CAMPUS AT THE DEKE
House. Good meals, good study conditions.   Call  Jamie   224-9691.
Furn.  Houses  &  Apts.
83
FEMALE TO SHARE WITH WOMAN
2 bdrm. apt. in Oakridge. Private
bthrm., kitchen facilities, Pool. Call
AM 1-3900.
YOUNG WOMAN    WORKING    UBC
wants housekeeping   suite.    Phone
Cathy, Rm.  119, Gifford  Hotel.  688-
5451.
Special Classes
Tutoring
63
64
EXCHANGE TUTORING — FREE
Japanese lesson in exchange for
free English lesson. 291-1825 (eves.).
URGENTLY NEEDED—TUTOR FOR
mathematics — certified general
accountant's course. Please call Mr.
Dunlop,  683-0744.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
BOOKS OF INTEREST POR RADI-
cal thinking people include works of
Marx Engels, Lenin, Trotsky, Malcolm "X", Che Guevera, etc. and
many other stimulating books —
periodicals "New Left Review",
"M o n t h 1 y Review", "Guardian"
(U.S.), "Gramma", "Workers' Vanguard", etc. Vanguard Books 1208
Granville.
FURNISHED BASEMENT SUITE
suitable for two students. Male
graduate or fourth year students
preferred.   738-6158.
BUY — SELL — RENT
WITH UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED

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