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The Ubyssey Jan 20, 1987

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Array Special Collections Serial
THE UBYSSEY
^  Vol. LXIX, No. 30
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, January 20,1987
^
228-2301
Marzari blames Socreds for woes
By SVETOZAR KONTIC
The financial problems that beset
both UBC and its students are not
the fault of the administration but
the government, said the NDP post-
secondary education critic Monday.
Darlene Marzari said she was
positive about a meeting with UBC
president David Strangway and
Vancouver Centre MLA Mike Harcourt at UBC Friday.
"We had a general discussion on
where Dr. Strangway thinks UBC is
going. He has a real sense of what's
going on," said Marzari.
"The administration is trying to
wriggle within constraints set up by
an anti-academic government," she
added.
Marzari said watching universities trying to justify themselves as
job training centres is "pathetic."
"It is an aberration. If universities are vocational training centres
we've missed the point," said Marzari.
Her recent student financial
assistance review was not discussed
in the meeting. The report makes
nine detailed recommendations to
the provincial government on how
to aid students better.
Some of the highlights are:
• a return to the grant system
• additional funding and help for
students from outside the lower
mainland
• forgiving outstanding provincial
loans
• freezing and eventually
eliminating tuition fees
• making   sure   students   are   not
denied access to university due to
lack of funds.
Marzari said the current government does not understand the true
meaning of education.
"Funding patterns reflect the
government's desire to have vocational training forces which will
turn us all into servile industry
members," she said.
Marzari said UBC alone is $57
million below what is should be in
funding if normal cost of living increases are calculated.
"Education has been cut
ruthlessly in this province," she
said.
In her report, Marzari points to
the widening gap between the B.C.
rate of participation in post-
secondary education and the national average.
The report concluded that twice
as many young British Columbians
from the interior attend university
in 1975 than in 1986.
In 1975, 11 per cent of students
graduating from grade 12 outside
the lower mainland attended
university. In 1986, that mark
plummeted to a mere five per cent.
The report stressed that less and
less students from outside the lower
mainland are attending university,
cutting themselves off from further
employment opportunities.
Election tainted
By EVELYN JACOB
One of the candidates running in
the student senate elections has filed
a complaint with the Alma Mater
Society elections commissioner,
saying a polling clerk in SUB advised students not to vote for him.
Elections commissioner Michael
Skene said Monday he will meet
with the complainant and officials
from the registrar's office today or
Wednesday to investigate accusations of election irregularities.
Rob Regan has charged that a
polling clerk was overheard Friday
telling two women students to vote
against him.
Regan said he has no solid
evidence confirming the accusations, but said the clerk may have
acted unprofessionally.
"There's no sense in creating a
big fuss," said Regan. "The whole
thing could be wrong . . . but she
(the polling clerk) should at least be
informed that her behaviour was
biased and unprofessional."
Skene said Regan's charges may
be invalid because Regan did not
hear the comments himself, and
that the person who did hear them,
did not hear what was said clearly.
He said the polling clerk is well acquainted with election regulations
and believes she did not act improperly.
Asked to explain the accusation
against her, the polling clerk, who
asked not to be identified, denied
any wrong doing.
She said she overheard two
women at the station saying that
they didn't like Regan, and that
Regan's friend was mistaken in
believing the comments were made
by her.
"1 told them they'd better watch
out who was around ... his friend
heard them saying it, not me."
But Regan said the clerk is claiming he had insulted her in the past,
and said she may have personal
reasons for telling people not to
vote for him.
"I don't want this to seem like a
witch hunt . . .I'm not claiming the
whole university is against me. I just
think the people involved, if found
guilty, should be punished."
Regan said he will withdraw his
protest if he wins the election, or if
he loses by more than 25 votes.
Polling officers work one hour
shifts in which time about 25 ballots
are cast, according to Skene.
"The worst that can happen is
one day's votes (approximately 40)
at that polling station will be invalidated," said Skene.
He added election irregularity
complaints such as over-sized
posters and overspending are not
uncommon.
malcolm pearson photo
ALL YOU CAN do when confronted by beautiful pictures like these is say "Oh Wooooowww!" Pass the Grape
Nuts please.
Former Anglican head endorses di
ent
By RICK HIEBERT
The former head of the Anglican
Church of Canada endorsed the
UBC Board of Governors' plans to
divest UBC's South African tied
holdings after a speech in the SUB
ballroom Friday.
Archbishop Ted Scott, who stepped down as primate of the
Anglican Church last year, said
"Divestment is a way of applying
pressure against the apartheid
system. Yes, we'll have divestment,
yes, we'll have sanctions until the
UBC appoints first woman dean
By SVETOZAR KONTIC
It's taken more than seventy years but UBC finally
has its first woman dean.
Nancy Sheehan, professor of the history of education at the University of Calgary, has been appointed
to the post of dean for the faculty of Education.
Sheehan, who take office on May 1, 1987, is currently associate dean of academic programs for the
faculty of Education at the University of Calgary.
She said she is delighted by her appointment and
doesn't feel added pressure being UBC's first woman
dean, because a fair number of senior administrative
positions have gone to women in other universities
and they have done good jobs.
'' I certainly hope that in 1986 people are judged on
what they accomplish and hot on gender," shi Said.
Sheehan said one of her top priorities is to see that
the new program for the education of teachers,
recently voted in by UBC senate, is properly implemented.
"I want to see the development of a research
oriented faculty. My obligation is to the various
academic fields, but I can't let the professional side
of the faculty down in any way. We must provide the
teachers with ongoing education," she said.
Sheehan said UBC is not unique with its financial
difficulties.
"I don't suppose this is an easy time for any
university. The universities in Alberta are just starting to experience the same types of problems that
B.C. universities have."
Sheehan said the social sciences are an important
part of the education system because teachers are
educated to understand society.
"Teachers have classes with children from different ethnic and religious backgrounds. It is
necessary for teachers to have a technical knowledge
of their specialties as well as knowledge of the human
condition," she said.
June Lythgoe, director of the office for women
students said Sheehan's appointment primarily provides an administrative role model for women,
especially undergraduates.
"She has set a precedent. Women in administration at UBC are no longer a novelty."
Associate education professor Jane Gaskell said
UBC is an institution that has been dominated by
men and that Sheehan's appointment is part of the
slow process of bringing women into the field.
system is changed."
Scott was one of the members of
the Commonwealth's Group of
Eminent Persons that visited South
Africa last year and spoke to many
of the black and white leaders there.
Scott defined the South African
system of apartheid as "a very comprehensive system of racially structured injustice that was instituted
by violence and is maintained by
violence."
Scott said the history of South
Africa, with the slave trade and
radically discriminative legislation
since before the turn of the century
made an "apartheid", or racially
segregative system, inevitable.
The system of apartheid, said
Scott, has made South Africa "a
beautiful, yet tragic country."
"I've never seen a place that is so
completely divided, where the
groups don't understand or appreciate anything about each
other," he said.
Scott added that the dominant
whites in South Africa have
developed "a whole sense of racial
superiority" and that the blacks are
"given no right to be recognized as
human beings," as a result.
Scott said apartheid can best be
overthrown by the use of increased
internal and external pressure. External pressure includes divestment
of South African holdings and
economic sanctions.
"Sanctions would at least be a
very symbolic act — saying to the
(South African) government that
the West wants fundamental
change."
Scott said violence is not the
answer for South Africa. When
asked about Winnie Mandela's
statement that by widespread use of
"necklacing" (burning political opponents to death with gasoline filled
tires) the government could be overthrown, he said he "told Mandela
that that was a very silly
statement." Scott also said that due
to the brutal nature of the South
African system he could understand
why she said what she did.
"Once violence gets unleashed,
then it takes on an impetus of its
own, on both sides," so he and
others were pushing for a
negotiated settlement.
Scott said the government cannot
get away with setting up certain
blacks of their choice as "leaders,"
when men like Nelson Mandela and
Oliver Tambo of the African National Congress are the leaders the
government should be negotiating
with. Page 2
*3\J i"^
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 20, 1987
National anti-apartheid student group forms
By EVELYN JACOB
A North American national student anti-apartheid group was
formed this month at a four-day
conference in Nashville, Tennessee.
The conference, which was held
from Jan. 1-4, was sponsored by a
group of American scholarship
foundations, offers financial
assistance to black South Africans
to study in the United States.
Student representatives from the
African National Congress, the
United Democratic Front, the Black
Consciousness Movement, and
other black South African political
groups attended the conference.
Michael Moeti, a UBC student
who fled South Africa in 1976 during the Soweto uprisings, was one
of   two   black   South   African
students representing Canada at the
conference.
Moeti said the conference was a
milestone in the struggle against the
racist   regime.
"It will send a strong message to
the oppressed of South Africa that
it is important we unite against a
common enemy," he said, noting it
will give confidence to blacks living
in North America who are worried
No breaks for bus fares in sight
By SARAH MOSELY
Not only are there no free rides,
but if the Vancouver Regional
Transit Commission has its way
there will no longer be lower bus
fares for off-peak hours.
The Vancouver Regional Transit1
Commission released a proposal on
January 16 to institute a flat fare
rate during all periods of the day.
This would eliminate the discount
for people travelling during the off-
peak hours through two or three
zones.
Diane Gendron, Public Information Officer for B.C. Transit, said
the proposal was made "in order to
collect the Commission's share of
the operating cost" and "to encourage pre-payment of fares which
makes  for quicker boarding and
avoids fare evasion."
Stephen Scott, executive director
of the Canadian Federation of
Students Pacific Region, said the
CFS has been trying to get a concession for post-secondary students
but their proposals were rejected.
Scott said "bus fares are too high
as they are" and that the proposed
elimination of discounts means
"the cost of being a student is going
up again."
Marg   Fartaczek,   vice-president
of the CFS, agreed with Scott. She
said the proposal will raise "just
another barrier to post-secondary
education" and "will definitely increase the debt load that students
are facing."
UBC studens had mixed reactions
to the proposal. Mike Fahy, Commerce 1, said "they should extend
the discounts to the university
students." Pat Madaisky, Law 2,
said "for the casual riders it
shouldn't really matter."
about in-fighting among South
African blacks.
In spite of the conference's
achievements, it was not free of
problems, according to Moeti. He
criticized the sponsors' motivation
to help black South African
students, saying the scholarships
are part of the Reagan administration's policy of quiet diplomacy.
"The U.S. hopes, through the
program, to bring about a black
middle class in South Africa which
will stall political revolution," said
Moeti. He pointed to the program's
restrictions, which allows students
to obtain only one degree and then
immediately return to South Africa
with little or no skills as a way of
removing those who are active in
the struggle against apartheid
within South Africa.
"We don't consider this charity.
The way the sponsors have gone
about    helping    South    African
students and their restrictions on
studying is questionable."
The network, which already includes over 2,000 members, will
establish regional anti-apartheid
groups in North America and will
work together to address black
South African students grievances
in North America, to organize more
scholarships for students, and to
educate North Americans about
political developments in South
Africa.
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AMS Box Office
AGGIES Office
MBS AWARDS-
WORK STUDY
BULLETIN
The last Work Study drop-in session will
be held Tues., Jan. 20th, from 2:00 to
3:30 p.m. in the Awards Office, GSAB 50.
Any student wishing to secure a position
must present their "Work Study
Authorization" form at the Canada
Employment Centre in Brock Hall before
the end of January. Postings will be taken
down at the close of office hours Jan.
30th and the program will be closed to
further applicants.
.   Awards and Financial Aid • Room SO, General Services Administration Building • Telephone: 228-5111
THE THUNDERBIRD SHOP
SECOND $EME$TER $UPER-DUPER
STARVING STUDENT SIDEWALK SALE
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PRICES SLASHED ON
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DENIM AND WINTER JACKETS
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Sat. 10 a.m.-5:00 p.m
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Accepted Tuesday, January 20, 1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Campus
»• i
calendar curtailed
By ROSS McLAREN
The AMS Programs Committee
can't find concert space on campus.
Concerts have been temporarily
banned in the War Memorial Gymnasium, and SUB ballroom will not
be available for more than two concerts this year because of a student
council policy, says the head of the
Student Administrative Commission.
According to Martin Cocking,
"Student Council's Ad Hoc com
mittee passed a motion in the summer of 1985 that allowed the AMS
Programs Committee a maximum
of four concerts a year in the SUB
ballroom."
The AMS Programs Director,
however, disagreed with Cocking's
interpretation of council's rule.
Bruce Paisley said this year SAC
is denying Programs Committee access to SUB ballroom because "someone on SAC has a grudge against
me."
Salvadorans aided
By DAVID FERMAN
UBC was the final stop yesterday
for a Canadian student touring the
country's universities in order to
gain support for the University of
El Salvador and its student association, the General Association of
Salvadoran University students.
Carole Kinitzki, a graduate student from York University, is coordinating the Canadian University
Students in Solidarity with AGEUS
in English Canada and is pleased
with the support received so far.
"Every student union we've approached has approved us. We've
actually had a fantastic response."
Kinitzki, who was a member of
an international delegation which
visited El Salvador last year, said
the volunteer student organization
is committed to raising funds for
the national university.
AGEUS was started in 1927 in
order to maintain the UES as an
autonomous democratic institution.
On July 30, 1975, the Salvadoran
army and police opened fire on a
peaceful student demonstration.
The day has since been marked as
with the Students of El Salvador.
The government of El Salvador has
attacked the university as a "sanctuary for subversives," and has
come under continuous attack, according to Kinitzki.
On June 26, 1980, over 800
members of a special strike force of
the Salvadoran military stormed the
campus with helicopters and tanks,
killing 23 students and over 60
faculty members. And the plight of
the UES has not improved, according to Kinitzki.
"The repression is more selective
but it is still there," she said.
Because of the earthquake which
destroyed much of what remained
of the university, CUSS-AGEUS
has had to focus its efforts. Donations will go to reconstructing and
providing the university with
laboratory equipment, books, and
scholarships to enable Salvadoran
students to continue studying.
Kinitzki said she is enthused with
the Canadian support.
"These are straightforward humanitarian issues. When students
are killed and student union offices
bombed, you can't deny it is a wor-
the International Day of Solidarity    thy cause," she said.
Chancellor race is on
UBC alumni voting in the
Chancellor elections, face an interesting decision between a onetime Social Credit cabinet minister
and a former UBC student radical.
Leslie Peterson, current chair of
the UBC Board of Governors and
cabinet minister in the provincial
government from 1956-1972 is running against Stan Persky: a
former campus activist currently
teaching political science at
Capilano College.
Both candidates were asked to
outline the problems they might
face as Chancellor, leslie Peterson
declined to give an interview.
Stan Persky is a three-time
Chancellor candidate. He is critical
of past Chancellors who have not
spoken up against government cutbacks.
"It (the Chancellorship) provides
a platform to talk seriously about
education from an independent
position," he said, adding that the
Chancellor is not only an honorary
position, but a practical one as well.
Persky is interested in
establishing a Chancellor's commission to look at post-secondary
education and identified several
problems he sees as priorities facing
the Chancellor.
Persky criticized the overcrowding of undergraduate classes
of UBC.
"For the most part, students are
jammed into amphitheatres — you
might as well put it on
videocassette. Their writing skills
are not improved, there are fewer
essays (being written) and verbal
skills are declining," he said. He
also said first and second year
undergraduate education provided
at any of the colleges is ten times
superior to that of the universities.
"It (university undergraduate
education) is a farce because of
policies of the Board of
Governors," said Persky.
Persky also suggested a system
which   allows   and   encourages
teachers to take a year off.
"Inbreeding is bad for the critical
spirit," said Persky. "Young
teachers are not being brought into
the college and university system.
You can feel the stagnation," he
said.
Persky emphasized the importance of keeping UBC a first rate
research institution and indicated
his interest in saving the library
system for from further cutbacks.
"If you don't have a first class
university library, you don't have a
first class university," he said. "I'd
like to respond in a political way,"
he said.
Private fund raising is not the
answer however, according to Persky.
"The government thinks
everyone ought to share the misery
equally, but education is more important," said Persky.
"Private fund raising is wrong-
headed. It's a public education
system," he said, warning against
the problems of having a small elite
calling the tune in a democratic
system.
Persky said that he'd like to make
the position of Chancellor much
more active than it has been up to
now.
Paisley said that last year, the
motion was not endorsed. "The
rule of allowing only four concerts
was not set in stone, and was only a
recommendation."
Cocking said that, "Programs
Committee doesn't seem to be
aware of Council policy. If the rules
are to be changed, they have to be
changed in council, and that is a
political decision."
Paisley's view, however, is supported by the July 11, 1985 minutes
of the Student Council Ad Hoc
Committee to Evaluate Programs.
Recommendation three of the
committee states that Programs be
allowed to hold a maximum of four
concerts in SUB ballroom. The motion stated that additional concerts
must be approved by SAC on a individual basis.
SAC secretary Don Bobert said
he is opposed to Programs concerts
in SUB ballroom because "more
students will have access to the
ballroom if clubs are given priority
over concerts."
"I personally think that the
bands Bruce Paisley books are not
conducive to getting a wide assortment of UBC students into SUB
ballroom," he said.
UBC students, "are not interested in alternative music," he
added.
Cocking agreed that clubs bring
more people into the ballroom. "In
general, more people show up to a
club-sponsored event than to a Programs event in the ballroom," he
said.
— Jennifer lyall and malcolm pearson photo
THE ENGINEERING UNDERGRAD Faculty won the title of 1986 World Tinkertoy Construction Champions,
beating out numerous American Kindergarten classes, by building this simple construction over Burrard Inlet this
weekend. Said EUS President Robespierre Schmendge "It's amazing what you can do with a semi-trailer full of
Foster's, 3,000 'Geers and 187,000 boxes of Tinkertoys!"
Student aid report aims to educate politicians
By JAMES YOUNG
Canadian University Press
On January 27, B.C. students
will launch a campaign to educate
both provincial and federal politicians on the current inadequacy of
financial aid programs.
"Student representatives are setting up meetings so politicians can
understand the problems with
financial assistance, such as high
debt loads," said Marg Fartaczek,
chair of the Pacific Region of the
Canadian Federation of Students.
The campaign begins with a press
conference announcing the results
of the student aid task force jointly
sponsored by the CFS and the Defend Education Services Coalition,
a lower mainland based group.
Student councils affiliated with
the CFS will then begin meeting
with both federal and provincial
politicians, explaining the 27 page
report, based on two months of
testimony at B.C. colleges and
universities last fall. The report,
which covers over 100 presentations, contains 46 specific recommendations.
Hopefully, this will be the beginning of educating our under-
educated MPs and MLAs," said
Fartaczek.
The student aid task force report,
completed in late December, was
submitted to both Stan Hagen,
minister of advanced education and
job training, and a student aid advisory committee, recently appointed by the ministry.
Fartaczek said educating politicians in private meetings was a
necessary first step before any real
progress could be made on student
aid. She said Social Credit backbenchers elected for the first time in last
fall's provincial election were particularly important to meet.
"If   you   don't   have   a  good
ground-base or common understanding to build on, then you don't get
anywhere," she explained.
Rob Clift, president of the student society at Simon Fraser
University said meetings between
student representatives and elected
politicians would likely take place
in February. Student councils at
both SFU and UBC recently submitted individual reports to the provincial student aid advisory committee. The committee was formed
in the first week of December and
received 50 submissions by its Dec.
31 deadline. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 20, 1987
Superhosts
Universities are an easy target of a government bent on fiscal
restraint. They are an even more likely target given a provincial
cabinet containing few university graduates, and generally intimidated by egg-head, brainy types.
UBC needs an effective lobby with which to counter the
dangerous cutbacks and poor funding which continue to plague
B.C.'s universities. We need the support of a public which
believes universities are important to our province's future, and
that universities bashing is wrong.
As part of a program to increase public support, UBC is hosting
an open house on March 8, 9 and 10.
A hokey idea? Yeah. Bake sales, balloons, a Chinese opera. Our
own Expo. Invite the province.
But a campaign to try to undermine those paranoid, but ever
election-conscious Victoria minds is a great idea. Let's give super
smiles to the masses (we expect 100,000) as they parade across our
campus.
Get involved with your faculty's pavilion. We at The Ubyssey are
going to open our pathetically understaffed, and poorly equipped
office to the roaming hordes. And we couldn't be more excited.
When open house days comes, offer directions, philosophical insights, and cheap drugs to all who visit. Let the public remember a
visit to our happy campus, not Pat McGeer, the next time the
Socreds come slashing.
(eureka /
THE BIRTH OF PSYCHOANALYSIS
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j.&.
Letters
Flaws in degree system honor business success
Below is the text of an open letter
to the President and the Senate of
U.B.C.   regarding  the   matter   of
honorary degrees.
* * »
Although Jim Pattison has
retracted his acceptance of the
honorary degree awarded to him
by the Senate, the issue of why the
degree was ever conferred on him in
the first place still remains.
Many members of the university
community have voiced their opposition to the award: Dr. Jean
Elder resigned from the Senate; individuals criticized the award in letters to The Ubyssey; the Alma
Mater Society, the elected representatives of the student body, voted
almost unanimously to condemn
the granting of the degree. In short,
the Senate chose to honour a man
whose honour is in doubt.
The events of the past few weeks
have brought into question not only
the process by which recipients of
honorary degrees are chosen but,
more importantly, the values which
this university stands for.
We as a university have had to
ask ourselves whether we wish to
honour a man who is the second
largest distributor of pornographic
magazines in Canada (magazines
which contain explicit descriptions
of incest, rape and bestiality),
whose companies have been convicted of violating the obscenity
provisions of the Criminal Code,
who has investments in South
Africa, and whose employment
practices place money over human
values. The answer, from the grass
roots, has been: No, we do not wish
to honour such a man.
The purpose of honorary degrees
should be to honour those individuals whose outstanding
academic, political, cultural or
humanitarian achievements have
enriched society. The degrees
should not be bestowed on an individual simply because of his or
her entrepreneurial skills.
As far as Jim Pattison is concerned, the final story on Expo awaits
the financial reports. Even if Expo
is determined to have been a success, Pattison's contribution was
accompanied by great personal gain
— his companies benefited from
many of the Expo-related contracts.
The bottom line is, why should the
King 's legacy celebrated
Yesterday, January 19, marked
the second official celebration of
the anniversary of Dr. Martin
Luther King Jr.'s birthday.
Although he died almost twenty
years ago his light as a champion of
human rights still shines on. His
quests and victories for social and
economic justice continue to
brighten the horizons for millions
of oppressed people.
As students we should be proud
to know that it was the students of
the 1960s who filled the streets during freedom marches, sang the
songs of social change, and wrote
letters and petitions voicing support
for the advancement of human
rights legislation.
As Jewish students, we remember
Dr.   King's   acute   perception   of
political conflict. In 1968, at an address at Harvard University just
before his assassination he proclaimed that, "When people
criticize Zionism, they mean Jews
. . . You are talking
anti-semitism."
Then, as now, few express such
honesty and clarity in the face of an
overwhelming Arab propaganda
and military campaign attacking
Israel's very right to exist. Yet, we
dream as did King for a better
world. His vision has moved us all
to do more.
Jewish students join hands with
all of God's children in celebrating
the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther
King Jr.
Janna Stark
Network Vancouver rep.
arts 4
THE UBYSSEY
January 20, 1987
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Friday
throughout the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and are not necessarily those
of the administration or the AMS. Member Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is SUB
241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising
228-3977
Long active in the Recreation Vehicle Industry Association (RVIA), David Ferman serves on the
marketing committee and a member of the national RV board of directors. Corrine Bjorge is proud of
her father's accomplishment but states David is a modest man. and he hasn't forgotten where he came
from and the days when he drove a mere car. "Have vou ever met an RVer who wasn't a nice guy?"
prods Ross McLaren. 'No," squeals Mike Groberman, "I haven't." Mike, Sarah Mosley and Svetozar
Kontic handle the hamburger chores on the RV association's monthly picnic to Fort Langley. "It gets
pretty cold 'round January,' says Evelyn Jacob, the chief pancake flipper, "but I flip those cakes and
keep the men happy." Those men include lifelong RVers Peter Burns (Captain East Langley Squad),
James Young (Expo Div.), Roben Benyon and lan Robertson. Proud owner of a beautiful, all fibreglass
Alpenlite RV, Rick Hiebert sums up perfectly, "RVs are beautiful baby." Jennifer Lyall and Malcolm
Pearson smiie sunny, geratric grins in agreement.
mark of someone deserving of
societal respect be success in
business?
Clearly, there are flaws in the
present system which allowed Jim
Pattison to be chosen as the recipient of an honorary degree. We are
pleased that the Senate will be
discussing reforms to the selection
process. We ask the Senate to reevaluate two current practices —
voting on recommended recipients
as a block, rather than individually,
and re-offering an award until it is
finaily accepted.
The first practice suggests a
quota system and creates the obvious  problem  of an  all  or  none
situation. The second practice not
only puts the university in the position of a supplicant but makes it appear that the degree is offered as a
matter of routine.
Ultimately, more than the procedures need to be looked at. The
Senate should set guidelines on the
types of achievements a university
should honour. These guidelines
should reflect the values of a community which has spoken out
against an individual like Jim Pattison.
The Coalition Against
Dishonorary Degrees
Kyong-ae Kim
law 3
Canada needs delayed abortion
In last Friday's Ubyssey, I noticed the announcement that a "pro-
choice" club is forming on campus.
It's interesting to note the names
which the opposing camps in the
abortion controversy have chosen
for themselves. Each uses its own title as a rhetorical weapon ("pro-
life" implying that everyone who
disagrees with them kills people for
fun, while "pro-choice" implies
that the opposing view is held by
fascists).
1 submit that neither side is
against life, and that neither is inherently against choice. Rather, the
dispute originates with our inability
to agree on the point at which a
human life begins. Given a debate
based on such an arbitrary point as
this one, it would appear that the
better option is the more convenient
one; in this case, pro-choice. It was
while considering this that yet a
third option occurred to me. This
one is even more convenient.
Statistically, a certain percentage
of aborted fetuses would have turned out to be brilliant, talented,
athletic and beautiful. These may
not have been so readily rejected,
had their parents been reasonably
certain of their future qualities.
Delayed abortion would eliminate
this waste. Parents would be able to
evaluate the development of the
fetus before having to make the big
decision. Under this plan, the cutoff point would have to be pushed
back a little, of course, defining a
human as anyone who has been out
of the womb for, say, ten years. By
then the parents would have had
plenty of time to appraise the offspring, and could more accurately
determine its potential value to
them and to society. The delayed
abortions could be performed in
sterile clinics, using a painless lethal
injection.
Under a system which is so
backward that delayed abortions
are illegal, parents are forced to
seek them in back alleys, and some
even opt to perform the tack on
their own. Often this involves a
messy and violent struggle which
may even endanger the lives of the
parents, especially if the fetus
manages to snatch the hatchet
away. The fact that delayed abortions are illegal does not reduce the
number that are performed every
day. It only causes them to be more
barbaric and dangerous when they
do take place. So the religious
fanatics, who would undoubtedly
try to stop legalized delayed abor
tion, would actually be promoting
the violent back-alley versions by
seeking the halt of the civilized
method.
As an American, I've been appalled at the number of moral
taboos still surviving in Canadian
society. The establishment of a
"pro-choice" club at UBC is an admirable beginning, but you need to
make a stronger, more consistent
stand. Don't settle for the minor
goal that the "pro-choice" people
in my country have attained. Fight
for the ultimate freedom instead.
Support delayed abortion.
Scott Randal
grad studies
Just waiting on a friend
I feel I must respond personally
to Martin Cocking's letter of last
Friday complaining that he had
been treated unfairly by the
Ubyssey and Tanis Sugden regarding security issues and response to
those issues.
Way back in October the
GLUBC mail box was broken into,
pieces of mail were taken from the
box and slanderous remarks were
written on the envelopes. May 1 remind Mr. Cocking that this is a
federal offence. When I approached the RCMP they, upon learning
the organization's name, told us to
take the matter to the AMS. 1 was
told by Mr. Cocking to write a letter
explaining the situation and he
would distribute it to all workers in
the business and executive offices,
have them sign it, and place it on
the wall for show.
I have yet to see any trace of that
letter that I placed in Mr. Cocking's
hands, and I have since spoken to
two business office workers and one
executive member who say that they
have never been informed of the
issue and were upset that it took
me, months later, to inform them
about it.
By no means do I want to deny
Mr. Cocking of his right to
holidays. Considering when the act
of vandalism took place it is
reasonable that he would not want
to respond until after Christmas.
However, in early January I approached him again about the issue
and he responded by telling me he
was sure the security staff were not
involved and there was nothing else
he could do.
Martin Cocking has never once
approached me about any matter. I
am a fair person and am not hard to
deal with. I have approached him
many times, most recently Friday to
discuss this matter, and am not being kept up to date about the issue.
I'm still waiting.
Scott Beveridge
vice-president
Gavs and Lesbians of I BC Tuesday, January 20, 1987
THE    UBVSSEY
Page 5
Walker's Hong Kong oddity is a riotous delight
By MICHAEL GROBERMAN
"Much of the following borders
on the truth."
From George F. Walker's
Ramona and the White Slaves.
stage
Ramona and the White Slaves
By George F. Walker
Directed by Robert Garfat
Firehall Theatre
until Thursday
Much of the following borders on
the truth.
I was investigating a series of
theatrical murders in Vancouver.
Recoiling from a blood-spattered
Vancouver Playhouse, I knew
where to look next: Dark Horse
Theatre at the Firehall.
Hong Kong. During the war.
George Walker's Ramona and the
White Slaves. Not Walker again. A
double bed nested in a huge wedding veil. A piano. Playing.
Ramona: Play something ironic
for me.
Friedrich: I can't.
Ramona: Then get out.
Blackout.
Where's the fucking plot summary?
Where is the fucking review?
Blackout.
Gloria notices her sister's hand is
missing, replaced by a great, gold
hook.
Gloria: What happened to her
fucking hand?
Ramona: I'm afraid I'm more or
less responsible for the loss of your
sister's hand . . . but I plan to make
it up to her very soon.
.piece theatrical, odd awfully an
to hilarity ironic, black gives direction Garfat's
Jolanta Pyra is Ramona. Mother.
With a Hungarian accent and a
dispassionate interest in the constant murders outside her window.
Her timing's impeccable (though
her accent slips).
Blackout.
Excuse me, does anyone know
what's going on? And my, that's a
lovely set Craig (Duffy).
Mary Scott Watson is Gloria, a
pouty Catholic schoolgirl (in
uniform). Six months in the cellar
(at the bald-headed man's in-
sistance) has mussed her hair. "I
would have combed it in January,
but they took my fork away."
The bald-headed man isn't bald.
And he gave Friedrich legs. Peter
Giaschi's Friedrich stumbles across
the stage on new legs. Then crosses
a busy Hong Kong street.
"Left foot, right foot, left foot,
right foot. He fell. He's crawling."
Blackout.
Rebekah Johnson's lights, un-
predicable,   creating   dreams,
nightmares, raising tension, then
Blackout.
How was Don Thompson? Cool
as Cook. Divine as Mommy.
But what did he think of the
damn play?
Lights up.
Much of the following borders on
the truth.
Endorsement denied
In response to Ian Hunter's letter
on youth sufferage, (Jan. 16) I
would like to clarify some of his errors. Mr. Hunter seeks credibility
for his cause through implying that
the NDP caucus at the Universities
Model   Parliament   seriously   sup
ported his campaign. I would like to
remind him that he was fully aware
that the NDP caucus was willing to
submit his resolution as a "joke"
resolution and that they would only
support it as such. At that time it
was made perfectly clear to Mr.
Hunter, in no uncertain terms that
BEST PRICES IN SIGHT
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FROM
CONTACT LENSES
FROM
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(ordered at the same time)
CHEEPER PEEPERS IN THE VILLAGE
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222-2055
J*-**y\f\
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OMe
TRIATHALON CLINIC
Saturday, January 24
1(k00 a.m.-12:00 p.m.
Rm. 60, Home Ec. Bldg.
Coffee and Snacks will be Served
"CYCLE TO VICTORY"
with guest speaker
KORI SINCLAIR
(National Cycling Team Member  1981-84)
and
TERRY LEWIS
(Third Place Finisher in Penticton
Ironman Competition)
Topics Include: Cycle Tips for
the Novice and the Advanced
{/(BC (fdAOMWUli'!.. ■ fjOi fr0#d  Spotfj I
/
this was not any indication of endorsement for his cause.
I would suggest that if Mr.
Hunter seeks credibility for his
cause, that he do so in a credible
manlier, without implying the endorsement of groups which clearly
state that they do not support his
particular obsession.
Freyja Bergthorson
president UBC NDP
Vanessa Geary
vice-president UBC NDP
Joan Young
editor, Grassroots
Lionel Yip
law 1
Ruth Picha
law 2
Robbie Fleming
arts 4
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HONG KONG
CHINESE FOODS
OtWk    JmWk     (SI
^^j-yy A 2630 Sasamat St.
ImL^M <at 10th Ave.)
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Best Quality & Prices
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0 LARGE PIZZAS $17.95
ta 3 Toppings of your choice    A #
FEATURING Montreal Style
1 /V5VV T0PP,NU  Smoked Beef
FREE 26 oz. Pop with any order over $9.00
224-3333, 224-2625, 224-2417
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OPEN HOURS:
Mon.-Fri.    11:00 a.m.-10:00 p.m.
Sat., Sun. & Holidays   4:00-9 p.m.
5732 University Blvd.
(in The Village)
v       Phone: 224-1313      >
You won't get to graduation
without one.
Buy it. Or rent it
by the week or month.
33
BUSINESS
MACHINES
The more choice store. Now at 1250 West 6th. 736-9111
BRAND NAME RIBBONS & SUPPLIES *»0PEN SAT»WE DELIVER
UBC BOOKSTORE
WED., JAN. 28th 8:30 a.m. - 8:30 p.m.
ONE DAY ONLY
%
OFF
ALL STAEDTLER PRODUCTS
BOOKSTORE
6200 University Boulevard 228-4741 Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 20, 1987
tween dosses
mecti
TODAY
PRE MEDICAL SOCIETY
Lecture on "Vascular Surgery," guest speaker
Dr. Litherland, noon-1:20 p.m.. Wood #1.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Intermediate Cantonese class, noon, Buch B32S.
JEWISH STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Hot lunch, Hillel House, 12:00-2:00 p.m.
UNITED CHURCH CAMPUS MINISTRY
Informal worship, all welcome, noon, Lutheran
Campus Centre.
SUBFILMS
Laurence Olivier In  "Othello," 12:40 and 7:00
p.m., SUB auditorium.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
Anson's Amiga Activists, regular meeting, noon,
SUB 111.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
All invited to the Warren  Fong show,  seats
available for IBM people, noon, SUB 205.
WEDNESDAY
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
Atari "comeback" meeting. All Atari uses show
your support. 4:30 p.m., SUB 212A.
INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS AND POLITICAL
SCIENCE QRAD COMMITTEE
Bake Sale,  11:30-2:30 p.m., SUB main concourse.
UBC SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Wednesday noon hour concert, James Manson,
piano, noon. Recital hall, music building.
UNITED CHURCH CAMPUS MINISTRY
Potluck dinner and diacuasion, all welcome, 6:00
p.m,., Lutheran Campus Centre.
UBC ENTREPRENEURS CLUB
General  meeting,  second  term,   noon,   Angus
425.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Beginner's Mandarin class, noon, Buch B325
CINEMA 16
(UBC Films Society!
"Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man," 7:00
and 9:30 p.m., UBC SUB Auditorium.
hot flash
A play. A free play. Called
Hopscotch. At Hut M-24 (by the
Kenney building). Today and
tomorrow, at noon.
The NASA gift shop is back,
complete with amateur astronomer
Jim Bernath, and for three days only: tomorrow through Friday in the
SUB concourse. And check out the
collection of space junk, including
spent fuel containers from Russian
satellites and a tile from the space
shuttle. Don't miss it.
STUDENTS FOR CHOICE
Organizational meeting, noon, SUB 205.
UNITED CHURCH CAMPUS MINISTRY
Potluck dinner and discussion, all welcome, 6:00
p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL OF UBC
Letter writing group — non-members welcome,
noon, SUB 212A.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Bible study and fellowship, 7:00 p.m., 1868 Knox
Road.
POLITICAL SCIENCE STUDENTS'
ASSOCIATION
General meeting, noon, Buch D205.
THE UBYSSEY
Staff meeting, new members welcome, noon,
SUB 241K.
THUNDERBIRD RUGBY
Top quality McKechnie Cup rugby action v. Vancouver Reps, 8:00 p.m., Thunderbird Stadium.
THURSDAY
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
Apple appreciation day, sponsored by William
Chow, noon-l:30 p.m., SUB 213.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
Computer expert Donald speaks on how to protect oneself from harmful X-rays emitted by
Commodore computers, noon-1:30 p.m., Buch
B319
PHILOSOPHY STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Philosophic conversation, 7:00 p.m., Upstairs
Lounge, International House.
AMS INTEGRITY IN ACTION CLUB
A talk given by Grant Clarke, "Cosmic Identity
and Practical Living," noon-1:20, Buch 225.
PRE-MEDICAL SOCIETY
Field trip to the Cancer Control Agency,
noon-2:X p.m., meet at room G-30 (Wood.).
THE BEST
THINGS
IN LIFE
ARE FREE
Staplers, paper cutters, hole
punches, tape, white-out, glue
sticks, paper clips and a large,
well-organized workspace.
kinko's
Crest coptos. Great people.
5706 University Blvd.
222-1688
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Beginner's Cantonese Club, noon, Buch B325.
PEOPLES FRONT
Meeting to oppose the politics of assassination
in India. Speaker is Charles Boylan of People's
Front, noon, Buch B220.
JEWISH STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
"Close Encounters of the Intermarriage Kind,"
noon, Hillel House.
NEWMAN CLUB
Discussion: "A Christian Perspective on Friendship," noon, St. Mark's College, Music Room.
PRE DENTAL CLUB
Tour of UBC Dental Clinic, noon, meet at Wood
5 or go directly to clinic writing area.
SUBFILMS
"The Gods Must Be Crazy," 7:00 p.m.. The Fly,
9:30 p.m., SUB Auditorium.
UBC ARCHERY CLUB
Regular practice, 6:30 p.m., SUB ballroom.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Club meeting, noon. Brock 304.
THUNDERBIRD GYMNASTICS
UBC women play host to Spokane Community
College in a dual meet — spectators welcome,
6:00 p.m., Osborne Centre Gymnastics Gym
(near tennis bubble).
INTERVARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
General meeting, all welcome, noon, Chem 250.
FRIDAY
DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE
Public lecture, noon, Buch B320.
POLITICAL SCIENCE STUDENTS'
ASSOCIATION AND INTERNATIONAL
STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
"The Deadly Game of Nations: The Arab Israeli
Conflict," a Gwyn Dyer film, followed by a
discussion with Professor Keren, noon, Buch
B314.
FOR DELICIOUS
SANDWICHES
with Daily Specials
Also
SOUP
SALADS
PIES & PASTRIES
IN SUB LOWER LEVEL
Open daily 7:30 a.m. 5:30 p.m.
fo* -STUDENT, wsewwr
TFRZBMccaL Dfi/viRY   I
Western FUToH ^a-fel'
LAST DAY TO RETURN
YOUR WINTER SESSION
TEXTBOOKS IS...
UBC BOOKSTORE RETURN POLICY
Course Books - Sessional course books may be returned (accompanied by original receipt)
for full refund any time up to JANUARY 31, 1987 for WINTER SESSION TEXTBOOKS. After
this deadline all course books will be NON-RETURNABLE.
Books must be unmarked and in saleable-as-new condition.
REMEMBER TO KEEP YOUR SALES RECEIPT.
NO RECEIPT - NO REFUND - NO EXCEPTIONS
BOOKSTORE
MnWA&-^i
K<d-c, 8./.V- jwoui rio*'
Pr.Victors fijjfed.
~ISP-
r* i
I
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-**•?«-
ft \
V
^
CLOSE ENCOUNTERS
OF THE
INTERMARRIAGE KIND
SESSION I: MIXED MARRIAGE,
INTERMARRIAGE AND CONVERSION
Jewish Concerns and Modern Needs
Guest Speaker: Marilee Segal
of Jewish Family Service Agency
Thursday, Jan. 22
12:30
HILLEL HOUSE
Remember, hot lunches are available every Tuesday,
Wednesday and Thursday,  12-2:00 p.m.
\
»^\*N    ±*    x^»-
N
\
i>
THE CLASSIFIEDS
| RATES: AMS Card Holders-3 lines, 1 day $2.75; additional!
lines, 60c Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.75, addi
tional lines,  .70c. Additional days, $4.25. and  .65c.
| Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a. m. the day \
before publication.
Publications Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $10.00. Call 228-3977.
COMING EVENTS
75 - WANTED
FOOD IRRADIATION - A PUBLIC HEALTH
CONCERN? A forum sponsored by Agora
Food Coop. Sun. Jan. 25, 7 p.m. 17th Ef
Dunbar. For further info call Greg 731 -0894.
BUST LOOSE!
to Mexico
Come celebrate the end
of final exams I
1 week from $499.
2 weeks from $599.
434-1279
JAPANESE-ENGLISH translators required
by international consulting company on
project basis. Send resume (mail replies only) to: Attn: Mr. B. Konar, 821-810 W.
Broadway, Vancouver, B.C. V5Z 4C9.
11
FOR SALE - Private
NEAR NEW H.P. 12-C calculator $135 OBO.
Texas Inst. B/A II calculator $30. 641-4645
weekday mornings.
HOME  STEREO  SYSTEM  FOR  SALE   -
Pioneer receiver, Eds speakers, AGS turntable, $175. Call 224-4049.
1975 MERCURY BOBCAT station wagon.
78,000 mi., one owner, good running
cond., $700 or offers. 987-6035 eves.
'66 DODGE CORONET, 318 V-8, automatic,
well-maintained, runs great. $600 OBO.
224-5209.
20 - HOUSING
1 BR. in 6 br. in shared house in Kerrisdale
to rem now 'til April 30. $267/mth. Call
261-2368.
41st & SELKIRK. Female share 3 bedroom,
2 bathroom house. On 41st bus route to
UBC. $185. 266-2636. (Tom).
25 - INSTRUCTION
INTENSIVE HANDS-ON instruction in word
processing (WordPerfect, WordStar,
Word). 2 per class. Wordpower 222-2661.
PIANO LESSONS by graduate of Juilliard
School of Music. Morning &■ early afternoon lessons arranged at your home.
321-4809.
30 - JOBS
LIVE-IN BABYSITTER req. for after school
& some eves. 2 children, 1 with special
needs. Self-contained Kits suite. Refs. req.
Deborah, 738-6582.
WEEKEND WORK leading to approx. 30
hrs./wk. after exams. Person is needed to
sell & accept some managerial responsibilities. Lady sporting goods shop located
on 4th Ave. near Alma. Phone Brett for an
appointment at 733-1173 (except Wed.)
EARL'S W. 10th is screening potential cooks
for part-time hrs. Please apply bet. 3-5 p.m.
Wed. and Thurs.
65 - SCANDALS
228-4741
CONGRATULATIONS to the Delta Phi
Epsilon Neophytes. What a weekend!!
Day-O-OM
70 - SERVICES
CRISIS PREGNANCY! Birthright offers
alternatives to abortion. Call 687-7223 (free
pregnancy tests.)
WANTED TO RENT-Garage for 2-3 months
Reasonable. Ph. 266-6393.
HUMAN TOE. $200 cash. To continue
world famous Sourtoe Cocktail drink. Capt.
Dick Stevenson. Ph. 875-9054.
80 - TUTORING
ENGLISH TUTOR: G. Harding-Russell
(PH.D) will tutor or give help with essays.
Phone 594-0960 after 6 p.m. $10/hr.
85 - TYPING
MINIMUM NOTICE REQUIRED Essays,
term papers, resumes, editing. UBC location. 224-2662 or 732-0529.
ACADEMIC AND BUSINESS WORD
PROCESSING/TYPING. Quality work,
very reasonable rates. Days/eves.
263-4862
WORDPOWER- editing, proofing & word
processing — Custom, self-serve in eves.
Stud, rates. 3709 W. 10th at Alma.
222 2661.
ARE YOU LOSING MARKS BECAUSE
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processing, editing & writing services.
Resumes, theses, essays, letters, etc. Hand
in work you can be proud of! 324-9924.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST. 30 yrs. exp.
Wordprocessor & IBM typewriter. Student
rates. Dorothy Martinson, 228-8346.
UNIVERSITY TYPING - word processing.
Papers, theses, resumes, letters, P-U Etdel.
9 am - 10 pm. 7 days/wk. 734-TYPE.
STUDENT/FACULTY RATES: $1.50/pg.
dble spaced text. Equations & tables:
$14/hr. Resumes: $5/pg. 50 personalized
form letters only $35. Cerlox Binding &
photocopying. Fast professional Service.
Jeeva's Word Processing. 201-636 West
Broadway. 876-5333. M/C & Visa accepted.
ADINA WORD PROCESSING for resumes,
essays, theses. Discount for students, 10th
& Discovery. Phone 222-2122.
WORD   PROCESSING   SPECIALIST.   U
write, we type, theses, resumes, letters,
essays. Days, eves., wknds. 736-1208.
K.E.R. WORD PROCESSING. 1633 E. 12th
Ave. Using IBC-XT with Word Perfect. Call
Kerry Rigby at 879-2895.
WORD PROCESSING $1.50 per page.
Letter quality. Theses my specialty.
Call Cathalynn 324-5921.
nTHE ORIGINAL fast accurate typing. $1.25
a page. Dunbar area. Ph. 228-1517.
GET RESULTS
IN THE
UBYSSEY Tuesday, January 20, 1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
AMS leaps on bleeding heart bandwagon
It is unfortunate that a few, I am
convinced, bleeding heart heroes of
the anti-apartheid group have
transformed the University of
British Columbia into a melting pot
of social traumas. There isn't a
bandwagon that goes by which the
A.M.S. doesn't seem to jump onto,
and for that matter, vocalize its plea
onto anti-apartheid numbed ears.
Although I am not sympathetic
to the policy of social segregation in
South Africa, I am stunned each
time the A.M.S. attempts to change
political policy thousands of miles
from here by acting as an indepen-
Connections can help
As I near graduation, I find
myself more able to sympathize
with those students needing career-
related experience for their future
jobs in the 'real world'. But who has
the time to find someone who will
give them this experience, what with
exams, term papers, etc.? The consultants at Volunteer Connections
(Student Counselling and Resources
Center, Brock Hall) have the time
to do it for you.
Organizations which require
volunteers are usually flexible to
meet your needs — after all, they
need you as much as you need
them. Therefore, you can work as
little or as much as you are able,
and can start volunteering with no
previous experience. There is a surprisingly wide range of opportunities available through
volunteering. Here are some examples:
Crisis Worker: to work with a
partner in assisting victims and
witnesses immediately after the victimization and in providing emotional support, immediate counselling, transportation, victimization
and court procedure information.
Activity Coordinators: 18 or
older, to help plan and implement
social and educational activities for
international and Canadian
students on campus. Good interpersonal skills an asset.
Accept award
I would like to suggest to the
honorable chancellor of UBC and
honorable members of the UBC
Senate that they should ignore the
A.M.S., the Law Students
Associaton and the small
"militant" group of students that
were opposed to Jim Pattison's
honorary degree, and persuade Jimmy to accept the award. I would
also like to suggest that the following be awarded honorary degrees
next year:
1. Vanna White for her contributions to women's status in North
America.
2. Oral Roberts for his contributions to medicine
3. Pat McGeer for his contributions to education in B.C.
4. Toyota Dealers of B.C. for
their contributions to sports (mainly high jump)
5. Oliver North for his contributions to American foreign policy
6. Agostino Pinochet for his contributions to democracy
7. Sylvester Stallone for his contributions to the art of acting
Ahmad Doroudian
science 4
GRADUATION
PORTRAITS
by
Atrwgrajrfj
&tufcUiB £tt.
Phone now for your
COMPLIMENTARY SITTING
Choose from 18 previews (proofs)
732-7446
3343 WEST BROADWAY
Resume photos as low as
75c in colour.
The consultants at Volunteer
Connections are all student
volunteers themselves, so they can
sympathize with your needs and
desires. By phoning 228-3811 or by
dropping in to the Student
Counselling and Resources Center,
(Brock Hall), you can make an appointment to talk to a volunteer
consultant, who will provide information and/or directly refer you to
one or more organizations. It worked for me!
Mila Desprez
arts 3
dent political body. What baffles
me is the notion of an elected body
making decisions which are supposed to be for the better interests of
students. 1 can't imagine individuals who spend endless hours
thinking of ways to prohibit the sale
of cigarettes and beer on campus
because they may have been
manufactured by a company that
owns a sea-side cottage on the Cape
of Good Hope.
To the best of my knowledge, the
Senate and the A.M.S. Executive is
elected to further enhance the quality of education at U.B.C. Most
students care about what is occurring in S.A., but quite frankly I
don't believe that these two groups
possess the ability to produce
change in a nation where the only
method of change will occur as a
result of the passage of time.
Perhaps it's because every time I
pick up a copy of The Ubyssey all I
ever read about is South Africa that
I wish the A.M.S. would do
something worthwhile besides talk
FEN
by Caryl Churchill
A New Play by the Author of Top Girls and Cloud Nine
Directed by Roderick Menzies
(Preview) JAN. 27-31
Curtain: 8 p.m.
Two Shows Sat., Jan. 31 @ 5:30 & 8:30 p.m.
DOROTHY SOMERSET STUDIO
The University of British Columbia
Doors Open 15 Minutes Before Curtain
FREE ADMISSION
MTfi£ IM
me oash
a dark comedy by Peter Anderson
— "winning performances", Sun
— "impressive new play", Georgia Strait
— "character so real, it's scary", West Ender
ARTS CLUB SEYMOUR STAGE
1181 SEYMOUR ST.
BOX OFFICE 687-1644
STUDENTS y2 PRICE
Super Bowl
in
tBa^ The Pit
f°°JoOi
****
******
***
BIG SCREEN
about apartheid. But seriously,
doesn't the A.M.S. and the Senate
have something better to do that
will benefit the students they represent?
What   next?   Pressure   students
from    buying    American    goods
because the United States is sending
money to the Contras?
1 wouldn't doubt it.
Todd Ferguson
arts 1
Pima
M
NOTICE
ntna
^rfc
ALL CANDIDATES
MEETING
Will  be held for those seeking election  in the
upcoming AMS EXECUTIVE ELECTIONS.
THURSDAY, JANUARY 22
12:30 p.m.
SUB Conversation Pit
Throw questions at the candidates and eat your
lunch (or do the reverse if you prefer)
AMS Speakers & UBC Debating Society
present
DOUG COLLINS
VS.
HARRY RANKIN
(Please note change of debater)
in a debate about South Africa
Fri., Jan. 23 — 12:30 p.m.
SUB BALLROOM
All Welcome
ITS HOMESTVLE!
VALID TIL JAN. 25/87
Look what you get! A 100% beef hamburger that looks,
cooks and tastes homemade. A small order of crisp,
golden fries. Your favorite soft drink. And to
top it off, a cool and creamy 5 oz.
DAIRY QUEEN' Soft Serve Sundae.
2601 W. Broadway
at Trafalgar
(this location only) 	
WE TREAT YOU RIGHT    brazier
AM D.Q. Corp./1987
Dairi|
Queen Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 20, 1987
Skiers soar
The Thunderbird Ski Birds had
another successful weekend at
Crystal Mountain, Washington
competing in the second Northwest
Collegiate Ski Conference meet of
the season.
They duplicated last week's
results, with the men capturing the
alpine and nordic titles and the
women placing second behind
Simon Fraser in the alpine events.
Stuart Gairns showed top form,
winning both the giant slalom and
slalom by wide margins. David
Buckley, Sean Jaegli, and Bob
Walton also finished in the top ten
in the giant slalom.
Gairns   trounced   rival   Robert
Fisties
This weekend the UBC men's
varsity basketball team dropped a
pair of conference games at the
University of Alberta and the
University of Saskatchewan.
On Friday night in Edmonton the
'Birds were thumped by the University of Alberta 91-71.
Paul Johansson scored 19 points
for UBC in a losing effort.
UBC could not cope with Alberta's pressure defence — a defence
that forced 24 Thunderbird
turnovers.
"We couldn't handle the
pressure," said fifth year guard
Kevin Hanson. "It was the most
pressure we've faced all year. It was
also our worst game of the year."
On Saturday night in Saskatoon
UBC played in a hardfought battle
but lost to the University of Saskat-
chwan 73-63.
Aaron Point led all UBC scorers
with 20 points in a very physical
game where nudgs and pushes
erupted into fisticuffs, and resulted
in four player ejections.
With 50 seconds remaining in the
game Kevin Hanson and Saskatchewan's Brian Cleland started
jostling.
"He was pushing Mike (Clarke)
so I gave him a shove and it started
from there," said Hanson.
After the incident had just begun
Saskatchwan's Kurt Jones came
from across the floor and grabbed
UBC guard Paul Johannson by the
nect. Johannson retaliated, and in
the end four players were ejected.
Traditionally UBC and the
University of Saskatchewan games
have been tough, physical contests.
In fact, fights and player ejections
have occurred in their last three encounters. Their next scheduled
game, which ironically is on
February 14 at UBC, should be an
interesting bout.
BASKETBALL
MEN
GP   W   L   F
A
Pts
Sask          3    3   0   239
212
6
Alberta     3   2    1    228
213
4
Victoria    4   2   2   302
279
4
UBC         4   2   2   272
273
4
Calgary     3    1    2    185
206
2
Lethbridge3   0   3    193
236
0
WOMEN
GP   W   L   F
A
Pts
Victoria     4   4   0   283
207
8
Alberta     3   2   1   205
152
4
Lethbridge 3   2    1    189
184
4
Calgary     3   2   1   208
197
2
Sask          3    12    135
199
2
UBC         4   0   4    188
269
0
SWIMMING — MEN
1.   Calgary
2.   Toronto
3.    UBC
4.   McMaster
5.   Alberta
6.   Victoria
7.    Montreal
8.   Laval
9.   Dalhousie
10.    Carleton
Bartsch of Western Washington in
the slalom. Rich Richardson of the
University of Washington was third
while Jaegli and Buckley finished
fourth and fifth.
In the women's events SFU
finished ahead but the Thunderbirds are catching up. Michelle
Johnson (SFU) recorded her second
GS victory in a time of 1:35.08.
Alby Dean of Puget Sound was
second in 1:36.42 and SFU's Elke
Socher was third. Andrea Jaegli
was the top Thunderbird in fourth
place and Mary Fraser was seventh.
In the slalom, Socher emerged
victorious for the second meet in a
row, Jaegli was third, new UBC
team member Marianne Kasper was
fifth and Fraser was seventh.
In the nordic (cross-country)
events, the UBCers had a more difficult course and rough competition
to contend with. The men's 3 x 10
km relay team of Terry DeLong,
Jaime Cathcart and Gerry Furseth
won their second straight race.
DeLong also managed second
place in the 15 km individual event
defeating PLU's Oystein Hagen in a
close race. Cathcart placed fifth
and Gairns ninth to clinch his second "skimeister" all-round title.
In the women 10 km race, rookie
Sire Gjessing captured second spot.
Coach Stu Gairns was pleased with
Gjessing's performance in her first
race. "Siri's a fighter. She made up
a lot of time on the second lap. By
the time regionals come by, she will
be doing very well."
The Thunderbirds compete again
next weekend at White Pass,
Washington.
UBC STUDENT GETS lost in mad land of bicycles.
Swim 'Birds dine on diving Dinnie desperados
The women's swimming and diving team was victorious Sunday
against the University of Calgary
Dinnies (63-48).
The Birds were led by Allison
Gilbert's wins in the 100 and 200
meter freestyles and Anne Martin's
gold in the 50 meter freestyle. Martin beat out teammate Angie
Haveman and Gwen Chambers who
placed second and third respectively-
Diving was a major factor in the
women's win since Calgary failed to
compete on the boards. Melody
Smeaton won the one meter competition while Trish Murphy was second. The two women reversed
roles in the three meter event with
Murphy coming out on top.
The men's team did not fare as
well against the powerhouse
Dinosaurs, losing (70-35).
Highlights included Chris Bowie's
wins in the 800 and 400 meter
freestyles. Bowie set a new UBC
record in the 400, knocking over
four seconds off the previous standard.
In addition Turlough O'Hare was
beaten by .07 seconds in the 200
meter freestyle and Kevin Draxinger
was defeated by .24 seconds in the
200 meter backstroke.
Steve Nordstrom was second in
the 200 individual medley while
Dean O'Flajilate was third. Michel
Hameury once again dove unopposed for the birds.
Friday night the swim team competed in Seattle against the University of Washington Huskies. The
Huskies won both men's (63-31)
and women's (61-32) competitions.
The sole women's winner was
Martin (50 freestyle) while Draxinger provided the only men's wins
(200 freestyle, 200 backstroke).
Draxinger set a new meet record in
the backstroke, knocking three
seconds off the six year old standard.
"These two meets were the
toughest ones of the year for us,
and we did about how we expected.
The Huskies are an NCAA Division
1 team and Calgary has one of the
best teams in the country. Overall I
was very pleased with the way we
swam," said Coach Jack Kelso.
The Birds next meet is this Saturday against the University of Puget
Sound.
  Recreation UBC presents
SHOTOKAN KARATE
Monday and Wednesday
8:00 - 10:00 p.m.
Saturday, 10:00 - 11:30 a.m.
Gym E, Osborne Centre, UBC
Beginners classes starting NOW
For further information
Call Rec. UBC 228-3996
"T. Ohshima - Shihan"
FEMALE
5.
Western Ontario
1.
Toronto
6.
McGill
2.
UBC
7.
Brock
3.
Calgary
8.
Alberta
4.
Laval
9.
Mount Allison
10.
Manitoba
BAHHtUPT CURS?
'"i
TEMPORARILY    FINANCIALLY    EMBARASSED
STUDENTS?    HIGHLY    MOTIVATED    ALTRUISTIC
TYPES?
WE WANT YOU!
to earn money by manning polling stations for the upcoming AMS Executive Elections Jan. 28, 29, 30. Sign up
NOW in the SAC Office SUB 246 (AMS Executive Offices)
228-2361. ^
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS
E.S. WOODWARD LECTURE SERIES
1986-87
PAUL SAMUELSON
MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
NOBEL LAUREATE IN ECONOMICS
SRAFFIAN ECONOMICS
Thursday, January 22, 1987
12:30 p.m.
Buchanan Building, Room A106
THE ECONOMIC FUTURE
Saturday, January 24, 1987
8:15 p.m.
(A Vancouver Institute Lecture)
Woodward IRC, Lecture Hall No. 2

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