UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

Pow Nov 19, 1993

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0126545.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0126545.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0126545-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0126545-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0126545-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0126545-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0126545-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0126545-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0126545-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0126545.ris

Full Text

Array M>l. 75, No.19
UBC NEWSBREAK ON THE CO
INSIDE
UBC's
legal eagles
Back Page
POLICE BEAT
The Pit
"The biggest danger
to women on
campus"
BY CHARLES NHO
UBC RCMP have called a
basement pub the greatest peril to
women on campus.
"The biggest danger to women
on campus is the Pit Pub," said Staff
Sgt. Bern Jansen.
While sexual assaults by
strangers remain rare on campus,
acquaintance rape, which includes
sexual assaults by people known
only for a matter of a few hours,
remains more common.
"With most reports, we've
found that they've almost always
started at the Pit," Jansen said. "My
advice is to leave with who you
came with."
Pit staff can kick out the
offender at their discretion but
intervene only after a patron's
complaint
Every crime investigated by
UBC RCMP is recorded in a thick
log book and given a file number.
On those dog-eared pages lie the
details of everything from campus
murders to campus fights. But in
response to a university
administration request, the RCMP
have recently kept a separate file on
all sexual assaults.
Thepurposeistohaveareadily-
accessible, comprehensive book
which renders the full scope of sexual
assaults on campus.
"The purpose of this detailed
account is not to scare students,"
said Staff SgL Bern Jansen. "It is,
instead, to document just how few
of the entries have nothing to do
with the horrifying predatory rapes
that seem to get all the attention...
I'd say we get maybe one serious
sexual assault case per year."
Of the sexual assault cases
reported in the past year, these three
gained media attention at UBC:
• In September a non-student
entered Gage Towers where he
removed his clothing and was
eventually apprehended lying on top
of the blanket of a sleeping woman.
He was later convicted in court of
break and enter with the intent of
committing a sexual assault
• In October a woman walking
home from thePitalong Agricultural
Road to her residence was grabbed
firom behind and wrestled to the
ground. She then escaped. Theattack
happened in the open late at night
Police are still investigating.
• In March a woman reported a
man hiding in the bushes near Main
Library who tried to pull her towards
him until she escaped. Police have
discontinued the investigation after
failing to find the woman at her
reported home address.
UBYSSEY SPECIAL
Vancouver, British Columbia, November 19,1993
UBC grads Jeff Jung and Billy Lau have found a new job. See story below.
TRAGEDY OR COMEDY?
LISA KWAN PHOTO
Decking the halls with unusual jobs
BY MICHELLE WONG
TWAS a month before
Xmas. And all through the
employment centre not a job was
stirring, not even the janitor who
was laid off.
The economy Grinch had stolen
all the McJobs, leaving stockings
empty across the land.
Billy Lau mailed resumes to St
Nick but none were replied.
Then one foggy night, Billy
with his head so bright launched
Smiley Productions, a greeting card
company, with his pal Jeff Jung.
Lau, a UBC biology graduate,
had worked atShaughnessy Hospital
until it was shut down. "No one else
would hire me," he said.
Now with Jung, a recent UBC
electrical engineering grad who
started a profitable computer
company, he sells colour-your-own
cards by word of mouth.
They doodle animal themes
onto the cards.
Said Jung: "We're not utilizing
our education to its full potential—
but then, who does?"
Lau said his university
classroom training contributed
considerably to his undertaking.
"I started doodling more—
especially in psychology, because
it's a little on the dull side," he said.
While Canadian universities
continue to pump out graduates en
masse in factory-like fashion, the
nation's soaring double digit
unemployment rate ranks highest
amongindustrialized nations. Many
graduates have been forced to resort
to creative, albeit unusual,
alternatives for self-employment
Last summer, two UBC commerce
students started a dog pooper-
scooping business, travelling across
town with loads of fresh fertilizer in
their bunk for sale.
Lau and Jung said they intend
to take a huge bite into the expensive
card market with their novel concept
The cards can be drawn to suit
personal tastes and occasions, and
the customers do the colouring to
personalize the designs.
"The market is very
competitive," said Jung. "However,
we're planning a take-over of
Hallmark and, after that, Carlton.
Give it a few years and it will be
'Hallmark who?'"
"We dream up ideas, literally.
We see the bubbles on top of our
heads and the ideas come from
there."
Their work now includes T-shirts,
logos and business cards.
QUOTE
"My advice is to leave with
who you came with."
Front Page
BLOW DART TRIAL
Men die
from
unknown
cause
BY CHUNG WONG
KUALA LUMPUR—Four
Malay men are dead but only three
are officially dead.
And what has hampered the
prosecution even more in this
landmark manslaughter trial
involving the indigenous Orang Ash
in Malaysia is that the coroner has
failed to find the cause of death
despite admitted confessions.
The Orang Asli, Malay for
Native People, claimed they used
poison blow darts in self-defense to
shoot at a landowner's goon squad
of six knife-wielding men. The
squad allegedly bullied and injured
villagers in Jeli Kampung near the
Thai border during an attempt at
forced relocation. B ut the Jehai tribe
had used natural poisons from
indigenous tree barks and roots
usually used to hunt monkeys,
poisons which are not looked for in
standard city poison detection tests.
Four men died during the
incident, !>ut mysteriously the
accused are charged with "culpable
homicide not amounting to murder"
for only three deaths: Ismail Che
Noh, 51, Yahya Sulong, 42, and
Haji Dollah Yaachob, 50.
The trial, which will set a
precedent for future disputes
between new land claims and the
Orang Asli, is set for January 6 in
theKotaBahru Sessions CourtLand
applications have soared recently in
Malaysia for regions not earmarked
for the Orang Asli. However, many
Orang Asli tribes have not moved
from their traditional settlement
areas. The Jehai conflict in Jeli is the
first violentNativeresistanceagainst
new landowners in Malaysia. There
are only 870 Jehais in northern
Malaysia.
A local entrepreneur has paid
bail for the 9 accused Orang Ash
food gatherers, who range in age
from 18 to 68.
The case has garnered a
heightened profile after seven of
Malaysia's top defense lawyers
including former Bar Council
PresidentRaja Aziz Addruse teamed
up to defend the Orang Asli free of
charge. Prosecution lawyer Haniff
Awang then stepped down to make
way for senior deputy public
prosector Amin Fiidaus Abdullah.
The defense lawyers are
confident they will successfully
reduce the charge to involuntary
SEE BACK PAGE Friday, November 19,1993
POW
\fol. 75, No. 19
CLASSIFIED • 822-3978
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
80 - TUTORING
RATES: AMS cardholders - 3 lines, $3.15, additional lines, 63 cents, commercial - 3 lines, $5.25, additional lines, 80 cents.
(10% discount on 25 issues or more). Classified ads payable in advance. Deadline 3:30pm, 2 days before publication. Room
266, SUB. UBC. Vancouver, BC, V6T 2A7,822-3977.
05 - COMING EVENTS
BUST LOOSE! HOLIDAYS
presents ski/party escapes. Dec 29/
93-Jan 2/94. Big White, BC or
Whitefish, MO. Starting from $299.
CaU 682-6044 for all of the details.
THE VANCOUVER
INSTITUTE
Free Public Lecture
Saturday, Nov. 20
Sir Crispin Tickell
Warden, Green College
Oxford University
on
THE UNITED NATIONS IN
PEACE AND WAR
Lecture Hall 2, Woodward IRC
at 8:15pm.
THE WEST POINT GREY
POTTERS CLUB is holding its
Christmas Sale and Tea at the West
Point Grey Community Centre, 4397
West 2nd Avenue, on Saturday
November 27 th from 10 ajn. to 3
pjn. Unique handcrafted pottery can
be purchased at reasonable prices,
along with tea and refreshments, and
there is a door prize.
11-FOR SALE-Private
APPLE LASERWRITER, N.T.
$1200 obo. One way flights to
Toronto & San. Fran-Single to F.
Nov. 22 & Dec. 10 $100. Tony -
730-9503.
1984NISSANMICRA.Reliable,body
in v/good condition-sunroof-air cared
$2300 OBO 739-9335 evngs.
83 NISSAN SENTRA. Air-cared, in
good condition, economical, roomy. 5-
speed manual. Only $1600. Call 733-
7238.
H.B.CHEV$250.Oldclunker reliable
trans. Phone 322-6474.
15 - FOUND
BUCHANAN B323 Eng. 365 notebook
since Nov. 8. Prof. Goldman. 822-5132 or
822-3881 messages.
FOUND: Friday Nov.5at Bus Loop camera
flash adapter. 224-8023.
20 - HOUSING
LARGE NEW 1 brm ste with shared
laun. North Delta, near bus & Skytrain,
non-smoker, no pets. For info, call 599-
5242.
2 BR GRND. FLOOR suite in house
MacDonald/14. Couple preferred. $750
inc. hydro + w/d. 986-1818 days 255-
4916 evenings.
30-JOBS
COLLEGE PRO PAINTERS, only
10 summer franchises still available in
Lower Mainland & Okanagan. Call now
at 8794108 anytime.
OUTDOOR STORE
$8-12/hr. aver. Thorough knowledge
of outdoor equip, required. Only
applicants who can work at least 1 full
weekday, plus Saturday, will be
considered. Apply at 390 W. 8th Ave.,
11-1 pm.
70 - SERVICES
BEST-BUYCAR & TRUCK rentals.
We gladly accept cash deposits. We
make renting hassle free. Ph. 261-2277
— 261-CARS.
LSAT PREPARATION COURSE -
Comprehensive 20-hour weekend
course; experienced instructor;
simulated exam; free repeat option; full
money-back guarantee. MEDLAW
SEMINARS 739-8030.
SAVE TIME AT THE LIBRARY!
We search for books & articles you need
on prints of microfilm. Lisar Delivers
271-7878.
NEED HELP TO
write that essay?
Kathy 688-0129.
ARE YOU PLANNING A
HOLIDAY?
Visit TRAVEL CUTS
The only Student Travel Experts!
We are ON CAMPUS
SUB Lower Level 822-6890
*Student Travel at Student Prices*
ATTENTION: International
students. Improve your grades by
improving your writing. Experienced
English Teacher available for
proofreading and polishing. Call Lester
at 439-7381.
85 - TYPING/WORD PROCESSING
PROFESSIONAL typist, 30 years
exp., wd process/typing, APA/MLA,
thesis. Student rates. Dorothy, 228-
8346.
SELF SERVE COMPUTERS
EXTENDED HOURS as of
Nov 8th: Mon - Thurs 9am - 8pm
& Fri 9am - 7pm. Hours subject to
expand without notice! IBMs, Macs,
different software packages, HP IV
laser printer.
AMS WORD PROCESS-ZING.
Ground Level, SUB. 822-5640.
THESIS BINDING
48 hr. service. Gold stamping, hard
cover. Your perfect XMAS gift Phone
683-BIND.
WORD PROCESSING-laserprinter
Essays, theses, manuscripts
Low rates, no GST.   Shirley 731-
8096.
WORD PROCESSING - reasonable
rates. Contact Donna at 737-1944
evenings or 623-3034 days.
BETWEEN CLASSES, FOLKS!
Noon = 12:30
Friday, November 19th
• School of Music. UBC Symphony
Orchestra. Jesse Read, conductor. Wendy
Hatala, soprano soloist. 8pm, Old
Auditorium
• Choral Union. Diane Loonier,
director. Noon, Recital HalL
• Dance Horizons. Stretch & Strength
Dance Class. Noon, SUB Party Room.
•Psychology Students'Assn. Infamous
BZZR garden featuring cheap bzzr and
shooters. Cool tunes by DJ Laura. Come
check your head! 4:30-9pm. SUB
Partyroom (rm 200).
• WUSC. Canadian Crossroads: at
wotk in Cote- d'lvorie by Karen Rolston,
Noon, BUCH A205.
• Nursing Undergrad "Directions in
Nursing*-Fon-mforundergrads with B.SN.
practising nurses. Noon, Univ. Hosp,
Acute Care Pavilion T-188 3rd floor).
Saturday, November 20th
• Choral Union. Diane Loomer, dir.
8pm, Recital Halt
•JapanExchangeQub. Bowling nighL
7pm, Park Royal Bowling Lanes (1080
Park Royal South, W. Van.)
• AMS Tutoring Service. Free drop-in
tutoring for 1st year students in Math,
Physics, Chem, St. English. 1 -4pm, SUB
212.
Sunday, November 21st
• Original Costume Museum Society.
Historical fashion show featuring fashion
historian Ivan Sayers & sponsored by the
Society. 2pm, Frederic Wood Theatre,
Tut $10.
• AMS Tutoring Service. Free drop-in
tutoring for 1st year students in Math,
Physics. Chem, & English. 5-9pm. SUB
212.
Monday, November 22nd
• Dance Horizons. Dance classes.
Stretch & Strength (noon). Jazz IT (5pm).
SUB party room.
• Anyone interested in starting a
Synchronized Swimming club please
attend an organizational meeting at the
Aquatic Centre lobby. Noon.
CUSTOMER
a
vvreciation \ I • */>*
^Vv j_jii"^ *«v   ^*
Y
^
it«
>**■
ou're   invited   to   our   Annual   Customer
Appreciation   Day   on   Wed,   Nov   24th,
8:30   am   -   8:30   pm,   at   both   or   our   stores.
Enjoy   our   complimentary   gift   wrapping   service,
refreshments   and   Christmas   treats
while   taking   advantage   or   the   savings;
its   our   way   of   saying   'THANK   YOU!'.
PLUS,   enter   our   special   gift   draw
-   prize   donated   hy   Travel   CUTS.
DAY
\ +
«*'
1993/
V/ to
OFF
Discount on All Purchases*
Including 'SALE'items!
'Exemptions: Coursebooks,
computer hardware &
software, postal items, &
special orders.
HlH E A L T H
HSCIENCES
MBOOKSHOP
2750 Heather Street
Vancouver, B.C. V5Z 4M2
•B* (604) 879-8547
Toll Free order Line
•a* (BC) 1-800-665-7119
Fax (604) 879-7613
HOURS
Mon-Sat 9:30 am - 5 pm
*^ TRAVELCUTS
Going Your Way!
UBC BOOKSTORE
6200 UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD
VANCOUVER, B.C., V6T 1Z4
(604)822-2665 FAX (604) 822-85 92 Vol. 75, No.19
POW
Friday, November 19,1993
NEWS
City politics: To wards or not to wards
BY ELLEN YEUNG
MAYORAL candidate
Libby Davies is appealing to alienated Vancouverites
by proposing a regional voting system similar to federal constituencies for future elections.
Under the current system, residents vote for all the candidates,
granting densely populated neighborhoods more political power for
their community interests.
Under the proposed ward system, voters would vote for only one
candidate for their home ward.
"Wards would prevent the south-
westcornerof Vancouver from con-
tinuingto dominate theeiection outcome because ofthe high voter tum-
outthere," COPE candidate Davies
said."The Downtown Eastside is especially neglected."
She said thecurrentsystemputs
candidates from low-income neighborhoods at a disadvantage because
of their need to fund a campaign that
would appeal to the whole city.
"The present at-large system
of electing politicians favours incumbents and people with money,"
Davies said.
In three referenda on wards,
the last one in 1988, more than SO
percent voted in support—just short
Libby Davies
of the 60 percent required to pass.
NPA mayoral candidate Philip
Owen, independent candidate Bob
Seeman, and Davies agree a ward
system would give voters fairer representation in council—but Owen
thinks Vancouver needs another referendum to decide the issue.
This June the provincial government changed the Vancouver
Charter to allow council to dodge a
referendum, a move Owen called a
"cowardly way of avoiding responsibility."
Owen said he and most NPA
candidates are in favour of a ward
system, but he wants another referendum, which he estimates would
cost about $500,000.
Meanwhile, Davies and Seeman
accuse Owen of hypocrisy.
Bob Seeman
Seeman argues that provincial and
national referenda require only 50
percentplus one to succeed and previous referenda results show that
Vancouverites want wards.
Owen said wards need to be reconsidered by a new commission because of "significant changes to the
face of Vancouver" since the last
commission in 1988.
Owen points to new developments
in the Fraser Lands, Coal Harbour,
Yaletown, and Concord Pacific's
development on the old Expo lands.
Seeman and Davies wantthe wards
implemented in time for the next
civic election in 1996. Both said another referendum is not needed.
Daviespromises to draw new ward
boundaries after talking to people in
the grassroots level, instead of delay-
Philip Owen
ing the process like Owen.
"Owen is undermining the ward
system," Davies said.
Seeman sai± "Democracy delayed
is democracy denied."
COPE will have an advantage with
the ward system because they will
win more seats from the Eastside,
according to Seeman. But Davies
isn't worried about wards benefiting
any particular candidate or partyover
another.
"I am not concerned with who will
get elected, because the ward system
is a more democratic way of electing
politicians," Davies said. "There will
be more accountability in council."
The Green Party, a small force in
Vancouver politics that do not yet
haveanelected representative is calling for "mixed-member representa-
Godzilla takes a charge at city hall
BY BIANCA ZEE
AND GRAHAM COCK
WHILE Davies, Owen and
Seeman may be the
names you first associate with
Vancouver's current mayoral race,
there will be 20 others on Saturday's
ballot, Does Wretched Ethyl ring a
bell? Sandy Beach? Godzilla?
These candidates and several
others are running for mayor in the
wake of new rules which make it
easier to become a civic candidate.
Prospective candidates now need
only two nominators' signatures to
get on the ballot, and there is no
longer a registration fee.
With the change in rules Brian
"Godzilla" Salmi of the Gnu Democratic Rhino Reform Party saw an
opportunity. In an article in the local
newspaper Terminal City, Salmi described how he and his friend Napoleon realized, in a drunken stupor,
the possibility of flooding the may
oral ballot with the names of a 1000
ordinary people.
He called up several friends to
encourage them to run, including
many in local rock bands.
One who answered his request
was Charmian Bullen, the designated
spokesperson of "Wretched Ethyl,"
a name on the mayoral ballot and
also the name of Bullen's rock band.
"We're running for mayor because we saw it as an opportunity to
make a statement against the general
decline in democracy," Bullen said,
"It seems to be the rich and powerful
who are elected into power and I'm
a musician with no collateral."
Wretched Ethyl advocates "the
greater distribution of wealth and a
better approach to the social system
because what worked 20 years ago is
not working now We would like
to see more of a collective system
with more cooperation between the
rich and the poor," she said.
Another rock musician who took
up Godzilla's call was Sandy Beach,
a SFU student pursuing a teaching
certificate andamemberofthepunk
band Aging Youth Gang.
Initially, he jumped onto the
mayoralty race without much forethought, thinking he would be one of
many fringe candidates.
"Then I started getting all these
letters and calls and interviews and
I'm in the public eye and I'm thinking, 'interesting,'" Beach said.
"It was funny to start off with
and then BCTV phoned up and
wanted to do aninterviewandldidn't
know what to tell them so I said I'm
for education, school and parks, but I
didn't know, so I said 'oh well, I
guess I should say something.'"
BCTV quoted Beach as saying
the system was "a farce," and now he
is worried that the publicity given
Salmi and the other "fringe" candidates may lead to a tightening of the
electoral rules.
"It's just that next time, because
of the publicity, it is going to be a
large nomination fee that will limit it
to businesses or large organizations,
and I don't agree with that," Beach
said.
Some of the lesser-known candidates have joined the race for more
mercenary reasons. "The Captain,"
aJca. John William Kut, is running
to raise the profile of his secondhand goods business. The Captain's
slogan is "Revitalize the Spirit of
Vancouver."
Kut said, "My first mate Dave
asked me to run for mayor three days
in a row, saying it would be good for
business and finally I said 'what the
heck, why not.'"
Godzilla Salmi himself is running for mayor and pushing to tweak
Vancouver off from Canada and join
it with Japan. In a ceremony at the
Japanese Consulate on Wednesday,
Godzilla presented a gift to the Japanese people and apologized for the
atrocities he's committed in the past.
Greens want Chinese to be official language
BY GRAHAM COOK
I HE civic Green Party wants
•**- Vancouver to make city
hall more accessible to the growing
Chinese population by making Chinese an official second language.
The party wants translation facilities for city documents and public meetings into Chinese said Andy
Telfer, council candidate in
Saturday's elections.
"We're always getting new
immigrants. What it comes down to
is that you need to service your
citizens, and in Vancouver, that
means servicing Canadians who
speak Chinese," Telfer said.
He compares city hall to
Chinatown where there is an array of
banking and other services available
in Chinese.
"If a Chinese person walks into
city hall and wants to talk to a councillor there is no service in place."
Non-Partisan Association mayoral candidate Philip Owen doesn't
think the issue is an important one for
Vancouver's Chinese community.
"I haven't heard one Asian person suggest that Chinese should be
an official language. I think they're
the ones that should bring the issue
forward. I've been on council with
three Asian people—Tung Chan,
Sandra Wilking.and now (NPAcan-
didate) Maggie Ip and none of them
have ever suggested it," Owen said.
Libby Davies is running for
mayor under the Coalition Of Progressive Electors (COPE) banner.
She said the Green proposal is well
intended but does not reflect
Vancouver.
"I have a problem with choosing one language as an official second language in a multilingual city,"
she said.
Davies said COPE would formalize translation services for all
common languages in the city.
Vancouver City Clerk Maria
Kinsella confirmed the informal na
ture of current services.
No facilities are available but
some documents are translated.
"All Vancouverites should be
communicated with in a language
they understand and in a manna* they
understand," she said.
But she admitted that Chinese-
speakers might have difficulty getting a translated version of a plann ing
document for their neighbourhood.
"We might give them a copy of
the English document and ask them
to ask a friend who speaks Chinese to
translate it, because we always have
to be mindful of the dollar."
Rick Scobie, deputy director of
planning said his department can ar-
tion."
Green council candidate Andy
Telfer said the mix-member system
would combine the at-large system,
which favours smaller parties like
his, with ward representatives.
The Greens warn that a ward system would be likecurrent federal and
provincial electoral systems, in which
the popular vote is often skewed by
riding divisions.
For example, the Conservative and
Reform parties each received 16 percent of the popular vote in the last
federal election but now have two
and 52 seats in the House of Commons respectively.
Owen also said the mixed ward
and at-large system is a possibility,
but Davies said it would not work.
"It creates a two-tier system that
defeats the purpose of the ward,"
Davies said.
Owen said the ward system would
be more bureaucratic and would lead
to the neglect of issues that affect the
entire city.
But Davies said his claims are
groundless.
"What happens in council depends
on the quality of people elected,"
Davies said.
Even with an at-large system, there
mightstill be people who don'tknow
about all the issues of the city, she
said.
Wretched Ethel
The Captain
range for a staff member to interpret
if they know ahead of time.
He said the department has not
had a lot of complaints regarding a
lack of formal services for Chinese-
speakers, but admits that may be
because of a communication problem.
"I'm not expecting this department would take any initiatives without a wider corporate policy to provide that service everywhere, in the
police department, health or engineering," Scobie said.
Kinsella said the city is improving policies with an accessibility program for the current election and a
permanent workinggroup to develop
staff policy.
The city has also hired simultaneous interpreters for some public
meetings, Kinsella said. Vfol. 75, No.4
POW
Tuesday, September 21,1993
ROUNDS
Q9
NEWS
2565 Alma Street
FOR HOFFEE f-w
-eet • Located at the corner of 10th & Alma.   VA WEEK.'
CIVIC ELECTIONS
Punjabi market sends Sidhu
BY JULIE LEE
DALJIT Sidhu is running for
city council with the Nonpartisan Association (NPA). A
founding member of the Punjabi
Market in Vancouver South, he
served on its executive and as
president.
Sidhu has also worked under
NPA mayoral candidate Philip
Owen as a member of the Owen-
chaired City Council Committee on
Small Business. He has been a
member of the Ethno Business
Council of the Federal Business
Development Bank, and has been a
resident of Vancouver for 21 years.
He pointed to his business
background as his primary
qualification for office.
When asked if he has any main
concerns to bring to office, Sidhu
answered, "Not really. I'm a team
player so I don't have any specific
issues."
He said he is running because
"I have a better understanding of
culture in Vancouver. I want to see
community input I respect such
inputand I'm committed to listening
to community concerns."
Sidhu said he wants to ensure
fiscal and social responsibility, and
work towards a safer, healthier city,
promoting "the security of
Vancouver, as well as health issues
and the environmment."
His campaign literature says that
he stands for "innovative housing
initiatives and other important social
programs... environment-friendly
initiatives," and a "balanced
common-sense approach to
neighbourhood and city-wide
issues."
Ij r baked fresh continuously all day longT_ _
_ " "." " " ~ ~       A push for the arts and safety
THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW
On Screen. On Stage & in the Audience!
BY JULIE LEE
EXPERIENCE
In the Vogue Theatre vogue
Thursday November 18, 7:00 & 9:30pm
Friday November 19. 9:00 & Z95.3FM
MIDNITE SHOW
Saturday November 20. 9:00 & MIDNITE
Tickets S12.50
TCKETMASTER 280-4444 (or at the door)
PRIZES! COSTUMES! SUPRISES!
FRANCES Wasserlein is
running for city council with
the Coalition of Progressive Electors
(COPE) slate. She said that civic
duties have always been an emphasis
for her because of her community
work.
Wasserlein said her work with
the local women's movement
showed that city politics were
important to the community
structure. She has worked with the
police and womens' shelters and is
particularly concerned with safety
issues.
ELECTION
"As a lesbian, I want to protect
minorities. We should take a good
long look at what it'll take to make
Vancouver a safe place. Safety is an
important issue especially in regards
to minorities, children, seniors, for
everyone.
"We need to understand that
solutions may not be necessarily in
more police but in unexpected places
such as neighbourhood cooperation
and responsibility," she said.
Wasserlein is also active in the
local arts community, including her
work as volunteer coordinator for
the Vancouver Folk Music Fiestival.
"I want to see the city take a
positive developmental role in the
arts and culture. I believe that without
a vibrant cultural sector, people will
lose their voice since I believe that
cultural expression is our voice."
She also stated that
neighbourhood input is of much civic
importance.
"I want to implement ideas
based on neighbourhood
participation, as I really want to
stress their participation. We should
recognize the important role
residents play in decision making,"
she said.
j*
/
UBC BOOKSTORE PRESENTS
Joseph  Wu
and sumitra dutt
Joseph   Wu,   Origami   Enthusiast   and
Expert,   will   he   demonstrating   the
'beauty   or  folding'   in   an   Autumn   theme.
Also,   Sumitra   Dutt,   local  artist,   will  he
demonstrating   clever   art   techniques
to   create   restive   jewellery   for
this   holiday   season.
Free   event   at   the   UBC   Bookstore   on
Wed,   Nov.   24th   1-3   pm.
0
UBC BOOKSTORE
6200    University    Blvd,     Vancouver,     B.C.,     V6T     1Z4
TEL. (604) 822-2665 (UBC-BOOK) FAX (604) 822-8592       vj
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
■^EIglE_I^IE_^El^E]^
0
There will be a special Sheaffer
Calligraphy demonstration in
the Fens 62 Gifts department at
the UBC Bookstore on
Wednesday, November 24th,
10:30 am -3:30 pm.
Receive free engraving on all Shaeffer pen
purchases made on this day.
SHEAFFER.
The name in quality writing instruments.
UBC BOOKSTORE
6200 UNIVERSITY BOULEVARD
VANCOUVER, B.C., V6T 1Z4
(604) 822-266 5 FAX(604) 822-8 592
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
i
M^MmMmMmMa^jmMmM^ Vfol. 75, No.4
POW
Tuesday, September 21,1993
ARTS
DOCUMENTARY
THEATRE
Films focus on families
BY ELLEN YEUNG
Return Home, written and
produced by Michelle
Wong, is a retrospective look at the
sacrifices of Wong's grandparents
who came to Canada several decades
ago.
The personal documentary
shows Wong's return to her
hometown, where her grandparents
settled. My great-grandfather was
also a gum san lo ("gold mountain
guys" who came to North America
in the 1900s) so I can relate to
Wong's guilt of having encouraged
the cultural and generational gap.
The years of working in their
small cafe in SL Paul, Alberta is not
over for the grandparents in their
80s. Return Home shows the
hardships the Chinese pioneers had
to endure, which built a niche in
contemporary Canadian society.
Return Home is also about
Wong's relationship with her
grandparents. In this first film, Wong
predictably concludes that her
grandparents do care for her and
their love was manifested
differently.
Anotherpersonal documentary
Me, Mom, and Mon, directed by
Vancouverite Mina Shum, satirizes
the traditional Chinese father, who
thinks he is in control but is only
made to think so by the women
around him.
Mina's 20-year-old sister,
Mona, has been living with her
boyfriend in Montreal. The film
revolves around the conspiracy of
keeping Mona's secret living
arrangement from the father. So, the
three Shum women sit around a table
and laugh in Chinglish—half
Chinese, half English—about
waiting for the right moment to tell
father.
Mina humourously calls her
father"stableandsensible"butreally
meaning her father is boring and
inflexible. Many pictures of the
patriarch are shown and vignettes of
Lawrence Welk and other old men
are told, but the father never speaks.
In the film he is unaware Mina is
documenting him. One can only
wonder what his reaction was when
the NFB documentary was
completed.
Because the fathernever speaks,
we assume the father is cold and
unforgiving. His reaction might be
milder than what the women
anticipate, but the audience never
knows.
Shum generalizes that
traditional Chinese men are unfair
by having her mother and
grandmother tell of their former
physical and mental abuse by her
grandfather and his mistress.
Mina insists the three Shum
women are independent and strong-
willed, yet they are still reluctant to
break the news to their father. If they
are so much in control, they would
have known exactly what to say to
win him over. The mother, however,
summarizes the three women's
attitude by insisting that you
sometimes have to "lie in order to
survive."
Diva to death in 5 quick beats
BY MARNIE MACEWAN
AND LUISA RINO
THE walls of the dusty
rose sitting room begin to
bend and creak under the pressure
as the haunting song of the whales
intensifies. One hole appears in
the wall, then two— soon an
overpowering cascade starts to fill
the room. Lyle raises his wine
glass to toast his emancipation
from this aquarium, his life.
So ends Whale Riding Weather.
The screeching of a car echoed
by the screeches of an effeminate,
has-been diva, are the opening
notes of the play. Lyle, sprawled
shirtless, stretched out on a
threadbare pink chaise longue,
drunkenly spouts Wildean
epigrams and licks excess sherry
off his ever present bottle. His
presence permeates the room.
Lyle pontificates, mostly for
himself but also for the ears of
Auto, who, back to Lyle, sits at a
desk in his underwear, obsessively
rolling cigarettes and downing
canned beer. Auto's unexerciced,
soft body and long, unkempt hair
and brooding silence make him
seem an incongruous companion
for Lyle. The introduction of the
young and overenthusiastic Jude,
Auto's new lover, betrays the tacit
agreement between Lyle and
Auto. A love triangle formed, the
stagnating couple must address
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
SIR CRISPIN TICKELL
- WARDEN, GREEN COLLEGE, OXFORD -,
THE UNITED NATIONS
IN PEACE AND WAR
Saturday, November 20 • 8:15 p.m.
Woodward Instructional Resources Centre, Hall 2
The Vancouver Institute
GAIA:
GODDESS OR THERMOSTAT?
Monday, November 22 • 12:30 p.m.
Geography, Room 200
The President's Lecture
Sponsors: Office of the President, Faculty of Graduate Studies,
Green College, External Affairs Office, the Vancouver Institute and
the President's Advisory Committee on Lectures.
issues that have gone unspoken for
years.
Lyle refuses to face any
reality. He has locked himself in
his apartment for years, blocking
out the rest of the world. Blinding
himself to the disintegration of his
refuge, he ignores his inhumane
living conditions and those of his
20 odd cats which he keeps locked
in a large pen.
Auto, by refusing to risk
changing his own condition, is
complicit to Lyle's defeatism. Lyle
says to him: "You've
accommodated me. You should be
given the fucking Order of Canada
for deciphering madness."
Universally, the play
addresses the fear and
vulnerability inherent in human
relationships. Specifically,
however, the relationships are
among men and the play deals
with characters coping with the
stigma attached to loving another
man. For that reason, this is an
important and political play.
"I'm afraid for this
world and of this world and this
world is afraid of me," says Lyle,
who finally releases his hold on a
life he despises when he yields to
Auto, letting him transcend the
SEE PAGE 6
MIJ
University Copy Centre
Alma at Broadway
#2, 3701 W. Broadway, Van., B.C.
Tel: 222-4142 • Fax: 222-9855
COPIES
(STUDENT SPECIAL - NO MINMUM)
Limited Time Offer
• AUTO FEED or
SELF-SERVE
COLOUR COPIES • RESUMES • REPORTS • LABELS • FAX SERVICE
True Family: Finding Our Place
in God's Great Love
~ A Christian Science Lecture ~
An understanding of God's constant care lor each of us in His
universal family works in human hearts to liberate and heal.
Holiday Inn, 711 West Broadway
Tuesday, November 23,8:00 pm
SPEAKER:
Ann C. Stewart C.S.B.
of Los Altos, California
Admission free
Sponsored by Second Church of Christ, Scientist, Vancouver
The University of British Columbia
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
J"
f^> ... presents... ^
Jeonce and Jena
^^^^^by Georg Qiichner    ^^^
a comedy of the mind
Directed by Richard Wolfe
NOVEMBER 16-20 & 24-27
2 for 1 Special Preview - Tues., Nov. 16
Curtain 8:00 pm
DOROTHY SOMERSET STUDIO
RESERVATIONS: 822-2678
Support your Campus Theatre Friday, November 19,1993
POW
Vbl. 75, No. 19
Pow
Editor
Effie Pow
Managing "Editor
Michelle Wong
Thoto Editor
Lisa Kwan
tyws Editor
Sara Martin
Steve Chow
Graham Cook
'Worldtyxvs Editor
Hao Li
Jront Cover Editor
Rosa Tseng
9{pwpaper (Design
SJ.Ahn
822-6681
Instructional'Editor
Chung Wong
Copy Editors
Brenda Wong
Doug Ferris
'Rsporters/Thotographers
Karen Go
Ellen Yeung
Bianca Zee
Charles Nho
Julie Lee
David Buchanan
Jemi Choi
Advertising
Lyanne Evans
822-3977
SUB241K -V6T1Z1
A UbytMy Special Mtton,
Tel: 822-2301    Fas 622-9279
OPPORTUNITY
Put WOW in your life.
Join POW!
• ZAP!-Journey to the lip ofthe abyss
of newspaper production.
• BLAM!--If you want to write, take
photos, or learn production skills, this is
your place!
• BOOM!--You can help determine its
future.
GENERAL MEETING
DATE: Friday, November 26,1993.
TIME:  from 1:30pm and all afternoon
PLACE: SUB 241K - 2nd floor
IBB AN lIMTOm
»
ipihoto©.
******S"?
*-■-- .»        i*. a*-*"
>* -
•*^#*«
■^wrMvfu-.
tf*
>******" *
% •**.»•?
*.   .
A dance for the dead on Sarak-san Mountain in South Korea
JEMI CHOI PHOTO
Entering a virtual reality
BY DAVID BUCHANAN
Imagine walking through the rooms 6f your dream
home before the foundation has even been laid. With
virtual reality, you no longer have to imagine.
Howard Rheingold, technology guru and journalist, led
the audience at the Orpheum last Sunday night on a magical
mystery tour through the corridors of virtual reality.
Presently, to enter virtual reality, an individual straps on
a rather ugly-looking piece of headgear, with the even uglier
name of Facesucker, along with a special pair of gloves, for
simulated environments, such as walking through a to-be-
built house or cavorting in a cave that the person has never
seen.
Rheingold is overflowing with wonderful examples. At
the University of North Carolina, a disagreement arose between
the architects and the future occupants concerning the location
of a wall in a building that was under design. Gentle persuasion
was called for.
The would-be occupants convinced the architects to
strap on a Facesucker and have a virtual walk through the
building. Lo and behold, the architects changed their minds
and repositioned the wall. '
Readers familiar with Star Trek: The Next Generation
will know of the "Holodeck"—a large room where three-
dimensional holographic images are created and humans
freely interact with these forms. This is a version of virtual
reality that is not yet technologically feasible.
All sorts of fascinating implications arise with such
technology. For instance, in one episode of Star Trek a
character completely created by laser beams in the Holodeck
actually becomes conscious and demands not to be annihilated!
Virtual reality can also be disorienting. Rheingold spoke
ofthe first time he experienced the eerie sensation of seeing his
own body at a distance from himself in virtual reality.
He also mentioned the social implications of this
technology. Already airplane pilots who use sophisticated
simulators are not allowed to drive for a certain period of time
after exiting the simulator. Will virtual reality users have such
THEATRE FROM PAGE 5
One evening around 11pm,
Rheingold found a tick on his
daughter's head.
restrictions placed on them in the future?
Another controversial aspect of this future techonology
might allow you to come home at the end of a frustrating day
at work, enter your virtual reality Holodeck and shoot your
(simulated) boss to death!
But Rheingold did not limit his discussion to virtual
reality. Set up on stage was a mobile telephone, computer and
modem.
He demonstrated the WELL computer network, of which
he is a member, to the audience. He talked about developing
a large group of acquaintances through this network.
Sometimes they even help each other out
One evening around 1 lpm, Rheingold found a tick on
his daughter's head. His wife phoned the pediatrician—he
logged into WELL. Before the doctor could return the call,
someone on the computer network had advised Rheingold
what to do and the tick was removed.
Rheingold spoke of one WELL member who announced
on the network that his son had been diagnosed with leukemia.
Doctors and nurses on the network helped him understand the
disease and the medical procedures associated with it. Parents
empathized with him. After some time, the boy's disease went
into remission.
Another member fell into a coma while travelling in
India. Fellow members got together and arranged to transport
her to a Western hospital.
Even after two and a half hours on stage, Rheingold
eagerly answered the endless questions from the audience. He
is an educator extraordinare who has spent the past 25 years
writing for and lecturing to popular audiences. The world of
science and technology needs more Howard Rheingolds to
satisfy the thirst of the masses for such fascinating information.
cage of their relationship. The only thing keeping Lyle in
this world is Auto—once gone, Lyle is able to cast off the
alcohol-induced semi-consciousness, in which he has been
and dies.
Roy Surette and Allan Gray have brought this new
play by Nova Scotian playwright Bryden MacDonald to
Vancouver after its Toronto premiere at the Factory Lab
Theatre. Touchstone's David Roberts is the first set
designer to realize the troubling stage direction that
demands water to break through the apartment walls at the
play's closure.
Surette's direction inspired intense emotion without
having the actors dip into manipulative or stereotypical
performances. The simplicity and honesty of the
production provide a refreshing and thought provoking
night at the theatre. Vol. 75, No.19
POW
Friday, November 19,1993
UM-U-UM-UM
NEWS
Japanese students putting on the Rits
Even though the Ritsumeikan-
UBC exchange program is in its
third year, most ofthe students from
Kyoto are still unknown on campus,
even to Main librarians.
Naoko Ishii, an editor of biannual student magazine Ritsumei
Review, randomly interviewed three
Rits students in this year's program
to reveal their life at UBC.
BY NAOKO ISHII
One day I went to Main Library
to ask about my lost card.
"I'm from Ritsumeikan," I said.
But the librarian didn't understand that I was a student at UBC
and, with an embarrassed look, he
asked me which faculty I was in.
"Well, we're in the special program for us," I said, trying to be
helpful, but the librarian was only
more confused.
Most Ritsumeikan ("Rits") stu-
dentsshare similar experiences. Now
I can say I am in the faculty of
education, but most people don't
know the exchange program.
Since 1991,100 students from
Kyoto have come to Vancouver for
the UBC-Ritsumeikan Academic Exchange Program, which focuses on
English and cross-cultural studies.
They live in Ritsumeikan-UBC
House—near Totem Park—with 100
non-Japanese students, including
other international students.
Hidefumi Sakai, 20, wants to
improve his conversational English
skills during the program.
"I also want to experience a life
in different cultures," said Sakai, an
English-American literature major.
"But the special residence is not
very good for us. We're always with
Japanese students—we tend to depend on them."
Kazue Imayama, 20, and Jun
Okamura, 21, both international relations majors, share similar views.
Imayama, an independent
woman, thinks the program is isolating or limiting for some students.
"I want to find out myself about
such things as adaptibility to new
surroundings," Imayama said, "but I
can't find out for myself because I
am with 100 Japanese students."
Imayama worries about safety
at night, whereas others complain
about Canada's expensive cigarettes
and candy.
This isn't Okamura's first encounter abroad.
"I joined an international seminar at Oklahoma University lastyear,
and the good experience brought me
to UBC," said the basketball freak.
Okamura went toOklahoma with 20
students for two months of ESL last
spring.
"I want to broaden my way of
thinking," Okamura said.
The students chat with friends
they meet at residence, sports clubs
or social events held by the Japan
Exchange and Pacific Rim Clubs.
However, it Ls hard to establish close
friendships.
Each has about 10 non-Japanese acquaintances but only two or
three with whom they discuss personal lives, love and worries.
Imayama said "it is hard when it
comes to communicating and to get
over shyness."
They stay up talking all night
with Japanese friends. But Okamura
also talks with a Korean student, one
of his closest friends. After being
teased one night, Okamura told his
friend to leave him alone—which
the friend refused tddo.
"I was pleased because it means
he thinks much about our friendship," Okamura said.
The buddy system of the program has paired Rits and UBC students. Buddies began by meeting
everyday,but now they seldom meet
except for occasional social events.
Okamura and Sakai haven't seen
their buddies sinceOctober. Imayama
still meets her buddy weekly to play
tennis or have dinner.
Sakai says "our interests don't
match. I used to try to meet more
building we cannot experience Canadian student life."
The lesson plan, which includes
four classesof academic writing skills
and cross-cultural communication,
does not appeal to the students. The
Imayama, Sakai, Okamura
often, but I'm now friends with a
room-mate."
He is sharply aware of being in
a foreign place when his friends or~
room-matesareabsenL "I feel lonely
in different surroundings when I'm
alone in my room."
Rits students have all classes in
the residence. They can take UBC
classes with a 580 TOEFL score, but
few achieve this level of proficiency.
"It is easy to go to class because
the classrooms are close," Okamura
says. "But shutting ourselves in this
KATSURA YOKOJIMA PHOTO
students want more practical English
classes like ESL instead of concentrating on communication theories.
Many students have complained and
the program office has recently circulated questionnaires on lesson
plans and instructors.
Although they face difficulties
none want to return to Japan. However, Imayama says to live in Canada
she would have to experience more
of Canadian life.
"I wonder if I could grow here.
I think I should work on it more."
The new Belhunes—Canadians working in China
BY HAO LI
BEIJING—The name of Canadian doctor Norman Bethune
was impressed into Chinese minds for a
decade by Mao's little red book during
the Cultural Revolution.
He would become Canada's most
recognized citizen in this nation.
Indisputably Mark Rowuswell,
also called Da Shan ("big mountain") leads the pack and is becoming the image of Canadians in China.
Rowuswell left Ontario for China to
study Mandarin in the 1980s. But his
outing in a nationally televised comedy during Chinese New Year, the
most popular viewing time for one
for the autograph, not mine though,"
saidKing.aformerUVicAsianStud-
ies profressor.
Other Canadians, not as famous
as Bethune or Rowuswell, have also
gained respect for their hard work in
China
Murray Irwin, a retired high
school principal from Ontario, is
mm
*. .;>?,       x ,„
II
^-SiiaiMaairtiCiii ,*-H_fX» •_>'• •SajAty?1*' ap**1!;
Tiananmen Square bustles with cyclists.
Bethune joined the Chinese com-    billion Chinese, secured his fame.
munist guerillas against the Japanese in
WWII. An infected cut from an opera-
don killed him, but alter the communist
victory in 1949 a university was named
and a statue erected in his memory.
Fifteen years after the Cultural
Revolution other Canadian names
are becoming extremely popular
among China's citizens.
He works in Cultural and Scientific Affairs for the Canadian embassy in Beijing, and his boss Richard KingbosssaidRowuswelTspres-
ence guarantees favours and better
treatment in restaurants.
"Whenever we go out together,
there are always people coming to us
HAO LI PHOTO
teaching English in Linfen, Shanxi.
He was prompted to teach in China
by a magazine article which highlighted the need for retired teachers.
"After I had to retire, I didn't
want to spend time doing nothing,"
explained Irwin.
"I chose a small city in China
because I felt that if I stayed in a large
city I would spend my time with
foreigners. I come to here so that I
can know people in China. Later I
did getto know many Chinese people,
not only people from my university
but also in the city."
He was one of the few Canadians to go to China in 1989 after the
Tiananmen incident
"I arrived in August and many
ofthe foreign experts had withdrawn
in June. All the hotels were empty
and you could hardly see any foreigners on the streets of Beijing.
"My first impression about
China was that people seemed to be
arguing on the street all the time,"
laughed Irwin. "But after I got to
some feeling and appreciation for
the language, I found out that the
people were not arguing at all. I
started to like the rhythm of the
language."
After four years of teaching
English at the Linfen teacher's college, the only university in a city
surrounded by mountains (population 320,000) and in one of China's
poorest provinces, he has developed
a warm relationship with his students.
"They are so friendly and treat
me so well no matter where I go.
They look after me and I'm like then-
fathers and need to be looked after."
Irwin is also trying to teach Canadian culture to students, many of
whom are from rural areas.
"They think Canada sounds like
a beautiful country where they would
like to visiL But one woman said she
doesn't think she wants to live in
somewhere that she is not entirely
surrounded by people."
Irwin is not planning to return to
Canada yet because he loves to teach.
"Of course I miss my family and
I'm always happy to go home each
year and spend time with them. But
I have been here long enough that I
feel I have some family in Linfen as
well.
"It's like a second home in
someways. I feel a certain excitement when I'm coming back here. I
will stay until I can no longer move
around."
DRYCLEAN SPECIAL!
SAVE
1 item 10%
2 Items i 5%
3 items 20%
4
items
items
25%
30
%
MAXIMUM HVE ITEMS PI* CUSTOMER
GOLD COIN
CLEANING CENTRE
3496 West Broadway
2 blocks east ol Alma on South Side
-OPEN 7 DAYS- 8 Friday, November 19,1993
POW
"■ift^a
NEWS
Vol. 75, No. 19
UBC MOOT REVIEW
Cahoots in moots
Gaynor Yeung, 2nd year UBC Law, thumbs through her factum.
LISA KWAN PHOTO
FROM PAGE 1	
manslaughter and plea bargainaone
day sentence to be saved during
court day. The accused have already
served a month while in custody. A
conviction for the manslaughter
charges can draw a maximum 10-
year jail sentence and a fine.
Aside from the corona's report,
the prosecution has suffered several
pre-trial twists and turns. A key
witness, a police photographer, was
originally thought to have
photographed     incriminating
evidence. It was later revealed that
Mohamed Tazar Man arrived two
hours after the alleged incident took
place and photographed only Orang
Asli holding blow pipes.
A second witness, a teacher who
reported the incident to the police,
had apparently fingered only those
holding blow pipes. They were all
eventually arrestedandcharged. The
teacher, however, was not present
during the incident but had only
heard of it
The Orang Asli say developers
tried to intimidate them off their
land on April 26, right after they
bought it. When the Orang Ash
refused to move a confrontation
erupted resulting in a 19-year-old
Orang Ash man'sarm being slashed
and an elderly village chief injured
after being pushed to the ground.
Only then were the blow darts used.
Four Malay men later died with no
apparent wounds.
r
STUDENT ADMINISTRATIVE
COMMISSION
•r
Please note that the following minute of SAC was passed at the SAC Meeting
on Sovemher ,Sth, 1993.
8. MOVED GRANT RHODES:
"That SAC freeze the accounts and bookings ofthe following clubs for two weeks effective November
8th, 1993 until said clubs submit complete executive lists, membership lists and budgets for 1993/94
to the SAC Secretary.
Aquaculture Club
Bhangara Club
Christian Science Organization
Commerce Community Programs
Economics Students Association
First Year Engineers
HASK - Croatian Students Society
Inter-Fraternity Council
Latter-Day Saints Students Assoc
Marketing Association
Metals and Materials Engineering
Mining
Personal Computing Club
Reform Party Students Society
Sororities of UBC
Sports Car Club
Stamp Club
Windsurfing Club
NOTE: Those clubs failing to submit these materials during the two-week freeze period will be
deconstituted without further notice.
Ifyou have any questions or concerns please contact Grant Rhodes in SUB rm 252, tel: 822-5466.
BY BRENDA WONG
The mock court debates
held      by   UBC law
students are an unlikely mix
of   solemn   rituals   and
lighthearted silliness.
Yet in the most recent year,
somehow UBC has produced the
best law student debaters in the
nation.
On this day as Miles
Baumgartner introduces his team of
counsels and outlines a boating
accident case, his two friends in the
audience put their thumbs to their
noses and waved their fingers in a
Three Stooges salute.
On TV Lawyers are often
thought of as posturers who dazzle
juries with wit and persuasive logic.
But such confidence does not come
automatically. It's done through
mock trials like this one where UBC
law students learn the ropes around
the courtroom.
They debate the general facts of
cases in first year and argue actual
contract, property, civil or criminal
law cases in second year.
The students get a chance to
hone their courtroom skills during
second-year "moots" or mock
debatesjudged by practising lawyers
and other law students.
Persuasive skills are not the
most important element of an
impressive courtroom performance,
but the ability to anticipate and
defend all the issues that
unexpectedly arise is essential.
For first year students who may
not be as skilled in determining the
secondary issues, handling the
judge's verbal volleys may prove
most daunting.
"It can be very nerve-
wracking," said Gaynor Yeung, a
second year law student "You don' t
know what the judges will ask you."
The judges scrutinize every
thread of the counsel's apparently
seamless argument. And sometimes
that means the counsels are
interrupted every few minutes for
clarifications.
Baumgartner opened his
presentation with interpretations of
maritime law, but was quickly asked
to expand on the relevance of his
generalizations to the boating
accident.
His nerves were clearly rattied
as sipped his glass of water and
gazed steadily at the trio of black-
robed judges seated in front of him.
The crux of Baumgartner's
argument was that the boat was really
in federal jurisdiction, and not
subject to any provincial law—but
the argument lost most of its
credibility after judge John
Lenaghan pointed out its flaws.
Baumgartner's co-counsel
Mark Short, who looked like a
nervous choirboy in his black robe,
did not fare much better. He tried to
convince the court that the plaintiff,
as an experienced sailor, did not
take reasonable care for her safety
after seeing the poor condition of
the boat
But Short was reduced to
shuffling his copy of the factum and
listening to judge Sandra Benson's
lengthy argument of the facts of a
supporting case. Ultimately he had
to concede that he did not extract the
same facts from the case as she did.
During this poor performance,
the other team of students looked
expectant, trying to read the judges' s
disposition and calculating how it
could work in their favour. After
Short's weak performance, counsel
Scarlet McGladery hadabrainstorm,
scribbling madly to advance her
position.
Typically the rebuttal is the tense
and anticipated climax in the
courtroom proceeding. But in this
debate McGladery knew her team
had an advantage because
Baumgartner and Short's weak
arguments almost gift-wrapped a
favourable decision for them.
In a loud and clear voice, the
diminutive McGladery stated that
she and co-counsel Dan Moore will
not respond to the appellant's case,
preferring to argue their case on its
own merits.
On TV Lawyers
are often thought of
as posturers who
dazzle juries with wit
and persuasive logic.
But such confidence
does not come
automatically.
Then she proceeded to argue that
the boat is subject to provincial laws
as a houseboat, and that there is a
trend toward federal and provincial
laws co-existing together. Judge
Benson questioned her to provide
evidence of this trend. She calmly
asked for a minute to think about it,
and then rattled off a few examples.
McGladery may have had an
unexpected edge with theappellant's
weak performance, but she clearly
had nerves of steel and plenty of
composure to skillfully handle the
judges's questions.
Although there are solemn court
robes and genteel customs such as
addressing counsel as "my honorable
friend," the atmosphere is distinctly
adversarial, as the lawyers jockey
for credibility by anticipating the
judges's pointed inquiries.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0126545/manifest

Comment

Related Items