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The Ubyssey Oct 6, 1967

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 A sandbox
THE urns
Vol. XLIX, No. 9
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, OCTOBER 6,  1967
COLLEGE PLAN
Macs secret experiment
open after four years
— kurt hilger photo
FEARLESS FREDDIE blew his mind Thursday noon when he
spotted one of the flower children studying in the flower
garden. Freddie better get used to it because UBC's flower
children will be doing many strange things.
Army huts have class;
high-rise offers nothing
By STEPHEN JACKSON
Ubyssey Housing Reporter
You'd better believe it—the residents of the ex-army huts
in Acadia Camp are happy.
Most students ignore its somewhat decrepid appearance,
a tour of the residence showed Thursday.
"The informality here makes it easy to meet people," said
John Morton, president of the Acadia Camp residence association.
"Our unstated policy is that if you are not disturbing other
people, do what you want to," he said, as a disturbing influence
dropped by with a case of beer.
Acadia residents are also happy with the food . . . and
food prices.
"Our canteen sells hot dogs for 15 cents each. They're 20
tents in Totem."
.^i "Administration is more lenient because the students are
older," Morton added. The average age in Acadia Camp is
21 years.
When the Acadia huts are vacated by Christmas, 1967,
residents will move into planned high-rise complex near the
UBC traffic offices. Many of those who will make the move
will be reluctant.
A $1.5 million experimental college scheme
proposed four years ago by former UBC president John (Macdonald has been uncovered by
The Ubyssey.
Macdonald proposed to use the then recently
bequeathed Ronald Graham mansion near Fort
Camp — now the school of social work — in the
four year, 160 student general education program.
He applied to the Ford Feundation for funds
but was turned down.
Knowledge of the experimental college has
been kept secret until now.
Macdonald proposed three broad goals for
the college. The college should, he said in a
letter to the Ford Foundation Dec. 18, 1963,
"teach students to read effectively and to write
good prose easily, to cultivate competence in
the French language (a unique and urgent need
in Canada) and to develop in the students an
appreciation for art, music and theatre."
Administration sources say t
the college would have required
an estimated $1.5 million in
initial capital expense. Such
funds were only available from
Ford Foundation, the sources
say.
In the letter Macdonald proposed that 40 students "would
be admitted into each of the   MACDONALD
four years of the undergraduate program.
"The program of the college will be free
from examinations in any formal sense. Any
student admitted to the programs will get automatic credit for the year during which he is in
the program," Macdonald said in the letter.
He said the program in each year would
account for approximately 40 per cent of that
year's credits. The other 60 per cent would be
used for the honors subjects in the area of
specialization.
"We suspect that . . . freedom from examinations will prove to be particulary significant,"
Macdonald said in the letter.
"We hope and expect to find a higher and
more desirable level of motivation directed toward learning rather than merely passing examinations."
Macdonald named the following features of
the program intended to improve the learning
environment:
—All students will live in residences;
—Graduate students will be paid fellowships
to serve as tutors;
—The staff-student ratio will be one to 10;
Senate race moving
Six more candidates have submitted
nomination forms for student senate positions.
They are Mark Waldman, graduate
studies; Arnold Abramson, law 3; Brian
Wallace, law 3; Hugh Madden, commerce 3;
Richard French, science 4; Ken Hallatt, commerce 3.
Election of one graduate and three undergraduate senators will be held Oct. 18, said
Kim Campbell, second vice-president of the
Alma Mater Society.
Previously nominated were Kirsten
Emmott, science 4; Gabor Mate, arts 4; Ray
Larsen, arts 4, and Ian Worley, graduate
studies.
Nominations closed Wednesday.
—Teaching   will   be   primarily   tutorials   and
seminars;
—There will be few lectures, some by students;
—Frequent essays;
—Some classes would be held  in French in
subjects other than French;
—The college would have its own library.
(Macdonald said the college had already
received a suitable  10,000 volume collection.)
(Librarian Basil Stuart-Stubbs said Thursday the collection was donated by General Victor
Odium who specified that the collection be
housed separately from the UBC library. The
books have been in storage for four years.)
Macdonald also said the college would have
a record collection and a rotating art collection.
In the letter he told Joseph M. Daniel Jr.,
secretary of the foundation, that the goals of the
college are "intended to provide the best possible
background for the continuing pursuit of knowledge."
"We believe that we are approaching a
matter of great significance to all state institutions and one which will be of more importance
as the universities get larger and larger.
"We are confident that if our experiment is
successful we can change the character of college education in this university and can provide
a useful model for others," Macdonald said.
McDaniel wrote back a letter of refusal Jan.
31, 1964.
"I am very sorry to inform you that the
foundation is unable to respond affirmatively
to your request," McDaniel told Macdonald.
"We are in sympathy .with your overall
purpose of improving the quality of general education for larger and larger numbers of people
in Canada but because of the current emphases
and objectives of our education program and
the fact we must work within clearly defined
program limits we have reluctantly concluded
that we are not in a position to support your
project," he said.
See:
TO PAGE 13
MAC'S COLLEGE
No, Virginia
No, Virginia, there will be no Ubyssey next
Tuesday.
Anticipating a hearty Thanksgiving, Ubyssey
staffers have announced they will publish no
paper until next Thursday, Virginia.
(Who the hell is Virginia?)
■- ;;«as2« Page 2
THE     U BYSSEY
Friday,   October   6,   1967
/MONEY IMPORTANT
If it sells,  its art
By MIKE FINLAY
The quality of art in our
society varies with its money
value, says UBC anthropology
professor Bill Willmott.
Speaking before the third
arts-politics symposium sponsored by the arts undergraduate
society, Willmott told 200 persons that art in our society is
becoming more and more commercial.
As an example, he referred
to a gifted chemistry student
developing a more beautiful
salt crystal for a pretzel company because it was profitable.
,'The same applies to art;
art in our society is whatever
a very small elite decides will
sell," he said.
Willmott also compared art
in marxist countries to art in
capitalist nations.
"In marxist countries, art is
designed to serve the revolution and the people; the mass-
WILLMOTT
es are encouraged  to criticize
art," he said.
Speaking on China, Willmott
said   he   admired   Mao   Tse-
Tung's emphasis on art in
everyday life and the cultural
revolution.
"All art is becoming westernized; the cultural revolution should have very positive
benefits."
He said he hoped that eventually the freedom of western
art could combine with the
social significance of art in
China.
"Each culture has something
to learn from the other."
Willmott was third in the
series of speakers for the symposium, which will continue
this weekend at Cecil Green
Park.
Tickets for the weekend
session, which will include
poetry and play readings,
films, dancing and discourse,
are available at the Alma
Mater Society office, from the
academic activities committee,
or from the arts undergraduate
society.
Unreliable student help out of work
By MARIANNE BEICHEL
Jobs on campus this year are about as plentiful as parking spaces.
"Fewer jobs than ever are available to students this year," said Mrs. Nancy Keith-Murray,
head of part-time and summer employment at
the student placement office.
"Because of irresponsible attitude on the part
of students—leaving their jobs without sufficient
notice being the most prevalent reason — per
manent help is hired to provide reliable and
efficient service in library and food services," |
she said.
This year only students known to be reliable I
were hired back, said Mrs. Keith-Murrary. Few |
newcomers got jobs.
She said student loans, which are now easy I
to get, have created a situation in which students [
do not depend on jobs as much as before.
"This leads to irresponsible job-quitting."
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DON'T SIT ON YOUR
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The Sweatshirt You Want
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SWEATSHIRT STYLES:
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Introducing 'Yacht' and 'Kodel'
ALSO JACKETS:
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Bench Coat -$26.98
CAMPUS
A GO-GO sat oct 7
WILDEST  DANCE  OF  THE  YEAR
3 BAN DSthe best ,n r°ck
the best in psychedelic
and the sexiest GO-GO GIRLS on campus!
UBC ARMOURIES
ONLY   $2.00 person
or $3.50 couple
FOR THE FRIVOLOUS HEART
THIS ELEGANT
Glenayr
0SMy
Leap into fashion with this
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To complete the pretty picture,
these superbly tailored pure
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match all bright new Kitten
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Pl»E VIRGIN WOO.
Look for the
Woolmark on the label
it is not a genuine KITTEN. Friday, October 6,  1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
4  Jfr~.    -~-   V
||
"VENGEANCE," RANG OUT the war cry of the black and blue Thursday. Red-jacketed
engineers fled from the sciencemen, who turned out in droves to avenge indignities forced
on John Taylor, first vice-president of the science undergraduate society. Earlier, engineers
dressed him in red underwear and turned him loose. In revenge, the test tubers turned on
the peace-loving red horde. Amidst flame and smoke from fireworks and steam from dry
ice, they dunked any luckless engineer found near the library. "This pound was polluted
by little red animals throwing things into it", shouted Taylor. "But we think we've found a
cure." In triumph, the sciencemen planted a sign naming the pool the "Octopus Johnson
Memorial Pond."
BY EXPERTS
Right of decision doomed
British science newsman Lord Ritchie-Calder
Jovially spread the word of gloom and doom
at UBC Thursday night.
Calder, on a lecture tour sponsored by ft
local newspaper, warned that mankind is surrendering its right to decide its future to the
tyranny of so-called experts.
"Nothing makes me so angry as to hear those
who are supposed to be decision-makers relying
on so-called facts or expert opinions as a substitute for the judgment we expect them to
make," he said.
Calder said there is nothing in the training
'bt an 'expert' which qualifies him as a man of
judgment.
"Science is not wisdom,  science is know-
Editorial prompts
bowling review
The Alma Mater Society has cocked a sympathetic ear to criticism of a proposed eight-lane
bowling alley in the Student Union Building.
"We aim to provide what the students will
use," AMS president Shaun Sullivan said Thursday.
"We are prepared to change our plans, but
we need suggestions from the student body. If
any idea is feasible and generally acceptable,
we'll take steps to see it through."
Sullivan was commenting on an editorial in
Wednesday's Ubyssey, which suggested bowling
is losing popularity.
"We realize that the interest in bowling has
declined, but we can't anticipate the student's
likes," Sullivan said.
ledge," he said.   "Wisdom is knowledge tempered by judgment."
Calder said scientists today are overwhelmed
by a Niagara of knowledge to the point where
it is almost impossible for them to even keep
up with literature in their own fields.
"The expert is usually single-track minded,
and cannot see the relationship to other things,
or the social implications, of his work."
Machines, he warned, cannot make value
judgments.
He said the launching of the Russian sputnik
started a space-race stampede which today is costing $10 billion a year.
The results experts quote from past projects
are used to justify more and more costly projects
ad infinitum, he said.
Scientists are discovering and applying new
ways of doing things faster than we can judge
whether or not they are potentially destructive.
Calder foresees the time when governments
are completely controlled by computers and the
faceless 'fact-finding' experts who are themselves
the prisoners of technology.
Frats welcome?
UBC fraternities and sororities will
have to prove to the senate that they don't
discriminate.
The groups were instructed five years
ago by the senate to remove discriminatory
clauses against Jews, negroes and orientals
from their constitutions.
Those that have not removed such
clauses by the senate's Oct. 25 meeting
face disaffiliation from UBC.
Fraternity and sorority officers will report to registrar Jack Parnell, who will
relay the news to the senate meeting.
*>
Govt blocks UBC
business center
By HEW GWYNNE
A suggestion for the development of a new campus
shopping center ran into a provincial government roadblock Thursday.
The suggestion, made in a Ubyssey interview by
associate English professor Thomas Blom, is to develop a
major business center along the new Sixteenth Avenue
extension.
This, Blom said, would offer convenience to the entire
population of UBC, and provide a competitive incentive to
lower campus prices.
The center could include a student-run coffee house,
which could be a place for resident students to relax during
evening hours, he said.
UBC Planner John Porter said Thursday he was interested in the plan, but that the new road is under the
jurisdiction of the provincial highways department, whose
approval would be necessary for roadside construction.
A highways department spokesman said in Victoria
the endowment lands are administered by the university,
who only require a permit from the highways department
for development on the approachway.
No likely problems exist in getting the permit, the
spokesman added.
But Arnie Myers, UBC director of information, said
Thursday the actual control of the endowment lands is
theoretically handled by a non-existent board called The
Universities Real Estate Corporation.
This board was created as Bill 90 during the 1965
legislative assembly, Myers said.
All that was required following passage of the Bill
was a proclamation by Lieut.-Governor George Pearkes.
This has never been done.
In the meantime, Myers said, no government-controlled
endowment lands can be sold.
Only when Premier Bennett names the five-man board  f
corporation can development of such  a business  center  (^
I  go ahead. *«
1 A  spokesman  for the  department of lands  said  in  Ti
If   Victoria Thursday that there is no reason that he knows   '-*
I   of that the board has not been named.
| Highways minister Gaglardi was unavailable for com-
p   ment to The Ubyssey. After reaching the minister's office    -
i   by   phone,   this   reporter   was   asked   to   hold   on   while
.    Gaglardi talked on another line. f-
After two minutes, a secretary said Gaglardi had left    *
*   his office.
i
New plans  (again?)
for SUB access  road
By PAUL KNOX
UBC's board of governors has new plans for the access
road to the Student Union Building.
At its meeting this week, the board favored a road parallel
to Wesbrook Cres. between Chancellor and University boulevards, with a branch artery leading from the new road to SUB.
The review came after Shaun Sullivan, Alma Mater
Society president, criticized an earlier plan at a meeting of
the B of G's property committee Monday.
The plan, released in July, called for a two-way access road
west from University which curved to miss Wesbrook north
of College Highroad. This was reported favored by endowment
lands ratepayers. **
Sullivan told the B of G that the plan wouldn't meet the
needs of UBC's increasing traffic.
The board has not definitely decided on an alternative access
road and is still looking at possible alternatives, he said Thursday.
He said the AMS anticipates no trouble from ratepayers over
the new plan, as the road parallel to Wesbrook will be on
university property. The boundary between the endowment
lands and the university runs 27 feet west of Wesbrook.
Sullivan also said the AMS will take part in all future
negotiations on the access road.
ALL RIGHT! HOW DO YOU TELL A^ WRONG MAIN] I THINK
2r
^ NEVER MIND THIS K1D!FRUN0'S
you fiusTBEA/yw/>riFN are /umcmf
BLORGS mSTffiHn BUT THEY WJN'T, AND
tfrjptWOrVE PERSON'CAN MAKE THEM!
Mffi.UHDERmiNED!\£ OUTNUTIBErntiEFD
YOU MEAN TtiEEMGrnW THE U8YSSCY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey subscribes to the press services
of Pacific Student Press, of which it is founding member, and Underground
Press Syndicate. Authorized second class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. City editor, 224-3916. Other
calls, 224-3242; editor, local 25; photo. Page Friday, loc. 24; sports, loe.
23; advertising, loc. 26. Telex 04-524.
SPIRITUAL BOMBS
OCTOBER 6, 1967
>'»''<'"
Hysteria
Where there is hysteria there is ignorance.
A classic example of this rule of human nature was
Tuesday's city council meeting debate on the suspension
of the business licence of The Georgia Straight.
Ubyssey reporter Charlotte Haire's account of the
meeting (Oct. 5, page 3) relates the sickening story of
frightened aldermen buckling under to pressure tactics
of hysterical — and ignoTant — people.
It is saddening that much of the hysteria came from
once-respectable groups like the parent-teachers association, council of women — and even girl guides.
But their behavior was hardly worse than that of
one Donald Halliday, who poses as a Christian minister.
Halliday, with the same spirit shown by the good
citizens who built the Nazi concentration camps, urged
Mayor Tom Campbell to snip the ears from ihe hippies—
"those two-legged rats."
These people were hysterical out of necessity —
their argument for banning the Straight was pitifully
weak.
The argument, such as it was, said that the Straight
was a filthy and obscene and dirty and trashy and not-
very-nice-at-all rag. It was being read by children. These
children, in their foTmative years and lacking mature
judgment, were likely to be damaged by reading the
Straight. Therefore, city hall should stop publication of
the paper by removing its license.
Now, plainly, this is nonsense.
First, there is no evidence that the reading of
pornography and obscenity is harmful to children.
Most educated opinion is that such reading is not
harmful. In fact, one study of the problem, carried out
by a pair of Boston psychiatrists, indicated such reading
could be beneficial. Whether obscenity is harmful or
beneficial to children is arguable — but the argument
is irrelevant in the case at hand.
It does not make sense to say that because children
shouldn't read a publication, no one should be allowed to
read it. Such a policy would ban publication of all
material considered unsuitable for the minds of children.
Censorship on these grounds, we believe, is not quite
fair to adults.
Left-right politics have been irrelevant during the
Georgia Straight controversy. This was made clear by
the stand of former Conservative MP Ernie Rroome in
opposing the license suspension.
Said Broome: "I'm not in favor of mob appeals,
whether it is PTAs or Devil's Angels.
Arch-conservative Broome was speaking up against
legislation by hysteria. So are we.
In fact, if we didn't know better we might even say
the PTA, council of women, and girl guides ought to
lose their licenses on grounds of obscenity.
But that's for the courts to decide.
I Vote here
I What do we want to do with a 110 foot by 45
foot room of 5,000 square feet?
I The  room  is  in  the  now-under-cons|ruction
■     Student Union Building. It is presently slated to
I     contain eight bowling alleys.
But   Alma   Mater   Society   president   Shaun
I     Sullivan  agrees  with a  Ubyssey  suggestion  that
maybe students don't really want bowling alleys.
I These alternate uses for the basement room
have been suggested: indoor swimming pool, nur-
Isery, bull ring, sauna bath, zen meditation room,
casino, indoor ski slope, giant sandbox, zoo, morgue,
lapidary, brothel, pub, air raid shelter, stable.
I Maybe you've got another suggestion. It's youi
I     room. Students' decision will be announced in nexl
I     Thursday's Ubyssey.
I believe the space in SUB presently planned
for bowling alleys should be used for „	
Stop this commie plot!
By GABOR MATE
As undoubtedly all readers
of The Ubyssey are aware,
Billy Graham has a syndicated
column in The Vancouver
Province every morning. Acting as a sort of spiritual Dear
Abby the eminent man of God
dispenses advice to the metaphysically forlorn. The following question and answer appeared one day last summer:
Question: I want to know
how I can be more effective
on my campus. I want to set
off a spiritual bomb in my
school, but I don't know how
to go about it.
Answer: Thank God for
young people like you who
recognize the need for a spiritual revolution in our schools.
Any close reading of the
above expostulation and Graham's reply will yield forth the
ugly truth that Graham is the
most   cunning   and   insidious
kind of Communist agent..
To begin with, one of Graham's fanatical young acolytes
wishes to know how he can be
a more effective terrorist. He
wants to set off a bomb — for
what reason but to kill, maim,
and mutilate people?
To the insatiable Graham,
however, such individual terrorism is not enough. He wants
to foment an entire "spiritual
revolution" — a ridiculously
transparent euphemism for a
Mao-style cultural revolution.
To this end he suggests the
organization of a clandestine
revolutionary party, to hide
under the pious name of "Bible
Club."
Graham — or is his real
name Guevera? — must not be
allowed to succeed in his subversive schemes. This campus
must not be allowed to become
the scene of a Peking-type cul-
"Discrimination? Why, nobody but white anglo-saxon
bourgeois would want to join anyway."
We may be freaks,
but we aren't outcasts
I
I
I Fill in the blank and deliver to The Ubyssey,   I
Brock Hall. '
By MIKE LOPATECKI
"UBC psychologists survey
attitudes toward outcasts. . . .
The team also submitted questionnaires to students . . ."
(Ubyssey, Sept. 29).
(Now, as a student, I may
belong to a minority group,
my mental capacity may even
be a handicap, but to call me
an outcast . . . Yet I'm sure I
was one of the first the psychologist chose for an interview. In any crowd I just stand
out to disadvantage.
"What kind of a car do you
drive?" was the first question.
To assess my public image, I
knew. I told him I don't drive.
He seemed pleased. Just the
kind of answer he expected;
he had me ticker-taped. And
he'd soon have me up there
with the other disadvantaged
persons: the ex-cons, the Chinese immigrants, and the women.
He asked if I had ever held
down a job for more than four
months. I admitted I had not
but that was just because
classes were starting again.
He recognized the symptoms
immediately: restless, unreliable,     persecution     complex,
B.O. In fact I was so bad he
gave up his interviews and
went back to the faculty club.
He assured me that with the
help of his study he would
find a place for me in society,
yes, even with my B.A.
I know as a student I belong
to a special caste and I know it's
not in, that I couldn't go to the
sportsmen's dinner. I may even
be a member of a fringe
group, but to say I'm an outcast isn't fair.
EDITOR: Danny Stoffman
City   Stuart Gray
News   Susan Gransby
Managing  Murray McMillan
Photo   Kurt Hilger
Associate .... Al Birnie, Klrsten Emmott
Senior  Pat Hrushowy
Sports  Mike Jessen
Wire   Charlotte Haire
Page Friday  Judy Bing
Ass't. Editor   Boni Lee
tural revolution.
Graham - Guevera must
therefore be defeated by a
bold assault on his infiltra-
tionary efforts. We shall adopt
the tactics that the Americans
are using with such great success in Vietnam. These are the
same ones which made possible
the brilliant victories of
Chiang Kai-shek in China, Batista in Cuba, and Napoleon in
Russia.
Our tactic will be to adopt
the enemy's tactics. We shall
form a counter-organization to
his proposed revolutionary
movement. If Graham-Guevera
insists on spreading his degenerate Commie germs through
a Bible Club, then all those
opposed to his evil designs
should join the Atheist Club—
possibly the last bulwark
against the rising tide of
Maoist - Castroist - Communist -
Grahamist  subversion.
UBC revolt
has begun
By BILL GRAF
One of the greatest problems confronting the post-war
generation is what to do about
the society we live in.
And there is something unquestionably wrong with a
social structure that, sustained
by armaments production,
offers as its primary values
money, possession, consumption and conformity.
The laws concerning abortion, ' censorship, welfare and
birth control are a farce.
There are obvious flaws in
the political, educational and
economic orders.
The only way to drop out is
to go off into the woods by
yourself and forget the world.
If you stay you can either
conform or revolt.
At UBC the revolution has
begun, led by Mr. Persky and
Co. A government that exists
for people, as the arts president points out, instead of for
nice impersonal things like
money and forms.
A society in which everyone
can participate of its collective offerings while retaining
his own identity. A place for
everyone. Voluntary participation.
No system, no ideology, no
impositions and no interference. Just people.
Sound Utopian? It is and it
works.
Leaping from sagging plpea, the
horde was floored. Pipe down, cried
the plumber, who tore himself away
with a wrench, only to be greeted
by a flood of yogurt. Even the
carpenter was hammered. Ann Arky
stood nailed to the spot, bearing
598 tubes of toothpaste. Playing
bagpipes were Scott MacRae, Mike
Finlay, Judy Young, Luanne Armstrong, Mark DeCoursey, Richard
Baer, Jane Kennon, Paul Knox and
Laurie Dunbar. Toasting a lone
blorg was Jim Luckey, while Alexandra Volkoff mourned, Fred Caw-
sey savored, and Irene Wasilewskl
sang in Zulu. Steve Jackson felt
happier, and Norman Hew Gwynne
made 187 calls, but didn't get a dime
back.  Irving Fetish was sick.
Meanwhile, a telegram arrived
arrived from Usk, B.C., confirming
the editorial board meeting at noon.
Sprinting about in the darkroom
were Chris Blake, George Hollo,
Lawrence Woodd and Bob Brown,
who all had runny noses. ©COPYRIGHT   '?66   8V    MICHAEL   QUK5LEV pi
music
-4?,!^-.\'",ijj«a?.
OCTOBER 6, 1967
editors: judy bing
Stephen scobie
cohort: dave welsh
politics: bert hill
cartoons: rae moster
arnold saba
COVER: Composed by theatre student Michael Quig-
ley, "Nicola" is part of a
series called "Six Filles."
Unlike the moronic "simplified versions" of popular songs, "Nicola" is la
vraie chose, with no mercy
taken on those unfortunates who can't reach more
than an octave in the left
hand. (Par the par, all the
left-hand chords in the
piece are to be "rolled",
except those with a vertical line in front of them.)
The original meaning of
the Greek word "symposium" is "drinking together."
Put that in your collection of useless information
but read on for some useful.
Fall Symposium, which
is not a drinking party,
starts tonight at Cecil
Green Park. This year the
topic of the Symposium is
Art and Politics, to be
studied through artistic and
political activities as well
as through discussions of
the relationship of the two.
The format of the Symposium is all new: five
speakers who are taking
part — Peter Cameron,
Arthur Ericksen, Bill Wil-
mot, Robin Blaser, and Bill
Reid — have each lectured
in the course of the past
week.
(Barbara Shumiatcher is
the mother of this invention.) The discussion tonight will attempt to clarify
the difference among the
five speakers and define
the direction of future
discussion.
Tomorrow and Sunday
there will be poetry readings, an instant newspaper, debating, soapboxing, poster painting, dancing, eating, a reading of the
play MacBird by members
of the theatre department,
and a showing of the controversial d o c u m entary
Sons and Daughters about
the peace movement in the
U.S.
All in all, an imaginative approach to an urgent
'testion to every un**
...j.,-,*
pf 2wo
m
Sgt. Pepper peps up pop
By MIKE UDY
Everyone knows something has happened to pop music
in the last year or two. It seems as though it has somehow
caught up with the people who listen to it. Instead of offering the lowest common denominator (which must be the
basic beat Time and Life talk about), it now offers the
highest common multiple (if there is such a thing) of
memories, impressions and feelings.
Anyone who has listened to Sgt. Pepper's has their
own particular thing worked out about what it's like to
listen to; and so it may be with the rest of pop music. So
here are a few ideas about what might be going on.
Consider, if you will, painting with sound. Now, every
song is a painting of some kind. Each song is a short period
of structured time as a canvas may ibe structured space.
LINEAR
It seems that much pop music of the past and of today is
a kind of monochrome art. The arrangement is linear and of
a piece. By linear is meant the record starts at zero and
takes you to three minutes, or whatever, via connections in
a linear fashion. The music is layered and converges upon
the line of time that you follow through the song. ("Standing
in the shadows" signalled the frenetic peak of this method
of construction.) Furthermore, the tones of the notes used
tend to converge, mentally, into a single impression so that
the overall effect is singular rather than a series of suspended impressions, each differentiated, yet all integrated. The
music is basically constructed in parallel lines, but is not
remembered that way. And you can find this out by listening
to any R&B band.
This linear kind of music has been brought to super
sophistication by groups like the Jimi Hendrix Experience,
Moby Grape, and in Vancouver, the Fast Flying Vestibule.
Essentially the music takes you down a line and sends off
things along the way that comprise the beauty of it. This is
especially true of Moby Grape and the FFV. Jimi Hendrix
does something like it, but plays with time so that the line
bends unexpectedly.
SPATIAL
Now, somewhere, the Beatles and others have broken
out of this linear arrangement into something we can call
spacial arrangement. A finite piece of silence is selected at
random, and into it, often by the means of tapes, are placed
linear strips of sound. In this kind of arrangement not
only is the sound important, but also the silence. From this
can come the series of impressions, each differentiated, yet
all integrated, mentioned above. For now the strips of sound
have dimension in space (silence) and maintain a distance
between one another. And the awareness of the distance
itself is a part of the music in addition to the awareness
of harmonies created by the distance that comes from the
linear music. Most of the latest Beatles record is like this,
and some other exponents are Country Joe and the Fish, the
Beach Boys, Sagittarius, and the Collectors.
From this kind of spacial arrangement a whole new
dramatic depth has appeared in pop music. It is as though
sound perspective has been discovered.
Obviously, I've made oversimplifications to get to this
point, and the distinction between the two kinds of music
is not always as clear as I would have you believe since one
group can obviously do both. But five years ago it couldn't.
A change has been.
If the above makes no sense, consider the words. Maybe
you remember, say, 1964 ? If you were a pop music addict,
relatively speaking, things were tough. Very few people
knew how to say the right things all the time. If you liked
Roy Orbison, then maybe he could do it. I can hardly
remember who else could. But at any rate, a record would
appear saying just the right thing and the group would
never be heard of again.
IDENTIFICATION
Then the Beatles came. And they said the right things
consistently as did the Rolling Stones and others. Suddenly
the musicians creating pop music and the audience listening
to it had become one and positive identification set in with
the symptoms of mobs, imitators and look-alikes.
Now this thing has grown from unqualified enthusiasm
to mutual respect in the last two years. And the lyrics have
changed accordingly. (They probably changed first, but it's
so hard to tell.) Hence we have come from "no satisfaction"
to being "a rich man." The lyrics move increasingly inside
from a point of mutual agreement about no satisfaction,
through the private life of Eleanor Rigby, to within you
and without you again. And the thing that the words come
from inside of is what it's like to be alive. What is more,
people are getting the message.
And there is more. Chester Manning wrote an article
about pop music in a fairly recent edition of the Oracle. In
it he mentioned a few things about the physiological effects
of music; how a base line, being effective mainly in the
lower abdomen, can give a sense of physical movement and
excitement; how a high trilling guitar or organ can take
'4 k^X&r-MM ■
FAT ANGEL, Mama Cass of the Mamas and the Papas one
of the groups with the new sound in rock music — thanks
to Cheetah magazine.
your concentration miles away. In short he foresees a kind
of music that will totally involve the physical senses of the
listener, as well as his mental processes. Some of this can
be seen already in Sgt. Pepper's, e.g. "Getting better all
the time." So that with special dimension, physical involvement, and lyrics that are life, pop music can become a
teacher as well as a reflection and an entertainment, and
can take on the dimensions of other art forms.
 contents	
music     .    . pf 2
zap  pf 3
mexico  pf 3
counselling  pf 3
outside in .    .    . pf 4
comment  pf 4
film  pf 4
poetry  pf 5
theatre   pf 5
democracy  pf 6
committees  pf 7
marines  pf 8
Friday,  October  6,   1967 Two on CIASP: social reform,
tortilla and beans for breakfast
Why haven't there been any
suggestions from the masses
for a new name for this bonbon?
ISOLATIONIST: We think
Science Dean Okulitch should
" be paraded through the streets
in a tall paper hat and a sign
reading 'I refused to serve the
people' for having his office in
the fine arts building. There
are science students on cam-
^pus who haven't even heard
of him.
Not only that, but SUS
president Robin Russell's office
is over by the education building.
We'll say this, though—SUS
council meetings are delight-
' fully unstructured. Probably
it's because their tiny office is
too small for a horseshoe-
shaped table.
OH CHRIST, MUTTERED
SULLIVAN: While we're on
the subject of councils — AMS
"' president Shaun Sullivan
stumbled over the pronunciation of agenda item "Election
rules and procedures" last
Monday night. He raised a tit-
_ ter by substituting an "r" for
the "1" in the first word. "My,"
said Kim Campbell, "this is
certainly a structured council."
AWK DEPT.: It happened in
the bio science building. A
- zoology student felt the call
and entered a washroom.
Scarcely was he comfortable
when he heard female voices.
It was a faculty women's John.
^He was trapped for fifteen
minutes . . .
HIGH SPY: Our Fourth
Avenue friend tells us the
diggers next door were sheltering a fifteen-year-old runaway up until the weekend,
when the cops came for her.
They brought four squad
cars, eight patrolmen, two
plainclothesmen and a paddy
wagon to grab the screaming
teenybopper.
'.One of the guys fell
through a window in the
struggle', says our friend.
Poor fellow ...
EXPOSURE: VOC mountaineers are sorry to see
the old stadium go, for it was
one of their favorite climbing
schools. An ascent has been
made of the new stadium, but
we don't know if it was the
same guy who climbed one of
»- the new medicine buildings
barefoot. And the new forestry-aggie building is reported
unclimbable.
GLUM GUM: Artsangel
Stan Persky appeared on
videotape Wednesday at the
- colloquium on university education. Ed prez Gary Gumley
was heard to sigh something
about not letting personal
prejudice color one's thinking
Jtas Persky slammed the exam
and lecture system. Gumley
disapproves of Persky, and
why? Because the arts council is spending little time on
Homecoming plans this year.
Friday, October 6,  1967
By HAROLD ARMSTRONG
In the popular student quest for social
reform there is an urgent need for students to agitate within the existing social
system for a transformation in public
attitude. Tuning-in and dropping out
may be socially elite now, but it is facile
and unproductive.
Students throughout the continent
have been "finding themselves" through
narrow evaluations of student individuality, rights and roles. Few have given consideration to the responsibility of putting
at society's service their knowledge and
understanding which seem to respond
so readily in unmasking the deficiencies
of our so-called "democracy".
There are some, however, who find
scope for expression in the programs of
the Peace Corps, CUSO, VICTA, and the
Company of Young Canadians.
There were ten UBC students who
spent the past summer trying to assert
the primacy of interdependence and cooperation in a similar way, in the service of the Conference of Interamerican
Student Projects, an international student
development organization.
Armed with such a vague ideal and
a sense of adolescent vocation these ten
CIASPers attempted to tackle the challenge of community development for two
months in the undeveloped areas of
Mexico.
They faced the ordeal of trying to
communicate through language and by
the example of personal commitment the
advantages of an intercultural exchange
for the mutual benefit of both the Mexicans and themselves.
They were not dismayed by any failures to improve the material lot of the
Oaxacans in whose villages and towns
they lived. Not being technical specialists the UBC CIASPers placed emphasis
on sharing with these Mexicans the problems of the pueblos rather than offering
ready solutions in typical Yankee fashion.
Unique amongst student organizations,
CIASP — the international, non-govern
ment sponsored movement — works on
the grass-roots level through a structure
of student-community projects in Mexico.
From their friendships the UBC
"Amigos" discovered new vistas for personal growth, and developed a new perspective on their own culture when they
returned.
They realized as Huxley said that
"You accept the world, and make use of
it; you make use of everything you do, of
everything that happens to you, of all
the things you see and hear and taste
and touch, as so many means to your
liberation from the prison of yourself."
Maybe the ten UBC students didn't
return from Mexico with any solutions
but they are in a better position to pose
more sensitive questions. There is nothing extraordinary or radical in their
attitudes or appearance to indicate the
deeper appreciation for social reform
they gained in Mexico.
By SCOTT MacRAE
Can you picture yourself arising from
your straw bed, heeding the call of nature in unusual ways, and starting the
day with a tortilla and beans breakfast?
This was part of the daily living
routine of ten UBC students who spent
last summer in rural Mexico with the
Conference on Inter-American Student
Projects.
CIASP, a student action group, began
in 1961 when a group of Yale and Berkley University students started a project
in Mexico. The organization now has
branches on 160 campuses in the U.S. and
Canada and last summer had 800 students working in 13 states in Mexico.
Valerie Turner, a graduate student
in the Spanish department, gave two experiences which typify the challenge of
the program.
"The people were not unfriendly to
us but they became skeptical when we
were not able to cure a child deaf from
birth," Miss Turner said.
She told of a bizarre experience of
one group.
"They had to leave a project early
when the family with which they were
living became involved in a local vendetta. Shots were fired into the living
room of the house."
The students each raised $200 as part
of a CIASP group project at UBC last
year. Upon arrival in Mexico City they
were assigned projects.
Their purpose was to act as a catalyst
to help Mexicans help themselves, Miss
Turner said.
"Los amigos," as the students called
themselves, were involved in such projects as teaching hygiene, sewing, first
aid and instituting adult literacy programs. They helped build stoves, sanitary
facilities and schools.
CIASP maintains an office in Mexico
City with a social worker and a student
who research and assign summer projects.
The conference consists of five autonomous regions which meet once a year.
All funds are raised within the regions and grants and donations supplement group fund raising schemes.
BATTERY CREATES SPARKS
By BERYL HALE
The writer was formerly associated
with   Student   Services   which   include
Counselling and Placement.
All students entering first or second
year university for the first time are required by the University of British
Columbia Board of Governors to write
the Counselling test battery before being allowed to register and, being gener
ally shy, group oriented, and accustomed
to follow authority without question,
they do so. Thus, they allow themselves
to be subjected to one of the greatest
impositions, indignities, and indeed
hoaxes, afforded by administration.
The test battery ordeal is a four-hour
nightmare which most students would
prefer to forget as soon as possible; but
one which the Counselling Office has
skillfully managed to persuade the Board
of Governors is beneficial, if not essential, to the student body. Not much
effort is made to dispel the generally
accepted, but mistaken belief, that the
test battery is an "entrance exam" upon
which the future university attendance
of the student depends. It is a testing
situation engendered by fear, conducted
with autocracy and regimentation, ostensibly to help the student, but primarily
carried out to promote and pressure interviews at the University Counselling
Office and thereby maintain the lucrative positions held by the counsellors.
In forcing the whole student body to
take the tests, a fairly accurate and
elaborate norm-scale for test interpretation can be developed annually — at a
rather alarming expense to the university.   And, by conducting a compulsory
test battery every year the counsellors
are assuring themselves of a guaranteed
percentage of counsellees. The percentage of students who actually do enter
the Counselling office is pathetically
small in comparison to the thousands
who sit for the test battery (see Counselling Office's Annual Report) and the
majority of people are prompted by
curiosity as to their best results; like
movie-goers, they demand their money's
worth—the overall picture. Some students are intimidated into seeking a counsellor's advice having been led to believe
during the test battery that interpretation of the Calendar is virtually impossible, and possibly dangerous; the student's insecurities are mercilessly played
upon.
What, exactly, does the test-battery
reveal about a student's potential after
all? Actually, it reveals no more than
the Grade 12 governmental scholarship
exams as to the student's standing against
i&x.->.
others from the province. The test battery reveals less than the high school
transcript of record, which covers a
three-year span; and for out-of-province
or foreign students, the test battery is
often useless in evaluation, as it seldom
covers material the individual is familiar
with. The short "MAC & S" Interest
Test gives only a superficial interest in
profile. To give the student individualized approval, more intensive, thorough
testing is required, and this work needs
to be done under separate supervision.
Such individualized testing is available
to students, but once again the Counselling Office stipulates that an interview
must precede such a service.
To censure the actual work of the
counselling office entirely, would, however, be unfair. Over the past five
years working in the front office, typing
counselling reports, making appointments, mimeographing bulletins, etc., I
have observed the counsellors and believe that some of them are sincerely
concerned with the well-being of the
student. These counsellors work tirelessly, conscientiously, and selflessly,
planning course programs, extending an
encouraging hand, and helping students
to make wise career-choices and to make
the best use of their potential. Their
genuine involvement with the student
body is worthy of praise and above
reproach.
But, to condone the continued compulsory administration of the test-battery would only serve to sustain the
false belief that the university, as a
whole, is benefitting, and would only
protract a long unexposed chicanery. flpinsiMQjj
6Y SCOTT LAWRANct*
comment
Unfortunately, the issues
concerning the Georgia
Straight seem, at least for the
time being, dead issues.
In my opinion, the cancellation of the Straight's licence
is one more example of the
coercive interference of government into the lives of individuals. The Georgia Straight is at
least admirable for its attempt
to present an otherwise un-
presented approach to news.
No one complains of the systematic brainwashing of the
youth today that is carried on
so efficiently by the official
educators and mass media.
Both of the latter attempt,
and succeed, in transmitting
the most heinous aspects of
our western culture; the legitimacy of war, the consumer-
produced myth, and the generally accepted view that ends
justify the means.
The complicity of the mass
media in the mosaic of politics
pf 4our
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makes it paramount, for the
sake of truth, that independent
opinion has a voice. The Georgia Straight has been, or will
become, such a voice in Vancouver. It is logical that various governments will try to
suppress the so-called underground paper, not because it
is obscene in any sense of the
word that I know, but because
it presents a threat to the
ordered lies of our society.
Government must not be
allowed to impose its will, an
artificial one, on any manifestation of private opinion, let
alone public opinion, as expressed by the Straight.
Charles Peguy once wrote
"Everything that begins in
mysticism ends in politics. The
interest, the question, the essential is that in each order,
in each system, mysticism be
not devoured by the politics
to which it gave birth."
Briefly, the western tradition ascribes ultimate authority to an omnipotent, omniscient God, and the early hierarchy of the divine (as revealed to early Christian and Jewish mystics) readily found expression in the governments of
Judeo - Christian countries.
Government, as man, sanctioned by the divine.
And now, the Georgia
Straight, the only medium of
communication (in Vancouver,
at any rate) between the seers
and mystics (the hippies, the
poets — both the editors are
poets) and the masses of today, has been suspended by
self-made censors. The hippies
undeniably have a conception
of an ultimate reality, be that
Love, or Truth, or Pure Energy, Brahma of the Hindus,
Manitou of the Indians, or God
of the Christians. And the
sceptre of .politics cuts the
tongue from the rising consciousness of commited youth.
Hickory stick rules
in public schools
By GEORGE HOLLO
If you have just enrolled in Education, or if
you have suffered through some portion of it
but still feel sane, this article is for you.
Try to accept the fact that the faculty of
Education in UBC is run by people who have
very little conception about public schools in
BC.
They work on a level of presumption that
teachers are there to teach; that teachers are
allowed to experiment or stray; that you as a
teacher shall have all aids and supplies you need
as well as clerical help; that our school system
allows pupil freedom, and so on.
Surely, there are schools in BC which qualify
under some of these, but for the other 90 per
cent you will have to learn otherwise.
If you are an imaginative teacher, you shall
have to live within the constricted rules of the
establishment.
No more experimentation, no more freedom.
Meanwhile, back at UBC there is another
type of faculty member you shall have the
misfortune to meet.
This kind has been part  of the  almighty
establishment for scores of years.
He thinks that the twenties were such
wonderful years for education and wishes to
bring those back.
Deep down, he would like to advise you to
teach to the tune of the hickory stick but realizes
that this is impractical.
So he'll teach you, with strong emphasis,
the various ways you must keep learning a
disciplined situation.
At the same time, he will bore you with his
lectures, since he is too old to do any better.
Beware though; his word is law.
So, you may experience a sense of security
when   your   profs  assign   you   homework   and
otherwise discourage the few from disagreeing^
with set principles.
There are some instructors this year that
will tell you that you are only first year so
you'll be more susceptible next year and the
years after.
If you have a mind of your own now, save it!
In the faculty of Education, it is a precious
and rare commodity.
LINCOLN'S  UNDRESS
By PETER LINCOLN
Standard berated opineing undress to the
new spewdents:
As your prevalent, I feed an emormouth
repondability to seed that you resieve the best
vegetation in view of the pregnant circumscis-
ions. Donut be afreak to come to me with your
problemishes. My drawer is always open (a gross
overbite on my part mainlinely due to an early
asfixation for ogre women, Jenny being the first
and chaste).
But why are we here in the first pace you
might be asking yourelves. Whenever you have
any droubts, creep in bind our motley "Up
Yours."
It will strangle you in good bread (a clock-
wheel termite for mandatory exchange). Dismember also the three principulls of Laboratory,
Maternity and B-quality which you can imply -
in every fade of your light here and in out as
welch. You are on your loan now, nobody is
going to tell you what^to doodle. We may offer
you some hellp but in the end you'll have to
make your own derisions.
To sum shit all up, its yours for the tafctas ~
(except for the Virgin Berry which do not touch,
perish the thought and bury the nose, for Edgar
and Paul thigh clingdom come, oddmen) the
starch we throw up to you with fondling hands.
Reinspect the tragicians that have becalm
anonymous with our name over the beers
(good ones at that I might addle but thats all
neither hare nor fox) therefore serves us well
Barnyard Crippling's lienes, "Eats is eats and
Betsy's Wet and never the train shall meet."
Thanqueue, virile mulch.
______ f am _____ _
Bergman  splits players   masks
_*.
By  K.   TOUGAS
To speak of Ingmar Bergman's
Persona is to mumble primarily about
the first few confused and spasmodic
images; the remainder of the film is
a flourishing and continuation of the
essence  revealed.
Before you, you see a black screen,
from which emerges a faint glimmer
of light which slowly moves, resolving and increasing to a blinding
glare, and becomes two carbon-rods of
a projector.
In fact, a projector has created the image of another projector: mirror-images of
each other.
On the screen is a constant conflict,
with a death figure, a woman's sex, titles,
a man's sex, a nail pounded into a contracting %pa_m, more titles, a still body of
a deformed boy, a monstrous spider, an
actress on stage, and so on.
The first section unwinds, and at
exactly half-way through the film, it
burns and breaks, so that more scattered
images flash — and the film re-starts.
The second half continues in a mirror-
type order, where all hypotheses established in the first half are destroyed.
Persona concerns two women, resembling each other quite closely, who are
brought together as nurse and patient.
Elizabeth  is  an actress who has chosen
not to speak, has refused to play any
roles, or take on a mask; Alma, the nurse,
reacts more deeply to the situation.
It at first appears that some sort of
character transferral takes place in which
Alma inherits the emotional disturbances
of her patient, while Elizabeth regains a
more optimistic view of life. However,
the change involves Alma to a much
greater degree than Elizabeth, so that
possibly  one  is  an  image  of  the  other
{they are physically). The confusing impressions of the nature of film resolve
and develop the two faces of one woman.
Are they the same person, or distinct?
(Remember the projectors and images.)
What is a part of what?
Bergman in the viewing of a delicate
and complicated relationship has produced
a valuable introspective situation. The
result is the metamorphosis of the double,
and mirages of the identical.
Bibi Andersson and Liv Ullmann  in  Persona,  now  showing   at  the  Varsity.
Friday,  October  6,   1967 Very stones cry out
stay    absorbed
By ARNOLD   SABA
"If there are any Noahs",
by Jim Brown. Published by
Very Stone House, $2.50.
Available at the UBC bookstore, Duthie's, or from 1911
Acadia Rd., Vancouver 8.
The  world   is   full   of  too
many    people   doing    things.
Thousands of people claim to
be poets and artists; so many,
in fact, that it is easy to wave
them all aside as hacks,  and
in    yourself.
So when another     poetry
book   comes
out, who really wants to
read it? Very
few people —
it is easier just
to   put   down
the    whole
SABA idea. Don't do
that to Jim Brown. He is talking about life, his and yours.
^    His poems, "The Bissets" and
"Poem for my Father", as well
as many  others  in the book,
reveal an attachment to people
and   a   very   real   feeling   of
love.
Especially charming are the
C poems of his domesticity.
Life   passing   through   him
leaves its impressions:
Today was the day
I bought a new conservative suit
and a rusty umbrella
Today was the day
the barber operated on my long
hair,
it didn't rain
Today was the day
I picked up photostatic copies of
my divorce
and paid for a new marriage
license
Today was the day
I forgot to punish myself
with dreams of old neurotic
empires
Moreover, behind all this he
can show us an inward horror, a crystal sterile death
that haunts our lives. We are
all in the same boat together.
Bittersweet   lovely   things   in
life and ugly things that can
happen — Jim Brown makes
you notice.
The book is decorated with
etchings by Sandra Cruick-
shank, that augment and ennoble, without illustrating. A
good combination of parallels
in art.
At times Jim seems a little
pre-occupied by form, but by
his own admission he has been
learning and style should be
a little more natural to him
from now on. I hope he carries
his human touch through into
even more advanced levels.
> ^ ^ ^ „«. tii^cr
Love for Love
is all you need
SAN FRANCISCO poet
George Stanley will read political poems at the Fall Symposium on art and politics this
weekend.
By KEITH  FRASER
With almost the entire seventeenth century separating their
plays, Ben Jonson and William Congreve shared similar
goals: to delight and instruct
audiences. Both playwrights
moved from established patterns of comedy to give us
Volpone  and Love For Love.
The Frederic Wood production of the first made certain
that Jonson's message came in
big building blocks. Plastic regalia and motorcycle black
leather provided costumes
with contemporary focus
which this play apparently
demands.
Unfortunately they often
left the viewers more interested in an interpretation of
appearance than in appreciation of language. The brilliant
gimmickry worn by the three
judges, for instance, took away
the edge to their punishment
and to the tragedy of avarice.
Donald Soule, the director,
brought to his interpretation a
good deal of genius, however,
despite its possible misdirection. We swayed with Celia in
music to Volpone's famous
overture to her; the choice of
Kerry White to play Bonario,
the virtuous but simple winner of Celia, was excellent.
While the play delighted, perhaps it did not instruct the
way it might have, given a
non-dichotomized Italian setting.
Written in 1695, Love For
Love is as much concerned
with comment upon the human condition. Unlike typical
sexual superficiality of Restoration comedy, this play,
like Volpone, is more involved
with money than love. Given
Laurence Olivier as Tattle,
foppishly delighting the audience in an oversized theater,
and Geraldine McEwan as Angelica, the National Theatre of
Britain performed comedy in
a traditional and polished
manner. The balance and
rhythm of characters never
faltered while facial reactions
were perfectly timed.
I know because someone lent
me his binoculars about a mile
up in the balcony.
pf 5ive
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Canadian Premiere of a New British Comedy
LITTLE MALCOLM
AND HIS STRUGGLE AGAINST THE EUNUCHS
by David Halliwell
October 12-21    —    8:30 p.m.
STUDENTS: 75c ADULTS: $1.50
Tickets: Frederic Wood Theatre
Room 207 or 228-2678
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The Hour of Patience
We thought it would be safe enough,
the bones buried, the white
bones buried.
(Time, the sister, trembling;
the sweet juice of a skull.
Beware.)
Out of the endless night-battering of music,
silent as souls they come.
Serpents with spider tongue.
The valley becomes green, like a man's
neck, under the axe's hesitation.
O SEE THE SCARLET PROUD ONES LEAP
there is no song below us /
/ where we sleep
There is no song below us, where we sleep.
Miners, the dead of some disaster, dig
and drill the white bones — still.
Be with us in the hour of patience.
No children's games are bounced upon this wall.
Even the cheap attain tragedy.
Time glitters bleakly, a forlorn diamond,
seeking  its richest setting,
skulls. Beware.
Silent as souls they come.
Serpents with spider tongue.
Silent as time they go.
Silver, sibilant, and slow.
Not expecting them to grow,
bones buried, into such forests,
such greenery.
By STEPHEN SCOBIE
Friday, October 6, 1967 ik
TOM JQ
4511 West 10th Ave.
224-7217
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Election for the Office of AMS Secretary
This office is open to a student who has completed his
or her second year or equivalent and is a fully registered student for the 1967-68 academic year. Candidates must have attained in the previous sessional examinations an average of no less than 60% for 15
units or more, and 65% for less than 15 units.
Nominations will open at 9:00 a.m. Wednesday, Oct.
4, 1967 and will close at 4:00 p.m. Thursday, October
12, 1967. Voting will take place on Wednesday, October 18,  1967.
Committee Positions Open
Applications are now being accepted for the following
student  administration advisory  committees:
Housing — 4 students
Library — 4 students
Traffic & Parking — 2 students
Applicants should satisfy the following rule of eligibility: The applicant shall have attained in the previous sessional examinations an average of ho less than
60% for 15 units or more, or 65% for less than 15
units. Appointments will be made at a meeting of
Student Council, Tuesday, October 10, 1967, at which
applicants should appear.
Letters of application and further questions should be
addressed to Kim Campbell, 2nd Vice-President, A.M.S.
Mailbox No. 53.
For further information contact Kim Campbell, 2nd
Vice-President, 224-3242, Local 47.
Returning Officer
Applications are now being accepted for the position
of AMS Returning Officer. The successful applicant
will work with the interim returning officer during
the October 18th elections, after which he will assume
responsibility for running all referenda and AMS elections until the General Meeting in March. Applications
and questions should be addressed to Kim Campbell,
2nd Vice-President, AMS mailbox number 53, or
224-3242, Local 47. Appointment will be made at a
meeting of Student Council, Monday, October 2, 1967.
COMMITTEE APPOINTMENTS
Applications are now being accepted for the following
committees:
Student Union Building
Constitutional Revisions
Student Housing
Student Union Building applications should be addressed
to Kim Campbell, 2nd Vice-President, AMS mailbox
number 53.
Constitutional Revisions Committee and Student Housing Committee applications should be addressed to Don
Munton, 1st Vice-President, AMS mailbox number 51.
______ democracy
Student senators fight
for democratic university
With the election of four student senators a week and a half away, pf
presents this interpretation-report of the experience of one student senator at
Simon Fraser. Miss Yandle who was elected last spring relates the problems of
struggling for a democratic university to that of developing an open society.
By SHARON YANDLE
Can people overtly committed to basic social
change operate within the system and its institutions without being co-opted and rendered ineffectual by them? Or, more specifically, can
students explicitly working toward full participation and control of the university by those
most involved in it — faculty
and students — hope to effect
any change at all from within
a power structure loathe to
lose control and favored with
overwhelming supportive odds?
This question is directed
particularly to the issue of
student representation on senate and to students working
YANDLE within the university system,
but the question applies equally to working
within the social system as a whole. I will
attempt to deal with both questions here by
suggesting a strategy for the university which
is essentially the same as that for society, and
I will speak not merely of student leaders but
of all students.
Firstly, students must have a clear idea of
the society they are working towards and what
the university corresponding to that society
should be. Many students—myself included—
are looking to create a society in which social
equality is more than a shibboleth easing liberal
consciences, where democratic process means
more than simply not revolting against corporate
control of human lives, and where decisions are
made by those affected by them and are guaranteed by democratic,  decentralized control.
CHANGE
Intellectuals cannot posit such a society while
subjecting themselves to the paternalistic despotism of the existing university. Society depends
on the university; one cannot change without
the other. And if people want control through
participation, that participation must be learned.
We must learn (in other words of the Evil Incarnate who shall remain nameless) to render
ourselves fit for political dominion,. to teach
ourselves the art of governing ourselves, of
making the rational, responsible decisions so
long removed from us here in the shade of neo-
imperialism. We must work toward change in
the university because we are in it, just as we
would if we were in the factory or the church
or the office or in any of the institutions society
depends on.
Secondly, we must understand what the
present system is and that at least one demand
—that of control—is not one which it can absorb
and remain unchanged. The demands we make
of the university (and of society) must be those
which we know it cannot meet without transforming itself. When at the last senate meeting,
student senators pressed for public meetings,
for example, they were demanding more than
simply an end to senate secrecy. They were in
effect demanding that senate and all university
bodies declare themselves publicly accountable
for their actions to those affected by them. They
were urging a necessary step toward responsible
government. They were attempting a clear move
toward participation and control.
DEMANDS
Their orientation in requesting an end to
secrecy ought not to be lost on senate members,
just as the fact that senate refused even to
discuss the issue ought not to be lost on students.
Senate, forced eventually by the climate of the
times, will have to open its meetings and for
this students will rightfully claim a victory; it
means that the university will have necessarily
transformed itself from what it now is. Students
and faculty must then posit further demands
for a further transformation, always moving
toward the ultimate demand for ultimate control.
Not only ought this to be the approach to
university change but, as the university is a
microcosm of society, so ought it also, I think,
to be the general approach to societal change.
Thirdly, we must be careful to distinguish
between those demand which the system cannot
absorb without transforming itself and those
issues which it can. We must press for, support
and push to confrontations point any issue which
implies a move towards participation and democratic control. The question of secrecy in university . government is such a move, as are the
questions of the right of the electorate to approve
their decisions. Pressing the power structure
to the limit of its flexibility on such issues
renders it impossible to merely ignore these-
demands. It must either yield at confrontation,
thereby destroying itself in its old form and
transforming itself into something new and closer
to the form demanded, or it must remove or
suppress those making the demands, thus revealing itself for what it then is—rigid and inflexible,
incapable of necessary change.
CONTROL
On the other hand, we must not attempt
confrontations on every issue because not every
issue implies a transformation. Confronting
every issue is in effect declaring total war, and
total war is antithetical to working within the
system. The key is thus to support to its limits
any move that furthers the participation and
control of people over their own lives, to actively
oppose all moves to the contrary, and to work
responsibly and cooperatively on issues which
do neither.
Fourthly, and most important, students must
attempt to work within the system without
becoming part of it, without being absorbed by
that which we are opposing. This is the most
difficult part of all, for the basis and orientation
of government in both university and society
are those of elitism. Three student representatives on senate, for example, operating within
the present system of secrecy and effective
isolation from their constituents serve to promote, not discredit, elitism and serve not at all
in pressing forward the essential demand! of
control. Student representation on senate is
a classic study in cooptation, of assimilating an
insignificant number of students into the governmental elite in order to pacify the rest, who
still remain divorced from decision making and
devoid of even token—let alone even effective
—control.
DILEMMA
As it now stands, students are prevented
from even receiving information on senate proceedings and discussions while student senators
are forbidden by senate even to inform them.
This, I think, is the real dilemma of attempting
to change the system from within: Students are
permitted to elect representatives to university
government and those representatives are then
pressured by an elitist system to become part
of it. And even if, forced to resort to the same
elitist tactics in order to accomplish anything
at all, student representatives serve in part
some few interest of the students, what does
it matter? Functioning on the administration's
terms is game playing. The real question—
that of allowing students the right to participate
in decision affecting them and in part controlling the institution which dominates them —.
remains unanswered; indeed, remains unasked.
The point is not for student elitists to guess at
speaking on behalf of students. The point is
for students to demand that such cooptation cannot occur, that senate be publicly accountable
to them, that senators be subject to recall, that
senate decision be subject to their approval.
The role of student senators is not to make
demands, but to present them. The role of
students in general, if the above theory is correct,
is to translate it into practice, to demand from
their representatives and from the university
access to decision making and control. It is the
students' right and responsibility to not let their
representatives be absorbed into an elite removed
from them. The point is not to join the system
but to change it.
Friday,  October  6,   1967 ADVISORY POWER?
By BERT HILL
This fall, a dilemma faces
students with the establishment of advisory committees
on bookstore, food services,
future housing, library, parking and traffic and residences.
On the surface it would appear that finally students are
getting an effective voice in
decision making in the various
services that influence their
lives at UBC.
However, closer examination reveals that the committees (with the exception of the
library) will remain controlled by the administration in
terms of numerical superiority
with the head of each service
controlling the naming of the
chairman of
the committees.
And even if
students are
successful in
winning consistent support of faculty members
(there will be
some) on the committees, there
is no guarantee that their proposals will be accepted by the
various services.
The advisory committees are
exactly   that.  A   reinterpreta-
With the naming by AMS
council of students to advisory
committees on food services
and bookstore this week and
library, traffic and parking,
and housing next Monday, pf's
Bert Hill takes a critical look
at the advisory committee system and what it means in the
struggle for a democratic university. Hill will be sitting on
the food services advisory
committee but he doesn't know
. for how long.
HILL
tion of the terms of the committees negotiated during the
summer by the AMS requires
: the various service administrators to show reason within
a reasonable period of time
why they have not acted on an
advisory committee proposal.
As long as students have no
^ definite bargaining control of
a policy making committee,
there is good reason for students to (recognize that the
present system is more useful
to the  administration than it
i is to students.
The outrageous experience of
last year's residence committee
is a clear warning. At that
time, student committee members were sworn to secrecy
and given no opportunity to
research the proposed rent
hike that came into force
July 1. In the face of these
difficulties, magnified by a
swift, thorough brain-washing
campaign, the students caved
**" in and went along with the increase. They even let the rent
hike be announced on the administration's own terms.
In the light of this experience students must recognize
, that the set-up gives the administration student support
since they participated in the
voting. And most importantly
pf 7even
Friday, October 6, 1967
the administration can point
to the student support as an
example of 'democratic' decision making while, of course,
maintaining full power.
Thus students must be prepared to bargain hard with
the administration through the
food services; not give in to
pre-structuring tactics like
secrecy demands; not assume
the administration will always
bargain in good faith and be
prepared to resign en masse if
major problems are not resolved in the students' interests. An example of such a
major problem is the 11 per
cent food price increase announced July 1.
Students must always have
the goal of eventual control
of effective policy making
committees. To attempt to
transform the present weak
system into effective bodies,
the students must concentrate
on major money issues and
push the minor issues back on
the priority list. Such essentially minor reforms as extended food services hours
have already been negotiated
this year by the AMS. They
make life a little easier at
UBC but they don't change
effective power relationships.
The committee members
must also transcend their immediate concerns and recognize the root problem of financing every service strictly
on its own basis.
To do this means real student policy-making power for
the Board of Governors is only
interested in providing facilities that produce trained technicians for their stratified managerial society.
OBJECTIVES
OF
INTERNATIONAL   HOUSE
DISCUSSED
THERE
NOON - COME - TODAY
Some guys have everything — a new XKE, a key to the
Faculty washroom and elevator, a date with the Frosh Queen,
and, above all, a sweater from
RICHARDS & FARM LID.
786 Granville
and THE COLLEGE SHOP LTD.
802 Granville
For all your clothing requirements.
HARVARD BUSINESS
SCHOOL VISITOR
Assistant Dean Woodford L. Flowers, Director of College Relations and a member of the Admissions Board of the
Harvard Graduate School of Business Administration, will
visit the University of British Columbia on Tuesday, October
10 to talk to students interested in business as a career of
excitement and  creative   opportunity.
Requirements for admission to the two-year course,
leading to a degree of Master in Business Administration
(MBA), include a college degree in any field of concentration,
a standing in at kast the top third of the class, and a record
of progressive achievement in campus activities, business,
the military, or elsewhere.
The MBA Program at the Harvard Business School is
based on the experience-oriented case method, pioneered at
the Harvard Business School to develop the practical, analytical, and decision-making capacities that are the key to
managerial effectiveness.
For outstanding students in each first-year class (of
roughly 690) there are 70 fellowships available. Approximately. 40 per cent of the Harvard Business School student
body also makes use of the Deferred Payment or Loan Program which enables all students admitted to the Harvai
MBA Program to attend even though their sources of funds
are  inadequate
Seniors, or others, wishing to talk to Mr. Flowers should
contact the office of Mr. J. C. Craik, Office of Student Services, for an appointment.
just in case you haven't heard
Duthie Books Ltd.
UNIVERSITY BRANCH
at 4560 W. 10th Aye.
Phone: 224-7012
has been
REVISED and ENLARGED
Come in and see it - and the books!
or visifour downtown branches at
514 Hornby Street Ph. 684-4496
Paperback Cellar 681-8713
670 Seymour Street 685-3627 "They make you into a complete nothing
then build you into a great marine"
Bernard C. Jillson, 18. joined the U.S. Marines May 17,
1966 and quit December 1.
1966. He was captured but
escaped a total of three times
before coming to Canada this
summer. He is interviewed by
Gabor Mate for pf.
male: Why did you join the
Marines in the first place?
jillson: I came from a small
town and I didn't know very
much. I was very apolitical
and   I   thought  this   was   the
right thing to do for my country. You might say I wanted
to be a hero. I was filled with
propaganda.
mate: When did you change
your mind about the Marines?
jillson: Right from the beginning. As soon as I got to
San Diego for boot camp. The
very first day my sergeant beat
me up because I talked back to
him and forgot to say "Sir".
The whole purpose of boot
camp is to take your own personality away, to make you
into a  complete nothing, and
then to build you into a great
Marine.
mate: Is this why you decided to quit?
jillson: No, I think after a
while I could have got used
to all the shit like most people
do. But once I went to San
Francisco and met some people
who started to ask me questions I just couldn't answer.
mate: What were these
questions?
jillson: They were asking
me what I was in the Marines
for, why I wanted to fight,
who I was fighting for, and so
on. I had never really thought
about these things before and
when they asked me these
questions I had no answer.
mate: What did you do then?
jillson: When I had left
camp for San Francisco I was
already AWOL, but I wasn't
yet thinking of quitting, 1 just
wanted to go home for Christmas. (But I went back from
'Frisco and I told them I was
quitting.
They arrested me and beat
me up — they put me in a
shower and kicked me — and
they put me in the brig. I
stayed locked up for a few days
and then I was taken before
a colonel for a hearing. I sat
down very calmly and lit a
cigarette, and the colonel started yelling at me and asking
him who the hell I thought I
was. I got pissed off, knocked
everything off the top of his
desk and told him to get
fucked.
They took me back to the
brig. Next day they were taking me to see the psychiatrist,
but I hit the guard and I
escaped. The police caught me
me in Flordia, and the MP's
came to get me but I escaped
again.
mate: Is this when you
decided to come to Canada?
jillson: No. I went to Los
Angeles, and I made up my
mind to give myself up and go
to jail. I didn't want to leave
the country because I felt I
wanted to fight against the war
and against the whole system
which is responsible for the
war, and I thought I could
best do this by staying in the
U.S. and going to jail.
mate: Why did you change
your mind?
jillson: In Los Angeles I
spoke with reporters of the
LA Free Press and they told
me that there was no point in
my going to jail for a country
I had no faith in. They convinced me I should come up to
Canada.
mate: What are your plans
now?
jillson: Right now I am living here under a false name.
I am working, but if I stay
here too long they could probably catch up with me. I will
be leaving soon and will go to
Europe and Asia. I don't know
what I will do in the future.
I don't know what I can do.
pf 8ight
Look! See!
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Jane Says See
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Dick Says Spell
Spagety
Jane Spells S-p-
a-g-e-t y
Baby Says
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Public Administration
Canada is undergoing Social,
Economic and Technological transformations
You can be a part of this as a
PUBLIC ADMINISTRATOR
in the Public Service of Canada
Positions in	
—Management Analysis
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general administration
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A 2 year Development Program
Examination to be held at
7 P.M., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 17,
1967, in Room 106, Buchanan
Bldg., Vancouver, B.C.
No application needed
For exam exemptions or more details, get our booklet from
your university placement office or contact the appropriate
office of the Public Service Commission of Canada.
Friday,  October 6,   1967 Friday, October 6,  1967
ThE      UBYSSEY
Page 13
MACS COLLEGE
FROM PAGE 1
It is believed Macdonald was discouraged by the inaction
and pessimism of a faculty committee he appointed to work on
the experimental college.
UBC has an experimental college program today, four years
after Macdonald's proposal.
Arts I doesn't have as wide as scope as Macdonald's program.
The teacher student ratio in arts I is twice as high — 20 to one —
and its participants are in first year only, not from all four years
as Macdonald planned.
Macdonald was planning a total community of scholars with
a low student-teacher ratio, small classes, tutors.
His program included both a wide general education program and a field of specialization.
The three general goals of the program, applied in all four
years were:
"To achieve an understanding of the origins of science and
an appreciation of the main currents of scientific endeavor today;
"To teach the history of western civilization;
"To teach an integrated course in social science."
— bob brown photo
UNBEATEN BOOKSTORE BOMBERS will take on UBC Thunderbird hockey team in a still to be announced floor hockey
game. All are bookstore clerks. L to r are Doug Van Camp,
Harry Preece, goalie Bill Lake, Jim Unsell and John Worst.
Team is unbeaten because it hasn't played a game.
Bookstore bombers to
tackle Thunderbirds
Ten stalwart males of UBC's bookstore staff have challenged
the UBC Thunderbird Hockey Team to a game — of floor
hockey.
Bill Lake, captain, goal-tender, and spokesman for the bookstore squad, said a meeting to decide on the date of the encounter
will be held next week.
"We will have ten players from the bookstore staff, and
four players from a local junior men's hockey league."
"The 'Bookstore Bombers' have never been beaten," Lake
said.   "Of course, they haven't played anyone yet.
"We were going to challenge the bookstore at Simon Fraser
too, but we figured they would chicken out anyway."
"The Birds have no thunder," he said.
««< <ss*r ■**„*., 'sw-i ™ w* * / ,wf<r- :-$&■ ?»,v,
.*£? sr ■^m°ss&mm>3&'
"Army  go  home" say
Japanese students
KYOTO, Japan (UPS) — Pro-communist students at
Kyoto University are agitating to bar members of Japanese
defense forces from taking courses in civilian class rooms.
The agitation threatens to spread to the 18 universities
and colleges where 109 military men are enrolled in technical and scientific courses.
Authorities at several universities have indicated that
future military applicants will meet obstacles in enrollment.
Kyoto university president Azuma Okuda agreed to
put the question of admitting military students to individual
department heads, after pressure from leftist students who
boycotted classes and held all-night rallies on the campus.
The protest followed an uproar over a disclosure that
various Japanese educational and research institutions had
accepted modest financial subsidies from a U.S.. Army
scientific program.
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tamponi
SANITARY PROTECTION WORN INTERNALLY
MADE ONLY BY CANADIAN TAMPAX CORPORATION
LIMITED. BARRIE. ONTARIO
Got Plans?
. . . doctor, lawyer, would you believe chief? All roads
lead to Eaton's because of what they have: a pencil, a
pen, a book or ten. The most in clothes, shoes in loads.
Cameras for pictures, watches for time. Excitement for
the newest, imagination
for the future. r—   A —i—_«-n. _.    ■ > _—*
EATON S Page 14
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,   October   6,   1967
VOLKSWAGEN
DRIVERS. . .
Welcome Back to U.B.C.
LAST YEAR OUR FACTORY-TRAINED EXPERTS REPAIRED MANY OF
YOUR CARS . . .
This year we have more equipment and more staff to make ear
repair servicing even more efficient. We cordially invite you
to visit our premises and meet
our staff.
Naturally we will quote on any
repair service because of our
guaranteed low prices.
ALL   WORK   GUARANTEED
Only At
AUTO-HENNEKEN
Specialized   Service
8914 Oak St. (at Marine)
phone Hans — 263-8121
Women's athletics schedule
Those interested in participating on a Women's Intercollegiate Athletic team should sign up for a sport and then come
to the practices as scheduled:
Basketball — Thunderettes: Monday, 6:00-8:00, Women's Gym;
Thursday, 4:30-6:30, Memorial Gym.
Junior Varsity: Thursday, 5:30-7:30, Women's Gym.
Curling — Wednesday, 8:30-10:30, Winter Sports Centre;
Saturday, 12:45-2:45, Winter Sports Centre-
Field Hockey — Thursday, 12:30-2:00, Spencer Field.
Figure Skating — Tuesday, 3:00-5:00, Winter Sports Centre;
Thursday, 6:00-8:00, Winter Sports Centre.
Gymnastics — Tuesday, 4:30-6:30; Thursday, 12:30-2:30;
Saturday, 1:00-4:00.
Skiing — Tuesday, Thursday, 6:30-8:00, Apparatus Gym.
Speed   Swimming  —  Monday,   Wednesday,   Friday,   4:30-5:30,
Empire Pool.
Synchronized Swimming — Thursday, 1:20-2:00, CYC Pool;
Sunday, 9:00-10:30 p.m., YWCA Pool.
Tennis — Monday, 6:00-7:30, Field House; Wednesday, 4:30-6:00.
Track  &  Field — Tuesday, Thursday,  4:30-8:00  (see  practice
notice in Memorial Gym).
Volleyball — Tuesday, 6:30-8.00 p.m., Memorial Gym;
Thursday, 1:00-2:00, Women's Gym.
«, -«mr.:
Ihtfottwth-
■5
548 Granville, Vancouver 2
MU. 2-1022
ii
Weekend £ftcrtJ
This will toe the first big weekend for UBC teams with
two football games scheduled, four rugby games, one soccer
game and a cross country meet.
In football action, the Thunderbirds travel to Ashland,
Oregon today for a Saturday night game against the Southern Oregon College Red Raiders. The Jayvees will play the
Everett Wildcats at 2 p.m. on Sunday at Wolfson field.
• •        •
The big rugby match of the weekend will Ibe UBC Past
and Present versus the B.C. All Stars. It begins at 2:45
p.m. on Saturday and will be the first game played in the
new Thunderbird Stadium.
• *       •
In Junior Collegiate rugby, the UBC Tomahawks meet
the BCIT squad at 1:15 on Wolfson field. At the same time
and at the same place the UBC Totems will play Trojans
and the UBC Braves go up against Western Washington.
• •       •
The UBC cross country team is running in the Seattle
Pacific Invitational Race at Seattle this Saturday.
• •       •
In non-campus sponsored sport, the Seattle Supersonics
play the St. Louis Hawks in a National Basketball Association game in War Memorial Gym on Saturday at 8 p.m.
Proceeds from the game will go to the John Owen Memorial
Bursary fund, in memory of UBC's late athletic trainer.
LADIES - 75c
GENTS $1.00
Tickets at I.H. and at Door.
EVERYONE      WELCOME
Africa Week
AT U.B.C.
The African Students Association presents a series of talks
on Africa at I.H. at 12:30 on the following days:
10th October:    Is African   Unity a   Reality?   Isaac Omane
B.A., Regional Administration
11th October:     One-Party   System    in   Africa—Muctairi    R.
Achebe Kabba 3rd year (Sociology)
Political Scene  in Cameroun—Aziah Vernon
1st year (Transportation Econ.)
12th October:     Crisis   of   Leadership   in   Africa—Abi   Jones
(B.A., Sociology)
13th  October:     Education    in   Africa—Francis   Tsikayi    (4th
year Education)
Africa Night
DANCE
TO THE MUSIC OF THE
TRINIDAD MOONLIGHTERS
STEEL BAND
Friday, October 13, 8:30 p.m.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Sponsored by The African Students Association*
M.C. - DANNY K. OTCHERE
FECIAL
fcfc
VENTS
THE MIDDLE EAST"
A HIGHLY VOLATILE DISCUSSION!
A SPECTRUM OF PERSONALITIES ! THE 60-MINUTE WAR !
PROF. RENE GOLDMAN    GABOR MATE    PROF. JEAN-LOUIS DELANNOY     DR. JEAN MARUANI
Tuesday, October 10 Noon Auditorium Friday, October 6, 1967
THE     U BYSSEY
Page 15
Thunderbird stadium
to open this weekend
The opening ceremonies are
to start at 1:45 p.m. Saturday.
Why not be in attendance.
It's free and I'm sure you'll
be pleased with what you see.
By MIKE JESSEN
Ubyssey Sports Editor
It was two weeks ago that
the structure affectionately
known on campus as the Stadium met its demise.
Saturday the new Thunderbird Stadium will be officially
opened as the replacement for
the torn-down  landmark.
Already some student complaints have been heard concerning the facilities which
are lacking in the stadium.
Football players are unhappy about the lack of a
tunnel from the upper level
dressing rooms to the field
level.
Track and field people are
also unhappy because the 440-
yard all-weather track will
not be finished till next fall
because of a lack of money.
If the problem is analyzed,
the lack of money situation
arose when too many dollars
were spent to make the outside of the stadium the most
beautiful in North America,
which is undoubtedly is.
But beautiful the stadium
is and as Bus Phillips, UBC's
athletic director, said Monday,
"It's something which we will
all be very proud of."
The uniquely designed
grandstand is the brainchild
of Vancouver architect, Vladimir Plavsic, whose main preoccupation seems to be think
ing up ways to put the Plavsic stamp on all of UBC's new
buildings.
Under cover seating for
3,200 spectators is provided
for. An extension will accommodate 15,000.
The stadium facilities include at the upper level,
changing rooms for the varsity and junior varsity teams,
a training room, a 50 foot by
30 foot wrestling room.
A stadium office, a concession both and storage rooms
complete the upper level.
At the field level, under the
grandstand, are four large
changing rooms, a cheerleaders' room, and a room for
game officials.
UNRULY HAIR?
Best Men's Hairstyling Service
at the
Upper Tenth Barber
4574 W. 10th Ave.
1 block from gates
NEW YORK
COSTUME SALON
RENTALS
WHITE DINNER JACKETS
TUXEDOS,   DARK   SUITS,   TAILS
COLORED  JACKETS
MASQUERADE   COSTUMES
SPECIAL STUDENT  RATES
224-0034      4397 W. 10»h
RAINCOATS
C ROYDON
$19-95
Regularly to $29.95
Manufacturers Clearance
UNITED TAILORS
BRITISH  WOOLENS
.Hand UN Club
welcome
NEW MEMBERS
to the
FRIDAY NIGHT
DANCE
Friday, Oct. 6    —    8:30 p.m.
International  House — Lower lounge
WE
KNOW
Our   Products
°Mfatt*
* MEN'S WEAR
4445 West 10th Avenue
THE UBC THUNDERBIRD STADIUM will be unveiled to the public Saturday at 1:30 p.m. Built
at a cost of $1.2 million provided by the un iversity board of governors, the stadium will
be home to UBC's rugby, soccer and football teams. Other sports may use it on the occasion
of an international match.
549 Granville
MU  1-4649
Open Fri. til 9
NBA BASKETBALL
SEATTLE
'SONICS
vs.
ST. LOUIS
HAWKS
Proceeds to
JOHN OWEN
MEMORIAL FUND
SAL OCT. 7,8 pm
U.B.C. Gym
TICKETS: Hicks', «10 Duns-
muir, UBC and SFU Athletic
Offices; Ivor Williams, 2120
W. 41st and Earle Peterson,
575—«th St., New Westminster. Prices are $4, W OBd
t_.50 for reserved seats,
1.S0 for rush tickets.
PECIAL
VENTS
ALI AKBAR KHAN «& CO.
Colleague &  Brother-in-Law  of    RAVI    SHANKAR!
NORTH INDIAN MUSIC - RAGAS
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 13
AUDITORIUM
7:30 p.m.
SWING your QUEEN
Kirm
Clubs
Two NHes - Two Bands
friday nite ... THE BITTER SWEETS
SAT. NITE     ... THE PAISLEY RAIN
1275 SEYMOUR ST.
FOR INFORMATION & RESERVATIONS CALL MU 1-4010 Page 16
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,   October   6,   1967
'TWEEN CLASSES
Mate probes problem
Middle East panel discussion
with Gabor Mate, Dr. Jean
Maruani of chemistry, Prof.
Rene Goldman of asian studies
and Prof. Jean-Louis Delanoy
of sociology; aud., Tuesday
noon.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Ali Akbar Khan and company, recording artists and
specialists in North Indian
music will give a concert, aud,
Oct. 13, 7:30 p.m. Ali Akbar
Khan is a colleague and
brother-in-law of Ravi Shan-
kar.
RAMBLERS
Touch   football   meeting   today    noon    hut    B-9    behind
Brock.
UCF
Ben Hapen,  associate Evangelist to Billy Graham speaks
today noon in Ang. 110.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
CSO sponsors & free lecture
entitled What Choice Do You
Have, noon Oct. 12 in BU. 102.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
First   meeting   of   the   year
noon   at   IH.    Discussion. in
French.  Coffee available.
UCF
All  buses for Thanksgiving
weekend camp leave Brock at
5 p.m. today.
GERMAN CLUB
Folk singing in Bu. 203 noon.
Coffee party at IH Tues. noon.
PRE MED SOC
Guest   speaker   from    Vancouver board  of health,  noon
Oct. 11, Wes. 201.
CIASP
A meeting for those interested in doing community development work in Mexico
next summer. Noon in Brock
Ext. 350.
AFRICAN STUDENTS
Mr. Isaac Omane talks on
Oct. 11. Is African Unity a
Reality? (One party system in
Africa and the political scene
in Cameroun).
FORESTRY US
All faculties will get wet at
the  burling   contest.   Oct.   12
noon in the library pool.
FORESTRY US
All faculties have been challenged   to   the   big   snowshoe
race,   Tuesday   noon,   on   the
main mall.
IH
Dance tonight in the lower
lounge of IH. New IH and UN
club members free, 8:30 p.m.
DEBATING UNION
First organizational meeting
noon in Bu. 102.
ARTS US
Wowie! Big Arts dance tonight—two bands—light show
and strobe lights. Brock 9-1.
75 cents. Blow your mind.
"My Indole Ring" and "French
Hand Laundry".
AAC
Fall   symposium:   Arts   and
Politics.   Free  lecture   in  Bu.
106 noon. New romantic poet
Robin Blaser.
IH
Objectives and programs of
IH  discussed  there,   noon   in
lower lounge.
COLLEGE LIFE
Conference at Cultus Lake'
starts tonight—still time to
register. Call campus crusade
for Christ office 732-6433 for
details.
COM US
Campus a-go-go! wildest
dance of the year is featuring
three big bands and the sexiest go-go girls on campus.
Saturday 9 to 1 in the armory.
CHORAL SOC
Second practice Wednesday,
Bu. 104, 6 p.m. New members
welcome.
Slacks Narrowed
Suits Altered and
Repaired
UNITED TAILORS
549 Granville St.
UNIVERSITY CHURCH
ON THE  BOULEVARD
UNIVERSITY HILL UNITED
11:00 a.m. Thanksgiving
Family  Service
"How Do We Give Thanks"
Rev. Harold McKay
ST.   ANSELM'S   ANGLICAN
8:00 a.m.  Holy Communion
10:00 a.m.  Holy Communion
& Sermon
Preacher: Jim McKibbon
WELCOME TO U.B.C.
HAROLD MacKAY
JIM McKIBBON
EC US
Professors, grads and undergrads football game will be
held Saturday, 10 a.m., weather permitting.
LUTHERAN STUDENT
MOVEMENT
Speak-up Sunday at Lutheran Campus Center. Film: The
Holy Swindle. Student panel.
Supper 6:00 p.m.
NO
IRON
Pants save you time
at
Mi****
f MEN'S   VI
MEN'S  WEAR
4445 West 10th Avenue
TIME
The longest word
in the language?
By letter count, the longest
word may be pneumonoultra-
microscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis,
a rare lung disease. You won't
find it in Webster's New World
Dictionary, College Edition. But
you will find more useful information about words than in any
other desk dictionary.
Take the word time. In addition to its derivation and an
illustration showing U.S. time
zones, you'll find 48 clear definitions of the different meanings of time and 27 idiomatic
uses, such as time of one's life.
In sum, everything you want to
know about time.
This dictionary is approved
and used by more than 1000
colleges and universities. Isn't
it time you owned one? Only
$5.95 for 1760 pages;      «g gg
thumb-indexed.
At Your Bookstore
THE WORLD PUBLISHING CO.
Cleveland and New York
LIGHT   SHOW
STROBE   DANCE
Friday, October 6
UNITED EMPIRE LOYALISTS
SEEDS OF TIME
Saturday, October 7
MY INDOLE RING
FRENCH HAND LAUNDRY
SEEDS OF TIME
RETINAL CIRCUS
9 P.M.-2 A.M.
$1.50
1024  DAVIE ST.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75*. 3 days $2.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00. 3 days $2.50.
Rates for larger ads on request.
Publications Office, BROCK HALL, UNIV. OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
Dances
11
UNDERGROUND ROCK BANDS ARE
where it's at. For your next dance
Phone  Magic  Theatre.   685-1711.
THIS "UNDERCUT" WITH HANK
and The Hoboes at the P.N.E.
Showmart Building. Friday, Oct. 13.
Hard Times.
BACK FROM THE BUSH BASH.
Friday, Oct. 13, 8:30-1:00. Hallmark
Hall, 5550 Fraser Street. Tickets
$3.00  couple.   Room  112 G&G.
TURN ON AT THE ARTS DANCE
Friday in Brock, 9-1. 2 Bands—My
Indole Ring and the French Hand
Laundry. Only 75c.	
DANCE TONIGHT 8:30 P.M. AT IN-
ternational   House:    New   members
of I.  House  and U.N.  Club free.
TOTEM PARK MIXER
with
THE EPICS
Friday, Oct. 6
75c — 9-1
CAMPUS A-GO-GO. It's the Big One!
It's Wild!  SAT., OCT. 7. ARMOURIES.  Be  there!
Greetings
  12
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE OBJEC-
tives discussed today at noon at
IH.   Come with  questions.
DARLING, I'M SORRY! PLEASE
meet me at the Totem Park Mixer
at  9:00  this  Friday!   Lover-Boy.
13
Lost & Found
LOST. HOME KNIT IRISH CARDI-
gan sweater. Last seen Reserve
Books Tuesday. Phone Susan Burns
732-6684.
SAVE A DAUGHTER'S LIFE DAD-
dy wants his staple gun lost on
Club's Day. Return to Dance Club
Lounge. Please!
LOST BLACK BILL FOLDER WITH
I.D. cards. Reward. After 6 p.m.
988-0532.
HITCH-HIKER LOST UMBRELLA
in Volkswagen. California licence
Oct.  4/67.  Phone 688-4048 after 8:00
FOUND LADIES WRIST WATCH
Oct.   4.  Phone June,  261-4702.
LOST TUESDAY GREEN MOTHER
of pearl bracelet. Finder please
phone 224-9875, room 204. Ask for
June.
LOST OPHTHALMOSCOPE HANDLE
in front of Woodward Elbrary. Finder  please   phone   224-5649.   Reward
LOST ORANGE MOROCCAN WAL-
let Oct. 2nd. Reward. Phone Heather,  681-0558.	
LOST GREY COLLAPSIBLE UM-
brella while hitch hiking Oct. 3.
Phone   Pene   224-0116.   Urgent.
WOULD THE PERSON WHO
found a slide-rule in Ma. 100 Wednesday please phone Al at 261-
7195.   Reward.
Rides & Car Pools
   14
THREE DRIVERS NEEDED FOR
Carpool—Vicinity of 49th and Oak.
Phone Andy at 321-2851.
RIDE DESPARATELY NEEDED
from and to Richmond. 8:30 classes
to 5:30 in afternoon. Phone Bob
277-0624.   (Near  hospital).
HELP! I STILL NEED A CARPOOL
from Caulfeild, West Vancouver.
Soon!  Phone Pete 926-1581.
Special Notices
 15
SICK OF HAIRCUTS? GET YOUR
hair styled at the Upper Tenth Barber, 4574 W   10th Ave. 1 block from
gates.
UNDERCUT TICKETS NOW AVAIL-
able from A.M.S. office and the
Forestry Undergrad  Society.
GEOLOGY'S BIG BASH FRIDAY,
Oct. 13. 8:30 - 1:00. Everyone welcome.   Hard   Times.
FILMS FROM CHINA—"VICTORY
of Chairman Mao's Thought" (The
Three Atomic Tests) and "Chairman Mao is the Red Sun in Our
Hearts" (National Day Celebration
in Peking, 1966). Sunday, October
8, 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. Olympia Theater, Hastings at Nanaimo. Admission,  $1.00.        	
GARY: WILL YOU PLEASE NOT
shoot flaming arrows in my door?
Arlene.	
LAST CHANCE fO~REGISTER FOR
Campus Crusade for Christ Conference at Cultus Lake. Phone 732-
6433.	
r.B.C. BEAUTY SALON ON CAMPUS for ladies haircutting, no appointment necessary, 5736 Univer-
sity Blvd.  228-8942.	
WATCH FOR THE BIG 3 FROM
Film Soc. November Is Movie
Month.
Travel Opportunities
   16
GREATLY REDUCED RATES ON
Chartered bus to Okanagan. Leaves
Friday, returns Monday. Phone
Dawn, 224-5742.      	
BOYS! 9 OUT OF 10 GIRLS AT
Totem Park Mixers end up at
Spanish Banks! Come and see for
yourself!   Friday,   9-1.   75c.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
WANTED: USED HAMMOND OR-
gan M. or L. Series. Perferably with
drawbars and double keyboard.
Phone  Harry   733-8694.	
WRAPPER NELSON PACK IN GOOD
condition.   Phone   Kit   942-8744.
AUTOMOTIVE & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
        ai
1D30    FORD    EXCELLENT    CONDI-
tion.  AM 6-6315 after 6 p.m.
1962    AUSTIN    850.    GOOD    VALUE.
Sports Car feel.  Phone 263-9141.	
'58   PLYM.   LOW   MILEAGE." GOOD
W.W. tires. Std. V8 Sedan. 733-1580.
'62 FALCON 2 DOOR 45,000 MILES,
new valve job & battery, radio,
excellent  tires.   $800.  —  738-0292.
FOR SALE 1961 VW. DELUXE
Window Bus, radio, snow tires. Ph.
321-8517.	
1964 VALIANT, SIGNET FACTORY
installed 4-speed plus big six; economy and speed. Excellent shape,
new   tires  738-8266.
\ulomobile Parts
 23
WRECKING 1957 AUSTIN HEALY7
Good motor, top, Tonneau, other
parts.  Andy  688-4052.
Motorcycles
  26
SUZUKI 80 MODEL K-10, VERY
good condition, $175.00. Firm, 224-
3853   after   6_p.m.	
1966 DUCATI 250 5 SPD. 30 H.P.
Excellent condition. Reworked engine. Chrome accessories. Dirt
cheap.   522-3135.
1965 HONDA CB-125. TOP SHAPE
$350 Minimum. Call Lawrie 277-7488
Friday after 7:00.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Scandals
37
THE YEAR'S BEST BASH. FRIDAY
Oct. 13. 8:30-1:00. Tickets $3.00 cple.
Room  112, Geology Bldg.	
TGIF — YOUNG ALUMNI CLUB IS
at it again. Friday afternoons, 4:30-
8:00 p.m. Cecil Green Park. Come If
you   dare!!	
400, COUNT 'EM, 400 SEXY GIRLS!
See them all Friday, October 6. At
the Totem Park Mixer.  9-1.  7Bc.
WILL CAROL (IN EDUCATION),
please phone again if she wants to
Go-Go Dance for CAMPUS A-GO-
GO.   Sat.,   Oct.  7 at the Armouries.
TOM, i" LOVE YOUf MEET ME IN
Aud., Nov. 9. Please say yes Mr.
Jones!	
WALLY HAS IT IN THE BAG.
Does George and Trish? Ask Dave.
From  the gang.
EMPLOYMENT
53
Male or Female	
MATHEMATICS AND SCIBNCB
tutors required. Fourth year or
graduate, 736-6923, 4:30-6:30 p.m.,
except  Tuesday.
VANCOUVER CENTRAL. RECREA-
tion Project of the Vancouver Parks
Board requires part-time staff to
lead adult and teen activities—Judo,
wrestling, gym; badminton; floor
hockey; gym; games; tumbling and
square dancing. Youth workers are
also needed. Phone 879-6011.	
GUITAR   —   VOCALIST " (M    or   F)
wanted   for   the   Elastic   Jug   Band -
(Folk  —  New   Vaudeville).   YU.   8-
4418 or Folk Soc. BH 8%.
Work Wanted
 54
PAYING    PLAYMATE    WANTED
for our two-year-old. Campus Area.
228-8930.
INSTRUCTION
Music
  62
MUSIC LESSONS TEL. 681-2762
theory, & or in composition, beginners. West End. piano — and advanced  guitar   students.
Special Classes
63
LEARN TO SKYDIVE FILMS
demonstrations. Licenced instructors. Tues., Oct. 10, 8:30 p.m. Buchanan   102.
Tutoring
  64
HELP! MATH 120 AND CHEM. 110
Tutor desperately needed. Phone
Bob   277-3346  after  6:00  p.m.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
THE FINEST MEN'S HAIRSTYLINO
at the Upper Tenth Barber. 4574 W.
10th   Avenue.   1   block   from   gates.
LOOKING
For clean, used, guaranteed appliances.
' lso   complete   repair   service   for  all
makes and  models.
McIVER Appliances  Ltd.
3215  W  Broadway—738-7181
GOLF CLUBS. 1964 WILSON STAFF".
2-9  Irons.  $75.   266-6503  after 6.   	
r--SPEED BICYCLE, " '67 MODEL.
Call Pruce, 224-9864, Room 564, after^ 6:00  p.m.	
UGHT" OAK DINING SUITE PHONE
327-6175  after 5:30  or  weekend.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
 81
ROOM ON CAMPUS TO RENT.
Girl grad. student. Ph. 224-6357 after 4:00.
FEMALE    STUDENT    REQUIRES
roommate to share s.c. ste. 733-7686.
WE    HAVE   ROOMS,    FURNISHED.
Come   and   try  our  chairs   for  size.
International    House    coffee   hours
3 p.m. every Tuesday in October.
SLEEPING ROOMS FOR RENT. 2042
West  3rd,   733-7982  after 6 p.m.
Room & Board
   82
EAR UBC. TWO MALE STUDENTS,
to    share    very    large    nice    room.
Good   meals,   table   tennis.   738-2305.
'.OOM-BOARD, MALE STUDENT.
Close to University. 3 meals, laundry.  Phone 738-5689.   	
83
Furn. Houses 8t Apts.
NEEDED MALE STUDENT TO
stare apartment in Marpole area.
Phone Dennis 261-0085 after six.

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