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The Ubyssey Nov 2, 1971

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Array Amchitka protesters ready
as crucial hour draws near
By BERTON WOODWARD
Public SBpport for Wednesday's
anti - A mchitka blast
demonstration at the U.S.
consulate seems to be growing at
an unprecedented rate.
Radio station CHQM will cover
the demonstration live.
The B.C. Federation of Labor
has called for a half-hour work
stoppage Wednesday morning to
protest the blast.
The Greater Vancouver Real
Estate Board, not generally noted
for its outspokenness, has bought
advertising throughout October
- protesting the blast and will have
a speaker at the demonstration.
High school students are
expected to once again come out
in full force to choke the
intersection at Burrard and
Alberni.
An advertisement has been
taken in the Province, signed by
demonstration organizers, urging
Vancouver's citizenry to attend.
But an official at the consulate
seems to have tired of the
constant delegations that enter his
office.
When informed that this time
the delegation would consist of
eight people, he tried to negotiate.
"Couldn't we make it four,"
was his weary query.
From this end of the city
things get under way at 12:30
p.m. with a rally in the SUB
conversation pit and at the loop
outside.
Joan Campana, campus
co-ordinator - for the Canadian
Coalition to Stop the Amchitka
Blast, Monday urged everyone
who can offer rides to the
consulate to meet at the loop at
12:30.
Students who are driving from
UBC are asked to park at Sunset
Park under Burrard bridge. From
there they are to march up
Thurlow to the consulate.
High school students will be
grouping^ at Seaforth Armories
and other meeting points and
marching along Burrard.
The demonstration will take
place on Alberni behind the
American consulate at 1030 West
Georgia.
Speakers will include Jim
Bohlen from the Greenpeace,
UBC English lecturer Hilda
Thomas, a labor speaker, two high
school speakers, Ted Henderson
of the Real Estate Board of
Greater Vancouver and possibly
Dean Herbert O'Driscoll of Christ
Church Cathedral, organizers said.
Coalition     worker     Rick
Nickerson said Monday the
coalition will provide four central
marshals wearing red armbands.
He said other groups, especially
the high schools, will also provide
marshals.
"The police will be wearing
blue uniforms," Nickerson said.
Funding for demonstration
publicity, a sound system at the
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. Llll, No. 21 VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 1971       °^^>48     228-2301
. i . 6.7 . t>. 5.4.> .2 ....
Dots represent earthquake fracture zone. Photo by David Phillips.
consulate and various other costs
has come from a variety of
sources, Campana said.
The Alma Mater Society
publicity fund is expected to
donate $60, she said. The Simon
Fraser and Vancouver City
College student societies are also
giving money.
The Student Lobby Against
Nuclear Testing has abandoned its
plan to send people to Ottawa and
Washington to fast on the steps of
Parliament and Congress and has
turned its funds over to the
Coalition, SLANT spokesman
John MacLachlin said Monday.
High school students are
presently trying to raise funds to
send people to Ottawa, and since
demonstrations are planned across
Canada the committee thought it
could be more useful in
Vancouver, he said.
"All our actions are toward
collecting money on campus," he
said.
"We are contacting people in
various departments who are
sympathetic and asking them to
allow us to speak in classrooms
and take collections," he said.
"What we rally need right now
is people to volunteer their
car/bus/plane to take people from
campus to the rally."
Campana predicted that the
rally "would be big."
"The main thrust will be to
stop the blast but there will be a
secondary thrust to stop all
warmakers.
"I think the Canadian
government could have stopped
the test and one of the pressures
of this rally will be to try to get
the government to stop it even a
day before," she said.
CHQM's coverage live with
local color, will run from 1:30 to
3:30 p.m.
'Purge is on' in anthrosoc
An intellectual purge is occurring _ in UBC's
anthropology-sociology department, assistant professor
Matthew Speier told a capacity crowd at the sociology
learn-in, held Friday in the Henry Angus building.
By Monday the remarks of Speier and a dozen other
speakers at the crisis meeting were being broadcast by TV
monitor in the Angus lounge, as student groups stepped
up the pressure to get the anthrosoc department to
reconsider the tenure cases of Speier and his colleague,
Ron Silvers.
Speier and Silvers were narrowly recommended for
tenure in early October by the department's promotion
and tenure committee, but anthrosoc head Cyril Belshaw
overruled the committee's decision and added his own
negative report on the two profs.
The Friday learn-in came on the heels of a lengthy
and powerful brief, issued the day before, which revealed
evidence of a series of puzzles and inconsistencies about
the way in which the Speier-Silvers cases were handled.
The brief was prepared by the tenure committee of the
anthrosoc graduate student association.
Department faculty members scrambled over the
weekend to read the brief's detailed examination of
tenure criteria and how the criteria (of teaching and
scholarship) were applied to this year's candidates. The
brief contends that both Speier and Silvers successfully
met the criteria, while assistant prof George Gray, who
was recommended for tenure, fell short.
First indications are that the report has been
well-received by faculty and that the briefs careful
presentation of new and specific evidence is having a
powerful effect.
Because they could not understand why Belshaw
made his negative decision on them, Speier and Silvers
said at the learn-in, they turned to the theory of
intellectual persecution.
After Speier made the claim, saying, "We are
confronted with something that is at the heart of the
meaning of the university, which is the concept of
intellectuarfreedom," Silvers rose and offered an analysis
of the claim.
He said a 'new' sociology has developed in the past
ten years which is at odds with 'conventional' sociology,
and claimed that this is one of the underlying issues which
is being fought over in UBC's sociology department.
Silvers described sociologists in recent years as
turning away from "the basic assumptions they had been
dealing with and that they had been using in their own
work."
They were also affected, he said, "by the claims and
arguments made by students on campus as to the
relevance of their work and as to their complicity in
working for the government on projects having to do with
war and suppression of ethnic and racial groups. In such
work they were very much a part of, not simply the
intellectual structure, but the political structure."
Letters edition
Today The Ubyssey turns the lion's share of its
space over to its readers.
Its writing readers, that is.
Pages 4, S, 6,7 and 8 of today's rag are devoted
to a vast array of letters which have graced our
ktnailbox over the past few days.
Both Speier and Silvers described changes in their
personal outlooks about teaching and research. Silvers
warned against the tendency of departments to become
influenced and directed by large-scale outside research
funding.
"I want to get out among those that I study. I want
to know them from the standpoint of their own
perspective," said Silvers, contrasting his view with that of
the conventional sociologist who is "two, three and four
stages removed" from the world he's looking at.
Students at the meeting largely concentrated on
issues involing democratization of the university and
student control of their own lives. AMS president Steve
Garrod, who chaired the learn-in, said: "It seems very
strange that we make our decisions about our education
by what those who in our society control wealth decide
that they want to see taught."
Daphne Kelgard, a member of the anthrosoc work
collective of the Union of Radical Social Scientists, told
profs: "Don't mourn, organize." She said that the issues
of student control of their lives and faculty control of
their careers must be separated. Although she agreed that
the two groups have some common interests, she said that
students should not be put up as "cannon fodder" to save
the profs.
The learn-in, which ran 2)6. hours, should be followed
by a second crisis meeting in the next 10 days, chairman
Garrod suggested to the meeting.
In addition, the anthrosoc undergrad union, one of
the sponsors of the learn-in, announced a strategy and
information meeting to be held tomorrow in Bu. 106 at
noon, for all students who want to participate in the
conflict. Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 2,  1971
New union to tackle
women workers' problems
CRABBY APPLETON
Oct. 25 - Noy. 6
An association which is aimed
at getting working women
together for better wages and
working conditions was founded
Saturday in Vancouver.
About 30 working women
attended a conference at the
Central Presbyterian church with
the specific goal of forming a
union of women that would
hasten the breakdown of social
and economic discrimination
against women in all occupations.
The first step in this direction
was the forming of the Working
Women's Association.
"We are not trying to set up a
union in competition to existing
unions," said Jean Rands, an
organizer of the conference.
A pamphlet issued before the
conference said that of the
280,000 women workers in B.C.,
only 20 per cent are members of
unions.
While these women make
better wages, have job security
and seniority provisions, they may
find many of their problems are
not dealt with by the
male-dominated labor movement,
the pamphlet said.
In a statement of goals the
association said it supports issues
unions have ignored such as free
community-controlled child  care
24 hours a day, equal pay for
work of equal value,
discrimination in firing, hiring, job
training and education.
Other goals are the union
organization of working women
and support for women
organizing.
"In the existing union
structure there is a distinct
separation between the union and
workers," said Rands.
"People think you just have to
phone the union and they will
organize — but what happens is
people get fired.
"We support the working
women at UBC in their attempt to
organize and protest the firing of
Jeanne Paul," said Rands.
The association created a
co-ordinating committee which
will staff the women's centre at
511 Carrall Street.
They can be reached by
phoning 684-0523 and will answer
questions concerning labor laws
and other work problems.
The committee is holding an
open meeting Wednesday at the
centre. Meetings for the general
membership will be held at the
downtown library at 7:30 the last
Wednesday of every month.
"Women are isolated from each
other  at work — even afraid to
'No teacher surplus'
says gov't flunkey
By LAURENCE LEADER
The provincial department of education claims there is no teacher
surplus in B.C.
In a memo to school superintendents, the director of research and
standards, C.B. Conway, wrote: "We have been hearing a lot recently
about falling enrolments, surpluses of teachers and declining birth
rates. Our advice to you is: 'Don't you believe it."
The memo said grade one enrolment declined last year to 43,145
and is estimated to drop this year to 41,210.
"Enrolments are declining in Quebec, Ontario, the Atlantic
provinces and Alberta and ... the number of births in urban cores of
B.C. is still going down."
But Conway is "still forecasting a record number of births in B.C.
in 1973-74."
This trend of declining enrolment promises a further shortage of
teaching positions in the future.
Furthermore, Conway's memo admits that "B.C. teacher-training
institutions provided only 68 per cent of those teaching in B.C."
In other words, one-third of those teaching in B.C. came from
outside the province, depriving British Columbians of those jobs.
As of Sept. 9 there are 506 unemployed teachers registered with
the British Columbia Teachers' Federation.
Government goes,
programs live on
Most programs conceived and initiated by the human
government will continue operating, although it was defeated in last
Wednesday's referendum.
Alma Mater Society president Steve Garrod said Thursday
the AMS alternate bookstore and the crafts workshop and store
will remain open.
"We hope these services can be kept going after we're gone,"
Garrod said.
Garrod admitted subsequent student councils could destroy
the bookstore by ejecting it from its room in the SUB
basement, using the argument that the space had to be used for
something else.
Bookstore manager Maureen Kennedy said the store will
remain open as usual.
The Union of Radical Social Scientists and the Union of
Radical Students in the Humanities will also continue with their
programs.
The women's studies program, which has separate funding
will operate as planned through the winter and spring.
The special events committee is attempting to obtain outside
funding to make up for budget cuts.
discuss    paychecks,"    said    the
pamphlet distributed earlier.
"Employers deliberately cause
turnover by giving unequal wages,
creating unfair working conditions
and transferring employees
often," said Rands.
"This means women are not
stable. Employers don't want
people to stay for any length of
time.
"That would make things
difficult for them; employees
would share their knowledge and
begin to know more than the
boss."
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THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
English prof awaits dean's decision on tenure
By SANDY KASS
English professor Seymour Levitan is
playing a waiting game.
Levitan, who was denied tenure by the
English department tenure committee in
October, is now awaiting final word from
arts dean Doug Kenny and the faculty
tenure and promotions committee before
planning his next move.
Kenny and the committee must ratify
all committee decisions for them to take
effect.
While department committee members
themselves were split over approving
Levitan for tenure, English department
head Robert Jordan — acting as a
committee arbitrator - denied tenure to
Levitan.
"As far as Jordan is concerned, my case
is closed," Levitan told The Ubyssey
Monday.
"It is now up to the dean and his
committee to make their own decisions,"
he said.
Levitan criticized Jordan for his lack of
interest in student opinion, which he feels
Kenny is "more interested in."
"Jordan shows a real contempt for
opinions of students," Levitan said.
Levitan cited two examples of Jordan's
lack of concern over student opinion.
The department head, who says he
"does not make public statements," first
tried to fire Levitan in October, 1969,
when a new English department tenure
scheme was introduced.
Because Levitan was hired before the
new scheme began, however, he was given a
two-year extension in meeting his tenure
qualifications.
The qualifications are based on three
main criteria: service to the university,
teaching ability and published works.
When Levitan's position was first in
jeopardy, seven of his students and two of
his colleagues sent letters to Jordan on his
behalf.
Jordan has since thrown out the letters.
"Jordan likes to do things in a regular
way," Levitan said.
"When Jordan asks for letters, that is
regular. When he does not ask for them, it
would be irregular to consider them," he
said.
He said Jordan's action throws into
question the fate of any letter a faculty
member writes in support of another's
position.
"What concerns me even more is
Jordan's reaction to those students who
wrote — he just erased their opinions
because he considered them unimportant."
Levitan said he has since recovered
about half the letters from copies the
authors have kept or sent to Kenny or
administration president Walter Gage.
A second incident of Jordan's disregard
of student opinion, Levitan said, is the case
of a poetry course he was slated to teach
this year — English 321.
Because the course was scheduled badly
only nine students enrolled for it during
registration week.
When the students were told by Levitan
their course would be cancelled because
each section needed at least 10 students,
they protested and asked Levitan to wait
another week to see if enrolment increased.
Levitan asked Jordan, who subsequently
said no.
When two English 321 students went to
see Jordan and asked him personally, he
told them to find 20 students interested in
the course, and he would keep it open.
Although the students found 11 others
(totalling enrolment to 20) willing to take
the course, Jordan told Levitan "it is
cancelled anyway."
"Jordan could just not believe there
could be such a strong personal reaction on
the students' part after only a few days,"
Levitan said.
Levitan said another weapon Jordan is
using against him is his status in the
department.
Levitan, presently an instructor, would
become a senior instructor if given tenure.
"Jordan    says    all    senior    instructor
positions go to teachers of English
composition only," he said.
Levitan was twice recommended by the
department promotions committee for
status boost to assistant professor, in the
springs of 1969 and 1971.
He presently has five works accepted for
publication, although he does not consider
them "scholarly".
Levitan said the purpose of tenure used
to be to protect freedom of speech and the
academic community from outside
pressures.
"Now it is used to protect mechanical
professionalism and repress freedom of
teaching styles and ways of thinking."
—daryl tan photo
TRIUMPHANT GRIN spreads across face of Irving Fetish, winner of this year's Trans-Victoria Motorized News Vendors' Rally last week.
Fetish credits streamlined design of Mark 9 newsmobile for record-shattering win.
It's a murder, a real murder'
MONTREAL (CUPI) - Today and
Wednesday are days of mourriing at
CEGEP Vieux-Montreal.
The Political Action Committee of the
junior college in downtown Montreal
Monday invited all Quebec students to join
them in mourning the death of Michelle
Gauthier, 28, a student at Vieux-Montreal.
Gauthier died Friday night of an asthma
attack precipitated by a police charge into
a crowd of demonstrators of which she and
her husband were a part.
"When the  police  attacked, she took
fright and the anguish caused the crisis
which she then suffered," said her husband
Michel, 27, who is a news editor for
Radio-Canada.
"It was assassination pure and simple,"
he said.
The young woman was taken to nearby
Hospital de la Misericorde which was
unequipped to handle her case because it
had no emergency facilities and apparently
no doctor on duty. By the time her
companions got her to a larger hospital, a
block away, she was near death.
"It's a murder, a real murder," said
Louis Laberge, president of the Quebec
Federation of Labor and a leader of
Friday's march on La Presse.
"This young woman is the first victim
of the dictator Jean Drapeau's
anti-demonstration by-law."
Leaders of Quebec's three largest trade
union centres, the QFL, the Confederation
of National Trade Unions, and the Quebec
Teachers Corporation, have invited all
Quebec workers to be present at Gauthier's
funeral services to be held today.
st consumer column
By LESLIE PLOMMER
The quality of campus food may be
rotten, but at least you don't have to go
far to get away from, it - if you're
looking for a good dinner at a reasonable
price.
Here are three suggestions - the start
of more to come in this column.
First is Hong Kong Foods, the Chinese
restaurant located near the east end of
the small shopping area on University
Boulevard near Wesbrook.
The prices are lower t'tan those of
almost every restaurant in Chinatown,
and the fond is better. And unlike the
food served by many of the Chinatown
places. Hong Kong's is hor.
The menu is varied, ranging from
standard, dishes like chicken chop sue>
(95 cents) and boneless sweet and sour
pork  (SI.10)   to   specialties  like   diced
chicken and almond, which is really good
and costs $1.60 -- one of the more
expensive dishes at the Hong Kong.
The various kinds of chow mein,
averaging about SI, are not as good as
most other dishes, but chow fun js a .good
substitute. It's basically the same as chow
mein, but made with broader noodles.
Cost of most varieties is about $ 1.45.
A little farther away, at 2946 West
Broadway, is the Acropol, where good
Greek food is served in a
semi-smorgasbord fashion.
A meal ■ usually more than you can
eat - costs about $2. The food is set out
in large baking pans under heat lamps on
a main counter, where customers choose
any combination of the different dishes.
However, this method of display and
service means food is usually only warm
when it gets to the table.
But unless you're a freak about piping
hot food, the Acropol is a good place to
eat. And it serves beer and wine.
Lamb is the staple meat: there's lamb
stew, roast lamb, macaroni and lamb.
Aiid on Sundays, a whole lamb is
barbecued.
The menu varies a bit from week to
week, but certain dishes are fairly
constant. Musaka, for example, made of
layers of potato, eggplant and ground
beef and covered with cheese cream.
Stuffed green pepper, stuffed eggplant
and spinach pies are good dishes - this
may be the only restaurant.in town that
could convert an eggplant, pepper or
spinach-hater. And there is always a
mixed vegetable dish and roast potatoes.
If you like (or want to try) Japanese
food, and don't mind dping some driving,
the   best   place   to   go   for   a   good,
inexpensive meal is Kamo's. 362 Powell.
A few of the prices: sukiyaki, S2.50
(vegetables and beef slices cooked at the
table): tempura, S2.50 (fish, shellfish and
vegetables quick-fried in a light batter and
dipped in tempura sauce); teriyaki
chicken, S2 and teriyaki beef, $2.65
(chicken or beef marinated in salty-sweet
teriyaki sauce).
All of these prices include soup and
rice. .
Tsunomono, at 50 cents, is a good
starter. It's a vinegared noodle salad with
shrimp and a couple of fresh vegetables.
A dinner at Kamo's is an excellent
buy, especially when compared with the
rip-off prices charged for much smaller
quantities of comparable food at other
Japanese restaurants. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 2..  ~\97'i
Bomb's away
This time it looks like the Amchitka nuclear test is
really set to go off.
Despite all the middle-class petition signers, all the
university demonstrators, all the high school protesters,
the U.S. has scheduled the blast for Thursday.
We don't go along with AMS ombudswoman Joan
Campana's belief that the Canadian government could
have stopped the test — Canada is too firmly tied to the
American machine to be able to take a strong
independent position.
But we do believe that if we have any kind of
integrity and national consciousness we must keep
telling the U.S. and Canadian governments what we
think of their policies and actions.
It's the least we can do.
For this reason, Wednesday's mass protest at the
U.S. consulate is important.
students
protest
Not    long
assembled     in
Amchitka.
ago,    10,000   high   school
downtown     Vancouver     to
On   Wednesday,
follow suit.
20,000   UBC   students   should
We cannot sit silently in classes while the U.S.
military gears up for another demonstration of
dangerous and arrogant power.
We know that the U.S. is close to controlling the
Canadian society and economy — which includes this
university.
if we remain silent now, it will not be long until we
have no voice at all.
The mail
One of the most important parts of any
newspaper is the section devoted to letters.
The Ubyssey, much to our delight, gets a lot of
letters and we print as many of them as space allows.
Unfortunately, this is never enough.
So we've decided that from time to time, when
the letters volume overwhelms us, we'll produce a
letters edition like today's. /
This permits us to print the lengthy letters that
are normally too space-consuming to run — like the one
from Cecil Green, who cries out for a little decency and
fair play while supplying arms with which people are
killed.
Letters that readers might not ordinarily see —
like the one from an advertiser who's trying to use
financial muscle on the paper.
Letters that individually might be forgotten but
collectively indicate a significant body of feeling or
opinion — like the anger evident in several letters about
hitchhikers or the views held by students on
Wednesday's human government referendum.
We hope the letters edition will become a Ubyssey
institution.
It's one way we have of showing that The Ubyssey
— unlike most newspapers — is accessible to its
readership, and that the content of the paper will
stretch as far as the interests and concerns of people
who take the time to write for it.
THE UBYSSEY
NOVEMBER 2, 1971
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the writer and not of the AMS or the university administration.
Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a
weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located
in room 24IK of the Student Union Building.
228-2307;    Page    Friday,    Sports,
Editorial    departments,    228-2301,
228-2305; advertising, 228-3977.
EDITOR:  LESLIE PLOMMER
"Awright, you guys," menaced David Schmidt to Pat Knopski and
Laurence Leader, who were busily engaged in drawing up the Sex Orgy
Club constitution. Vaughn Palmer leafed through the Kama Sutra in the
corner while Berton Woodward and Randy Frith practised Position 53.
Sandi Shreve polished her whip while Wanda Lust did tricks with Sandy
Kass and Stan Persky. Tricia Moore purpled noticeably while Leslie
Kreuger recited Masters and Johnson to John Oscar Andersen, who was
visibly drawn to the lovely D. M. Finlay.
Paul Knox and Jan O'Brien noted that Gord Gibson was doin' some
funny things with Keith Dunbar's body, but Kent Spencer told Ian Jukes
that for a football player he sure didn't know much about blorgasms.
David Phillips was the man handling the golden lens, and Daryl Tan worked
too, no mean feat, since he wasn't even here. Did someone mention peanut
envy?
Letters Edition
Recycle
As a volunteer helper for the
Joshua recycling project on
campus, I find it extremely
hypocritical of the university to
support a recycling effort and
continue to use disposable utensils
and plates in the SUB cafeteria —
not to speak of all the plastics and
styrofoarn cups used on campus.
We are quite likely disposing of
as much paper in the form of
non-recyclable plates and cups as
we will be saving in the form of
office and computer paper and
cards.
I encourage students to push
for a return to non-disposable
utensils and plates in the cafeteria
and support this by avoiding the
temptation to steal these utensils
once the switch-back is made.
Craig Runyan,
Grad studies 9,
Resource science centre
Values
I feel I must reply to the letter
signed by Dave Marshall in
Friday's Ubyssey.
In his letter Marshall takes the
Union of Radical Social Scientists
to task for a contravention of
"value-free" ethics in its analysis
of the social sciences in general
and at this university.
I find it interesting that
Marshall should cite Max Weber
asi the initiator and, I take it,
epitome of "value-freedom" in
the social sciences. In fact I find it
useful for I intend to use Weber as
an example of the neutrality
which the social sciences espouse.
In 1895 at Freiburg, Germany,
Weber gave an address which
clearly subordinated value-free
economics to national power
politics and rising German
imperialism. Thus rising national
feeling among the German ruling
class seemed to have an effect on
Weber. The process Weber
espoused here was an
international thing and led to the
First World War, where nations
fought for world economic
control.
Later Weber stated that
socialism was "contrary to
Western reason". The German
bourgeoisie dug that kind of
value-freedom.
I am not denying that in m any
aspects Weber was a great thinker.
I am simply pointing out that a
social scientist who deludes
himself or herself into thinking he
or she is being value free has on a
couple of pretty effective
blinders.
There is a social reality with
social relationships. It just so
happens that social science in the
main serves the interests of those
who possess the wealth and power
in this society.
Anyone disagreeing with me on
this point can take a look at the
record of the an thro, sociology,
poli-sci and economics
departments at this university.
The record speaks for itself. Bring
in the corporate money; don't do
anything that will alienate the
money; thus, please the
corporations.
When the URSS brands the
social sciences as "reactionary" or
"bourgeois" it speaks the truth.
The truth does exist, though
"value-freedom" puts blinders on
it. When is the last time any of us
witnessed the social sciences at
UBC working for the benefit of
workers or unemployed? When
have they broken out of their
"neutrality" to advocate social
change which may benefit the
majority of society?
Don't hold your breath, people.
Dick Betts
Anthro student on
leave and on welfare
Cyril
Why do you waste so much
valuable space in The Ubyssey
publishing those bullshit letters
from anthrosoc head Cyril
Belshaw?
By now we all know that he's
only trying to pull the wool over
our (and perhaps his own) eyes.
I'm embarrassed for the guy!
Til Nawatzki,
Law 3
The Ubyssey welcomes letters
from all readers.
Though an effort is made to
print all letters received, The
Ubyssey reserves the right to edit
for clarity, legality, brevity and
taste. Tuesday, November 2, 1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters Edition
From Cecil Green
A copy of The Ubyssey issue
of Oct. 15 has inadvertently just
come to my attention.
As you might have anticipated,
the cover article and your related
commentary on page 4 are most
disturbing to us — in fact, never in
all of our lives have my wife and I
been so insulted, maligned and so
downright hurt by anyone!
Nate Smith can feel proud of
his descent to the depths in poor
taste, and particularly when your
comrnentary makes reference to
Mrs. Green with disparaging and
unkind remarks. I strongly resent
- such inconsiderate references, for
after all her background in New
York State was far distant from
Vancouver.
Yet, she not only went along
with our joint contributions to
date to UBC, but even more
provoking, she actually prompted
these gifts in the first place, and
incidentally, even though no tax
credit (either Canadian of U.S.)
could be realized for either of us.
I know that apologies cannot
be expected, nor are they looked
for, since even such irresponsible
statements would probably fall
' under the heading of so-called
"freedom of speech."
Mrs. Green and I can do some
rationalizing and with the passage
of a little time will recover our
composures. Even the disparaging
references to my interest and
participation in helping national
security can be accepted, for it
has been part of my long-time
work background!
Thus, even as a very young
man, I worked summers during
the First World War - (1) in a
Vancouver shipyard (Coughlin's)
helping to turn out vitally needed
cargo vessels, and (2) in a smelter
north of Prince Rupert turning
out much needed blister copper —
then before, during and after the
Second World War, I personally
supervised exploration operations
v. in out-of-the-way areas all around
the free world to help build up
much needed petroleum reserves
— our company is still by far the
world's largest service concern in
this regard!
Nate Smith may also feel that
Mrs. Green and I have a recently
developed interest in the
industry-education relationship —
perhaps occurring as late as
Vietnam! If so, then he is greatly
mistaken, since we found it
natural to work with educational
. institutions starting with my early
' recruiting missions on behalf of
the company to many of the
principal universities throughout
the U.S. and Canada. Thus, I used
to visit UBC during the late 40s.
Apparently Nate Smith in his
''research" thought it
inconsequential to include that
these contacts have developed
during the past 25 years into
working relationships as trustee,
or adviser, to many educational
and research institutions
throughout the U.S. — from
California to New England (with
emphasis, of course, here in
Texas) — in both state and private
institutions.
Such exposure has included the
presidency of the worldwide MIT
Alumni Association. From among
all these many contacts, Nate
Smith stands alone in his
ill-mannered accusations based on
some farfetched imaginative
correlations with a few Standard
& Poor facts regarding our
company.
As his findings show, Texas
Instruments does indeed supply
military apparatus, along with a
wide range of civilian equipment,
but he didn't bother to mention
that military business is a long
way from providing a major share
of our revenue. Also, not only is
he completely wrong with
reference to any kind of favors
from Washington, but he becomes
downright insulting in this regard.
Further, he is pitifully, though
understandably, ignorant of the
mechanics of highly competitive
commercial bidding. His
references to President Johnson
and Secretary Connally are
likewise insulting and comprise
totally uncalled-for doubts re
their integrity, which evidently he
cannot,   or   does   not   care   to,
CECIL GREEN >^
. . . "hurt, maligned"   /
appreciate  in   order  to  make a\
so-called "good story". '
As I resent the off-side
references to Mrs. Green, so do I
feel indignant about his
disparaging remarks regarding my
company and its 45,000 people —
some of whom I have had the
pleasure of working with for over
40 years in building together a
most sophisticated electronics
enterprise — an accomplishment
resulting from calculated risks,
hard work, and, may I say, good
management abilities.
I am naturally proud of this
collective accomplishment, but
Nate Smith's accusations show his
complete lack of understanding or
appreciation for our growth
accomplishment, which has also
been due in good part to industry
leadership in good personnel
relations.
Nate Smith seems to favor my
classification as a UBC
"drop-out". In my student day
this kind of event was known as a
"transfer". Apparently, I am to be
censured for aspiring to be an
electrical engineer, which
necessitated leaving UBC at the
end of my second year of applied
science and entering the junior
year of electrical engineering at
MIT in 1921. As a life member of
the MIT Corporation, I resent his
inference that a "drop-out" could
ever get into MIT.
Again, I realize that Nate
Smith writes with the license of
free speech, which I agree must
always be so on all of our
educational campuses. I note also
that editorial opinions are those
of the writer and not of your
office. I know nothing of the
nature of your circulation, but
judging from the number and
variety of your advertisements, I
assume that there are at least
some off-campus subscribers. I
wonder about the effect of this
libelous, or tabloid-type
front-page item upon the silent
majority of students, but equally
important, I also wonder about
the damaging mental effect upon
alumni and other lay people on
the outside, as they contemplate
current requests of the trustees,
administration and faculty for
financial support.
It seems to me that if I
happened to be some new
individual contemplating
assistance to the university, I
would now have second thoughts
for fear of generating
subsequently the peculiar kind of
appreciation which Nate Smith
here expounds. This one callous
article can possibly negate an
unknown amount of good will
towards the university and indeed
virtually neutralize at least some
of the good work produced by
those conscientious individuals
who are working devotedly to
build a still better university.
Apparently. Nate Smith prefers
to ignore the existence, or at least
the importance to UBC of such
dedicated individuals. In my case,
I am somewhat surprised that he
did not conclude by
recommending that our "tainted"
money be returned.
In summary — please
understand I am not as much
-■-w for myself as I am sincerely
icerned about the hurt to my
family, the insults to my company
associates, and the unkind
category assigned to our several
friends at UBC for their parts in
our gift transactions.
Finally, I would hark again to
the great importance of free
speech, but wouldn't you agree
that it should be coupled with at
least some semblance of common
decency and fair play?
Cecil H. Green,
3908 Lexington Ave.,
Dallas, Texas.
Your lengthy letter
conveniently glosses over the main
subject of the article in two
paragraphs — what you choose to
call your role in "national
security."
We are all well aware that
Texas Instruments makes
products other than military
hardware, products including, we
believe, heart pacemakers.
But all the heart pacemakers
you will ever produce can never
compensate for one of your
air-to-ground missiles that lands
on a defenceless Vietnamese
village.
Incidently, if your wife and
your employees are so upset
about a story that didn't mention
them, we'd be very happy to hear
from them directly. —N.S.
LE CHATEAU
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For overseas students and families.
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Whatever your need in footwear you'll find it at
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Walter Zuber Armstrong Ensemble
Free Form Jazz
Walter Zuber Armstrong
Composer, Arranger
WOODEN FLUTE (Oriental and own design)
ALTO-FLUTE - BASS-CLARINET - PICCOLO -TAMBORINE
MUSIC
The music represents a break from traditional concepts of music
and moves within a free rhythmic structure. It is an expression of
a spiritual creative freedom. Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 2,  1971
NOTICE TO OUR CUSTOMERS
BOOKSTORE HOURS
8:45 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
On the recommendation of the University Labour
Committee we are reverting to our regular store hours
of 8:45 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday to Friday until
discussions have been held with the representatives of
CUPE. 116.
We regret any inconvenience this may cause to our customers.
the bookstore
UNIVERSITY OF B.C.
228-4741
BIRD CALLS
Your Souvenir of UBC
The University of
British Columbia
STUDENT TELEPHONE DIRECTORY 1971-72
BUY YOURS TODAY 7C
UBC BOOKSTORE AND SUB #   W
THE ROCK OPERA BY THE WHO
sound by Kelly-Deyong
THUR. NOV. 6-8:30 p.m.-UBC Old Auditorium
TICKETS: $2.50 & $3.00 at Vancouver Ticket Centre 683-3255
and outlets; Pants Plus in the Village.
STUDENT SHOW
Thurs. Nov. 4 - 12:30 Noon - $2.00 with card
Letters Edition
Curious
Though I thought that the
campaign posters of the human
government were too heavy on
the "love, work, knowledge —
we're it" line, and though I fully
agreed with their statement that
"our responses have often been
too elitist," I felt that in deciding
their merit as a government only
their actions should have been
considered.
On the basis of that criterion,
they are by far the best student
government I have ever been in
contact with. Another
enumeration of their actions
benefitting UBC students is not
needed.
But since I have read of the
human government defeat, the
question plagues me: On what
criteria did the 4,020 base their
votes against the human
government? I am very interested
in the answer to this question and
hope that one of the 4,020 will
write to The Ubyssey and
illuminate me.
One can only hope that they
feel they can do much better and
that in five weeks we will have the
privilege of listening to their
programs.
Susan Alexander,
Arts 2
Request
I would appreciate it if The
Ubyssey would print this request.
Would anti-human government
campaigners please send letters to
The Ubyssey explaining exactly
why they wanted UBC students to
vote against the human
government.
These letters will please not
contain any of the lies or scare
tactics employed by the
anti-human government people
during the campaign. Now that
your goals have been reached, I
feel it would be pleasant if you let
the 4,020 students who voted
against the human government
know why they did so.
R. Starck,
Arts 2
Reality
Now that the human
government is gone, we can
detach everyone's eyes and legs
and replace them with film
footage of Mount Etna erupting
into a football field.
It's only a matter of conscience
to dispense with political reality,
and now that we're rid of it, let's
recall Hanson Lau's dizzy dancers
from the closet for a bit of comic
relief. Maybe they can solve the
great conundrum: Who really
planted this ivy and why is it
eating me?
Christine Schoening,
Arts 3
Money
In answer to your incorrect
;omments about me in The
Ubyssey of Oct. 27:
My job as education AMS rep
includes, among other things,
keeping the students of the
education faculty informed about
the activities of their AMS
council.
Eighty-five cents, not $10, was
spent on ditto stencils and paper
to print an information sheet of
my     own     composition.     The
internal affairs officer's budget
covered this expense because it
was used for the purpose of
keeping the students of our
Education Students' Assembly
informed.
The $10 you referred to
concerns a motion I put to the
EdSA council requesting a
donation to help finance an
opposition blurb to the human
government which was
collectively prepared by several
AMS reps from a variety of
faculties. It failed. That blurb was
not published through EdSA
funds.
Please, in the future, get your
facts straight.
Vicki Meakes,
AMS Rep for the
faculty of education
Choice
We, the undersigned, would
like to urge human government to
run again in the forthcoming AMS
by elections, for the following
reasons:
1. If Steve Garrod's
statement that "people on a super
apolitical campus are beginning to
consider political issues" is to be
taken seriously, then the refusal
of human government to run
again effectively removes the
political choice from the election
— all other factions being
politically interchangeable.
2. In no way can the Society
for Environmental Education
pretend to represent student
opinion. They merely profited
from a backlash against human
government.
3. This backlash can, in part,"
be attributed to the smear
campaign which so many students
actually believed.
4. The result of Wednesday's
referendum was also partly due to
bad timing on the part of human
government. After six months in
office, four of which were
vacation months, and only six
weeks of term, many students had
not had the opportunity to judge
the success of human
government's programs.
Moreover, new students to
UBC had no yardstick with which
to compare these programs with
those of previous executives.
In conclusion, we believe that
because of the factors mentioned
above, this has been an election
which does not fairly represent
student opinion at UBC.
Furthermore, if human
government does not run in the
forthcoming byelections, an
important body of student
opinion will be left unrepresented.
Precisely those, in fact, who have
never had representation until
human government.
Mary Carline,
Rita Lang,
Grad studies 7;
Heather Wagg,
Grad studies 9
Disgust
The human gov't has been
defeated, and as a good friend and
comrade of the humanoids I am
delighted.
It made me quite ill to see my
friends busting their asses for
people whose response to some of
the most imaginative programs
such as Indian week, Quebec
week, women's studies, was to
choose   to   stick  to  their  racist,
narrow attitudes and stay away.
To add insult to injury, people
judged the humans on the basis of
the most obvious and deliberate
smear campaign ever conducted
on this campus, after having
refused to give the programs a
chance.
I mean, what the living shit is a
fucking university supposed to
be? One sits in a council meeting
and hears some turd try to
eliminate "poets, speakers", and
anything else that vaguely
resembles the remnants of
creativity and enlightenment.
And worse, one knows that
this wind-up mechanical robot,
who sounds like a fucking Greek
military general announcing the
censoring of Socrates, Dostoevsky
and other "subversives", is
probably expressing the attitudes
of the majority of students on this
campus. Students — that's a good
one.
On Wednesday, "students"
demonstrated that they would
gladly support total suppression
of any progressive activity. And
no feeble appeal about unfair
budgetary allocations to clubs or
intramurals changes that fact. It
could lead one to believe that this
world is in big, big trouble.
But as experience has taught
me, this university is a particularly
reactionary place. There are few
other places around that call
themselves universities that
haven't changed in recent times,
that have held on to all those old
ideas of the university as stepping
stone to success, wealth and
status.
There are few places still
around where mere
professionalism, devoid of any
human feeling and emotion have
so totally succeeded in strangling
and keeping down creative,
expressive individuals. If only I
could keep this in mind.
A moderately pissed-off
music student
Dear sir
A few weeks ago you published
a letter of mine, and the results
have been so heartening I hope
you will find space to print this
note of thanks to all Ubyssey
readers.
You may recall that I am the
woman who works on a campus
newspaper handling the letters
section, and I was sick of receiving
letters that ignored the existence
of women by beginning with the
salutation "dear sir".
Since you published my letter
asking writers to correct their
socially-conditioned sexism, the
response has been astounding.
The newspaper now receives
very few "dear sir" letters. Instead
we get letters beginning with:
Dear friend, dear rat, dear
newspaper, dear person, dear
human being, dear hack, etc.
The whole episode has been
enough to restore my faith in
woman and mankind. Clearly
there is hope for human
liberation.
Leslie Plommer,
Arts 4 Tuesday, November 2, 1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
Letters Edition
Westco
It has been a pleasure to do
business with you. We have long
admired the University of British
Columbia as a seat of learning for
intelligent people.
We are aware that all segments
of society (even the University of
British Columbia) are entitled to
indulge in the raising of a few
useless and even damaging people.
We do not necessarily understand
this but we know that such is the
case. However, we have not been
able to note too many instances
where one single article took up
the whole front page of The
Ubyssey when dealing with one
individual. The issue of The
Ubyssey for Oct. 15 therefore
caught our attention.
I know nothing of Cecil Green
other than that portrayed in the
article written by Nate Smith.
From that information, Mr. Green
seems to be a man of outstanding
achievement and generosity. If he
has seemed to have, as an
individual, played a part in the
development of the defence and
fighting capabilities of the United
States, I feel that is to his credit
and not his shame. The Soviet
Union and China certainly maJce
heroes out of their equivalents of
Mr. Green. In spite of the
embellishments provided by Nate
Smith, Mr. Green appears, even in
Nate Smith's article, to be a
worthy and capable man.
However, the article is laced
with slanted embellishments
obviously intended to be
derogatory. Apparently, Nate
Smith is considered to be of such
high intellect and achievement
that he may judge not only Mr.
Green but also Linus Pauling,
Margaret Mead, Laurence Olivier
and Kenneth Clark, who, he says,
"might even be interesting for a
number of students" — and claim
the whole front page of The
Ubyssey to do it.
My placing of advertising in
The Ubyssey has been based on
the belief that it would be read in
large measure by intelligent
people. However, intelligent
people are certainly going to be
put off reading a publication
which puts such a banner headline
on an article written as though by
an author suffering extreme
frustration or from some feeling
of inadequacy and with the aim of
venomously attacking a man
brought to the author's attention
by a generous act.
Certainly, that sort of thing
must diminish the interest of
intelligent people in The Ubyssey.
If intelligent people can be turned
off by this sort of thing (and I
think they can), the value of
advertising in The Ubyssey is
certainly lessened. The peculiar
temperament that published such
articles usually translates a
reaction such as mine as being an
attempt by an advertiser to
influence the editorial policy.
Such illogical arguments were first
heard by us when the current
perpetrators of those arguments
were still in diapers. However, as
an advertiser, I am influenced by
the view that we want to attract
only intelligent readers and that
the level of journalism (using that
word loosely) is sinking to the
level at which intelligent readers
must be dissuaded from reading
past the first few lines of Page 1.
Therefore, please take this as
notice that we wish to terminate
our advertising in The Ubyssey at
the earliest possible time. Would
you kindly advise what date you
consider that to be.
We are well aware that the
mentality represented in this
article is by no means indicative
of the majority of the people at
the University of British
Columbia. We are simply
concerned that the intelligent
people we wish to attract are not
going to be reading advertising in
a publication that has sunk to that
level and payment for such
advertising would therefore be a
waste of money.
As even Nate Smith may one
day   discover, everything has to
earn its way or else be abandoned.
Brian Rudkin,
President,
Westco Insurance.
Outlook
Re: J. Nolan's letter, "Creeps",
published in the Oct. 28 issue of
The Ubyssey.
While we, the undersigned, are
not opposed to hitchhiking or to
picking up hitchkikers, we would
like to point out to J. Nolan that
no one owes him a ride.
The narrow-minded,
self-centred attitude that he
expresses in his letter is disgusting.
Car owners must buy gasoline and
oil, pay for maintenance, and
purchase licences in order to
operate their cars. It is only out of
personal generosity that they
offer rides to any hitchhikers.
It seems amazing to us that a
person such as J. Nolan could
spend seven years at university
and still retain the distorted
outlook that the world owes him
anything.
20 signatures,
Mechanical engineering 4
Thumb
As one of many UBC
commuters, I am greatly disturbed
that some of us are prepared to
fall down on the duty we all owe
to J. Nolan, arts 7, when he has
his thumb out in the morning.
Perhaps he could send a photo
in so we can all take a look at him
for next time.
Hopefully, he will find some
way of supporting himself by the
time he gets_to arts 17.
J.Richardson,
Applied science 1
Reeks
Re: the letter from the arts 7
student who didn't have much
success hitchhiking:
I think your attitude pertaining
to drivers who pick up hitchhikers
reeks.
Since you get the ride for
nothing, you should consider
yourself lucky to be picked up at
all. We drivers are not obligated to
give you a ride. We also have the
fortunate option to pick up or not
pick up whom we please.
I definitely did not miss your
company, odious phallus (limp).
PeteGutzmann,
Science 1
Chariot
The traditional T-CUP game
will be held once again next year
complete with the half time
Chariot Race.
Though the chance of injuries
is always present in this sort of
event, the efforts made to reduce
this chance were very successful
this year.
The event was planned and
executed with a spirit of
co-operation that peaked at one
of the best T-CUP after-parties in
recent history. The members of
the "human government" entry
(which failed to make the first
turn) have asked that they be
included in next year's race. The.
gentleman who put on the
dazzling display of open-field
running (au naturelle) has been
approached by several students
hoping for a repeat performance.
Since both participation and
attendance are voluntary, charges
of "idiocy" are irrelevant.
Students who missed the game
and race this year, but would like
to donate to the Crippled
Children's Fund are invited to
make their donation any noon
hour at the EUS office, main
floor, Civil Engineering Building.
Engineering Undergrad
Society
Slam
And now, a word of advice to
the minority of hitchhikers at
UBC who slam doors when they
get out of cars, and consequently
wreck it for other riders.
Cram it, and walk.
Adrian Carter,
Artsl
Union
Recent developments in the
anthro-soc and English
departments have revealed to
more people how tenuous it is
being junior members of a
competitive organization.
Life decisions are being made
for assistant professors by their
"superiors", their big daddies, and
still they are slow to join together
and organize. This same class
apathy operates within the ranks
of graduate students, who view
arbitrary decisions as
characteristic and therefore
explainable (like the diagnostic
essay in the English dept. which
was railroaded through in the
summer without consultation
with the teaching staff.)
The graduate student, like the
undergraduate, sees her/himself as
only 'passing through' and uses
this notion of transience as good
reason to disregard the power of
unionizing.
There are issues.
Like demanding a defined
grievance procedure. And wages
which should be negotiable. And
the quality of education that can
be generated by existent systems
of teaching in various
departments. And having a parity
voice in decisions made regarding
curriculum, budget etc.
These are points which are
being brought up and discussed in
weekly meetings with the
president's, committee on
academic assistants, which means
- WE MUST MAKE
OURSELVES KNOWN. If any of
these things interest you, become
a member of the Non-Faculty
Teachers' Union (we're a group
that includes TAs, research
assistants, markers.)
Come out of the closet.
Letting things drift (inaction)
and playing safe (protecting
careers) when we know things are
wrong,   is   the   worst   kind   of
isolationist sentiment. Let us
know how you feel. You can find
us in SUB 262.
Mark Madoff, TA,
Barb Coward, TA,
Andrew Reeve, TA
Bomb
The Amchitka blast raises so
many questions in my own life.
My children end up believing
that this is a great catastrophe,
asking such questions as "Doesn't
President Nixon know what he
can do to us? If a tidal wave
comes, does it come slowly or
drown you right away? What does
radiation do to you? If there is an
earthquake, will we drop into the
ocean?"
I try to answer them and to
assure them that nothing will
happen.
But...
There remains the "But" that
means I cannot satisfy them
because I cannot satisfy myself.
We stop talking and go rake leaves
or play games and life has to go
on in spite of the "But". I am
overwhelmed with a sense of
helplessness because I cannot
remove the possibilities that this is
a great tragedy that will affect us.
On Wednesday of the week,
the Canadian Coalition to Stop
the Amchitka Nuclear Blast has
called for an 11:00 a.m. total
work halt. I urge all people to
respond to this.
At the chapel in the Lutheran
Campus Centre, we plan a service
for Wednesday, 10:30 a.m. Some
people will speak. Some people
will pray. We hope all will be
asking what we can do in response
to this blast which seems
inevitable. What can we do today
and tomorrow and next week to
say no to those forces that
carelessly use power to frighten us
all and to frighten children?
Don Johnson,
Lutheran Campus Pastor
Myth
We would like to comment on
the opening lines of the article in
Tuesday's Ubyssey (Oct. 26)
concerning the Christian and
Jewish demonstration against
Soviet suppression of religious
activities.
You stated that it was a
demonstration against "alleged"
Soviet suppression, alleged
meaning "stated as fact without
proof." We would like to inform
you and those who read your
article that this type of Soviet
intervention extends far beyond
any supposed myth or fantasy.
We personally have spoken to
people who have been in prison
and have undergone incredible
torture, who have been written
off as insane because of their
beliefs and committed to mental
institutions where they were
placed in strait-jackets, whose
children have been thrown
homeless into the street because
their parents had religious
convictions, who have friends
with every bone in their body
broken because they helped these
children.
We have talked to many who
have visited friends and relatives
over there and know of children
who have been denied further
schooling because they spent one
Sunday in a church, who didn't
See page 8: LETTERS
COMMERCE
GRADUATES!
Would you like to earn a
good income when you are
young enough to enjoy it
and still have a career 20
years from today?
will
KENG. KELLER
Assistant mgr. of the
Vancouver Genera! Office
be    interviewing    graduating
students for sales and management
careers   at  the Student Placement
Office on
Thurs. & Fri. Nov. 4 & 5
Call      the      Placement     Office
22S-3811 for an interview.
.-,. | WILLIAM ,
Shakespeare s
A
MIDSUMMER
NIGHTS
DREAM
HEBB THEATRE - 50<f
Thursday 4th- 12:25
a Cinema West presentation Page 8
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 2,  1971
Letters
Edition
From page 7
even profess to be Christian. We
know of people whose full-time
occupation it is to smuggle Bibles
into these countries.
True there are churches in the
Soviet Union and other
communist countries — churches
that old people only are allowed
to attend because they are no
longer any use to the state. And
now there are state churches for
people who will compromise their
beliefs, this step becoming
necessary because blatant
persecution only increased the
numbers and strength of those
believing.
We wrote this because we feel
it is our duty to present the other
side of the story for those who
think everything is tea and roses
over there; and so you know that
demonstration was not against
some myth, but against an actual
fact.
The Church of Smyrna
of Revelation 2, Bible
'*-'**•
Rote
I would like to make several
terse comments on the fifth-year
transfer program in the education
faculty, specifically the
intermediate division.
As an active but now passive
member of this inane group of
retarded individuals, I feel
qualified to comment on the
subject. Basically, the program
consists of degree transfers from
every walk of life. Regardless of
the reason for joining, we all are
seeking employment.
The teaching procedures used
in this rote faculty leave
something to be desired. The
closest comparison that comes to
mind would be my life in the
primary grades.
I can forgive them for
producing a bevy of redundant,
mundane, "busy-work" courses. I
can forgive them for their childish
seating plans, their frequent
attendance checks, explaining
one's absence, and their
"brow-beating" lecture methods. I
can forgive them for their varied
personal threats to play the game
to the letter or leave. I can forgive
them for their prying student
biographies and their forced
familiarity.
I can forgive them for all of
this, but there must come a day
when the role of the ardent
transfer student will be more than
just the feces of the faculty.
Ralph Moy,
B.A. sociology
Jungle
Deer Ubissee Stuff:
Here in our tiny jungle
metropolis, blorged as it is by
respectable but still backword
humble citizens, our only contact
with your sharp, dreamy world
that we so long to emulate is your
esteemed paper.
Therefore we feel it is unfair to
us, your most fateful readers, to
have almost only letters from
creepy readers filled with
ingratitude instead of punchy,
hard-hitting news.
Your best friends,
THE BLORGS
Pango-Pango
LEST WE FORGET
MH. 11th
POPPIES WILL BE
AVAILABLE ON CAMPUS
NOV. 3rd & 4th
WEST POINT GREY
BR. 142
ROYAL CANADIAN LEGION
IF YOU CAN'T REMEMBER
THINK!
ONE DAY ONLY
SATURDAY, NOV. 6th
Ingmar Bergman's
"WINTER LIGHT"
Max Von Sydow
HEBB THEATRE U.B.C.
75c for Everyone
Two Shows:-7:30 & 9:30 p.m.
At British Columbia Nov. 9 & 10
We mean it.
Even if you have no idea of coming with us,
sign up for an interview.
Come in and rehearse.
Do it on a company whose very life depends
on its ability to come face to face with strangers.
You won't waste our time. We have a number
of surprises about the insurance business in general
and ours in particular. So if there's a latent response in you, we're confident we can trigger it.
Besides, we're perfectly willing to take the risk.
If you can't make an interview, take a look at
"How to separate yourself from the herd." An
eight page booklet on how to go to an interview
on your terms. What to do about nervousness.
About money. How to turn an interview around.
When to get up and walk out. Things like that.
Our booklet is tucked into the new Employment Opportunities Handbook. The handbook
is yours for the asking at the placement office.
"How to separate yourself from the herd"
won't change the world for you.
But it just might help.
InsuranceCompany/London/Canada Tuesday, November 2, 1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 9
page tuesday
Bitter-Sweet Love
By STAN PERSKY
Sunday, Bloody Sunday, a film directed by John
Schlesinger, featuring Peter Finch, Glenda Jackson
and Matthew Head, playing at The Park.
Bloody Sunday is the first movie I've seen that
includes homosexual love in a way that doesn't
offend one's intelligence.
It is a film that speaks about love wisely and
with the unsentimental bitter-sweetness of reality.
Glenda Jackson, portraying the mid-thirtiesh
daughter of a ruling-class business family, recently
divorced, is having an affair with a young (and of
course, rather beautiful) sculptor, played by
Matthew Head. The sculptor is having a second
affair, with a middle-aged intellectual Jewish doctor,
played by Peter Finch. It is Schlesinger's
achievement that these relationships come to us as
sophisticated and not sordid. Both affairs are real
and   sensuous.
Although Schlesirtger shows us contemporary
life (mostly middle and upper class affluence) with a
fast and sharply satiric eye, affectionately trained
on his native London, this is an existential rather
than a social or political film. (As a socialist, I
self-mockingly experienced a learned and now
almost instinctual revulsion for its absence of
political content and bleak individuality.)
When Matthew Head — fairly fresh from Glenda
Jackson's bed and a weekend of minding the squalling
hoard of kids of a hilarious and determinedly
'progressive" family — walks into Finch's office, and
they embrace and kiss, a shocked ooh echoes
through the mostly young bourgeois audience.
What Schlesinger intends to shock us with is
not homosexuality, but His insistance that the
relation between the sculptor and the doctor is also
love. Schlesinger's statement is clear and effectively
put. First of all, it is not a movie "about
homosexuality'-' — which immediately turns the
audience into voyeuristic social scientists — but
about human relationships.
For Schlesinger, homosexuality is neither a zoo
(as in Boys in the Band) where we are shown all its
beastly variety, or black magic (as in The Servant),
or an exposition of perverse pitiful human fraility
(as in the faggotry of Staircase). That is, this film
does not play on our tolerance. It despises
tolerance. It shows you Head and Finch in bed and
it doesn't encourage the viewer to think with liberal
satisfaction, 'yes, I should try to understand this'.
The problems Bloody Sunday deals with in
terms of the doctor and the sculptor are not
problems about sexuality, but about their lives —
for the sculptor: his shallowness, nomadic
uncertainty of identity, and corrupting
ambitiousness — for the doctor: age and loneliness
set in the thick texture of familial relations that
both draw and repell him. As with Glenda Jackson,
faced with the 'free woman's' dilemma of work and
love in a world of narrowing possibilities, the
emphasis of this movie is on lives — lives that
contain powerful sexuality, but that are not
distortedly dominated by lust.
Bloody Sunday is a superbly crafted film, its
major and minor performers all turn in excellent
portrayals, but more than that, it is one of those
rare movies that has emotional intelligence.
Poet Daphne Marlatt
Poet starts at the beginning
Poet Daphne Marlatt will read
her work tomorrow at noon in the
SUB art gallery. This is another in
the year-long series of readings by
Canadian and Quebecois poets
sponsored by the student
government. Ubyssey reviewer
Ted Lynd looks at Marlatt's most
recent book, Rings, published in
the Vancouver Series of the
Georgia Straight Writing
Supplement.
"There is no story only the
• telling with no end in view or
born headfirst, you start at the
beginning and work backwards,"
writes Vancouver poet Daphne
Marlatt in Rings, her compelling
account of the experience of
giving birth.
"You start at the beginning
and it keeps on beginning," she
says.
Rings is an important book, in
- several ways.
Writing as a woman, and as a
person involved in the issue of
women's, consciousness, Marlatt
contributes   her    own    moving,
unsentimental and intense
experience of one of the processes
particular to her sex. This is very
much a book of 'what it feels
like'.
It is not just about giving birth
tb her son — she also takes up the
troubled relationship to her
husband — "Do I make it up? this
cold within him. Nerve ends
replacing what I know, or what I
know he says. The moments,
delimited now, grow into hours he
doesn't move towards me . . ." —
and friends, memories, moving
from home, travelling, the land.
Marlatt is also one of the
writers in North America engaged
in the discovery of new ways to
get down what she has to say. In
Rings she has to re-enter a series
of events to bring us the intensity
that is there — she engages in a
process of narrative re-creation —
and although the form of her
writing in Rings is prose, the
energy of it is distinctly poetic.
That is, her prose relies on the
poetic power of sound and the
kind of 'instanter' perceptions
that occur only in poetic
structure, not on 'character' or
'plot', though, indeed, there is a
'story' here, or at least, as she
says, the telling of one.
In working in this 'inter-media'
narrative form she joins a small
company of writers, mostly
Canadian — Gladys Hindmarch,
b.p. Nicol, and George Bowering
among others — who are
developing this kind of writing.
In the central section, on the
birth itself, her writing moves into
a real high, and she carries the
reader on through, in a
fragmentary world of doctors and
nurses, the unborn but very
personified creature — "this one.
with his hands behind his head
who doesn't even know" - inside
her, and the condition of her own
body.
Perhaps this is the striking
artistic shift - that this writing, in
more ways than one can pun,
comes from a moment-by-
moment condition of physical
being.
SCHLUMBERGER OF CANADA
A DIVISION OF SCHLUMBERGER CANADA LIMITED
SCHLUMBERGER
Schlumberger representatives
will be on campus
NOVEMBER 4 & 5
to conduct interviews of:
• Students graduating in ELECTRICAL
ENGINEERING, MECHANICAL ENGINEERING,
or ENGINEERING PHYSICS for field work in
Western Canada.
• Third year Engineering students for summer
employment as Field Crew Operators
Contact your
student Career Planning Office for details.
Prague's Black Theatre
By BARRY FRIESEN
The Black Theatre of Prague
gave Vancouver a unique dramatic
experience Wednesday and
Thursday night.
Using highly controlled black
lights and spots, the performers
(meaning objects as well as actors)
were able to change shape and
form with a freedom of
imaginative fantasy that until now
I'd thought possible only in film.
A simple definition of the
Black Theatre's origins in
Southern Asia is given as "a
musically organized movement of
objects in combination with live
action on the stage". But besides
successfully enriching the ancient
form technologically (a brilliant
sound track to complement and
orient the action, highly
controlled color lighting, and of
course the black lights), the
company    has   brought    to   its
Mphahlele
"Conditions were crushing me and I was shrivelling in the acid
of my bitterness."
These  are  the  words of Ezekiel Mphahlele, a black South
African  teacher  and  novelist   now  in voluntary exile from his
country. Mphahlele will be speaking on South Africa and racism in
- SUB ballroom at 12:30 today.
presentations an inventiveness
that frequently makes you feel as
if your mind is being chewed up
simultaneously by Lewis Carroll
and Salvador Dali.
The surrealistic magic the
company creates is simply not
describable. Most     people
will probably describe the two
characters with snail heads who
carry on a dialogue consisting of
nothing but letters of the alphabet
in pitched battle. And the eggman
whose brain is fed by long red
spoons to a ghoul for breakfast,
while the audience shudders. Not
to mention the snail who makes
love to a woman, a saw used
almost exclusively for cutting
actors' limbs off, turtle shells
turning into wheelbarrows, hat
trees into flowers, hats into
hairdryers, hands into
everything . . .
COMPOSER, CONDUCTOR, PIANIST
LIIOSSI OSS
conducts the
VANCOUVER SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
in concert two of the
201 h i:iaV i uirv si:irn:s
THURSDAY NOVEMBER 4
ONE PERFORMANCE ONLY
BELASIILI
BRILLIANT HUNGARIAN PIANIST
performs the Bartok Piano Concerto No.2
Lukas Foss also conducts his own composition,
BAROQUE VARIATIONS; IVES'THE UNANSWERED
QUESTION and the North American
premiere of ARNE NORDHEIM'S- FLOATING.
QUEEN ELIZABETH THEATRE
Tickets NOW at the Vancouver Ticket Centre or
charge to your Eaton account. Call 683-3255.
$5.50, $4.50, $5.50
sponsored by C P Air
r<cp
Air Page 10
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 2,  1971
TODAY
PANHELLENIC SOC
Lisa  Hobbs on  women's  liberation,
7:30 p.m., SUB auditorium.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Ezekiel   Mphahlele,   refugee, speaks
on    South    Africa    and    literature,
noon, SUB ballroom.
NEWMAN CLUB
Dinner    meeting,    5:30    p.m.,    St.
Mark's.
CCF
Singspiration, noon, SUB 213.
SAILING CLUB
Short   general   meeting,   noon,   Bu.
104.
CUSO
Informational   night,   film   on  New
Guinea,    IH    upstairs   lounge,   7:30
p.m.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Canadian      constitutional      reform,
noon, SUB 111.
CANADIAN PEOPLE'S UNITED
FRONT AGAINST U.S. IMPERIALISM
(VANCOUVER BRANCH)
Mass   democratic  discussion,  noon,
SUB conversation pit.
PRE-MED CLUB
Dean      McCreary      speaks,      noon,
Wesbrook 201.
WEDNESDAY
HISPANIC & ITALIAN
STUDIES DEPT.
R.  M.   Flores, Spanish department,
University      of      Victoria:      The
'Tween classes
Composition of the First Edition of
Don Quixote, Part I, Bu. 204, noon.
ENGLISH DEPT.
Actor   Maurice Good:  John  Synge
Comes Next, Ed. 100, 8 p.m.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Canadian     poet     Daphne     Marlatt,
noon, SUB art gallery.
PRE-DENTAL SOC
General      meeting,     speaker      Dr.
Johnston, noon, SUB 215.
PSYCHOLOGY CLUB
Membership  meeting,  noon, Angus
24.
ONTOLOGY SOC
The beauty of being, noon, Bu. 216.
FREESEE FILMS
Civilization    —   The   Great    Thaw,
noon, SUB auditorium.
AMCHITKA COALITION
Massive   peaceful   rally  to  stop  the
Amchitka  blast,  1:30 p.m., Alberni
St.   side   of   U.S.   consulate,   1030
West Georgia.
LUTHERAN CAMPUS CENTRE
Service of  worship, talk and prayer
in    response    to   Amchitka,    10:30
a.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Student   senators   Darren   Anderson
and    Leo    Fox    discuss   with   Karl
Burau, 2:30 p.m., SUB 111.
CANADIAN CROSSROADS
INTERNATIONAL
Information     and    discussion,     IH
upper lounge, noon.
VOC
General  meeting, noon, Angus 104.
ITALIAN CLUB (IL CAFFE)
Prof.   Smith's   slides   on   Florence,
noon, Lasserre 107.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
ORGANIZATION
Testimony     meeting,     noon,    SUB
224.
ANTHROSOC UNDERGRAD UNION
Action gathering for  all  concerned
students, noon, Bu. 106,
GERMAN CLUB
Slides,  all  welcome,  noon,  IH  402.
THURSDAY
CINEMAWEST
Film: A Midsummer Night's Dream,
50 cents, 12:25 p.m., Hebb Theatre.
LEGAL AID
SUB  232-234,  12:30 p.m.  Also on
Mondays.
GAY PEOPLE'S ALLIANCE
General   meeting,  noon, SUB   224.
For those who would like to talk to
someone, or just correspond, write
to Box 12, SUB, UBC.
COLD MOUNTAIN INSTITUTE
Paul Reps, philosopher, poet, artist.
8 p.m. Thursday and Friday, Hebb
Theatre.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Free     form     jazz,     Walter    Zuber
Armstrong,  noon, SUB auditorium.
UBC SKYDIVERS
General meeting, noon, SUB 211.
ECO
Dr.      J.      W.      Gofman:      Some
Considerations of the  Implications
of the Peaceful and Warlike Atoms,
noon, Bioscience 2000.
VCF
George  Malone:  Gifts in  the Body,
noon, SUB 207-209.
BAHA'I CLUB
Rap session, noon, Bu. 230.
ALPHA-OMEGA
(UKRAINIAN CLUB)
General     meeting,     new     members
welcome, noon, SUB 105B.
ANGLICAN-UNITED
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Dean   Herbert   O'Driscoll. of  Christ
Church     Cathedral,     Beliefs     that
Matter, noon, SUB 215.
CCF
Post-Hallowe'en, noon, SUB 205.        \
VARSITY DEMOLAY
General  meeting,  7 p.m., SUB 213.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Karl   Burau   on   Hesse:   Glass  Bead
Game, 3:30 p.m., SUB 111.
CAMPUS CAVALIERS
Thursday,    noon-2:30    p.m.,    SUB
207-209.
PRE-MED CLUB
Field   trip.   Meet   at   lobby  outside
Wesbrook 100, noon.
SLAVONIC CIRCLE
Panel discussion, 8 p.m. See notice
outside Bu. 1262.
FRIDAY
CYCLE CLUB
Bike maintenance clinic, film on
campus  cycling,   noon, SUB  105A.
SPECIAL EVENTS
David Suzuki: Science, thc-
University, You and I, noon, SUB
ballroom.
UBC WAFFLE
Organizational meeting, SUB 215,
noon.
SATURDAY
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Car rally and after-party, 7:30 p.m.,
Oakridge parking lot.
Hot flashes
CCO has tiles
on ecology
The Environmental Crisis
Operation, a campus ecological
group, has a fact file available to
everyone designed to relate all
relevant fields of the environment.
"Many environmental
problems  result  from  a  lack of
communication amongst
highly-specialized people," said
John Sydor, student senator-elect.
ECO is eager to co-operate
with other anti-pollution groups
in educational or action projects.
Students and faculty may tap
ECO's resources, become
involved, or report a pollution
problem, by phoning 228-4402 or
visiting  room  110A  in the UBC
Institute of Resource Ecology.
Hobbs to speak
Lisa Hobbs, author of Love
and Liberation and a Vancouver
Sun reporter, will speak on
women's liberation in the SUB
auditorium tonight at 7:30.,
Admission to this lecture,
sponsored by the Panhellenic
Association, is free.
ATTENTION SKIERS ! !
THINKING OF SKIING?
Take advantage of these
tremendous Ski Package
Savings
*  METAL FISCHER ALU ST. SKIS
Salomon S.404 step-in harness.
1,200 tapered aluminum poles.
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*   FISCHER RED MASTER WOOD SKIS
Salomon S404 step-in harness. Good tapered
aluminum poles   only . .      5V'
* ELAN EUROPEAN WOOD SKIS
Salomon S404 step-in harness. Good tapered
aluminum poles only *52'
.50
*   SKI PACKAGES INCLUDING BOOTS
European Wood Skis
Salomon S404 harness. Tapered aluminum
poles — le Trappeur buckle boots (value
85.00). FULL     PACKAGE PRICE $1 05'00
European Wood Skis
Salomon S404 harness. Tapered aluminum poles —
Tyrol buckle boots. FULL PACKAGE PRICE
>90
00
SEE US AT
IVOR WILLIAMS SPORTING GOODS
LOCATED IN THE MIDDLE OF KERRISDALE
2120 W. 41st Ave. 261-6011
OPEN DAILY TILL 6 P.M. - THURS. - FRI. TILL 9 P.M.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Campus — 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; 3 days $2.50
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $125; additional
lines 30c; 4 days price of 3.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable
'M. advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications QBm, Room 241 S.U.B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
POLKA PARTY — DANCING AND
great refreshments, Friday, Nov. 5,
from 9 p.m. - 1 a.m. at International House.
Aulo Repairs
24
Losl & Found
13
LOST: BROWN BRIEFCASE SAT.
night, Oct. 16 around Faculty Club.
Valuable music inside. Cash re-
ward.   Phone   Lome   876-0345.
LOST LAST WEEK: SQUARE
brown glasses, either hitching to
or walking around campus. Des-
perate   521-0882.	
LOST: HARRISON EDITION COM-
plete works of Shakesp. in Freddy
Wood or Buchanan. Call Linda at
733-3446. Very important.  Reward.
LOST: ONE PAIR OF GLASSES.
Between bike parking shed and
MacMillan  Bldg.   988-5386.
Special Notices
15
MALE AND FEMALE DANCERS
and singers needed for Songfest
'72. Performing February — Students—contact Rory, 224-9691. Au-
ditions   Nov.   7.   Partyroom,   SUB.
SUNDAY INFORMAL WORSHIP.
"Chapel Loft" 7:00-7:45 p.m.
FIRESIDE Lounge, 8:00 p.m.
Guest John Williams "What Is A
Typical Indian?" V.S.T. 6050
Chancellor.	
THE GRIN BIN HAS THE LAR-
gest selection in Canada of posters and pop art. Also Jokes, Gifts
and 24"x36" photo blowups from
your own prints and negatives.
Enquiries welcome at the Grin Bin,
3209 W. Broadway across from the
Liquor   Store.   Call   738-2311.
IN CONCERT "A DAY IN OUR
Lives"—Rock Ballet and Light
Show, Thursday, Nov. 4. 12:30,
SUB Ballroom,  50c per person.
U.B.C. BARBER SHOP IS OPEN
Mon.-Sat. See Dino or Rick at
5736   University   Boulevard   (near
Campus).	
SKI   WHISTLER
OR
MOUNT   BAKER
Six week ski course at above areas,
only    $32.00    includes    return    bus
transportation   and  1%   hour lesson.
Further information from:
Canadian Youth Hostels Association,
1406  West  Broadway,  Vancouver  9,
738-3128.	
CYPRESS LODGE YOUTH
HOSTEL
WHISTLER  MOUNTAIN
Open Dec. 1st until Apr.  30th,  1972.
Special Midweek Package:   5 nights
accommodation with  3 meals a day
$22.00
Further information from: Canadian
Youth    Hostels    Assn.,    1406    West
Broadway, Vancouver 9, 738-3128.
Wanted—Information 17
If you own a British Car
we  can  offer:
* Low Labour Rates
* Below   Retail   Parts
* Repairs and Modifications
* Personalized   Attention
* Guaranteed Work
BRITISH CARS ONLY
1906 W. 43rd 266-7703
(rear) at Cypress
VW SPECIAL—REBUILT MOTORS
and trans, exchange service, also
repairs. Brakes relining, $25. King
and link pins. $30. 683-8078 — 760
Denman St. (rear).
Scandals
37
MALE NEGRO SINGER-DANCER
interested in performing early
February Songfest '72, contact
Rory, 224, 9691. Auditions Nov. 7.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Typing
40
EFFICIENT    ELECTRIC    TYPING.
My home, essays, thesis, etc. Neat,
accurate   work.   Reasonable   rates.
 Phone  263-5317.	
TEDIOUS TASKS, PROFESSIONAL
typing. IBM Selectric—days, evenings, weekends. Phone Shari at
738-8745.   Reasonable   rates.
TYPING—ISSSAYS; THESIS. AS^
signments, Research Papers, Fast
Service Near 41st & Marine Drive.
266-5053.	
ESSAYS, ETC. TYPED NEATLY,
quickly and efficiently, 35c page.
Phone   224-0385   after   5   p.m.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
1959 MERCEDES BENZ DIESEL
engine in good condition. Transmission and tires good. Sell for
$125 or best offer. Call 732-7935,
evenings.	
1970 SUNBEAM ALPINE G.T. Excellent condition. Must sell. Phone
681-1708.   Best   offer   takes.	
'68 AUSTIN 1100 STN. WGN. 30,000
miles. Excellent condition, new
brakes. Extra snow tires. Phone
224-4480.	
1963 DODGE DART. STD. 6-CYL.
good condition and tires, call 228-
9371.	
■6S DATSUN 2000, 150 H.P. 5-SPD.
New paint, tires, quick sale please.
266-8727.	
•65 ANGLIA 4-SPD. FLOOR SHIFT.
2 door. Excellent mileage. Offers.
Phone 521-1514. 1-4 p.m. 	
ASSISTANT SWIM COACH KIL-
larney Swim Club. 4 hours per
week. Phone Dave. 321-3678, evenings 8-9  p.m.	
SECRETARY WANTED. PART
time. Five hours a week. Apply
Student Christian Movement (224-
3722) (224-0069). Write Room 39r
6000 Iona Drive.
Tutoring Service
63
COURSES CONFUSING? GET
help with a tutor. All subjects,
reasonable rates. Register at UBC
Tutoring Centre, SUB 228. 12:30-
2:30.	
Tutors—Wanted 64
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
COPPER CHROME TABLE AND 6
chairs.   ($45.)  688-2852 after 5 p.m.
RENTALS 8c REAL ESTATE -
Rooms
81
BASEMENT SUITE, SHARE FA-
cilities. Private entrance. Kerris-
dale. $60. Phone 261-7739 evenings.
ROOM IN LARGE OLD HOUSE.
Kits area, shared facilities. $50.00
per month. Phone 733-4585. after
6 p.m.	
SUNNY ROOM FOR RENT ON
campus. Girls $55 mo. Private entrance, 2260 Allison or phone 926-
2896.
Room & Board
82
Photography
35
INFORMAL PORTRAITS BY
Carol Gordon. May be taken outdoors. Ideal Xmas gifts. 733-0715
or 736-4923.
ROOM   AND   BOARD   —   $110   MO.
Males.   Excellent   food.   Color   TV.
Sauna.    5785   Agronomy   Rd.,   Ph.
224-9684.	
ROOM & BOARD FOR CHRISTIAN
student.   Located   at   2555   W.   8th.
For    information     contact    Harry
Stanbridge,  V.C.F.	
BEST FOOD ON CAMPUS! ROOM
and  board  at  Delta Upsilon  Frat.
House.   Phone   224-9841. Tuesday, November 2, 1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page  11
Grid 'Birds in third win
r
By KENT SPENCER
The UBC 'Bird football squad
won their third straight game
Saturday, beating the Seattle
Cavaliers 9-6 at Thunderbird
Stadium.
The last time the 'Birds won
three or more games in a season
was in 1966. That year they had
five wins and a tie. Since then,
in 	
they have managed a total of four
wins and one tie in four years.
UBC took control early, on
two Bruce Kiloh field goals.
They missed their big chance
to jump ahead early in the second
quarter, when Cavalier
quarterback Bob Cason kicked
from his own 10 yard line.
The  kick went 60 yards — 30
yards  straight up  and 30 yards
 —^V
hoop shots
Story and Photo
by
KEITH DUNBAR
As    this    year's    basketball
season rapidly approaches, a few
STAN CALLEGARI
profiles will be given this week
on some of the UBC players that
fans should keep their eyes on.
First on the list is guard Stan
Callegari. The 6'1" native of
Vancouver will be starting his
third year as a Varsity player.
His first year with the 'Birds
was abruptly ended by a serious
knee injury, and last year Stan
never seemed to live up to the
potential expected of him.
Hopefully this year will be
different, and it will need to be
as he will be expected to handle
the ball much more in the new
offensive system to be employed
by coach Peter Mullins.
To help improve the physical
aspects of the knee injury, Stan
has been running the stairs at
Thunderbird Stadium as well as
working out on weights with the
physiotherapist.
Quick is one of the best ways
to describe Callegari, and
quickness is probably Stan's
greatest asset. And quick he will
need to be, as this year's edition
of the Thunderbirds will still
employ much use of the fast
break, their most potent
weapon.
He has been described as
perhaps the best "pure shooter"
of all the Thunderbirds. In
workouts so far this year, he also
seems to be playing good
defense, as well as passing better
than before.
It is also reported that
football coach Frank Gnup
would love to have Stan as a free
safety. Tough luck, Frank; the
basketball team also needs all
the help it can get. And they are
lucky to have Stan Callegari.
Callegari, along with the
other Thunderbirds, will be on
show this Friday night in War
Memorial Gym in the annual
Grad game.
straight down. 'Bird middle
linebacker Abe Vanderhorst
grabbed the bounding ball at the
16 and lugged it to the six.
But they couldn't punch it
over in three tries. The ball went
over on downs when Gary Gordon
missed from the one yard line on
third and goal.
Kiloh provided the winning
margin midway through the third
quarter with his third field goal.
He kicked it while lying flat on his
back.
In the first half, Cavalier back
Ed Softi had grabbed a seven yard
Cason touchdown pass to tie the
score.
Dick Barnes, the Cavalier 53
year old wonder, hit the upright
on the convert attempt, missing it.
Again the UBC defense played
well. They recovered three
fumbles, intercepted two passes,
and stopped the Cavaliers twice
on third down gambles.
The Cavaliers did almost as
well, forcing five 'Bird turnovers.
The 'Bird defense has improved
considerably since the start of the
season. In the last three games,
they have yielded 11 points, an
average of 3.6 points a game.
In the first five games they had
yielded 157 points, an average of
31.4 points a game.
UBC has improved 870 per
cent since the start.
Of his third straight win, Gnup
said, "It was a good thing we had
Kiloh out there."
"He's the only field goal kicker
in Canada who can score from flat
on his back," said assistant coach
Cy Finnegan.
All the coaches agreed the
'Birds were fortunate to win this
one.
Paper Tigers
undefeated
The Pango-Pango Paper Tigers
chalked up another impressive
victory in Kosmic basketball
Sunday, defeating the rather inept
Granville Grange Zephyrs before a
standing-room-only crowd of 20.
Leading * the scribes in their
relentless attack were John Twigg
and Mike Sasges, who between
them must have accounted for
about 12 of the Tigers' points in
their 19-22 victory.
Despite the rather one-sided
refereeing, even Fred Cawsey, the
pudgy, no-nonsense guard,
managed to crawl out from
beneath fouls called against him
to bag a basket.
The Zephyrs were noticeably
tired at the end of the game, and
in a hopeless attempt to bolster
their sagging morale were forced
to resort to baiting the Paper
Tigers' female team members.
The Tigers' victory was made
even more resounding by the fact
that super-novas Norbert
Ruebsaat and John Kula were
unable to make the game, and
white dwarf Michael Finlay was
sidelined by a twisted ankle.
The team is gradually getting
its legs and members are sure of
victory once again next week
against an opponent as yet
unknown.
Team members are reminded
to check the Georgia Straight for
game times and places.
•••**••••***
* EDELWEISS *
* HAUS
*
"Sports Specialists"
BEGINNER SKI
PACKAGE NO. 1
3+- Red, white, blue -At
j  Wood Ski 25.00  [^
Jr Poles     6.SO -*
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jL.     "Money at par always "
Thunderettes win
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
EDELWEISS
HAUS
"Sports Specialists"
UBC Thunderettes basketball
team exploded for 12 unanswered
points in the third quarter and
coasted to an easy 49-31 win over
the Victoria Maplettes, the
reigning Canadian senior women's
champions in a game played
Sunday at UBC.
After a sloppy first half which
ended with UBC leading 22-19,
the Thunderettes tightened up to
outscore the Maplettes 27 to 12 in
the second half.
Terri McGovern and Wendy
Grant led the Thunderettes with
10 points apiece, while Jan Gee
chipped in eight and controlled
the boards at both ends.
The Thunderettes travel to
Seattle next weekend for two
games against the tough Seattle
Sandpipers.
1230 N. State 733-3271
Bellingham, Wash.
J+~ Next To Shakey's
tL
Weekdays I ^
Till 9 - Sat. Til 6 I T*
••****••***•
Intramurals
MEN'S
UNIT MANAGERS meeting
tonight at 7 p.m. in SUB council
chambers.
HOCKEY and BASKETBALL
schedules are now up outside the
intramural office.
CURLING deadline is noon
Friday.
SOCCER preliminary rounds
continue at noon today.
TENNIS finals go from
November 1 to 19. Check chart
outside the office.
WOMEN'S
BASKETBALL continues
today at 4:30 p.m.
BROOMBALL is on for
tonight at 4:30 p.m. at the Winter
Sports Centre.
THUNDERBIRD
BOOSTER CLUB
There will be a meeting of all those interested in
working for the Thunderbird Booster Club on Friday,
12:30 Noon in Room 213, War Memorial Gym.
The Booster Club helps publicize Thunderbird sports
events and works with the U.B.C. Cheerleaders to
help cheer for U.B.C. at home games.
Free tickets to all games plus passes for a non-student
friend are offered. In addition arrangements are made
for members to travel to "away" games for free or
reduced rates.
HELP PROMOTE SPORTS ON CAMPUS
Turn out Friday, 12:30
Noon at Room 213 War
Memorial Gym.
&■ ^ jj\n*_.
mm on.'
THIS WEEK'S FEATURED
SPORTS EVENTS ON CAMPUS
•THURS. NOV. 4
Pacific Coast League Soccer
Thunderbirds vs
Firefighters
Stadium — 12:45 Noon
• FRI. Nov. 5
Grad Basketball
8P.M.   —Old-timers Game
9P.M.    —Thunderbirds vs
Young Grads
MEMORIAL GYM
FREE ADMISSION TO U.B.C. STUDENTS
ON PRESENTATION OF A.M.S. CARD Page  12
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 2,  1971
Montreal strikers win one: still one to go
MONTREAL (CUPI) - The strike at the Universite
de Montreal is over but arrangements for a return to work
at the Universite de Quebec a Montreal have broken
down.
Faculty members at UQAM voted Friday to accept
the first collective agreement in the history of Quebec
higher education. They expected to return to work today.
But yesterday, after the administration had refused to
pay them for the time they spent on strike since October
13, the faculty members voted to continue picketing and
not to resume classes.
The U de M office and lab workers voted by 456 to
60 Sunday to accept the latest administration contract
offer. The university reopened Monday and classes should
resume today.
The workers settled for a raise of 18 per cent, far
below the union's demand of parity with wages at Laval
University.
But the maternity leaves and other fringe benefits
under the agreement are better than those at other
Quebec universities.
The negotiators reached a compromise on job
security. Workers will have job security after one year,
instead of after 18 months as asked by management or six
months ac asked by the union.
The U de M negotiations were mediated by Quebec
labor ministry representative Yvan Dansereau. The 950
workers have been on strike since Oct. 4.
At UQAM, faculty members obtained complete job
security for those with a masters degree or four years
experience. Teachers with less than four years experience
will be on probation.
The university's original offer was permanent status
after five years experience.
This clause gives the teachers one of the best tenure
systems in North America. Only about 20 per cent of
McGill faculty members have tenure, almost all of them
are at least associate professors.
The UQAM strikers have had the support of students
and maintenance workers since the beginning of the
strike. The McGill Faculty Union has contributed
picketers for the past week and a half.
Student and faculty organizations at the U de M back
the union there throughout the strike. Students and
professors, as well as delegations from UQAM, Laval and
McFill, helped out on the picket lines.
One thousand students demonstrated Thursday at the
Montreal office of the ministry of labor. They demanded
an end to the strike on the union's terms. They said they
wanted a return to classes, but not if it meant a
back-to-work injunction.
Ed class
complaint
said trivial
By SANDI SHREVE
A complaint to the committee
on research involving human
subjects, concerning counselling
interviews by Education 561
students, has been dismissed by
committee chairman W. S. Hoar as
a "trivial matter."
Barbara Errington,
anthropology and sociology grad
student, alleged there is "no
protection from possible
inappropriate or disturbing
encounters in unsupervised
interviews" by Ed 561 students, in
a letter to Hoar written Monday,
Oct. 25.
"The complaint shouldn't have
come to me but to a faculty
screening committee," Hoar said
Monday.
Hoar told The Ubyssey he sent
the letter to Dr. Frank Forward,
research committee member who
deals with matters not under
research grants.
Dr. Myrne Nevison, one of
four professors teaching the Ed.
561 course, denied Errington's
allegations that students were
approaching people at random,
asking them to be counsellors.
"The course is concerned with
the processes of counselling.
Students conduct interviews
under supervision in the education
clinic," Nevison said Monday.
"Most people involved in the
interviews are volunteers taking
Ed 427, a course in guidance
planning and decision making.
Other volunteers are carefully
screened to check if they should
be going to the university health
service," she added.
"We are not doing therapy. We
recommend student talk to their
friends for the purpose of learning
to listen rather than counsel."
— BRAND NAME WATCHES—
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WE MUST END IT NOW!
Despite the fact that thousands of people have already demonstrated to
stop the Amchitka blast, Nixon is arrogantly going ahead. Detonation date is
now scheduled for Thursday, November 4. Trudeau's feeble protest is not
enough - it is we who must compel the two governments to call an
immediate halt to this suicidal adventure.
Wednesday, November 3 has already been called as an international day
of student protest against both the Amchitka blast and the war in Indochina,
under the joint theme of "Stop the Warmakers Now!" This call has gone out
from university councils across the country - included are McMaster
University, Hamilton; Trent University; York University, Toronto; Acting
President of Waterloo University; Waterloo-Lutheran University; Ryerson
Polytechnical School; Simon Fraser University and the UBC Alma Mater
Society, as well as the High School Committee Against Nuclear Testing
which organized the massive walk-out of high school students on October 6.
The Amchitka blast area lies on a series of faults in the earth's crust and
the detonation of the bomb could very possibly lead to earthquakes, tidal
waves and other major geological and ecological disasters. The last Amchitka
test in 1969 was bad enough; the present one is to be FIVE TIMES MORE
POWERFUL. There is a very real danger of radiation leak from the
underground cavern created by the blast. One of the Greenpeace crewmen, a
former employee of the Atomic Energy Commission, reports that over a
quarter of the underground tests in Nevada (67 out of 230) resulted in
radiation leaks': We must stop the Amchitka blast!
The test is to perfect a warhead for the ABM system. If the system is
used, all detonations will occur over Canadian territory. Once again our lives
are threatened. The warmakers must be stopped for once and all. We have
seen the effect of the Indochinese War on our economy. The inflation and
unemployment it causes very directly affect our lives, especially as students.
The Canadian government sends over one million dollars DAILY in arms
shipments to the US-these go to aid US slaughter in Indochina. Anyone in
Canada could tell them that there are more pressing and humane needs to
which this money could be directed. War and the bomb testing must be
halted!
It is up to us. The Vancouver high school students have already put
their bodies on the line and seem likely to do so again this coming
Wednesday, November 3. What is being planned is a massive, peaceful protest
at the US Consulate that afternoon. A rally has been called on campus for
12:30 - it will be held on the first floor of SUB, in the lounge-conversation
area. From there we intend to go downtown to join the high school students
at the Consulate. We call on all members of the university community to join
us. The undersigned students urge all professors to cancel their afternoon
classes.
If we are to stop this blast, if we are to bring an end to the war effort,
we must demonstrate our opposition. Now is the time to take a stand.
November 4 could see the Amchitka blast go ahead, or we could come out in
such massive numbers right across the country that Trudeau and Nixon will
have to call it off.
• Come to the brief noon-hour rally,
Wednesday, 12:30 in SUB.
• Come to the Nov. 3 rally at 1:30,
Alberni street side of the US Consulate.
• March November 6 against the Warmakers.
They must be stopped!
Signed by:
unanimous   endorsation   of   UBC
Alma Mater Society.
Doug Aldridge,
President, Engineering
Undergraduate Society.
Adrian W. Belshaw,
President, Science
Undergraduate Society.
Joan Campana,
Ombudswoman, UBC Alma
Mater Society; co-ordinator,
campus Amchitka actions.
George Hermanson,
Chairman, Canadian Coalition to
Stop the Amchitka Test,
Anglican-United Campus
Ministry.
Ken Lassassen,
treasurer, University Clubs
Committee;   Director,   National
Board,     Student     Christian
Movement; President,  Lutheran
Student Movement, UBC.
K. Tougas,
film-maker.
RobMcDairmid,
Vice-president, UBC Alma Mater
Society.
Teresa Ball,
Agriculture   Undergraduate  rep.
Rick Nickerson,
Vice-president,     UBC    Young
Socialists.
Fred Reimold,
President, Experimental College.
Svend Robinson,
Science Undergraduate rep.
Ann Petrie,
Co-ordinator,   Women's  Studies
Program.
H. C. Boyle,
Mamooks.
Hilda Thomas,
lecturer,    UBC   English   Dep't;
past    chairwoman,     Vietnam
Action Committee.
Mr. H. M. Rosenthal,
Program     Director,     Social
Sciences: Urban Affairs Program,
Continuing Education.
Dr. David Aberle,
Professor,     Anthropology,
Sociology, UBC.
Dr. Jan DeVries,
Asst.   Professor,   Soil   Sciences,
UBC.
Dr. Thomas L. Perry,
Professor,     Dep't     of
Pharmacology, UBC.
Dr. Harold E. Kasinsky,
Assistant    Professor,     Zoology,
UBC.
Dr. Renee Kasinsky,
Centre     for     Continuing
Education.
Dr. Norman Eptstein,
Professor, Chemical Engineering,
UBC.
Dr. Roger Howard,
Assoc.   Professor, Physics,   UBC.
Dr. Frank Newby,
Assistant    Professor,     English
Department, UBC.
Dr. Betty Howard,
Assistant    Professor,     Physics,
UBC.
Dr. Walter D. Young,
Head  and  Associate  Professor,
Political Science Dep 't, UBC.
Mr. Michael Wallace,
Assistant    Professor,     Political
Science, UBC.

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