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The Ubyssey Sep 21, 1984

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Array THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXVII, No. 4
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, September 21,1984
«&%.
228-2301
THE YEAR IS 1980, THE PLACE IS A
HIGH SCHOOL AUDITORIUM IN
FILTHY RICH KERRISDALE, AND THE
OCCASION IS A NOON-HOUR CONCERT
BY   THE   LOCAL   PUNK   BAND,    THE
K-TELS.
Your faithful scribe is on his firsl assignment for the Magee
Messenger, the school rag. As I enter the auditorium filled
with miniature Nelson Skalbanias and their female counterparts, my brow sweats at the thought of interviewing three
punk rockers who named themselves after a company that sells
both bad records and "truly amazing, one-of-a-kind." home
appliances.
The music starts, and as if on cue, the school principal motions to an indifferent roadie to turn the amps down. But his
efforts prove fruitless as strains of "We're going lo fuck in
Hawaii" caroom off the auditorium walls and into the ears of
150 pubescent kids, all whom are ready to spend their allowances on skinny black pants, chains and leather after this rousing performance.
At the end of the gig, most of the trendy tots trot off to
class, but a few die-hards remain, hoping to find a song list
taped to the stage floor or some other prized souvenir. 1 quickly wade through the tangled cords and equipment. With
courage built up, I walk up to the drummer with the shiny
clean shaven scalp. When asked how he classifies the group's
music, he promptly responds "disco."
The interview continues like this with the interviewee
using a vocabulary limited to about 50 words, including
yes, no, and ah ha. As he packs his gear, I spot the tall, unshaven guitarist in the corner.
He flashes an ornery scowl when I stare like a groupie at his
banged up guitar.  Pangs of embarrassment show on my
SLOW
tA
face. I rush out the door, having had enough of music outside
the CFUN playlist's safe confines for now.
* *     *
The year is 1984. The place, an East Vancouver house. The
occasion, another encounter with that same tall, unshaven
guitarist — Art Bergmann.
In the name of journalism, my brave photog and I walk
through the foreboding dwelling's back, trying to avoid beer
bottles and sleeping bodies.
It is dark, dank and downright disgusting inside this house,
known as the Snake Pit. A pleasant looking fellow named Ted
ambles from a room. He apologizes for the mess, explaining
the country punk bank Rank and File had their after-concert
bash in the house the night before. This solves the mystery of
the woman with spiky boots and a western hat lying on the living room couch.
Bergmann himself eventually saunters down from upstairs,
apparently having no recollection of the prearranged noon interview. He quickly orients himself and we head to a local
diner for the interview.
* *      *
The time is about 12:30, and the place is weirder than either
the Snake Pit or the high school auditorium. The patrons of
this place, Dr. Munchies, congregate at small tables, chomping
a bizarre melange of gooey substances.
Art, a woman friend, and Ted who plays guitar in Art's
band, order a meal. I ask Bergmann about his new band.
"How's your demo tape doing Art?"
"I've been assured it's going to number one next week at
CITR. Did you pay them yet?" he asks Ted.
Next question. "The Georgia Straight says you're making
your first real serious attempt at going somewhere with a band,
how do you react to that?"
"I don't know what that means, do you know? I've always
been deadly serious," he says with a ghoulish grin.
Silence pervades, except for the trio's giggling and chomping noises.
"How old are you?"
"You have to guess."
I contemplate gagging myself with a fork, staring into their
plates, heaping full of ham, eggs and hash browns. The remaining conversation, most of which is unintelligible on tape, turns
to another subject: the music of his new band, Poisoned. Yes,
it's true, Mr. Bergmann, the man with ruffled hair, egg yolk
on his mouth and beer by his breakfast, is the centre of local
music media attention with Poisoned's sudden burst into
notoriety.
All major Vancouver publications ran. stories on this man.
And all glowed about his talent. Add ore more to the list.
His music should be force fed to every UBC sociology student. Poisoned's 10-song cassette release is a brilliant
documentation of the pressures and emotions human beings
face in an imperfect world. Bergmann's tunes do not make for
silky pop songs that sell records. The music is concerned with
the ugly side of life: broken romances and sexual power plays,
the bums on skid row, and the arrogance, jealousies and
pretentions existing in society.<^^^^""^^^"—"~^^^™^""
mj*~ See page 4: BERGMANN Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, September 21, 1984
Long male waiting list remains
Three hundred men are still
waiting for single rooms in Gage
Towers, Totem Park and Place
Vanier, UBC's housing director
said Thursday.
Mary Flores said, "We are at 885
on a waiting list of 1130 men." She
said approximately 200 of these are
hoping for room and board accommodations.
Women's residences openings are
an entirely different situation,
Flores said, because there are now
two vacant single rooms in Totem
Park for women and there are 25
openings in double rooms in Totem
for women.
"Most of these openings were
caused by 'no shows'," people who
did not come to residence despite
being assigned a room, Flores said.
"A few of them did not find out
until September that they weren't
accepted to UBC," Flores said.
She added applications for all the
residences were down 236 this year,
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but   women's   applications    for
residence were actually up.
She said the new Gage lowrise extension being built will provide accommodations for approximately
200 more people next year. She added,   "They  are  eight   apartments
especially designed for the mobilely
handicapped which we have already
received numerous inquiries
about."
Flores said the lowrise extension
would increase campus residence
capacity by six per cent next year.
Transit offers
discount faro cards
The Vancouver Regional Transit Company is offering discount
rates on October fare cards, Larry Ward of the transit company said.
A local adult fare card will be $6.80 less than the regular $34 per
month fare, with higher rates for multi-zone cards. Senior citizens
and public school students can buy the concession card at $20 per
month, but university students are "not considered to be a concessionary area," Ward said.
People holding June fare cards can receive a discount of possibly
20 per cent on their next month's fare card, he said.
Fare cards are available at approximately 140 outlets in Vancouver, including the AMS ticket office on the first and last five working
days of each month.
UBC TERRY FOX RUN
MOVES TO THE
JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTRE
The UBC Intramural Sports Program has accepted an invitation from run organizers at the Jewish Community Centre
to join forces and to participate in a choice of a seven
kilometer or 10 kilometer run at 950 West 41st Ave. this coming SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23rd. Both distance runs begin
at 8:00 a.m. and a spirited promotional campaign along with
the addition of UBC participants should make the Jewish
Community Centre Run a very successful one.
Again, the UBC Terry Fox Run will not be run this year in
favour of the one being held at the Jewish Community Centre. Pre-registration is requested and the entry fee is $5.00 per
person and $10.00 per family.
DON'T JUST HIGHLIGHT IT,,
"BOSS"IT!
Put STABILO BOSS to work
and get attention. "BOSSING"
is highlighting at its best.
Computer printouts, book
reviews, graphs and maps.
To colour-code or
emphasize, "BOSS" them
all! Insist on the original.
STABILO BOSS,
available in
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at a special
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of $1.69 on
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and $2.09 on
STABILO BOSS 2.
SAVE
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at
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STUDENT UNION BLDG., UBC
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Distributed in Canada by:
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900 Magnetic Drive, Nortk York. Ont MJJ 2C4
Q. What would Bvf« Praatoy be doing if h* were alive today?
A. PfO^»Sy scrttehin? His coffin !*• craiy.
INTERESTED IN CA EMPLOYMENT?
ARTHUR ANDERSEN & CO. is seeking 1985
graduates for Vancouver and all other offices of the
Firm. Submit your resume to the Canada Employment
Centre on Campus (forms are available from the Centre)
by October 3, 1984.
All resumes will be acknowledged. You will be contacted on or about October 12th regarding campus interviews which take place during the week of October
22nd. Additional information is available at the UBC
Canada Employment Centre and the Accounting Club.
YUKON JACK ATTACK 2
The Wolf Bite.
Unleash 1 ounce of Yukon
Jack with 1 ounce of
coffee liqueur. Add a splash of
soda, pour over ice and you'l
have lassoed the Wolf Bite.
>To heat the bite, substitute
* coffee for soda. Inspired in
the wild, midst the damnably cold, this, the black
sheep of Canadian liquors,
is Yukon Jack.
Mikonjack
The black sheep of Canadian liquors. Concocted with fine Canadian Whisky.
Rhodes Scholarships
for 1985
Applications are available from the Awards Office for the Rhodes
Scholarship, for 1985-86.
Candidates must:
— be Canadian citizens or persons domiciled in Canada.
— be unmarried.
— have been ordinarily resident in Canada for at least five years immediately proceeding October 1st, 1984.
— have completed at least three years of University training by October 1st, 1985.
Successful candidates will have demonstrated literary and
scholastic attainments, fondness of and success in outdoor sports,
qualities of truth, courage, devotion to duty, sympathy for and protection of the weak, kindliness, unselfishness and fellowship, moral force
of character and instincts to lead and take an interest in their contemporaries.
COMPLETED APPLICATIONS MUST BE SUBMITTED
BY OCTOBER 25, 1984
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fun, GREAT PRICES. Point Grey's only LIVE
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*    *   10% OFF WITH YOUR STUDENT CARD  •    •
Only 3 blocks from the gates — 4450 W. 10th
(by EDM Enterprises Ltd. — Eat, Drink and Be Merry!)
BOX OFFICE
University of British Columbia
FREDERIC   WOOD THEATRE
presents
LOOK BACK IN ANGER
by John Osborne
SEPTEMBER 21—29
(Previews Sept. 19 & 20)
Curtain: 8 pm
STUDENT SEASON TICKETS
4 Plays for $13
September 19-29
LOOK BACK IN ANGER (Osborne)
November 7-17
TWELFTH NIGHT (Shakespeare)
January 16-26
THE IMAGINARY INVALID (Moliere)
March 6-16
HAPPY END (Weill)
a musical
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
Support Your Campus Theatre
ROOM 207 Friday, September 21, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
More university cuts possible
By STUART COLCLEUGH
The provincial government may
be poised to introduce another five
per cent funding cut to B.C. universities, a move UBC representatives
say is sure to mean elimination of
programs and possibly a whole
faculty at UBC.
"It's just a rumour right now,"
said Don Holubitsky, UBC board
of governors student representative
Thursday. "But then it started out
as a rumour last year too before
they (the government) made a cut
without giving us any notice."
UBC received a five per cent cut
this year, and the resulting deficit
was met with tuition fee hikes and
salary and hiring freezes.
"It's disastrous . . . just
disastrous," said Holubitsky. "The
government is sacrificing universities as an investment in the future
for the sake of short term gains
which I think is a terrible mistake,"
he said.
Holubitsky said another attack
on   the   university   budget   would
result in program cuts, a freeze on
enrolment and higher tuition fees.
It would also mean a further freeze
on faculty salaries, "and that would
really be devastating," he said.
A freeze on salaries, beyond the
two year freeze already in effect,
would accelerate the brain drain oc-
curing at UBC in a number of
faculties as universities in Canada
and the U.S. lure away instructors
with higher salaries and better
labour climates, Holubitsky added.
"It took sixty years to build up
(the academic reputation) of this institution and the government could
eliminate those gains in the space of
three years," Holubitsky said.
Holubitsky said a five per cent
cut in the budget, UBC's operating
budget, could translate into a $12
million loss to the university.
"That's the entire budget of the
faculty of education, the combined
budgets of the faculties of
agriculture, law and commerce, and
three quarters of the budget of the
faculty of medicine," he said.
University president, George
Pederson said while he has not
heard anything from the government on the matter "The universities
ministry made a presentation to the
Treasury Board, on a cut. The
move is in the direction of a
negative five," Pedersen said.
Jane Burns, assistant to universities minister Pat McGeer, said she
did not know what university
budgets will be like next year.
\ -Students
petition
for
• • •
ze
— rory a. photo
"USE THE FORCE, LUKE," exhorts famous Jedi training master as young warrior trains himself in art of combat. Young knights prepare
themselves for ordeal of negotiating student loans, learning to fight off muggers and repo men. Scenes like this will become obsolete with
arrival of new credit union. (See story, page 5).
Priest muzzled during papal visit
By DEBBIE LO
Campus chaplain Father Bruno Tesolin of
St. Mark's College was told by Catholic Archbishop Carney not to speak or preach in
public during the papal visit to Canada.
"Father Bruno was flabbergasted and felt
that he had not said anything controversial
on a recent appearance on the CBC FM radio
talk show Testament on the Papacy," said
Ray Schultz, UBC Lutheran chaplain. "He
had only named issues on economics, justice,
and native concerns that were already made
public," he added.
Father Bruno said Thursday in a phone in
terview that he is not able to comment publicly on why he has been silenced until he has
spoken to the archbishop directly.
But Father Bruno said he could comment
on the Pope's visit to Abbotsford. "The
Pope said some powerful things in Abbotsford, but he could have been a lot
stronger and said more things within the context of Vancouver." He added, "I was impressed with the way the Pope received the
small ethnic groups."
Father Bruno wasn't sure why he was told
not to speak publicly," Schultz said. "He enjoys solid support from his constituency,"
Schultz added. Schultz said he believed the
issue had nothing to do with comments
Father Bruno made on the talk show, but
that the archbishop was just anxious because
of the Pope's visit.
"Father Bruno is a very popular priest. He
tells people the facts of life which shook people because they are uninformed. He is a
warm and serious person, not a radical for
radicalism," Schultz said.
Campus Anglican minister Barry Valentine
said, "There are few world figures and the
Catholic Church doesn't like to project an
image of division.." Valentine said he did not
believe it was an attempt to curtail the right
of freedom of speech.
By DAVE STODDART
Students in Gage Towers residence are
reacting to housing liquor restrictions with a
strong petition drive, an organizer said
Thursday.
Bruce Hammersley said 40 of 51 petitions
sent out were returned with more than 725
signatures. And if the remaining 11 petitions
are consistent with the others, there will be
950 signatures and an 80 per cent response
rate, he said.
"This is an overwhelming response considering that nobody ever turns out for
regular campus elections," Hammersley said.
The petitions call for a return of the traditional Wednesday night beer nights. The
UBC housing office proposals include a ban
on organized parties from Sunday to Thursday, an earlier bar closure of 11:00, and a
ban on drinking games at organized residence
functions.
Max Pethybridge, Gage Residence
Association president, said he is concerned
about the proposed changes.
"They aren't going to be controlling the
drinking problem. People will be going
elsewhere to drink and then driving in their
cars. Then there's a problem," he said.
Housing director Mary Flores said she
would not comment on the petitions until she
received them, adding she was skeptical of
the validity of petitions.
"Petitions are subject to peer pressure. A
referendum could give a better indication of
residents' concerns," she said.
Brian Hashimoto, Totem Park Residence
Association president, said he opposed
changes in the format of beer nights. The
changes would segregate the dancing area
from the drinking area. "I think it interrupts
the continuity of beer nights."
"We plan to distribute a survey to determine our residents' feelings on the new format," Hashimoto said.
Craig Farnden, Place Vanier Residence
Association president, said he was not too
upset about the changes. "We're not taking
any action right now because we feel that
housing is basing its actions on some very
valid concerns."
Chemistry students get stuck out in cold
By ROBERT BEYNON
If dental hygiene and rehabilita-
tional medicine were honest with
their students some students might
not be left without a requisite
course chemistry this year, a student board of governors member
said Thursday.
Dave Frank said if these departments toughened their entrance requirements and told students the
bare requirements of Chemistry 103
would not likely get them accepted
many students would not have attempted to get in to the course.
Due to chemistry cutbacks close
to 60 students who wanted this
course, a prerequisite to dental
hygiene and rehabilitation
medicine, could not enter the
course.
"If some of these students were-
told they would have trouble enter
ing chem 103 and it wouldn't likely
help them they might have
registered in first year sciences,"
Frank said.
Only 10 per cent of the applicants
to rehabilitational medicine are accepted, Frank said.
Frank also said these departments should work closer with
chemistry to assure their future
students will receive necessary
prerequisites. He added a jiote
should be added to the UBC calendar saying this course is very hard to
enter.
Chemistry head Larry Weiler said
his department would put such a
note in next year's calendar regarding chem 103. Weiler added if
rehabilitation medicine and dental
hygiene chose suitable applicants
coming from high schools and asked the chemistry department to
educate these students,  chemistry
could easily do it because very few
students are actually accepted into
these departments.
"These departments like to use
chem 103 as a filter of prospective
students," Weiler said.
Alma   Mater   Society   president
Margaret Copping said she thought
students should be filtered but she
did not think they should be cut
from the program if they could not
get course cards at registration.
Medical students lose funding
Fifteen rehabilitation medicine
students are caught in a catch-22 situation because they are being denied financial aid by the provincial
government while still attending
school.
Students being turned dov/n finished their last year of classes this
May but then have four months
practicum, said Joanna Rainer, student council rehabilitation representative. She said these students
still go to school in the summer but
have technically graduated so do
not qualify for student loans.
Rainer said students complained
to the government. She added they
are not optimistic. With the 18-unit
winter course load rehabilitation
students have difficulty working
part-time, "though apparently
some are doing it," she said. And
most bursaries and scholarships are
for small amounts, she added.
Rainer said rehabilitation students have always been able to
claim thjgir practicum as time in
school, until this year. Students'
hopes are being placed on the UBC
awards office which "has really
been pulling for us," Rainer said.
Awards officer Byron Hender
said students affected must wait until May to see whether aid will be
available.
The government is morally wrong
to end the loan eligibility of rehabilitation students, said Nancy Bradshaw, Alma Mater Society external
affairs coordinator. "If they've
been able to help people in the situation in the past, they should be
able to help them now."
Bradshaw said the government
considers the granting of aid to
these students a longstanding mistake. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, September 21, 1984
Bergmann has moxie
From page 1
"That's what I like to write
about, not happy things, not pretty
things. Happiness isn't the be all
and end all of life. Human beings
are really ugly sometimes," he says.
There's no calculated formula or
pre-determined method to his madness. His songwriting is simply of
the honest, slap-in-the-face variety.
And Bergmann is a guitarist with
a talent so hot that it must have
come from the devil. No player in
town, and few outside, can match
his proficiency on the six-stringed
instrument. His playing matches the
sheer guts of Neil Young and the
bluesy moxie of a young Keith
Richard.
And this guy can sing too. On
Tunes like Emotion, Vultura Freeway and It Won't Last, Bergmann
wails like a man possessed, one who
lived in a snake pit.
No doubt about it, Bergmann's
penned tunes verging on genius, and
his playing has progressed substantially since his days of three
chord punk songs. Years of performing with bands like the
Shmorgs, the K-Tels (later renamed
the Young Canadians) and Los
Popularos paid off.
Those bands faded into oblivion.
The current ensemble is tight and
capable of generating excitement
after a string of gigs around town.
But will Bergmann go beyond the
local scene's confines with his talent
and message? I for one am content
with playing Poisoned's cassette until the magnetic tape snaps and catching their live performance.
Poisoned's music, full of truth
and emotion, comes from a feeling
only Bergmann can describe. "It's
when you have a real rotten taste in
your mouth, when you feel wretched, aargh, like life is fucking shit.
When you're poisoned by guilt,
fear, hate, love."
Poignancy like it's never been ex-
pressed before.	
Poisoned will be at the Vancouver East Cultural Centre tonight
and tomorrow night.
ARBUTUS
& 16th
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PHONE
738-6311
UNDER THE VOLCANO' is explosive. John Huston is a
great filmmaker... Albert Finney's acting is awesome."
Joel Siegel. GOOD MORNING AMERICA. ABC-TV
7:15 and 9:30
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DAYS
OFF ANY PERM OR BODYWAVE
A shuttle bus service runs every evening from the northeast corner
of Sedgewick library to residences and B-Lot. The service run by UBC
Traffic and Security provides protection for those walking on campus at
night. Bus runs from 6:30 to 11:30 p.m.
FROM THE SOVIET UNION
TO U.B.C.
With only a much needed rest at his home in North
Carolina, Dr. Billy Graham's busy schedule will take
him from major Soviet cities including Moscow and
Leningrad to the War Memorial Gym at U.B.C. Such
a transition is indicative of the extreme diversity of
speaking opportunities that he has been granted.
For whatever reason, Graham, a long-time world
traveller and speaker, seldom, if ever, fails to attract
large crowds. In a recent three month tour of
England, Dr. Graham spoke in cities such as London
and Liverpool, to crowds as large as those who attend first division soccer games. Then in a single
meeting in Korea, Graham spoke to more than one
million people.
You have an opportunity to hear Dr. Billy Graham
for yourself. He will lecture on "Peace in a Nuclear
Age." in the U.B.C. War Memorial Gym on Oct. 12
at 12:30 p.m. Admission is free.
NOW YOU CAN RENT
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Located in booth at Osborne Centre Unit 2 between Thunderbird
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Phone 228-4244
Open Monday-Friday 8-10, 12-2, 4-5 Friday, September 21, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
New SUB credit union planned
By MARTIN WEST
In response to the Bank of Montreal's refusal to negotiate student
loans on campus, student council
has invited a credit union to move
into SUB.
The B.C. Teacher's Credit
Union, geared to handling student
loans, will open at the end of October in what used to be the Alma
Mater Society listening gallery.
The SUB branch will have all the
services of an open bonded credit
union, including five automatic
tellers, computer links with other
union offices in B.C. and up to
three teller personal at any one
time, BCTCU spokesperson
Rosemary Cook said.
Cook said the BCTCU is starting
the branch with a $100 million
dollar fund. In the lease agreement
with the AMS, the union has made
specific committments to use these
monies for loans, she said, adding
the rental fees for the office space
will go into the AMS bursary fund.
Dave Frank, student board of
governors representative, said he
was pleased with this arrangement
and said it demonstrated that in this
situation, the AMS was doing a
good job to ensure that the operations would benefit students at
UBC.
Since the Bank of Montreal stopped negotiating student loans at the
campus branch two years ago, the
AMS has actively been seeking a
financial institution that would
locate on campus and deal with student needs. Frank said that the new
BCTCU program was "incredibly
constructive."
"Not only will this branch bring
a much needed service to relieve an
overcrowded situation at the Bank
of Montreal, but it will also shame
 rory a. photo
BUS DRIVERS BACK in uniform, back in machines and back to work after three month lockout. Reactions to
return ranged from "I'm so happy, I could just shit," to "get that @ + &@!&@ mike out of my face." In any case,
students seem assured of many more adventures on metro-transit especially with new route assignment system.
Defence research numbers baffle director
By PATTI FLATHER
Reports that UBC vies for first
place in Canada regarding the
amount of secret defence research it
does baffles UBC's research director, he Claimed Thursday.
"These numbers do not make
sense to me. They're totally different from what I know is going on
at UBC," said Rick Spratley.
Two Ontario graduate students
investigated Department of National Defence research on campuses. They found major differences in the volume of military
research reported by the federal
Supply and Services department
and that reported in university
research bulletins.
Ahab Abdel-Aziz and John
Bacher, two researchers for Ontario's Federation of Students, said
Supply and Services figures for
DND research on campuses, ob-
- tained through the Access to Information Act, were much higher than
university figures. They charged
that the large discrepancy
represents secret research and they
have demanded a public inquiry.
"I wouldn't have thought we
(UBC) were at the forefront of the
DND research program," Spratley
said. All UBC researchers must
publish their research, he said.
But  Spratley said he does not
know what happens to the DND
research after publication. "Does
someone in the Department of National Defence stamp it as confidential?" Spratley said it is not clear
what Supply and Services and the
students mean by classified
research.
Spratley said for most DND
research, the university needs permission to publish it during and
three months after the contract,
although graduate students can use
data for their theses. But there are
two exceptions, "politically sensitive" research and patenting,
where publication can be delayed
but not avoided, he said.
Politically sensitive research is
usually social science research
related to government policymaking, and publication can be
delayed up to two years in isolated
cases, he added.
"I wouldn't really call that
politically sensitive, I'd call that
common sense."
Some research is .nfJLpublished,
before a patent has rfflpfiled but
Spratley said the filingprocess is
short, and the issue is one of
business, not secrecy.
Spratley said it is possible some
professors doing private consulting
for the DND are included in the
report's figures. Spratley said he
will investigate a comment in the
report by Dr. Frost, assistant vice
president of McMaster University
research, where Frost is quoted as
saying universities have begun
classified research "in recent months."
There are nine DND contracts
totalling more than $350,000 at
UBC this year, according to a computer printout obtained from
Spratley.
the banks and the parts of governments that are not doing their job in
adequately creating and servicing
the student loan program."
"The Bank of Montreal's refusal
to handle student loans on campus
is obnoxious," Frank said. "It insults the purpose of the Canada
Student Loan and defeats the purpose of having a bank on campus
that is supposed to look after student interests."
Stewart Clark, Bank of Montreal
manager,  said he did not know
whether the credit union's new
branch will affect his business.
Clark said his bank will take
student accounts with loan money
in them, but students must go to the
downtown office, open an account
there, negotiate a loan there and
then have the money transferred to
an account in the campus branch.
Cook said, "The procedure for
student loans will be the same except that the convenience of being
able to do it all on campus will
make it a great deal easier."
Budget passed
By DEBBIE LO
The 1984-85 Alma Mater Society
budget was finally passed at student
council Wednesday night. AMS
finance director James Hollis said
he was relieved the matter was finally settled.
The motion that the AMS should
take a position on the November
referendum on whether to join the
Canadian Federation of Students
was tabled to allow for further
debate. Nancy Bradshaw, AMS external affairs coordinator, said she
decided to remain neutral on this
issue. A forum will also be set up at
a later date to provide more information to students and faculty on
the CFS.
Council defeated a motion for
the AMS to provide a $59,000 loan
guarantee to help the new student
campus credit union repay loans for
students unable to do so
themselves.
Graduate student representative
Frank Frigon said, "This was a simple emergency scheme that could
not replace the bursary. There was a
misrepresentation on the need of
the loan guarantee." But Frigon added, "it could have helped a lot of
students right away."
"Two hundred fifty tickets have
been sold to date in the AMS student aid lottery, where the prize is a
tuition fee. This lottery has promoted increased public awareness
to government education cutbacks,
Bradshaw said.
Two people donated $1000 to be
used for a scholarship and another
individual has inquired about sponsoring a student through university
as the result of the publicity, Bradshaw said.
In a narrow vote council defeated
a motion to pass the budget during
the winter session rather than at the
start of the winter session.
Hollis said there would be no incentive to work on the budget until
September if the budget approval
date was changed. "There would be
no responsibility," he said.
A presentation was made to
council on the barn renovations
project. The project could be completed in three phases and the total
cost would be $650,000.
The renovated barn would contain club space and a new campus
pub more refined than the Pit.
Students taking courses in the
summer session will now pay an
AMS fee of $2 per unit in addition to their summer session society
fee.
A B.C. Teachers Credit Union
will be set up on campus in October, located in the SUB listening
lounge, AMS business manager
Charles Redden said.
New SUB plaza delayed
The SUB plaza renovation project originally expected to open in
December will not be completed until mid-January, the expansion
committee co-chair said Thursday.
But Dave Frank said the project
will cost slightly less than the $1.5
million budgeted for it and will create jobs for students when it is completed.
All retail business in the plaza will
be staffed by students," Frank said.
Major features in the plaza will
be a typewriting and word processing centre, a restaurant and a snack
bar, but most space will be allocated to student clubs and services, he
said.
Funding for the project comes
from a 1982 student referendum
that raised Alma Mater Society fees
$15.
Parking policy means towing
The iron rule of law is about to fall on students who violate Endowment
Land parking regulations. This time the authorities will tow rather than
ticket offenders.
And that will include violaters of the one-hour-parking limit.
Cars parked on residential Endowment Land streets have not received
tickets since April 1, 1984 when the ministry of the attorney general
eliminated the Endowment Land traffic commissioner.
But because of a multitude of complaints from residents, the Ministry of
Lands, Parks and Housing is reinstating a commissioner by the first week
of October.
Endowment Land manager Ronald O'Genski said the more towing, less
ticketing policy is to police the area. "Ticketing doesn't work. Students
simply don't pay their tickets," O'Genski said.
O'Genski said his phone has been ringing off the hook. "Residents are
fed up with students parking all over sidewalks, in front of hydrants. And
last week there was a report of a little kid almost getting hit," O'Genski
said.
"We are not anti-student by any means, but we see no other solution to
the problem," O'Genski said.
UBC Endowment Land residents Eire paying for the commissioner.
O'Genski said this was allowed.
Frank said the delay in building
new on-campus daycare, the second
priority in the referendum, is because SUB plaza can make students
money. He said the Capital Projects
Acquisition Committee made the
decision so that plaza revenue could
partially finance other AMS projects such as daycare in the future.
New daycare facilities are past the
planning stage and into the political
stage, Frank added.
Women take night
Vancouver people are gathering
Friday night to march downtown
and take back the night of sexual
harassment that is part of our society.
The Vancouver Rape Relief and
Women's Shelter organized this
year's "Take Back the Night"
march in conjunction with other
marches across Canada protesting
violence against women.
Megan Crowhurst, Alma Mater
Society women's centre member,
said the march makes people aware
of the problem of sexual assault in
our society.
"It also makes people aware
there are organizations who are
fighting it," Crowhurst said.
She added the march is a powerful release because women's fear of
sexual assault "translates into
anger."
Centre member Cathy Hlucky
said the march is a very important
yearly event for women and that it
allows them to express and overcome their fears.
The march will not end the problem however, she added.
The march will begin at 7:30 p.m.
Friday at 666 Burrard Street. Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, Septerr
Images risk new style
w
W W ith tl
By STUART CAMPBELL
the exception
of Bolero Lava, the opening band
for Images in Vogue, it was entertaining Friday night at the SUB
ballroom. Although Bolero Lava
has dominated the local media's attention for the past few months, the
best thing going for them was their
name.
If you like repetitive,
monotonous music, you might like
the band. But the lead guitarist's incessant imitations of a Mexican
bullfighter once or twice in every
song   becomes   very   irritating.   A
friend who is particularly fond of
this band agreed their performance
was poor.
The highlight of the evening was
the head lining act, Images in
Vogue, one of Vancouver's favorite
underground bands. They've opened for the likes of Roxy Music and
Duran Duran. But the band comes
across better in a small venue with
an audience who is there to see
them.
Opening with artificial smoke
billowing around, they impressed
the surprisingly large audience with
their stage persona. Lead singer
Dale M. and new guitarist Ed Shaw
were the audience's favorites, collecting numerous bracelets and
other items from overzealous adoring fans.
Their set included material from
the debut album as well as unreleas-
ed material. "In The House", an
anti-television song, rants against
the folly of television controlling
lives. Another song titled Holiday,
promotes nuclear awareness. Holiday states the hypocrisy of some
peace rally demonstrators who view
rallies only as alternative events to
week-end barbecues.
Joe V. (keyboards) classifies the
band's music as "wrong pop"
because it is not carefree or
mindless music. His favorite musicians includes The Stranglers, Peter
Gabriel, and the Simple Minds. He
said he hates to see them in concert
because their music never comes
across as it does on the album. (Images In Vogue does not suffer from
the    same    problem).    Dale    lists
Lines stretch patience
■ * '■.:
»*■■;-:
<■•:>■.--
A
£ V_ nything    titled
Stretchmarks and Other Fine Lines
can only suggest innovative and experimental to seasoned audiences of
the Firehall, and this performance
was no exception. In this case, innovative and experimental
translates to raw and haphazard.
Stretchmarks and Other Fine Lines
Choreographers Lisa Cockrane
and Michelle Hersey
Firehall Theatre
"If 1 had a nightmare it would be
that I created that, said one woman
during intermission about Stretchmarks. And with good reason —
Stretchmarks suffers from not having a quick edit at a dress rehearsal.
It was extremely self-indulgent.
Michelle Hersey, a graduate of
the Simon Fraser University dance
By CHARLIE FIDELMAN
program, creates works which include everything that could possibly
have poignant meaning to a human
being in today's society. Her dance
was replete with symbols: giant
plastic udders, a caged woman, a
chained woman wearing a bra, a
male doctor in a white lab coat and
bare legs. The overkill on symbols
creates a distancing effect on those
watching.
Furthermore, it is a bit simplistic
to divide the world so clearly into
male and female particularly since
there are so many in-betweens.
Stretchmarks also contains a
crack at the pains of old age. The
aforementioned pantless doctor
said nasty things to an old woman
while another man, clothed in a
large diaper, dumped her from here
to there for no apparent reason.
There was a lot of work involved
in putting such a performance on
stage. But it is not enough to point
at the evils of the world.Say
something constructive, however
bizarre  it   might  be.  The  second
piece by Hersey was full of personal
angst, and Crayon Lipsticks also
contained interesting parts. But
they are not strong enough to consider because of their inconsistencies.
The best performance came from
Lisa Cochrane's choreography. It
was also the shortest and best delivered. A blind folded woman jumping from foot to foot is stalked by
a knife carrying man while reciting
a poem. Will he get her? The lights
go off and yes. The lights return
and no, she is the one with the knife
although still blindfolded. The
dance was well conceived with
focused ideas and performed with a
punchy sense of self. There was
nothing redundant in it.
Stretchmarks and Other Fine
Lines was a work of sweat. Cochrane and Hersey are to be commended for their bravery and hard
work. Let's hope Hersey grows out
of the 'suffering artiste,' a syndrome common to many fine art
students.
Richard Butler of the Psychadelic
Furs and Smiths amongst his
favorites.
On the subject of videos, Images
in Vogue members say they don't
take them seriously. "The point of
videos has gotten confused," said
Joe. "I mean, are they supposed to
be a three and a half minute movie
with a soundtrack? If so, they do
not come across that way."
Images in Vogue is due to release
a five song EP before Christmas as
well as an album after Christmas.
The band says their record company restricts them to mainstream
pop because unbeaten musical
paths are risky. But if they continue
in the same style as Friday's show,
Images In Vogue should have no
trouble convincing the record company of the value of their style.
DANCE . . . filled with emotional symbols.
'-A.7A,-.
'mmQjmW^ iwwwv^m^M
'*■" 7W%l4*x ••** -••
'tfs      ■ X
— Charlie fidelman photo
lUUM»(!PJ»l!jPi«l«l 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Repo man has got heart
he life of an auto
repossessor is an exciting life indeed. For, where else can you meet
up with trigger-happy Gunmen,
Ms. Rogers with her steel claw and
maybe even a few extraterrestial
aliens? (You don't really get to see
the aliens because they're locked up
By DENNIS LUM
in the trunk of a beat up '64 Chevy
Malibu which is really a Time
Machine.)
Repo Man
Starring Emilio Estevez and
Harry Dean Stanton
At Studio Cinema
Otto, the main character, was
just an ordinary punker before he
became a Repo Man. His lifestyle
reflects the despair of youth; he is
out of school and also out of a job
(attitudinal problem, his former
boss said).
While out on the streets, he is
fooled into stealing a car for Bud, a
repo man. But when Otto accepted
money for the job, he knew he was
hooked. "The life of a repo man is
not the life of ordinary jackasses,"
Bud tells Oito. "Jackasses go about
life avoiding tensions, but a Repo
Man lives intensely.'"
Repo men do exactly that Otto
soon learns. For those who enjoy
living on edge between morality and
legality, this is the film for you.
Despite their hardnosed semi-legal
methods of operation, Repo Men
still shiver in their boots at hints of
legal incidences such as whiplash
during car chases and improper
seizure of vehicles.
There were some  fine touches.
Repo Man Otto shows that he has
heart and talks matters over with an
elderly debtor, only to find himself
assaulted by the woman's huge
sons.
Repo Man has all the camp ingredients to make it an interesting
and entertaining film. Meet the
repo member who doesn't know
how to drive. "I don't want to learn
to drive. A lot of my thinking's
done on buses," he says. "The
amount of intelligence you have
goes down with the amount of driving you do."
This character also spews out a
theory that life is but a cosmic lattice of coincidences and that this
planet is really populated with people from the future. It doesn't really
make sense, but who cares anyways.
The campy craziness continues as
we follow the sullen-faced hero. Otto's deadpan performance gives
these amazing premises some credible flavor. Meanwhile, a loboto-
mized schizophrenic neutron bomb
physicist driving the aforementioned '64 Chevy is also being pursued
by nuke-jacketed members of a top
secret project.
Presented by Michael (Monkees)
Nesmith with a directorial debut by
Allan Cox (also the film's writer),
the film offers a good 90 minutes'
worth of fun.
| n an unspecified part of
Africa, a wealthy English family is
establishing a British colony. The
settlers are typically English with
strong Protestant values: they are
loyal to the queen, England, and
the family. They are the model
family of the 1880s.
Cloud  9  —  A  Play  of  Multiple
Organisms
By Caryl Churchill
Directed by Larry Lillo
Waterfront Theatre
Behind this upstanding veneer in
Cloud 9 — A Play of Multiple Organisms, the characters' repressed
sexual desires lurk. Through the
first act the characters reveal their
desires and orientation.
Clive, the family head (Brian
Torpe), while supposedly loving his
wife lusts after Mrs. Saunders
(Suzie Payne). His wife (David
Marr) respecting her wifely duties,
dreams of running off with Harry
Bagley (Tom McBeath), a family
friend and famous explorer. Harry,
however, is a closet homosexual,
who successfully seduces Edward
(Nicola Cavendish), Clive's oldest
child.
The same values which force the
natives into submission trap the colonialists; thus, they too must fall
victim to what is expected of them,
instead of what they feel. The climactic end of Act I liberates everyone's sexuality when the family patriarch, Clive, is shot by his dominated African butler (Jay Brazeau).
Act II moves the actors into
present-day London. The characters are the same but they are 25
years older. Playwright Caryl Churchill explores sexual lifestyles of
every persuasion, in a frank but humorous way.
It is in this modern setting that
the themes of sexual role conditioning and sexual repression become
clear. Although the characters live
their alternative lifestyles, they discover that their roles in society are
no longer obvious. The role models
they were exposed to as children do
not fit or solve their situations.
Gerry (David Marr) and Edward
(Brian Torpe), are a gay male couple suffering role confusion. Gerry
who enjoys things male, dislikes
Edward's self-admitted feminine
qualities. He neither wants to be the
husband of the relationship nor
does he want to be a wife. The other
couples have similar problems.
By FRANK POLILLO
The lesbian couple fall into the
same predicament. Lin (Suzie
Payne), the more aggressive female,
seems comfortable in. her dominant
role. She seduces her would-be lover
Victoria (Kim Seary), a married woman with a child. Victoria considers
her relationship with Lin only as
sexual experimentation. Only at the
closing of Act II does Victoria realize that she can have equal status
in a lesbian relationship.
Cloud 9 is inventive and cleverly
draws humor from a serious and
controversial subject. The play does
have its weakness, however. The
characters' problems seem to disappear by the end. The problems of
Gerry   and   Edward   are  resolved
somehow. The audience is not told
why they have decided to get back
together or whether the roles within
their relationship have changed.
The more obvious problem is in
the open discussion of sexual acts,
particularly in Act II. The characters' sexuality lacks soft, sensitive
feelings — simply no love is offered. The feelings stressed are those
that come from fucking rather than
mutual caring.
Churchill relies too much on the
characters' discovery of their genitals, which seems to solve all of
their problems. But since life involves more than sex, Cloud 9 falls
short of insightful comment on human relations.
mmm—pmmm
&,*■   .   ^
—n-
wwf^f'tM
v_
-fjm Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
The job of a
campus bank
It makes good sense for any financial institution to tailor its services to
meet the needs of its customers. Not only in terms of offering special savings and chequing accounts, but in helping people borrow money for
something needed, and needed very badly.
Students of post-secondary institutions usually need money for tuition.
In many cases, they also need money for residence fees, textbooks, and
materials crucial to their discipline. Food would be nice, too. Because most
students do not own much collateral — items the bank can collect if the
loan is reneged — and because most students do not hold a steady job,
getting a loan can be very difficult, if not impossible.
Any financial institution which chooses to operate on campus is catering
almost exclusively to a special group of people. It must recognize their problems and aid them as much as they can, without putting them through a
lot of unnecessary inconvenience. If it refuses to do this, there is no point
in continuing to operate on campus.
By this criteria, the Bank of Montreal is not doing its job. Students
needing loans cannot obtain them at the SUB branch. Instead, they must
venture downtown to get one — causing a needless loss of valuable time
when there is a branch right on campus.
Furthermore, it is unreasonable to expect a bank branch operating
downtown, in the city's financial district, to understand the needs and circumstances of young people whose occipations differ so greatly from
customers the branch is used to.
And the huge lineups students face regularly in the local branch only add
to the problems.
The arrival of the B.C. Teacher's Credit Union to SUB is a welcome addition therefore. The credit union has promised to make both federal and
provincial student loans available at the campus branch, and to provide financial services to students, faculty and staff.
The benefits of another financial institution on campus are twofold. The
first ones are obvious — students will no longer have to go out of their way
to obtain the funding so desperately needed in this age of increased tuition
and higher demands for textbooks.
Second, and more important, the introduction of competition may make
the Bank of Montreal responsive. The bank may realize that it can no
longer ignore the unique financial situation of students by shifting them
somewhere else.
JALA b»uu Reu>
RfcSt&MS   AS   CHAIR.
OF   M.TO.C.
* Continue to priorize student daycare'
We would like to remind the
students of UBC that during the
1982-83 academic year the executive
of the UBC Alma Mater Society
held a referendum to determine
whether or not the student body
would support a $15 increase in
fees, to be used to finance certain
capital projects. Some of the proposed projects included the construction of housing, daycare and
recreational facilities, SUB development, increased parking, renovations to the B-lot barn, and the purchase of the Whistler cabin land. In
addition to voting on the fee increase students were asked to
priorize these projects.
The referendum passed overwhelmingly with the top priority
given to the construction of the proposed daycare facility. Although we
are aware that the list priorizing
these development projects was not
legally binding, we feel that the
democratically elected officers of
B-lot stinker
Foul! How can the Motor Vehicle
Branch get away with a 100 per cent
increase in B-Lot parking. This act
was done during a bus strike, of
course, so we must blame the
Socreds as well. Talk to the Young
Socreds, get answers, do your job!
Find our union! K. Gesen
engineering 1
student council have a moral
obligation to be guided by the
stated wishes of the student body.
Why is it then, that AMS is going
ahead with the SUB renovations
rather than the daycare facility?
What makes student council feci
that a new restaurant and plaza
mall are in keeping with the needs
of most UBC students? Why do
they feel empowered to make decisions that conflict with the requests
of the majority of students on campus?
Does it have anything to do with
profit and greed? Certainly the new
restaurant and additional commercial space will generate considerable
revenue for the AMS in the long
term, but with a revenue last year of
$1.1 million the obvious question is,
when will it feel financially secure
enough to proceed with a few nonprofit projects that would help
students struggling to cope with
Socred restraint, tuition fee increases, and inflation?
Despite student council's protestations that this particular project will employ a number of
students, in reality very few will
benefit.
Next time the AMS conducts a
fee referendum perhaps we will all
remember how blatently we were
deceived in 1982-83 and vote accordingly. What is the point of holding
a referendum if there is absolutely
no intention of following its directives (with the exception of levying
the fee increase)? When will student
council's priorities be aligned with
those of the people they are suppos
ed to represent? We do not need
another restaurant now. We do
need a daycare facility!
P.S.  Express  yourself on  your
construction site.
Horacio de la Cueva
Pat Miller
graduate studies
Sue Mcllroy
science 4
Ubyssey and administration align
The Ubyssey and some student
officials seem to have struck an alliance in order to polish the administration's tarnished image and absolve it of any blame in imposing
the huge tuition fee increases.
In a series of red-baiting items
published in The Ubyssey this alliance raised the spectre of expulsion
for non-payment of fees, and pre
dicted that the administration
would retaliate against the students
joining the fee hike strike. In the
very next breath they insisted that
the administration is "not to
blame" for the fee increases.
Well, if these people are so sure
that the administration is innocent,
why are they so confident that there
will be a ferocious response? What
Education grows narrow
THE UBYSSEY
September 21, 1984
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Fridays throughout the
academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British
Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and are not
necessarily those of the university administration or the AMS.
Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is
SUB 241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising
228-3977/3978.
Debbie Lo, Martin West and Mark Nielsen decided that if Donna Turko, Rory Allen and Patti Flather
were not part of the solution they were part of the problem. Charlie Fidelman and Dave Stoddart
thought Stuart Colcleugh was the problem. Frank Polillo, Dennis Lum and Robert Beynton said they
didn't know there was a problem. Victor Wong said he didn't care as long as he and Neil Lucente
weren't part of the solution, which created a problem for Chris Wong who wanted Erin Mullin to come
up with a solution. Yaku said the only solution was more of everything but Dierdra thought, and Paul
MacDougall agreed, that this would only cause more problems. Nobody could figure it out so they all
went to the Pit and got pisied.
What a tragedy that fewer young
people can afford to go to college
and university in British Columbia
this fall. The cost is simply too
high, student grants have been eliminated and scarce summer jobs cannot make up the difference.
It is precisely at a time of record
high unemployment that we should
be encouraging students from low-
and middle income-families to pursue higher education. The critical
thinking necessary for any economic recovery can be acquired
now for use later. What else can
young people do? The B.C. Central
Credit Union estimates that actual
unemployment for youth aged
15-19 hit 39.5 per aent in B.C. last
spring.
In three calculated moves, the Social Credit government has tried to
cut off access to higher education as
an option for these unemployed.
First, it reduced provincial support to colleges and universities.
Provincial government grants to
universities, already among the lowest in Canada, were cut by five per
cent this year. These institutions responded by raising tuition fees.
Simon Fraser increased fees by 22
per cent, the University of Victoria
by 25 per cent and the University of
British Columbia by 33 per cent, effective this September.
Second, it eliminated the student
grant program. In February 1984,
the provincial government an-
nouncd that it was scrapping the aid
program that had provided a nonrepayable grant of up to $2,000 to
needy students. Starting this September, needy students can only incur large debts if they wish to pursue a post-secondary education.
Third, it reduced student job creation programs to a minimum. Students have simply been unable to
earn more money in the summer to
pay the higher fees and to com-
pensateftfor the loss of student
grants.**Unemployed parents, or
parents in fear of losing their jobs,
are in no better financial shape to
make up for the tuition jumps, the
aid cuts and the decline in summer
job income.
Colleges and universities will increasingly become the preserve of
the rich, and the unemployed young
people will be left to self-destruct
on drugs and used as an excuse for
attacking unions and reducing
wages.
Is this the kind of "recovery" we
want? Chris Allnutt
Vancouver, B.C.
kind of innocent administration is
this that would expel students who
stand up for their rights?
We think that the administration,
silent on the fee hike strike this
year, is hiding behind the skirts of
The Ubyssey, reluctant to issue
threats which would certainly stiffen resistance to the unjust fee increases and expose the administration as villains. A university administration which is genuinely
against the fee increases would be
sympathetic to those who cannot
pay their tuition.
The Ubyssey has published a
number of schemes which they advise the students to take up instead
of the fee hike strike. They want to
have a "dialogue" with the government; they want to "make the government more aware;" they want to
have an "open public forum" with
Bennett or McGeer.
The government is very much
aware of the impact of the increases, and they are going ahead
anyway. No, these proposals which
are couched in terms of concern for
the "well-being" of the students are
really substitutes for any genuine
fight against the tuition increases.
The Ubyssey and its allies are advising timidity for the students.
They are telling us to bow our heads
and submit to the fee increases.
But, these attacks are just the beginning of a round of fee increases.
The only way to challenge these attacks is through a strong and determined opposition, an opposition
which is being led by the Fee Hike
Strike Committee.
Barbara Waldern
Unclassified 5
Fee Hike Strike
Committee, Box 126, SUB Friday, September 21, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
Students, take charge of your education
By JANE TEMPLEMAN
Boom. It begins again, the
slumbering giant awakens. The
hibernating anthill, stirred, now is
transformed with activity. Excitement newness, and expectations as
shiny as that polished apple
presented way back when.
And why not? The warm
mellowness of long summer days
gives way to the brisk sharpness of
the fall. Time to 'get on with it.'
Most every September has signaled
'school days,' our reflex is
automatic. Often not thought
about.
But hold it. There are two harsh
realities at work here.  Both need
looking at, in beginning again.
The first. . .  "Why am I here?"
"Why do I do it" Is it the lure of
job security, or KNOWLEDGE, to
have a good time, or just to put off
the inevitability of life "out there?"
Don't kid yourself. Separate
myth from reality. Make sure this is
the right place at the right place at
the   right   time.   Else   you   waste
money in a world where money
becomes all the harder to find and
all the easier to lose.
So you stay. The next reality
presents itself ... 'At what price?'
The flip side to the coin of
newness, excitement and high hopes
is shaded, hidden at first glance. In-
siduous. I begin to feel its cutting
edge after only a few days.
This reality begins with stalus. I
have none. (A touch of irony, I
have a bit more of non-status than,
say, someone in first year, low woman on the pole!) I realize that being 'student' labels me as "one
without power." Even as
unemployed, I would enjoy the
sympathy of the workies, and a support network to defend my cause.
But as a student, I am a world
removed, ultimately alone.
Ouch.
I must be reminded that it is for
me that this place ultimately exists.
The powers that be would have me
forget. So I must take charge, not
numblv nod assent when first turn-
English 100 held in Room 101
By BRIAN WOODLEY
There is a challenge facing students today, a challenge that takes
everything they have to give.
English 100 is that challenge.
Created in the latter years of the
Spanish Inquisition as a means for
extracting confessions, it has developed into a ferocious mental assailant of all who oppose it.
The professors control the modern version of English 100. Progress
has equipped them with weapons
and devices designed to whip even
the most literate student into submission.
You battle writers cramp, noisy
neighbors, and creeping due dates
to produce your life's best achievement, and end up hung up to dry,
battered with vague phrases, lashed
with wandering paragraphs, or
bludgeoned with the dreaded incorrect pronoun reference.
But the fierce classroom torture is
not  enough  for the satanical ty-
Letters
Dr. Riseborough incorrect'
In the Sept. 14 issue of The Ubyssey Dr. Neil Risebrough, associate
vice-president for student affairs, is
quoted as saying that the "campus
unions are unofficially boycotting
the centre because of the G.S.S.'s
(Graduate Student Society's) labor
practices."
Please be advised that on Sept. 6,
the graduate student executive requested the university employee relations officer to reinstate our for
mer bartender, a member of CUPE
116. On Sept. 13, that official informed us that he could not do so
without the consent of Dr. Neil
Risebrough. Dr. Risebrough has refused to grant this consent.
It has been and it remains our intention to rehire our former union
employees whom the university administration had laid off in May.
Brian Bain
secretary
Graduate Student Society
 UBC DANCE CLUB	
FREE
INTRODUCTORY
JIVE LESSONS
Tues., Sept. 25 SUB Party Room
Fri., Sept. 28 12:30-1:30
Contact: UBC Dance Club, SUB 220 (228-3248) or
see us during Clubs Days!
■S^-
INTERESTED IN
VOLUNTEERING?
Become A Volunteer
at SPEAKEASY
: U.B. C. 's Crisis and Information Centre
•
• Please apply between the hours of 10:30-2:30 Mon-
\ day through Friday at SPEAKEASY (located on the
'. SUB Concourse). Weekend training seminar: Sept.
• 28 & 29th. Application deadline: Sept. 27, 1984.
•
• A great way to gain experience
: and meet friends!
rants. They end your literary career
with an id-destroying three-hour exam, designed so that no mortal man
could possibly complete it in under
six hours.
Should you pass this paragon of
nerve wracking classes, you are
blessed with a four month reprieve
from English, but upon your return, the sadistic devils get their revenge, as you are forced to take . . .
English 200!
How long can this go on? Can
anyone stop it? No one knows. No
one cares. No one will read this
story. This is just the mad utterings
of one who is suffering these horrible classes. HELP!
Brian Woodley is a first year
science student and struggling
satirist.
**^^r
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EARN
m¥'
512,000
PER MONTH
IN YOUR SPARE
TIME
Then come and
spend a little of it at
FELLINI'S
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SANDWICHES,
FABULOUS
CHEESECAKES,
CAPPUCCINOS,
ESPRESSOS,
NANAIMO BARS
Located at the back of the Village
on Campus
ed away in my request to be heard.
"Hear, me damn it, or I'll start to
shout." I've paid my dues. It is for
me to reclaim my status. I must
assert my power, my choice. I must
take charge. Else I am lost in the
"midst." (mist?)
The reality might end with care.
The race is on and this system
rewards winners. The pressures
mount, both subtle and overt.
Should I forget why I'm here, and
what I want, I could be in trouble.
Knowledge is an amazing thing.
Its been around a long time and I
could guess that it will outlast me.
So what's the buzz? It's the race.
The game. The helter-skelter
pressure that causes me to loose
perspective and balance. It sneaks
up on me, compounded by my lowly perch on the totem.
Taking charge. Remembering
that I carry tomorrow the baggage I
pick up today. Taking care. If I
don't, no-one else will. The race
just travels on.
Jane Templeman is a masters
candidate in counselling psychology
who doesn 't want people to waste
their time at this big campus of
ours.
FOREIGN SERVICE
EXAM PREP SEMINARS
Offered CANADA-WIDE: SEPT. 22-OCT. 12
SllO.oo (Tax Deductible)
Small Classes       Personal Attention
Experienced Instructor
For Information, Registration Package
CALL TOLL-FREE
MON. - FRI.   10:00 - 5:00 E D T
1-800-267-8289
Aha., Sask.,
Man., N.W. Ont.,
B.C. (1 12-800-)
Ottawa/Hull Residents only: 232-3497
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Ont., Que., N.S.,
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ypSSvP
CECIL
HOTEL
VANCOUVER B.C.
Good to October 31,1984
Present your student card for this special offer.
Theatre Department
AUDITIONS
GET INTO THE ACT
AUDITIONS
for
TWELFTH NIGHT
by William Shakespeare
Directed by Pamela Hawthorn
(To be presented Nov. 7—17/84)
TIMES:    WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
FRIDAY
3DAY, September 19")
)AY, September 10 >
, September 21 J
5:00 - 8:30 pm
PLACE:   Frederic Wood Theatre, Room 206
(OPEN TO ALL U.B.C. STUDENTS, FACULTY & STAFF)
Arrange audition appointments in Room 207,
Frederic Wood Theatre or Phone 228-2678
Be prepared to read from Twelfth Night
AUDITIONS
GET INTO THE ACT
AUDITIONS Page 10
E    UBYSSEY
A Man For All Seasons by Robert Bolt,
Henry VIII returns to lust again, at the Q.E.
Playhouse Sept. 22-Oct. 20, 8:00 p.m.
873-3311.
"Un Ouvrage De Dames": insanity, cruelty,
mystery, mystery. Poetry, lots of black
humour — in French — by La Troupe de la
Seizieme, Sept. 26-30, 8:30 p.m. Firehall
Theatre, 280 E. Cordova, 689-0926.
Cloud 9: a play of multiple organisms opened
Sept. 14 at the Waterfront Theatre Granville
Isle., 8:00 p.m. 873-6622.
Skool: A musical look at education from the
student's point of view, until Sept. 22,
Presentation House, 333 Chesterfield, N. Van,
986-1351.
Look    Back    in    Anger:    Honest    and
courageous protest against things as they are,
Sept.    19-29,    8   p.m.,    Frederic   Wood
Theatre. UBC campus, 228-3880.
Talking   Dirty:   Canada's  favorite  comedy,
until  Sept.  22,   8:30,   Arts  Club Theatre,
Granville Island, 687-5315.
Ain't Misbehaving: Fats Waller Classic, until
Sept. 29, 8:30, Arts Club Theatre.
The Late Blumer: Comedy based on the interaction   of  the  love  generation   with  the
Eighties,   until   Sept.   29,   8:30,   Arts   Club
Theatre.
Celebrations: Three one-act plays including
Letting Go, Between Mouthfuls, and
Gosforth's Fete, Sept. 19-22, 8 p.m., St.
James Auditorium, 3214 W. 10th Ave.,
266-6473
Autochromes: Color photography comes of
age: a collection of some early color prints,
until Oct. 7, Presentation House, 333 Ches
terfield Ave., N. Van., 986-1351.
Margaret Randall; Photographs from Nicaragua: Insightful black and white photos, until
Oct. 7, Presentation House.
Vancouver/Seattle: Three dimensional art
in glass, ceramics, and fibreglass, until Sept.
30, Surrey Art Gallery, 1375088th Ave.,
Surrey, 596-1515.
RED LEAF
RESTAURANT
Luncheon Smorgasbord
Authentic Chinese Cuisine
228-9114
10% DISCOUNT ON
PICK UP ORDERS
LICENSED PREMISES
Mon Fri 11 30 9 00 p ni
CLOSED SATURDAYS
Sundays and Holidays
.. ,,^ ..       4 00pm   9 00 p in
2142 Western Parkway
UBC Village
Director's choice: Mixed media exhibit
selected by retiring Vancouver Art Director
Luke Rombout, until Oct. 28, Vancouver Art
Gallery, 750 Hornby St., 682-5621.
Jiri Kolar — Poetry of Vision, Poetry of Silence: Collages by internationally-known
Czech artist, until Oct. 21, Vancouver Art
Gallery.
Brancusi — The Sculptor as Photographer: 50 silver prints by this great figure in the
development of modern art, until Oct. 21,
Vancouver Art Gallery.
Bob Steele, So Far. . .: Retrospective of this
important Vancouver photographer and
Drawer, Sept. 19-Oct. 21, Burnaby Art
Gallery, 6344 Gilpin St., 291-9441.
The Clifford E. Lee Collection of Inuit Wall-
Hangings, until Oct. 13, UBC Fine Arts
Gallery. 228-2759.
Three decades of ceramics made in the
David Lambert studio, Cartwright street
Gallery, Granville Isle.
Friday, September 21, 1984
HoVL£6
Alternative Celluloid
SUB Films (SUB Auditorium, 228-3369)
Splash, 7 and 9:30 p.m. Sept. 20-23. Terms of
Endearment Sept. 27.
Odeon Theatre 1881 Granville St. 682-7468)
Amadeus has gone from a stage production
to the silver screen, 7:00 and 9:45 p.m.
Video Inn (261 Powell St., 688-4336) "artist-
in-residence" Gabor Body the Hungarian
film/video avante-gardist is showing a screening of new videoworks produced' during
residency, Sept. 27, 8:00 p.m.
Pacific Cinematheque (1155 W. Georgia,
732-6110) Sept. 21-22: And Quiet Rolls The
Dawn, 7:30 p.m., Possessed 9:15 p.m.; Sept.
26-27: Esthappan 7:30 p.m., Ther Role 9:15
p.m.; Sept. 28-29 The Case is Closed 7:30
p.m., The Ascent 9:15 p.m.
Cinema 16 (SUB UBC 228-3639) Sept. 24.
The Draughtman's Contract 6:30 and 8:30
p.m.
Vancouver East Cinema I7th and Commercial, 253-5455) Sept. 21-23 That Sinking Feeling 7:30 p.m. Kepperband 9:15 p.m.; Sept.
24: Meet Me in St. Louis 7:15 p.m.. Words
and Music 9:30 p.m.; Sept. 25: David Copper-
field 7:00 p.m., A Tale of Two Cities 9:30
p.m.; Sept. 26: Murder She Said 7:30 p.m.,
Murder Most Foul 9:15 p.m.; Sept. 27: Easter
Parade 7:30 p.m.. That's Entertainment 9:30
p.m.;
The Ridge Theatre (16th and Arbutus,
730-6311) The White Rose 7:15 and 9:30 p.m.
/ta£
Holly Near and Inti-lllimani Sept. 23 at the
Orpheum Theatre 865 Seymour at 8:00 p.m.
683-2311.
Ferron and We Three: Blues, folk, classical
and swing blends with feminism, humour and
raw emotion.  The Vancouver East Cultural
Centre, Sept. 25-29, 8:00 p.m. 254-9578.
Johnny   and   the    Distractions:    middle
America steel-town rock, Sept. 26-29, Town
Pump.
Rubber Biscuit: Return of the rockers, Sept.
17-22, Town Pump, 66 Water St.
Chris   Sigerson   Trio:   Jazz,   Sept.   14-15,
Good Neighbor Jazz Cafe, 535 E. Broadway,
879-8208.
DINNER DELIVERED?
Call Candia Taverna
Traditional Greco-Roman Cuisine
4510 West 10th Avenue
Open Sunday through Thursday 5:00 p.m. to 1:00 a.m.
Friday and Saturday 5:00 p.m. to 2:00 a.m.
For reservations and delivery: 228-9512 - 228-9513
Tp
Try Candia Taverna's carefully prepared Greek dishes, *rum such standards
as Mousaka, Souvlakias grilled carefully to your tastes, Greek Salads
smothered with Feta Cheeses, to specially prepared Kalamaria brought to
your table piping hot and delicious. Sample the large selection of Greek and
Italian appetizers: Kotosoupa, Tzanziki, Homus, Italian Salad rich with Moz-
zarella. Candia Style sauces prepared for the Lasagna, Spaghetti and
Tortellini are great favourites, as are the wide varieties of pizzas. The chef
lovingly creates daily specials such as spinach pizza and BBQ Chicken for
your appreciation. A friendly staff member welcomes each customer at the
door and insures that a visit at Candia Taverna is a memorable one. And to
the delight of the customers, each Friday and Saturday evening dancers
perform their Dance Oriental.
Jim Beatty Jazz Band: Dixie band from
Portland, Sept. 21-22, Hot Jazz club, 2120
Main, 873-4131.
Kin Lalat: Guatemalan band who play a variety of instruments, $5, Sept. 15, Vancouver
East Cultural Centre, 1895 Venables,
254-9578.
Poisoned: Featuring Art Bergmann, local
guru of rock and roll, Sept. 21-22, 8:30 p.m.,
Vancouver East Cultural Centre.
Magnetic Band: Performing works by U.S.
avant-garde composer Steve Reich, Sept. 21,
8 p.m., SFU Theatre.
Pacific Motion Dance Company presents:
Water, Women, Rubber Monkeys & Fertility;
choreography by Janice LeBtond, Tara
Twigg, and Connie Schrader. Three evenings
of unconventional dance, Sept. 20-22, Firehall
Theatre, 280 E. Cordova, 8:30 p.m. 689-0926.
Las Grands Ballets Canadiens: part of the
Dance Alive series, Quebec's premier ballet
company performes Balanchine, Butler and
Macdonald creations, Sept. 21-22, Queen
Elizabeth Theatre, 649 Cambie, 683-2311.
Judith Marcuse has a new national dance
ensemble, debute celebration Sept. 25 after
the performance, Sept. 25-30, Arts Club
Theatre, Granville Island 8:30 p.m. 687-1644.
Corn Ball Stomp: a benefit dance presented
by the B.C. Region of the Dance in Canada
Assoc, featuring Jump, The Great Divide,
and The Talking Heels, Sept. 22, Odd
Fellows' Hall, 1720 Graveley St. 8:30 p.m.
732-5528.
Touche Ross &Co.
Chartered Accountants
We are an international firm of chartered accountants with offices in Vancouver, New Westminister, Langley, Victoria, Prince George and all major centres in Canada. We are seeking graduates who wish to make a career in
Chartered Accountancy with future opportunities in a number of specialized
areas such as audit/accounting, tax, valuations, insolvency and EDP.
If you are ready to turn your degree into a profession, we invite you to meet
with representatives of Touche Ross & Co. on October 22/23 & 24 on campus.
Applications, accompanied by recent course transcripts, may be submitted to
the Employment Centre on Campus until October 3rd. We will be in contact
with you subsequent to that date.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders — 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional lines, .60c. Commercial — 3 tines.
1 day $4.50; additional lines, .70c. Additional days, $4.00 and .66c.
Classified ads ore payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a. m. the day before publication.
Publications, Room266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders over > 10.00. Cell 228-3977 -^
5 - COMING EVENTS
THE VANCOUVER INSTITUTE
Free Public Lecture
THE HONORABLE MADAME JUSTICE
BERTHA WILSON
Supreme Court of Canada
CHILDREN: THE CASUALTIES OF
A FAILED MARRIAGE
Lecture Hall 2. Woodward
Building, Saturday, Sept. 22
at 8:15 p.m.
1972 VW SUPER BEETLE. Bright blue,
excellent condition. Lady-driven 10 yrs.
35,000 mi. on rebuilt engine. $2000.
434-5387.
20 - HOUSING
HOUSING
Vacancies in student
Residences for Women.
Room and board. Make
application at Housing
office or call 228-2811.
CLASSICAL
GUITAR
Instruction at all levels
NEAR CAMPUS
Ph: 263-2038
35 - LOST
LOST: pr. wire rimmed glasses, plastic
tinted for reading. Tues., Sept. 18. Possibly
in Buchanan or SUB. Reward. Ph. Sara
736-0052.
85 - TYPING
11 - FOR SALE - Private
1969 VW VAN POP TOP. gas heater, quartz
hi, st. snows, reliable, $1700 obo 988-7409.
1973 CORTINA 2000. 79.000 Mi. Very
reliable $700 o.b.o. 734-4401
FOR SALE: Hewlett-Packard 34C calculator.
210 lines program space, 21 storage
registers. Numerical integration and root
finding operations. Ph. Ron 228-9102.
RENAULT GRODINI Excellent shape,
low miles, FWD, 5-speed, fuel inj, am-fm,
great sunroof, great summer & ski car.
$3500. Don 689-8118 or 688-6585.
THRIFT SALE at West Point Grey
Presbyterian Church, 4397 W. 12th Ave.
Sept. 28th at 7:30 p.m. Er Sept. 29th at
10:00 a.m.
SPRINGSTEEN TICKETS MM Excellent
location in reds. Call 261-7862 between 6 &
7 p.m.
FURNISHED RMS available on campus.
Rent incl. meals. Contact David Kelly
224-9930 or drop by the Deke House, 5765
Agronomy Rd., just across Westbrook
Mall.
HOW ABOUT shared ownership in a home?
Look into owning a home with a friend or
friends. Contact me for how it works. I have
prepared very workable details. Better than
renting. Good choice of 2-5 bdrm. homes.
Elizabeth Hopkins 943-5995. Block Brothers
Realty. 943-7441.
ONLY A 5 MINUTE WALK from SUB,
cooked lunch _ dinner, largest living space
in fraternity houses, Sigma Chi 224-3381.
SIGMA-CHI has room & board (singles
& doubles) available. Good food!I! Phone
224-3381.
25 - INSTRUCTION
PIANO LESSONS by Judith Alexander
graduate of Juilliard School of Music. Near
Cambie & 38th 731-8323.
WORD PROCESSING $1.50/PG IDS)
CRWR major - Winona Kent 438-6449
located in south Burnaby.
TYPING. Essays _ Resumes. Also Transcription from cassette. Spelling corrected.
Layout on resumes optional. 263-4739.
EXPERT TYPING. Essays, term papers,
factums, letters, manuscripts, resumes,
theses, IBM Selectric II, reasonable rates.
Rose 731-9857.
WORD   PROCESSING   SPECIALIST.    All
jobs, year around student rates,  on  King
Edward route. 879-5108.
WORD WEAVERS - word processing.
Student rates, fast turnaround, bilingual
5670 Yew St. at 41st 266-6814.
TYPING — Fast, accurate, reasonable rates
734-8451.
YOUR WORDS PROFESSIONALLY
TYPED - TO GO. Judith Filtness, 3206
W. 38th Ave., Van. 263-0351 (24 hrs.). Fast
and reliable.
W/P & TYPING: Term papers, theses,
mscpt., essays, incl. reports, letters,
resumes. Bilingual. Clemy: 266-6641. Friday, September 21,1984
THE    UBYSSEY
11
PLAYERS . . . playing
STUDENT DISCOUNTS AND
SAME DAY SERVICE
SAVE 20% &
SAME DAY SERVICE
AT THE,
WESTERN OPTICAL EYE LAB
With your prescription and
STUDENT I.D. CARD -
ChOOSe ANY FRAME
IN OUR STOCK.
WESTERN OPTICAL
 EYE LAB	
Mon.-Fri. 8:30-5:00
2nd & Burrard
(1742 w. 2nd Ave.)
731-9112
COMMUNITY SPORTS
GRAND
OPENING SALE
5629 W. Boulevard
"Boulevard Centre"
Same prices at 3615 W. Broadway
CCM Ultratacks, Cooper Roos, Micron
Medalics and Bauer 100's. Reg. $249.50.
Sale $219.50
Wilson Sting Tennis Frames. Reg. $159.50.
Sale $127.60
Patrick Soccer Boots. Reg. $79.95.
Sale $59.95
Hockey Jerseys. Reg. $24.95. Sale .$14.95
Titan Hockey Sticks. Reg. $19.95.
Sale $11.95
PLUS MANY
2 FOR 1 SPECIALS
Phone 266-1434 or 733-1612
X^WMMmWMMmWJmWJFMmWmMmWMk
%wub&y
TODAY
GAYS AND LESBIANS OF UBC
Wine and cheese party 8 p.m. Contact SUB 239
or phone 732-1786 for more information.
THUNDERBIRD SOCCER
Vs. Calgary Dinosaurs, 2 p.m., O.J. Todd field,
Thunderbird park.
ROCH CARRIER
Author  of  La  Guerre;   Yes,   Sir;   The  Hockey
Sweater; et cetera, reads from his own work.
12:30 p.m. Buch. A100.
SATURDAY
UBC WATER POLO CLUB
Practice, bring your swim suit, 5 p.m. Aquatic
centre.
ISMAILI STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Welcome back dance,  8:30 p.m. grad centre
ballroom.
THUNDERBIRD SOCCER
Vs.    Lethbridge,   2   p.m.,   O.J.   Todd   field,
Thunderbird park.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Rim: Jesus, 7:30 p.m., Buch. A104.
SUNDAY
UBC WATER POLO CLUB
Practice, bring your swim suit, 5 p.m., Aquatic
centre.
VANCOUVER JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTRE
Terry Fox run for cancer research. Pledge forms,
available at centre or at Canadian Cancer Society
office, 8 a.m., Vancouver Jewish Community
Centre, 960 W. 41st Ave. at Oak. 266-9111.
MONDAY
AMS CYCLING CLUB
Annual general meeting for election of execu
live, 1:30 p.m., SUB 215.
UBC STUDENTS FOR PEACE
AND MUTUAL DISARMAMENT
Issues Committee meeting — organization and
NATO project. All welcome, 7 p.m. SUB 212A.
HUMOR IN OLD RUSSIAN THEATRE
Lecture by Dr. Ewa M. Thompson, professor,
department of German and Russian studies. Rice
University, Houston. 12:30 Buch. penthouse.
THROUGHOUT SEPTEMBER
INTERNSHIP PROGRAM
Information, interviews for internships in social
planning, public health, writing, television
museum work. 8:30-4:30 daily. Brock 213.
ZETA
PSI
Wants
YOU
Come to our RUSH
to  meet   the  guys
and down a pint or two
Fri. Sept.21   7=30-8:30
Wed.Sept.26 7=30-8:30
W.16Ave.   or call 224-2212
wm '""■ ■ \ :X*>5; >., ^1^
THE MAN...
THE MUSIC...
THE MADNESS...
THE MURDER...
THE MOTION PICTURE.
AmadeuS
.EVERYTHING YOU'VE HEARD IS TRUE
«____&      jSS-X
™ SAUL ZAENTZo™--™ PETER SHAFFER'S AMADEUS  . MILOS FORMAN _,
F. MURRAY ABRAHAM     TOM HULCE     ELIZABETH BERRIDGE
SIMON CALLOW    ROYDOTRICE    CHRISTINE EBERSOLE    JEFFREY JONES    CHARLES KAY
SS= MICHAEL HAUSMAN _ BERTIL OHLSSON _SX MIROSLAV ONDRICEK
^TS NEVILLE MARRINER "££ PATRIZIA VON BRANDENSTEIN <_^»_ TWYLA THARP
~-ttZX PETER SHAFFER ,-_*SAULZAENTZ __»MILOS FORMAN
* OKOfl ncrunfs Hmmu,       '— punavbion*
-«•__— <w-__—._—D     p~»* TECHNICOLOR*
ORIGINAL SOUNDTRACK ALBUN
IV RECORDS AND TAJ-ES
PG nKCTunnucESuasESTHi«
MAY NOT M HRTAaU ROM CHRJMN
Opens September 19th at the Odeon in Vancouver. Check your local listings for times. Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday, September 21, 1984
School marked by tears
(CUP) — Malaspina College students were in tears recently, but not
over the usual back-to-school blues.
Students walking to classes in the
early morning were affected by
teargas fumes drifting in from nearby Nanaimo Military Camp, where
a riot-control gas was being tested.
Building director Dave Wadeson
said when he arrived at the affected
area his throat went dry, he felt
nasal conjestion, and his eyes began
watering.
The physical effects disappeared
once people went indoors, he added. The fumes had completely dissipated by 8:30, when firemen arrived
to investigate.
College president Bruce Fraser
sent an angry letter to the camp
commander demanding that tear
gas exercises be stopped. "We had
r~
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
i
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
L-
no warning nor explanation, nor
did anyone check to see if the effects of the gas had caused any problems to the public," Fraser said in
the letter.
Major Gordon Reed, the camp
commander, said the gas had been
blown  onto campus by an unex
pected breeze. He added that
several citizens in Nanaimo had also
complained about the exercise.
"Obviously, we will no longer
conduct open-air testing on this
camp," he said. He added further
testing will be done outside city
limits.
SUB FILMS. 228-3697
From the first laugh, you'll be hooked!
•\
w
TECHNICOLOR* LENSES AND PANAFLfcX "   CAMERA BV PANAVISiON
Distributed by Buena Vista Distribution Cc   tne    c 1984 Buena Vista Distribution Co , inc
SEPT. 20-23. TWO SHOWS EVERY NITE
GRE4T    GEATUirOM*     ^O^U&l I l _
*buy>\ccj- \& tv\<_. c<=>oaiVio^s ou-v\ir\€a beV^oo..
^• t^v^r be Q,b^olcrV_. connd^<,eur<, ©f tuners.
3.Hu*f ^n*"_  no  usc*e+o VxasJe.   v^o\\<l\ -Vrc«.w\p\^5l <&.«_  bo
4- Hot-V tMt_j ont- cM^er 'bone,   of e^ual &<r arecAe.c \nlo€
CKf\cX   bc'\r\C\ +V\t<> \>a&eL o\ vr\e. -coxier UiH\ vAOU.£op\«i5,
3431 W. BROADWAY • 738-5298 ^
STEVE MARTIN LILY TOMLIN
ALLOFME
The comedy that proves
that one's a crowd.
■■ KINGS ROAD STEPHEN FRIEDMAN.-,       : .AS. ftfcifl)     u ■■f »■
■ ■■ mm LIBERWi .- ■ vTCTOftA 'EMA,T   - . -. .
.. -■■.. *-.- :,EDDAVIS :■,.:..■ ■ •.. HEW OlcK  ■».-„-.■,PHit AlDEnSi08lr»SON
„PATRICK W9.DAMS ........ - PHIL AlDEM RQBIMSON ; - . -. STEPHEN REDMAN
>,; -, CARL REINER   ""••*■■*
Opening September 21,
1984. Check your local
listings for details.
h.1
>-:
ALL HEWLETT-PACKARD
OFF (Calculators
^LWM     m        \^4 & PRINTERS
m
& PRINTERS
SALE ENDS SAT., SEPTEMBER 29th
1HP-41CX
for the PROFESSIONALS
OR THE STUDENT
L_X \3    "I   fZ m^   Advanced Programmable Calculator
for Computer Scientists
eg Whether you're performing arithmetic calculations, analyz-
"" ing data or controlling a system HP-41CX can adapt to your
task! The HP-41CX offers the most functions and greatest
^expandability of the HP-41 family. With 20 additional functions for enhanced programming, the HP-41CX has the power
8c flexibility to solve most complex problems.
The UBC BOOKSTORE carries a full line of
HEWLETT-PACKARD Calculators,
Hardware & Peripherals.
HP-41CX
Reg. $503.00
ON SPECIAL
The HP- 16C brings a unique combination of power, versatility,
and convenience to your computer science applications. Let
your HP-16C quickly convert among number bases, determine the outcome of Boolean operations or emulate individual processor instructions, so you can spend more of your
time in creative design work.
The HP-16C comes complete with owner's handbook, three
long life disposable batteries, and a soft carrying case.
mm
WiwSM
im?*Hmb*Sm.
$39995
'AVE NOW!
f SHOP & COMPARE OUR PRICES.
BOOKSTORE
HP-16C
Reg. $194.74
ON SPECIAL
$15595
t__l
^•tS_s |'-Vancouver, B.C VtiT 1Y^ .
&**;•;• 228-4741 •„.
u Wed. Evening- &i
HEWLETT
PACKARD
•MfsS?
■M
■ i '*'
___-;'m2$
iS-
:-' "-at*-*
mm
-   SKS
*f%\'>

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