UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Feb 24, 1987

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubysseynews-1.0126518.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubysseynews-1.0126518.json
JSON-LD: ubysseynews-1.0126518-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubysseynews-1.0126518-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubysseynews-1.0126518-rdf.json
Turtle: ubysseynews-1.0126518-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubysseynews-1.0126518-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubysseynews-1.0126518-source.json
Full Text
ubysseynews-1.0126518-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubysseynews-1.0126518.ris

Full Text

Array <m
Mc-^chives Serial
THE UBYSSEY
IX, No,>40  y\  ?        Vancouver. B.C. Tuesday. February 24,1987 »<s^|g^
Vol. LXIX, IMo.^0 1f\
228-2301
Threat of closure draws protest
By EVELYN JACOB
"I think it's terrible. I could sit
down and cry right now."
That's how Delia Lynch, a Bus
Stop cafeteria waitress for 20 years,
described her feelings as one of the
oldest institutions on campus faces
closure.
The Bus Stop — which has been a
popular eating spot and campus
tradition for over 50 years — will be
making way for a new management
research library, a decision reached
by the Board of Governors two
years ago. Bus Stop staff was informed of the closure last Thurs
day.
And that has some UBC students
angry enough to launch petitions
and letter-writing campaigns to save
the cafeteria.
Food Services business manager
Shirley Louie said "all hell broke
loose" when facilities planning informed food services director
Christine Samson to begin looking
for an alternative site for the
cafeteria.
By Monday, Louie said that she
had already received four petitions
against the closure, each containing
about 200 signatures.
— malcolm pearson photo
ONCE EVERY 3.14159265359 years, a trans-galactic portal opens between
the fourth and fifth dimensions which manifests itself in the third dimension as a burst of energy that contradicts relativistic laws of conservation of
energy-mass. It is impossible to predict where these energy bursts will occur; however, this one was discovered quite by accident mere light nanoseconds from the math building.
"The customers are going
crazy," she said. "We're one of the
oldest food outlets on campus and
the only one with waitresses. It'll be
an end of an era."
Although Food Services management has known all along that the
cafeteria faced potential closure,
Louie said she hoped there would
be room for the cafeteria in the new
development.
But K. D. Srivastava, vice-
president of student services and
academic, said the Bus Stop will
probably not be on the same site as
the library, because "eating places
and libraries" should be kept in
separate areas. But he said a newly-
created task force set up a look at
possible use of the area must
"seriously take into consideration a
food outlet in the same area."
And president David Strangway
agrees. Lunching at the Bus Stop
Monday, Strangway said "if we
could be assured food would be
kept separate from the library, we'll
look into providing a space for the
cafeteria." Strangway refused to
sign the petition which protested the
Bus Stop's closure.
Assistant librarian William Watson said the university must raise
between $18-20 million before con-
— malcolm pearson photo
BUS STOP, BUS stop, bus comes, bus goes, he/she stays, love grows...
eat in this end of the campus," said
Kendall Frankham, Arts 4, who has
frequented the Bus Stop for a year.
"The university could do better
things with their money," said
graduate student Chris Homes.
Louie said she does not expect
"drastic layoffs" of the Bus Stop's
25-member staff.
But employee Anita Long said,
"It's breaking an institution. I'm
too old to get a new job."
struction of the library begins. Part
of the funds have been donated by
Vancouver philanthropist David
Lam.
"We don't have near the amount
of money needed yet," said Watson, adding it will be four or five
years before demolition of the Bus
Stop gets underway. But that is not
stopping regular customers from
complaining.
"There's no where else to go to
Condoms considered for SUB
By DAVID FERMAN
Although the mens washroom in
SUB has been without condoms for
over a year, the newly elected Alma
Mater Society president would support their return.
"I think it's a good idea. I'd be in
favor of it," said Rebecca Nevraumont.
A condom dispenser had been in
place in the men's washroom on the
main level of SUB until 1985. But
after months of "typical vandalism
the company (that serviced and
stocked the machine) gave up and
ceased the operation," said physical
plant custodial superintendent
Peter Nault.
The condoms dispenser were
originally installed "as a public service because SUB has a lot of parties and social events," he said.
With health experts saying con
doms are the best preventative
measure against Aquired Immune
Deficiency syndrome, the use of
prophylactics is becoming more
popular than ever. The CBC and
the Province newspaper have
agreed to ads promoting condoms,
and convenience stores are selling
them for the first time. The introduction of condoms into schools
has recently become the focus of
debate.
Vancouver medical health officer
John Blatherwick said condoms
should be made as widely available
as possible.
And in North Vancouver, the
Capilano College Student Executive
voted unanimously on Feb. 5 to
support the installation of condom
dispensers in mens washrooms.
Capilano College communications  coordinator  Juliet  Pendray
called AIDS an epidemic, and
described the instalation of condom
machines as an "appropriate action
for any socially aware
organization."
A volunteer for AIDS Vancouver, who would only be referred
to as Gary, said "there should be a
demand for it (condoms) on campus. People are getting worried over
AIDS and rightfully so. I know
some religous groups are saying the
only safeguard is celibacy." But for
those who still want to engage in
sex," so far it (condoms) is the best
protection," he said.
AMS general manager Charles
Redden said: "We'd be prepared to
install them if there was a.demand.
We'd just have to make sure they
were better anchored to the wall
next time."
Board blocks student input
By SVETOZAR KONTIC
The Board of Governors is denying students input in its decision
making process by cancelling monthly board meetings, said a student
board representative Monday.
Doug Stewart said as a result of
the cancelled meetings, a smaller
committee of the board is making
decisions on university policy rather
than the full board.
"Student representatives aren't
there (at the executive meetings) so
there is no chance for our input.
Policies  should  be  debated  and
discussed since we are the representatives on the board," he said.
There are 15 members on the
board including two students. The
executive is comprised of the president of the university, the
chancellor, the chairman of the
board and several other chairs of
select committees.
If a board meeting is cancelled,
the executive must meet prior to the
next scheduled meeting.
Former student board representative Claudia Gilmartin said the executive  cannot take on  the role of
Support expected by Coalition for Accessible Education
A petition being circulated by the
Coalition for Accessible Education
is receiving favorable response from
students angry about high tuition
fees and poor university accessibility.
Coalition member Vanessa Geary
said public opinion is growing more
sympathetic to the plight of universities, and she is optimistic the petition can effect a change in the
government's education policies.
"The tide is turning — we have a
new government which is probably
more impressionable then the old
one," said Geary.
The group collected several hundred signatures yesterday and is
hoping to have 5,000 before the
provincial budget is announced at
the end of the month. They al>o
plan to solicit signatures off campus
because, "we want to show that the
whole community is concerned
about education," said Geary.
Although   "students  are  really
starting to feel the crunch," said
Geary, "they are reluctant to participate in public demonstrations."
"People        aren't into
demonstrating at UBC — that's
why we chose the petition," she
said. "It's probably more effective
than having people march
anyway.'
The   Coalition   for   Accesssible
Education  was  formed  after the
Board of Governors voted on
January 29 to raise tuition fees by
four per cent, and now has about
thirty regular members representing
a cross section of UBC students.
"It's a really non-partisan
organization — a big jumble of different people," said Geary, adding
that it is open to all students.
Tie group will be collecting
signatures every lunch hour in SUB
and throughout the university.
the board because it lacks across the
board representation.
"It is fine for the executive to
make decisions but if it is a common practice the executive must
have campus wide representation,"
she said.
Gilmartin said she feels strongly
that the board should have monthly
meetings and be coming out with
decisions as a whole.
"Even if there is one thing on the
agenda."
The March 1 board meeting has
been cancelled and Gilmartin
remembers two being cancelled during her term as representative.
"What was on the March agenda
would comfortably go on to the
April meeting agenda," said
Sauder.
Gilmartin said the explanation
usually given is that if there is not
enough information on the agenda
"to warrant bringing people from
downtown to UBC" then the
meeting should be cancelled.
Sauder said if an important
policy needed to be debated or
"thrashed out" the entire board
would meet. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 24, 1987
Carling O'keefe boycott upheld
MONTREAL (CUP) — An attempt to overturn a Concordia student council decision to boycott
O'Keefe products was narrowly
defeated recently.
The move came only three weeks
after the boycott was passed by the
council's board of directors.
"We have done O'Keefe an injustice by making them the first
target of our boycott," said director Jim Locke, who made the mo
tion.
Locke cited a United Nations
publication which lists companies
with interests in South Africa. Carling O'Keefe does not appear on the
list.
But council co-president Karen
Takacs was not convinced.
"This has all been debated
already and none of the information is new," she said. "O'Keefe
itself has admitted the potential ex
ists for funds to go to South Africa
from here."
Takacs also pointed out that
Statistics Canada lists the brewery
as being a South African-controlled
company.
Opponents of the boycott stressed that O'Keefe does not fit the
description of the original motion,
which relates to companies with
direct or indirect investment in
South Africa, or which support or
promote the regime.
O'Keefe does not have any
plants, employees or investments in
South Africa. The link is through
ownership in the company.
Rothmans Canada has a 50 per
cent stake in Carling O'Keefe.
Rothmans in turn is 71 per cent
owned by Rothmans International
PLC. The Rembrandt Group,
headed by South African
businessman Anthony Rupert, has
43 per cent of the voting sharesd in
Rothmans International PLC.
Proponents of the boycott say
this translates into control of
O'Keefe.
"The potential is there for Carling money to go to South Africa,"
said Lynn Calliste of Concordia
Students Against Apartheid. "We
have to make sure it doesn't."
The board voted in a 9 t 9 tie,
leaving the motion passed three
weeks ago intact.
5,000 rally against cutbacks
CALGARY (CUP) — In the
largest demonstration in the usually
quiet University of Calgary's
history, more than 5,000 people
railed recently against provincial
funding cuts to universities.
After chanting anti-cuts slogans
around the archway that spans the
main entrance to the university, a
crowd of undergraduates took to
the major roads adjoining the campus and brought traffic to a standstill.
The rally was the largest of three
separate Feb. 11 demonstrations.
Earlier about 30 Fine Arts students
protested the elimination of a
ceramics program by occupying a
corridor outside the office of the acting dean of Fine Arts.
Later, graduate students occupied the offices of the
University's vice-presidents to protest cuts to graduate programs, and
f-Wu """-' ""   "-"rr, T"*11
to say the University has not done
enough publicly to fight cuts.
While the demonstrations drew
heavy media coverage and praise
from some faculty and opposition
representatives, government officials say the three per cent cut in
provincial operating grants for
universities will stand.
Tom McLaren, executive assistant to Advanced Education
Minister Dave Russell, said that
while the protests are "understandable," his department is committed to the government's program to
reduce its deficit.
Two days before the demonstration, though, Russell said protests
may have some bearing in future
because "public opinion is an important barometer" for government.
The massive turnout for the
demonstration caught most people
p-imsi
M
APPLICATIONS NOW AVAILABLE
for
TWO STUDENT-AT-LARGE
REPRESENTATIVES TO
AMS BUDGET COMMITTEE
1987-88
and
POSITION OF EDITOR OF
INSIDE U.B.C.
APPLICATIONS DEADLINE
4 p.m. FRIDAY
MARCH 6
FORMS AVAILABLE
SUB 238
IF YOU CARE
ABOUT EYE
CARE, SEE US
Now in Point Grey
Fast, professional service to satisfy all
your Contact Lens and Eye Wear needs:
• Daily and extended wear
contact lenses
• Quality tinted lenses
• Wide selection of frames
• Student Rates:
20% off contact lenses
this store only
10th at Alma
3665 West 10th Avenue • Phone 736-5669
^___^__^_ also 6 other locations 	
— even organizers — by surprise.
"Holy shit," said Don Kozak, a
student council vice-president, as he
surveyed the growing crowd.
The crowd chanted such slogans
as "You've got the guts — fight the
cuts" and "Russell out, education
in."
Ooops!
In the Feb. 17 issue of The
Ubyssey, the phone number of the
Crisis Pregnancy Centre of Vancouver was listed incorrectly. The
centre's number is 731-1122.
GOT A PROBLEM?
NEED TO TALK?
SPEAKEASY
UBC's Peer Counselling Centre
Confidential Anonymous
Mon.-Fri.: 9:30 a.m.-9:30 p.m.
SUB CONCOURSE
228-3700
EXPLORATION^
UBC A^ OPEN HOUSE
March 6,7,8 1987
WE'RE HAVING A PARTY!
We've got company coming ... On March 6, 7 &
8, every faculty is opening its doors to welcome
the public for EXPLORATION '87, UBC's biggest
Open House ever!
Medieval food fair * Indoor windsurfing * Mock trials * Concerts
* Underwater bicycle races * Simulated earthquakes * Sideshow
cabaret * Beer gardens * Forum on AIDS * Skydiving *
Chemistry magic show * Film making * Debate with David
Suzuki, Allan Fotheringham and Earle Birney on the role of arts
in a high-tech society, and more . . . THREE FULL DAYS OF
FUN, EXPLORATION AND ENTERTAINMENT.
SO COME TO THE PARTY! JOIN IN THE UBC
SPIRIT! CONTACT YOUR STUDENT OR FACULTY   REPRESENTATIVE   FOR   MORE   DETAILS.
LET'S ALL MAKE IT A ROARING SUCCESS!
MARCH 6, 7 & 8 - 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. DAILY
Further Information: UBC Community Relations
228-3131 Tuesday, February 24, 1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
Federal budget fails students
OTTAWA (CUP) — The latest
budget brought down by federal
Finance Minister Michael Wilson
fails to address funding problems
for education and research, lobby
groups say.
In fact, the Canadian Association
of University Teachers says the
"one positive thing" to come from
Wilson's Feb. 18 announcement is
the elimination of import tariffs on
many English language books and
computer parts, among other
things.
We're happy with that," said
CAUT president Allan Sharp, "but
otherwise, it was pretty bleak."
The government imposed the
tariff last June in retaliation to an
American tax on Canadian cedar
shakes and shingles. Book
publishers are confidnt that an extensive postcard campaign, which
attracted an estimated 130,000
Canadians, was key to changing the
Cabinet's mind.
The budget contained no explicit
references to research or post-
secondary education. Sharp said
the Tories "missed the boat,
again" by not introducing long-
promised measures to aid research
in Canada.
"This was the year for them to
live up to their election promises,"
Sharp said, referring to the Conservatives' pledge to double Canada's
research and development performance.
"If they do anything next year,
it'll look like another pre-election
trick. It will be greeted with
cynicism," Sharp said.
However, he said CAUT and
other lobbyists are not prepared to
just wait for the government to
make improvements at its own
pace.
"Now is the time for increased
pressure, not the time to give up,"
Sharp said. "It's still not too late."
Todd Smith, executive officer of
Instructor defended
By ALLISON FELKER
Fired Cariboo College instructor
Allan McKinnon was the victim of
discrimination by a government-
controlled college board, McKinnon's lawyer said Thursday.
The college suspended McKinnon
after he criticized college and provincial government education
policies in letters to the Kamloops
News in 1985.
He was fired after sending a
memo to college faculty members
soliciting support against his
suspension.
Three other college faculty
members had publicly criticized
Cariboo as early as 1982, when the
government restraint program
began, but McKinnon alone was
disciplined, said his lawyer, Leo
McGrady.
McGrady recommended the
reinstatement of McKinnon at
Cariboo College and argued the
memo fell within the faculty
union's guidelines.
He said McKinnon was
guaranteed the right of free speech
under the Canadian Charter of
Rights and as an academic.
"The concept of academic
freedom at the college is so broad as
to enable instructors to criticize
their own institution," he said.
McGrady attacked both the
Social Credit government and its
appointees on the college board. He
criticized the board for its
"negativism and paranoia."
McGrady said McKinnon admits
some comments he made to the
press concerning the college were
"excessive."
"But the damage to the college
must be very great to deny someone
the freedom of expression," he
said.
Derogatory statements made by
college board members went undisciplined, McGrady said.
He cited one incident reported by
the press in which Janowsky had
called a student protest last year
"bullshit."
Arbitrator Donald Munroe is expected to come to a decision in
March.
the Canadian Federation of
Students, said CFS was neither
pleased nor surprised by Wilson's
budget.
"Quite frankly, there wasn't
anything in the budget for
students," Smith said, adding "but
we didn't expect any great news
from Michael Wilson."
Smith said the absence of any announcements about research or
education worries CFS. He said the
proposed forum on post-secondary
education, announced last October,
may be used by the government as a
catch-all for dealing with funding
problems.
"We are quite concerned that the
government is putting all of its eggs
in the national forum basket,"
Smith said.
"By golly, we're going to have to
get some significant dividends out
of this forum," Smith said.
Government restricts sex
By KAREN GRAM
Canadian University Press
Toronto journalist Varda
Burstyn says the federal government wants to eliminate sex, not
sexism, with its obscenity legislation.
Since December 1984, when the
government responded to Penthouse pictorial of bound and gagged Japanese women by giving
Canada Customs a freer reign to
restrict obscene material, the flow
of pornography has not slowed
Burstyn told a forum sponsored by
the B.C. Civil Liberties Association
Feb. 13.
Instead, there has been a
"systematic persecution of
feminists, gays and lesbians," said
Burstyn, editor of the book Women
Against Censorship.
Burstyn said men's magazines
objectify women such as Penthouse
or Hustler "that misogynist piece of
excrement"   —  usually  cross  the
border without problem. But anti-
porn, erotica, and gay and lesbian
literature get stopped.
"So what we see is women
displayed as sex objects, but we
can't see people making love," she
said.
Materials with the actual depiction of sexual activity, including intercourse, can be banned from
Canada under the category labelled
hardcore" by the customs.
To Burstyn, the main reason why
censorship shouldn't be applied to
sexual material is that sex is subjective — what some people see as
obscene, others see as erotic.
As an example of the subjectivity
of the censorship, Burstyn said that
a passage discribing consentual
sado/masochism in the Joy of Sex
is permitted, but a similar passage
in the Joy of Gay Sex is banned.
"It's selective repression on the
basis of what offends the people
Professors awarded
Students in the faculty of Arts will be awarding three Teaching Excellence awards this year.
Students will be nominating and seconding Arts professors for
awards in the areas of languages, humanities, and social sciences.
After the nomination due date of March 4, a committee consisting
of Arts Undergraduate Society representatives and two representatives from each Arts department will review the nominations,
monitor the classes of the nominees, and select the three winners.
"It's long overdue," said Carolyn Egan, Arts Undergraduate
Society president. "It's really important that deserving profs be
recognized, and arts students realize that. There's already been quite
a bit of student interest."
The winners will be announced in late March or early April. Each
will receive a certificate of recognition as a prize, and Egan said the
AUS is also hoping to engrave the names of the winners on a
teaching excellence plaque.
who are enforcing it," she said.
According to Burstyn, obscenity
legislation (Bill 30) introduced last
year by former justice critic John
Crosbie, would have worked
against feminist concerns because it
outlaws the presentation of natural
sexual functions and practises.
Although the legislation died on
the order paper after parliament
prorogued last fall, the government
is expected to introduce similar
legislation in the next session.
Among the sexual acts Bill 30
labelled obscene were: vaginal sex,
oral sex, anal sex, masturbation,
penetration by foreign objects such
as vibrators, lactation, menstruation and the depiction of anyone
who appears to be under the age of
18.
Burstyn said the government paid
lip service to feminists by including
a clause about violence against
women, but politicians had their
own agenda which intended to get
sex, not sexism, out of the public
realm.
"(The legislation) makes the
government look like it is responding to legitimate concerns about
the nature of women's representation but it backs off on women's
concerns that would give women
real power in society," she said.
Burstyn said she would be opposed to censorship even if all censors
were feminist women because there
would still be problems with determining what is objectionable. She
said society must work to change
i the conditions which cause the sexist images through a broad program
of  sex  education,   and  economic
■ equality for women and youth.
NORMAN TAIT CARVES model of canoe.
CARVING IS STARTING on a new Nishga canoe at the Museum of
Anthropology. The 22 meter cedar log will be transformed into a canoe by
Norman Tait and a team of five carvers. When launched in August the
canoe will travel to the Nass Valley and then be paddled along the coast to
California. The canoe, the largest of its kind, contrasts strongly with the
modern variety seen around the west coast.
MODERN MACHINE MADE aluminium canoe light but lacks asthetic quality. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 24, 1987
Sign'em
A few weeks ago The Ubyssey ran an editorial urging students to
take President Strangway at his word and cry out against the chronic
underfunding faced by our university.
Well, a handful of students were angry enough to circulate a petition that will enable the entire UBC population to tell the government
and the public how much B.C.'s post secondary institutions are hurting.
The petition calls for greater accessibility to universities, a halt to
excessive fee increases, and the reinstatement of the grant program.
The demands express the frustration of students paying the highest
fees in Canada while living in the only province without a grant program.
Perhaps if we voice our concerns loudly enough the provincial
government will listen and realise their priorities will change.
De&ar Editor:
I thinKk you ar some
kind of Communist. Where
J-m^™" do you get off
saying sexism,
^"racism, oppression and
war are Lad tan ds?
Students consider news coverage one-sided
Well, gay and lesbians week has
come and gone once again, and The
Ubyssey has jumped on the gay's
rights bandwagon as only The
Ubyssey could. Although this letter
will only be read by us and the person at the paper who will promptly
throw it out, we could not let the
Valentine's issue go by without a
few comments.
Firstly, the gay community of
UBC has the same right as any
other group of students — the right
to be treated fairly. We defend that
right as an integral part of any
democratic system. The Ubyssey is
not interested in a democratic
system however; it is too busy with
its crusade to abolish gay
discrimination to represent any
other interests on campus.
Gays are approached with the
reverence given to martyrs by the
writers of The Ubyssey. Their lives
are seen as one big struggle to endure the hardships our unfair
system places upon them. What
about our physically handicapped
or economically disadvantaged
students? We guess these are not
trendy enough issues to deserve
coverage in our "representative"
student newspaper.
We realize some people's
predispositions lead them to feel
gay sex is the most natural. We
respect their right not to be
discriminated against because of
this. But this does not change the
fact that the thought of gay sex is
foreign, repulsive, and contradictory to everything we know. Lines
on the front page letter of a
homosexual to his father do not
help us understand a gay person's
feelings because we never will. Nor
do we expect a gay to understand
heterosexual love. A gay person's
sexuality is an aspect of his personality that we do not need to
know to respect him as a human being.
It is this sexuality that The
Ubyssey continually reminds us is
what makes homosexuals so much
different from heterosexuals. The
more this difference is emphasized,
the more separation and discrimination will prevail between the two
groups.
We are not homophobics, we are
just sick of The Ubyssey trying to
"educate"   us.   If   The   Ubyssey
would stop taking such a one-sided
self-righteous view in their choice of
student news coverage, the paper
might end up being read and
respected by more than a small
minority of students.
Andre Cyr     Calvin Townsend
arts 2
Kevin Mason
commerce 2
Daryn Leas
arts 1
applied science 1
Iain Sutherland
science 3
Larry Rodney
arts 2
Bus Stop next to mom
My heart is broken to think that
the tradition (since 1927) of the Bus
Stop Cafe may come to an end.
When I was a student here years
ago, the discovery of the Bus Stop
was the best thing since going home
to mother.
I was so pleased, upon returning
to UBC, to find the Bus Stop still
here and  the ladies working  here
Bus Stop cafeteria faces possible demolition
We're sitting at our usual bay in
the Bus Stop, the oldest coffee shop
on campus, where we've sat
religiously two times a day, nearly
every day since arriving at UBC a
year and a half ago. Here we've
been able to relax, away from the
pressures of student life for the
duration of one or two cups of coffee or a cinnamon bun.
Here life is easy; Doris, Delia or
one of the other waitresses has a full
cup waiting for us as we sit down,
and is always willing to lend a
friendly ear or give a piece of
motherly advice. In short, the Bus
Stop has been for us and many
others a home away from home.
Now we learn that our favourite
haunt is slated for demolition, to
clear the way for the building of a
new multi-million dollar library. To
our knowledge the plans for this
library have been in the works for
few years but only recently have the
funds been raised. We are certainly
not against the building of the new
library in such a central location. At
the same time, we do not want to
lose the unique atmosphere of the
Bus Stop.
The original Bus Stop was exactly
that. In the first days of the university the bus route ended at what is
now Main Mall, between the
Chemistry building and the Bus
Stop. At that time, the small
building contained a counter selling
coffee and doughnuts. In the early
1950's, it was replaced by the current arrangement of waitress-served
tables and counters.
Many of the ladies have worked
there for twenty years, and one of
them can even recall the last days of
the original building. During this
time they have seen a lot of faces
come and go. Many who have gone
return to visit, chat and renew old
acquaintances. It would be a pity
for both past and future customers
to lose this place to relax.
Although the new library is inevitable, does it have to imply the
death of the Bus Stop? Couldn't the
plans include a space to ensure that
the character of the old Bus Stop remains alive?
Can the university afford to lose
a place of such historical and sentimental significance? If you feel as
strongly about this as we do, please
write to:
Miss Shirley Louie
Business Manager
Food Services
Ponderosa Building, UBC
Write soon because the money
raised has to be used by the end of
this year and demolition of the Bus
Stop will occur this summer.
Andrew Clase
Alexis Smith
science
still as wonderful as ever. If you are
lonely or feeling blue, having coffee
in the Bus Stop is a sure cure
because there is always a smile and
sympathetic ear from the
waitresses.
Just watching the pinched faces
of stressed out students cheer up is a
wonder to behold. If there was an
award for the best waitresses in the
world, these ladies would get it.
When you mother is 1,000 km away
and long distance bills too high, you
can still go to the Bus Stop.
There is a petition to be signed in
The Bus Stop Cafe to bring it to the
attention of the Administration that
not everyone is in agreement about
the demise of a terrific tradition.
Please, if you feel as I do, make a
point of going there to sign it.
Thank you.
Cheryl Fieguth
philosophy
Student favors capital punishment
THE UBYSSEY
February 24, 1987
The Ubyssey is published" Tuesday and Friday
throughout the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and are not necessarily those
of the administration or the AMS. Member Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is SUB
241k.  Editorial 228-2301/2305.  Advertising 228-3977
To the amazement of Mary McAlister and Chew Wong, while lan Robertson and Kevin Adams were
discussing the psychic abilities of Dan Andrews and Sarah Chesterman, a UFC gently landed on the
front lawn. "My Godl" cried Steve Chan, "And there's no film in the cameral" "That's okay," Allison
Felker said, "it's probably just a hoax anyhow." Soon the hatch opened causing Evelyn Jacob and
Karen Gram to faint and Michael Groberman and Rick Hiebert to be dumbfounded by shock. As Angie
Norman rushed out to administer first aid a creature stepped out of the space ship and said (in a
monotone), "I am Jenni Mott from the North-West Quadrant of the planet Mars. I come in peace,
searching for the source of David Ferman's Mother's carrot cake!" Inside Sailen Black exclaimed,
"You've got to see this guys." And, as everyone else rushed outside, Jennifer Lyall stayed behind saying, "Let me type one more word first." Svetozar Kontic, and several others, quietly sneaked on board
the extra-terrestrial's ship so that Malcolm Pearson could try his hand at programming polar-
coordinates. Neil Philip asked "What's this button for?" and they soon blasted off. As Stephen In-
gvaldson took control and flew the UFO into the dark void of space, Betsy Goldberg cried out, "May
the Force be with you!" 	
In a recent Ubyssey editorial, the
issue of reinstating capital punishment was commented on from the
opinion that it should not be
reinstated. As a supporter of the
reinstatement of capital punishment, I felt obligated to express my
views on the arguments against
reinstating it.
The most common reasons I hear
for not reinstating capital punishment are those of deterrent and
economics. In view of the statistical
evidence indicating that capital
punishment is not a deterrent, I
quite agree. However, if I intended
to murder someone, that last thing I
would expect to happen is that I
would get caught.
Secondly, even though it costs in
the area of $40,000 a year to keep a
criminal in jail, it is apparently
more expensive to reinstate capital
punishment. I'll grant that point
even though I don't understand
how even the electricity bill for the
electric chair could cost more than
keeping someone in prison for 15
years. In my view, both points are
relatively inconsequential considering that a life has been taken.
My argument for the reinstatement of capital punishment concerns a crime far too common after
a murderer has been caught, con
victed, and served his time — repeat
of crime.
Far too often, while glancing
through the paper I come across
another case of a released murderer
with a long history of violent crime,
who has been caught after killing
another innocent victim. Capital
punishment may not be a deterrent,
save money, or bring back the victims, but it will prevent murderers
from repeating their crime(s) —
that I guarantee.
If you wish to debate the right of
society to condemn someone to
death, then I leave myself open to
criticism. I can only argue that
society has more right to condemn
someone, than the murderer had
the right to take an innocent
victim's life.
By deliberately killing someone,
an individual demonstrates an inability to live in society, and has
given up the right to life.
Michael Glenister
science 2
Hansen fundraising planned
In honor of Rick Hansen's Man
In Motion Tour, a week of fundraising and educational
demonstrations is currently being
planned for March. The week is
scheduled to run March 23rd to
March 28th.
During this week several fundraising events are to take place.
One of the committee's objectives is
to involve the entire university community. Clubs, faculties, staff, and
athletic teams are encouraged to actively take part in some form of
fundraising, whether it takes place
during Rick Hansen Week or prior
to it.
It is hoped that all donations will
be pooled together and presented to
Rick on behalf of UBC. If fundraising has already occurred, it is
desired that groups hold on to their
contributions and add them to the
pooled UBC sum.
Each group's contribution will be
recorded on a list, which will be
presented with the one total cheque;
therefore, the efforts of each group
and their event will be equally
rewarded.
If your group wishes to be placed
on the week's calender of events or
if any group or individuals wish to
volunteer their time, please contact
myself at 228-4183 or Bruce Paisley
at 228-5336.
Brent Lymer
Rick Hansen Committee Tuesday, February 24, 1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Political and educational priorities confused
By JENNIFER LYALL
The provincial government
doesn't share the academic community's interests and that could
create problems for post secondary
education in B.C.
The recently announced
dismantling of the Universities
Council of B.C. is just one more indication of the trend towards involving politicians and government
appointees more directly in determining education's priorities.
The Universities Council was introduced to protect post secondary
education from political interference but recently has succeeded only in the disrupting dialogue
between universities and governments.
It has been stripped of the power
to carry out its original responsibilities, which included dispersing
provincial universities funding between the three B.C. universities,
helping determine university
budgets, and representing the
universities to the ministry. Instead,
the Universities Council has become
an advisory board.
For these reasons Stan Hagen,
the minister of advanced education
and job training, was clearly
justified in disbanding the council.
Nevertheless, his decision raises the
important question of what role
government should play in post
Lifittsrs
Puzzling
Well, well, well. Another Valentine's Day, another Gay and Lesbian issue of The Ubyssey. But
wait! Science week is long over and
I can't recall a Science issue.
You have said in the past that you
produce such issues because that
specific group — gays and lesbians — feels pressured by a particularly homophobic society and
that the group wishes to inform the
public of such matters. Let me ask
you two questions:
1) When was the last time the
New York Times (an apparently
reputable and worldly newspaper)
published an issue totally devoted
to the plight of Jews (or any other
group which considers itself a collective victim of discrimination)?
2) When will you address the
feelings of those in the general
populace at UBC who feel intimidated by the fact that their
newspaper (sponsored by the student union) is run by a group of
biased, "homophobic-phobic" individuals?
Open-minded but puzzled,
Bruce Arnold
science 3
THE UNIVERSITY
OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
presents
THE
WINTER'S
TALE
by William Shakespeare
MARCH 4-14
Special Previews
March 4 & 5
2 for the price of 1
regular admission
Matinees—March 10 & 12
at 12:30 p.m.
Curtain: 8 p.m.
Box Office * Frederic Wood Theatre * Room 207
Support Your Campus Theatre     I
secondary education.
The Universities Council was
established in 1974 to keep the
government out of decisions of how
university funding should be divid-
ed: the government was to provide
the money and the council was to
disperse it.
It was recognized at the time that
making dispersal of funds a direct
responsibility of the ministry meant
leaving open the possibility that
money would be allocated with the
best interests of the government,
but not necessarily of the universities, in mind. This is precisely the
danger we face today.
The passing of the Universities
Council represents more than the
elimination of an obsolete institution. It is an indication of the provincial government's attitude toward post secondary education: it
does not understand the importance
of university autonomy to the
preservation of academic integrity.
Political interference in post
secondary education is manifesting
itself in many ways.
Projects receiving grants from
the Funds for Excellence must first
be approved by the ministry of advanced education and job training,
which appears to give preference to
those projects with the most immediate positive impact on the
economy.
The government's emphasis on
education as an economic stimulus
and as preparation for a future
career has its merits, but it runs
contrary to many academic
priorities. Education must be
valued for its intrinsic merit and not
subject to outside priorities of constantly changing governments.
There is cause for alarm when
college boards are made up entirely
of government appointees and the
Ministry of Post-secondary Education changes its name to the
Ministry of Advanced Education
and Job Training.
Academic integrity is beiisg
sacrificed to Social Credit politics.
Jennifer Lyall is a Ubyssey staffer
who loves the philosophy of education but prefers Swedish fish farming.
FOR DELICIOUS
SANDWICHES
with Daily Specials
Also
SOUP
SALADS
PIES & PASTRIES
IN SUB LOWER LEVEL
Open daily 7:30 a.m. 5:30 p.
LSAT/GMAT/GRE
EXAM TRAINING
Taught by Professionals and Educators
Application Essay Assistance
Local Offices & Staff
Lecture Format • Practice Tests
Tape Library • Low Tuition
Weekend Courses (Fri. evening, all Sat. & Sun.)
B.C. & Yukon
(604) 684-4411
ALBERTA
(403) 278-6070
-Sexton
Educational Centers
414-1200 Burrard, Vancouver
*>.
[GRADUATION,
TOU COULUBEGIN USING
i THE AMERICAN EXPRESS CARD
If you're graduating this year and you've
■ accepted career-oriented employment
at an annual salary of $10,000 or more
and have a clean credit record, you can get
the American Express Card.
That's it. No strings. No gimmicks.
(And even if you don't have a job right now,
don't worry. This offer is still
good up to 12 months after you
graduate.)
Why is American Express
making it easier for you to
get the Card right now7 Well,
simply stated, we recognize
your achievement and we
believe in your future. And as you go up the
ladder, we can help-in a lot of ways.
The Card can help you begin to establish
a credit reference. And, for business, the
Card is invaluable for travel and restaurants.
As well as shopping for yourself.
Of course, the American Express Card
is recognized around the world.
So you are too.
So call 1-800-387-9666 and
ask to have a Special Student
Application sent to you. Or look
for one on campus.
The American Express Card.
Don't leave school without it™
American Express Canada. Inc is a registered user of the trade marks owned by American Express Company 'CCopynght American Express Canada, Inc 1986. All Rights Reserved Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 24, 1987
Cruise missile flies through Alberta flatlands
By CHRIS FRASER
The cruise missile will be tested in
Northern Alberta today, despite
considerable public outcry and
technological developments which
will undeniably give the weapon the
capability to initiate a first strike.
During a recent campus visit,
Federal Defense Minister Perrin
Beatty was quoted by The Ubyssey
as saying:
"I believe that NATO is wise to
have (the) cruise missile(s) ... It's
very much a second strike device;
it's not a first strike device because
it's so slow. If I were to initiate a
nuclear war, I'd be much more likely to use ICBMs than cruise
missiles." He added that Canada's
continued testing of the cruise was
necessary because of our NATO
obligations.
While his absurd thoughts of
possibly "initiating a nuclear war"
don't even merit consideration, Mr.
Beatty's flawed, simplistic, and
pathetically shortsighted assessment
of the cruise missile's strategic implications cannot stand uncorrected:
(1) Despite the cruise's extremely
small size, unprecedented accuracy,
and ability to elude radar detection,
U.S. and (in true knee-jerk fashion)
Canadian defense officials have insisted that it is only a second strike
weapon because it flies "slowly."
This may be a fair characterization of present generation ground-
launched cruise missiles (GLCM)
situated far from Soviet targets, but
it is clearly a spurious argument
when applied to the mobile air-
launched (ALCM) and submarine-
launched (SLCM) varieties, which
can be launched anywhere.
More importantly, the next
generation of cruises, which could
be deployed within the next five
years, will be designed to fly at
supersonic speeds, be equipped with
(and flown in bombers having) the
latest "Stealth" radar avoidance
technology. These modifications
will make it impossible for anyone
with a rational mind to persevere in
the claim that the cruise is a
"slow," second strike device.
(2) The cruise missile has
dramatically increased instability in
U.S.-Soviet relations, and can lead
to unconstructive positions at their
arms control negotiations. Its
minute size creates verification problems, with the SLCM having been
described as "defying limitation"
by prominent arms control experts.
Consequently, progress towards
bilateral treaties has been much
more difficult.
Rhetoric aside, the Soviets view
the cruise as a first strike threat,
and have responded predictably
with renewed efforts at cruise
development after abandoning their
research into this area in the 70s
(not even the most rabid Pentagon
hawks can refer to the Soviet cruise
capability without chuckling
aloud).    Suddenly   the   world   is
I
Price
is Right
Hair Design Ltd.
STUDENT CARD
I
2
• 00
OFF
Original Price of Cut
(with this coupon)
We appreciate your
business and want to
give you $2.00 off your
next hair cut.
Open 7 days a week
Sundays 12:00-5:00 p.m.
3621 West 4th Ave.
733-3831
witnessing the genesis of yet
another arms race.
This "cruise race" will likely, if
continued, necessitate Canadian involvement in an air defense buildup.  As John Lamb noted at the
ffreesfylej
widely publicized "True North
Strong and Free" conference in Edmonton last November, arms control postures of both the Soviets
and Americans mainly involving
"Star Wars" and ballistic missiles
will, in the future, push ALCMs
and  SLCMs  to  the  forefront  of
strategic planning.
This makes Soviet cruise missile
attacks via the Arctic a scenario
which will have to be prepared for
more seriously than at present.
Because of the threat to Canadian
security entailed in this scenario, it
is in our interest (and more generally in the "global" interest) to insist
on ALCM deployment limits, a
mutual superpower ban on SLCM
deployment, and a mutual ban on
development of more sophisticated
cruise generations. In addition,
Canada's testing of the cruise must
cease as soon as the current agreement expires.
(3) In no way at all do Canada's
NATO obligations extend to the
testing or deployment of nuciear
weapons or their delivery systems.
A case in point is Norway, which
has chosen a non-nuclear NATO
role. Similarly, Canada could make
a non-nuclear NATO contribution,
such as the establishment of a
surveillance system for the Arctic
which could monitor Soviet (and
American!!) submarine activity.
(4) The SALT II treaty was the
only limit on U.S. and Soviet
ALCMs    until   the   U.S.    began
disregarding it altogether last
November (in the facr of
frequently-alleged but never-
verified Soviet violations). There
are now no negotiated limits on this
destablising weapon.
Canada must insist — in much
stronger terms than the Conservatives have been willing to use —
on U.S. compliance with SALT II
ceilings on all weapon categories.
Chris Fraser is a medical student
who writes for The Ubyssey when
he is pissed off or wants free tickets.
$
ISRAEL WEEK
(March 3-6)
offers you a
FREE TRIP TO ISRAEL
That's right! Enter and win the ISRAEL TRIVIA
QUIZ and you can win a FREE round trip ticket to
Israel this summer.
For more details and eligibility requirements, call 224-4748.
Israel Week is sponsored by HILLEL and THE ISRAEL
ALIYAH CENTRE.
**************************
{ NEW YORK SELTZER presents *
PUNCHLINES!!
FREE COMEDY
WITH MIKE CLIFF
TOMORROW - WEDNESDAY
FEBRUARY 25th-12:30 p.m.
SUB AUDITORIUM - FREE
WIN $$$$$
*
¥
* * *********** * ** * *********
FOURTIMESAWEEK
WE TOUR THE HOMES
OFTHE STARS.
CHRISTCHURCH $67750*
v "m%Vi,,
AUCKLAND $643.50*      '
ADELAIDE $793.00*
,<YJ""°*
WELLINGTON $670.50*
PERTH $847.50*
SYDNEY/MELBOURNE/BRISBANE $711.50*
* **U #T«     \  ^
FIJI $538.00*
Welcome to Continental's South Pacific. Welcome to the home of
the stars, skyscraping palms and sunswept beaches.Welcome to shining
cities, breathtaking country and some of the warmest people you'll
meet anywhere.
If you think that sounds kind of easy to handle, you're going to like
the sounds of this even better.
Continental Airlines flies to paradise with up to 5 flights weekly
(that's more than any other airline). And only Continental offers you its
now legendary Pub in the Sky on every flight. So what are you waiting for?
Give Continental Airlines a call and tell 'em vou want to hang out
with the stars. 800-525-0280 800-231-0856.
^CONTINENTAL AIRLINES
Proof that man was meant to fly.
141 Cities • li.S." Mexico • Canada • South Pacific • Micronesia • Hawaii • The Far Mast • Fngland
Certain advance booking requirements and restrictions apply. Fares apply for departures from April through November. Prices subject to change without uotirt.
'One way costs based on round trip purchase. Tuesday, February 24, 1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Translator builds up Moliere
dr-*,i'f
CfT.\
"Sometimes a joke cannot be
translated, so you have to find one
in English. Maybe on a completely
different subject," explains UBC
French student Stefan Winfield.
Winfield, who is 23 and currently
tidying up the end of a BA, is the
translator of the Moliere one-act
play Les Precieuses Ridicules (or
Real Women don't do Vogue),
which opens tomorrow at noon for
a three-day run at UBC's Dorothy
Somerset Studio.
Winfield has been an actor since
childhood, creating the role of
Michael in Metro Theatre's Peter
Pan, and spending two season, in
the mid-seventies, as a regular on
The Beachcombers.
"It was fun," he says, "but I was
too young to appreciate what was
happening. And let's face it, the
scripts are not masterpieces."
With this production of his own
script, it would appear that he is
putting his money, or at least his
opinion, where his mouth is.
Winfield says he loves the task of
translating, finding it an enormous
challenge, especially with a seventeenth century play. "You have a
seventeenth century play, speaking
to a seventeenth century society.
By MICHAEL GROBERMAN
There's more to the art of
j translation than finding an English
i equivalent for "au revoir."
(interview
| With Stefan Winfield
j Translator of
Les Precieuses Ridicules
| (or Real Women don't do Vogue)
By Moliere
Dorothy Somerset Studio
UBC Theatre Building
February 25-27
j At noon, free admission
And when it's a whole seventeenth century play you're moving
jfrom French to English, being a bit
jof a playwright yourself is rather
[handy.
#iV.
*V-\-FV;*-.-V.*4S*
£* .*."■
•    ,'mmZm*i*S4lt*mi-Zt-y       '    . J^£_ ^U^--_*_ >■ ■■'li^^t/: .... -Wm
i-tainment comedy
.i *
fi*» -.'
Wrr. ::m
V* *♦ *. * .-** "^ '
Vi
:i
-   r
4
m
» (± TJJL-      JI
By SAILEN BLACK
Neill Gladwin and Stephen
Kearney are Los Trios Ringbarkus.
They began in Australia in 1979,
and have since carried their self-
described "anti-tainment" to
critical appreciation in various
European and Canadian cities.
interview
with Los Trios Ringbarkus,
"new vaudville" performers
Neill Gladwin and Stephen Kearney
performing at
New York Theatre
February 24 - 28
An interview:
The   Ubyssey:   Your   show   has
j been billed as "A must see for the
culturally exhausted".  What does
I that mean?
Stephen   Kearney:   That   came
j from a Toronto review. I think it
means that our approach to theatre
lis   not necessarily innovative but
[ quite fresh and aggressive.
NeiJI Gladwin: We tend to send
a lot of the forms of theatre. .
.not   through
satire  but   by
direct   sarcasm   or
way  of these  two
characters that are the antithesis of
entertainment.
TU: You've said that kids get into
your show but it's also "Freudian."
Kearney: It's true kids get into
the show because we work on an innocent and naive level. . .if a kid
yells out during the show, we just
talk back to them, and they get a
real kick out of that. They don't
know the rules of theatre, so they're
more likely to do that sort of stuff.
Kids have fun in an airport, so imagine when they get into a theatre. .
Gladwin: The show is fun, but
people who try to read
psychoanalysis into it also see a
point of view. It does have a point
to it and it is entertainment.
Kearney: People read a lot into it.
. .we operate on a very facile level
to some people but
Gladwin: . . .we've read Susan
Sontag as well, so there.
Kearney: . . .You can't say "it's
Gust) a Mums and Dads show" but
TU: It can be —
How do you translate those ideas to
a twentieth century audience?"
Although exact translatations for
a specific word are usually possible,
sometimes they are inadequate, he
says. "One translation is to the
rarely used English word 'canion.'
Even if you're doing a period show,
it's not going to have the same impact."
And impact, according to Winfield, is the key to good translation.
"A good translation communicates
the same general ideas of the
original. If this is a good translation," he says, referring to his
script, "it attacks the affectations
of society with the same force as the
original."
"And if the original makes you
laugh 99 times, I'll make you laugh
99 times. But I might make up a
joke where none existed before, to
make up for a joke that didn't
work."
When he originally translated the
play last year, for a French class, he
tried to keep it in the seventeenth
century. "I tried to keep the flavor
of the period," he says.
But the play's director, MFA student Bruce Dow, decided Winfield
should bring the play completely up
to date. "And he is the director
after all," says Winfield.
So all of the flavorful seventeenth
century stuff has been changed.
This play production is set today.
"Instead of a reference to a novel
called Clelie, a popular seventeenth
century novel which everyone was
reading if they were going to be in
at all, we mention Hollywood
Wives."
He does not consider these
changes damaging, or disrespectful
to the text.
"It's a false respect to keep the
references intact. You're fooling
yourself, because you're changing
so many things anyway."
"You're   tearing   down   the
house," he says, as a metaphor for
translation, "and your talent as the
translator, as a writer, is to build it 1
up again in your own language."
I
GLADWIN AND KEARNEY. . .keeps on anti-taining
Kearney: — Because there's no
swearing.
Gladwin: There is a bit of phallic
suggestion
Kearney: Kids do that. I can
remember playing with my willy. .
.last night.
Gladwin: Who's Willy?
TU: What do you dislike most
about interviews?
Kearney: Our first tour was
through New Zealand, and that's
when we hit two days of interviews:
going to a radio station and talking
to a Radio Personality. That was
the first time it hit me that we actually had to be nice to these people
that we don't even like, and be
chatty and cheery. . .
you
TU:  What references could
make to yourselves?
Gladwin: Want a buzzline?
Kearney : We make up
buzzlines. We say "the press have
called us a cross between Laurel &
Hardy and the Beatsie Boys." but
they haven't, we just made it up.
Gladwin: Just because we're intellectual art bullshit wankers.
Kearney: You can use that as a
heading.
TU: In your show, do you comment on North American culture?
Kearney: On the improv things,
we'll go towards what we've seen
and our personal views on the
culture come out. . .
Stylized and physical,
goofy comedian likes to do things his own wayl
>v.
u.«
By RICK HIEBERT
"I'm not a political person. I just
like to be goofy," says comedian
Marty Pollio, the feature performer
in Thursday's UBC Comedy
Special.
The program stars Pollio and
Canadian comedian Dave Cameron
and is being hosted by Punchlines
comic Barry Kennedy.
Pollio is looking forward to coming back to Vancouver to perform.
He performed at Expo and says he
"loves" Vancouver.
"I don't usually say this, but I
feel like I could live there (Vancouver).    It   has   the   best   of
everything."
Marty Pollio, who studied to be a
interview
with Marty Pollio
A comedian performing in
UBC Comedy Special
SUB Ballroom
February 26
electrician before being bitten by
the show business bug, started performing as an actor.
"I started acting when I was 20,
then I started working as a mime
and juggler. I wanted to make a
name for myself," Pollio says.
"I started doing stand up comedy
to make my act a little more casual
and relaxed — give myself a
character."
He says he feels his ability to juggle and perform mime adds a
physical dimension to his comedy.
"You don't really see too many
comedians in comedian clubs doing
mime and juggling. Some people
are snotty about it, thinking that
stand up comedy is pure, that it's
the only way to go, but I disagree."
He added, "I know that what I'm
doing is very physical, stylized, my
own way of doing things. It makes
me stand out."
Pollio says he enjoys college performances. "I've worked in bars, in
strip joints between acts, so I've
had the worst audiences there are.
Anything else is a piece of cake."
He wants to get back into acting
eventually, adding he is in a couple
of plays around Los Angeles and
that he has some projects on the
"back burner." He is also in-1
terested in writing comedy. Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 24, 1987
Mad maids massacre madame
By SARAH CHESTERMAN
Twentieth century French
playwright Jean Genet said that
"the perfect work of art makes the
devil God?' ... his play The
Maids, as performed at Kits House
last week by UBC students, was not
strong enough to succeed after
Genet's definition.
stage
The Maids
By Jean Genet
Directed by Klaus Strassmann
Kite House
February 17-22
Certainly it was disturbing. When
The Maids opens, the ritual has
begun: .Madame's two maids,
Claire and Solange (sisters) have
already donned their vestments for
the "ceremony" we soon realize
takes place every night: their impersonation of Madame in front of the
orchid-laden vanity table (the
"altar").
the final planned act of violence:
their murder of Madame. The actors — Claire as Madame, Solange
as Claire — play out their inner
frustrations, revealing their love-
hate feelings for their employer.
Claire as Madame exercises her
fullest power over her
"worshipper", making her stoop,
cringe, finally kicking her head;
Claire as the maid explores the
limits of her maidly debasement,
evoking the odors of a belching sink
and the nightly visits of the
milkman.
Three times the ritual is performed, once interrupted by the entrance
of Madame herself, each time the
tempo increasing and the words
becoming a litany of hatred and
religious perversion — and sexual
frenzy:
Solange, to Claire's "Madame":
I'm ready — I'm tired of being an
object of disgust. I hate you, too. I
despise you. I hate your scented
bosom, your ivory bosom! Your
golden thighs! Your amber feet. I
hate you.
The sexual connotations and
therefore yearning for possession
From there, they move towards
iri«i«iiiit«»iiiiiitnntmi.mn
•  ROLE PLAYING GAMES
•  COLLECTORS COMIC BOOKS
AND MORE . . .
GolcfetjAge Collectdbles
830 Granville St. Mall ^5\ Alma St.
Phone 683-2819 Phone 222-2141
4**-m*w*m-wm-r-ri *********** WK*m*-m***S
and liberation are in the language.
But this was only lightly suggested
in UBC's production, as was the intense cruelty of the play. Director
Klaus Strassmann gave us a more
toned-down version.
The ritualistic aspect of the play
(of which the perversion of the
Christian white mass is obviously in
the script: the vanity table as
"altar", the incantatory language
recalling that of the Christian communion; and in the end the suicide
of Claire who drinks the poisoned
tea intended for Madame) was
downplayed.
Instead, the UBC playes went for
a more "human", controlled approach, which lost some of the
rhythm while gaining in acceptibili-
ty and humour.
More chances should have been
taken, less holding back. The three
actors — Sarah Rodgers as Claire,
Pam Dangelmaier as Solange,
Kathleen Measures as Madame —
all had their powerful moments
even if they didn't quite enter the
obsessional, violent, dreamlike
rhythm of Jean Genet to reach their
apotheosis. Genet would probably
have liked it more "demonic" —
demanding, admittedly, on both ac
tors and audience.
Chris Plunkett's ornate set,
however, captured the heavy
decadence that hung stiflingly in the
air.
Performing this difficult play is
demanding. UBC students took the
plunge, and it looks like we're set
for more: this new collaboration of
UBC players with Kits House
Theatre (7th and Vine) is an off-
campus venture whereby actors and
directors can showcase their skills
with unusual new plays. So here's
to them. Interesting to see what
they come up with next . . .
10% OFF
UBC STUDENTS
ONLY
12 Exp   $4.95
24 Exp     8.95
36 Exp    13.95
C-41 Process "Glossy"
RUSHANT
CAMERAS
4538 W. 10th Ave.
224-5858
Outside Gates
1 Ms. SANDY WILSON |
I Writer-Director of "My American Cousin"   |
| WILL DISCUSS |
|       "Grace Under Pressure" |
1 —women in the film industry |
| TUES., FEBRUARY 24th, 1987 |
| 12:30-1:30 p.m. |
| BUCHANAN A 102 f
= Sponsored by the Office for Women Students =
S with tbe support of =
= The Leon and Thea Koerner Foundation. =
IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIH
<#
pirns)     NOMINATIONS    pms|
NOW
OPEN FOR
APPOINTMENTS TO
Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre
Management Board
Aquatic Centre Management Board
and
Student Representatives on the following Presidential Advisory Committees:
Child Care Services
Concerns of the Handicapped
Food Services Advisory
International House Board
of Directors
Land Use Committee
Men's Athletics
Safety, Security &
Fire Prevention
Student Placement
Student Services
Student Union Building
Traffic & Parking
United Way Campaign
Walter H. Gage Memorial
War Memorial Gym Fund
Women's Athletics
Youth Employment Program
Nominations Close
4 p.m. Friday
March 6
1 position
1 position
3 positions
1 position
1 position
3 positions
1 position
1 position
2 positions
1 position
4 positions
1 position
1 position
1 position
1 position
1 position
Applications
Available
SUB Rm 238
Save with Greyhound's
new Frequent Traveller
BONUS TICKET BOOK
Now! Greyhound travellers who travel frequently between any two
cities or towns can get 25% more with Greyhound's Special Bonus
Ticket Book. Ten rides for the price of eight.
Your choice, use in either direction whether travelling alone
or as a group.
Convenient savings for business commuters, college students,
or anyone who makes frequent trips to the same destination
and likes to save!
For more information, call Greyhound today.
Greyhound
Canada♦
We drive, you save — with us, the bus. Tuesday, February 24, 1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
■^^^sy
±m^tmjimmmmrtt£Mrm**mM
Sr-.rg-"';-.'SS."-;:
Students needed to guide at Open House
For three days at the beginning of
March, UBC is inviting the public
onto the campus for a giant party.
We've had Open House before, but
it's been eight years since there last
was one that involved the whole
campus, and amazing things are in
the works — simulated earthquakes, an underwater bicycle race,
Chinese lion dances, hot air balloon
rides . . . hundreds of events.
A hundred thousand visitors are
expected to tour the campus and its
attractions, and student volunteers
are needed to welcome the visitors
and   help   them   find   their   way
around. All UBC students can be
guides — even those who've only
been here a few months.
There are two really good reasons
you should consider signing up:
first, it'll be fun — showing all the
visitors a good time.
The second good reason is that
popular support for education, in
particular for universities, is the
basis of government support for
education; and if you've ever had
to sit on the floor in an overcrowded class, or been unable to get a
course "not offered 1986-87", you
can figure out what that means. It
may sound a little ditsy to have hot
air balloon rides in the cause of
higher education, but a hundred
thousand people who feel some
warmth for the university are a
powerful political force.
The work is light: the minimum
commitment is a two-hour training
session (with refreshments, of
course) to familiarize hosts with the
events and the special arrangements, and one three-and-a-
half hour shift. Actually, we'll
spend almost as much time
celebrating as "hosting"; plans are
already underway for a thank-you
Jews fight to leave USSR
The Soviet Union has recently
shown a marked change in allowing
its own citizens the right to leave
their own country.
Some people, including Soviet
Jews, just don't like living in the
Soviet Union. But it would seem
that the recent increase in Jewish
immigration is due not to a flood of
liberal humanitarianism taking hold
in the Soviet Union, but instead to
the persistant pressure which the
west has brought in publicizing the
plight of Soviet Jews.
Jews  in  the  Soviet   Union  are
persecuted, denied entry to universities, arrested on false charges and
tortured in Soviet prisons.
We should be encouraged by the
recent success in emigration and
have it spur us on to greater belief
in the power of public opinion.
Emigration could end tomorrow.
We must remain vigilant and continue the pressure. On February 26,
meet at Robson Street entrance,
Old Courthouse/Art Gallery, in a
roll call of Soviet Jews. The
Blekhers, a Vancouver family
waiting for their three chldren who
HAWAIIAN
SHIRT NIGHT
THURSDAY,
February 26
BEST SHIRT CONTEST"
Big Prize for the Winner!
—Juke Box Music—
JERRY'S COVE Neighborhood Pub
3681 West 4th Ave. 734-1205
a Musical Comedy
by A.M. Collins & Chad Henry
ON STAGE FROM FEB. 25
STUDENTS % PRICE
ARTS CLUB REVUE THEATRE
GRANVILLE ISLAND BOX OFFICE 687-1644
have been refused emigration will
be participating.
And during Israel Week, come to
SUB Main Concourse at 12:30 to
sign a petition in support of the
Blekher family.
Janna Stark
Jewish Students' Network
arts 4
OPEN EARLY.
OPEN LATE.
kinko's business day starts early
and ends late so we're here when
you need us most—before an early
morning class or business
appointment, after an evening
meeting or seminar, and even on
Saturdays and Sundays.
Come by and see us. No
"Closed, Come By Again" signs
when you have a job for kinko's.
kinko's
CiRt.AT COPIESCiRLATIM OPl.l
5706 Universin Blvd.
222-1688
MTH 8-9 F 8-6 Sat 10-6 Sun 11-6
-#    i%   Wx   J&
HONG KONG
CHINESE FOODS
-«*-..
featuring daily
lunch special for
ONL Y
$Q.25
+ tax
A11 food prepared
within our premises
are "MSG" free
OPEN HOURS:
Mon.-Fri.     11:00 a.m.-10:00 p.m.
Sat.. Sun. & Holidays  4:00-9 p.m.
5732 University Blvd.
(in The Village)
v      Phone: 224-1313      .
party for the volunteers.
In addition to student guides,
we're also looking for students with
Class 4 licences, to drive the shuttle
busses around the campus and to
the parking lots. Drivers are really
necessary to this project, so every
volunteer with a Class 4 licence will
be gratefully appreciated and
treated like the wonderful, multi-
talented person you really are.
Every drive will be accompanied by
a guide, so consider asking a friend
(or potential friend) to team up with
you.
Open House will go from 10 a.m.
to 5 p.m. from Friday March 6 to
Sunday March 8. Shifts will be
roughly half the day. Training sessions will be held Monday March 2
and Tuesday March 3 from 7 to 9
p.m. in SUB Room 212. You can
sign up at Intramurals or the Word
Processing Centre in SUB, or
through any club or undergrad
society.
Margaret Copping
Open House Volunteer
Coordinator
0)
>
ra
o
FREE      -v-studio
GRADUATION PHOTO SESSION
• For Grad Photography That Is Different •
This is your invitation to have a guest sitting and see a complete selection
of colour previews without cost or obligation. This offer is valid to all 1987
UBC graduating students. Phone now for an appointment.
• UNIQUE FRESH STYLES FOR 1987 •
Purchase only whatever you wish. Prices start at $6.95.
o
2111 West 16th Ave.     -?
TUDIO
VANCOUVER, B.C.
736-7281 or 731-1412.
C/5
<
Ct>
Thunderbird Athletics
<t
^r
CORKY'S FROSH AWARD
Awarded seasonally lo outstanding freshman male and female
Thunderbird athletes
Winners January 1 to February 15
MALE FEMALE
ALAN LALONDE-BASKETBALL
A starter with the Thunderbirds, Alan is
averaging over 10 points per game and
is shooting 55% from the field. He and
the rest of the T-Birds will be playing
the Victoria Vikings this weekend for
the Canada West title.
KIM SAUDER -BASKETBALL
Out of Fraser Valley College, Kim has
helped the Thunderbird basketball team
immensely during her first year with the
team.
CUTTING, STYLING. PERMS - FOR GALS AND GUYS
Call 734-4191 - 3644 West 4th Ave. (at Alma)
THE FROSH AWARD: each male and female frosh award winner
receives $20 worth of hair care products, free hairstyling plus a
CORKY'S t-shirt. Nominees also receive a t-shirt. Page 10
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 24, 1987
tween dosses
TODAY
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
IBM meeting. We need more members to show
upl noon, SUB 206.
UBC DEBATING SOCIETY  .
Debating Society meeting, noon, Buch B320.
PRE-MEDICAL SOCIETY
Lecture, "Emergency Medicine," guest speaker
Dr. Johnson, noon-1:2D p.m.. Wood #1.
UNITED CHURCH CAMPUS MINISTRY
Informal worship, ell welcome, noon, Lutheran
Campus Centre.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Co-op supper, 6:00 p.m., Lutheran Campua Centre.
DISABLED STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
General meeting, noon, SUB 224.
POLITICAL SCIENCE STUDENTS'
ASSOCIATION
Mary Collins, MP, will speak from 3-4:00 p.m., in
Buch A203 on "The Reform of Parliament," and
from 4-5:00 p.m. in Buchanan Penthouse on
"Women in Politics."
ARTS UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
Nominations forms for teaching excellence
awards available, noon, Buch A107.
WEDNESDAY
SORORITIES OF UBC
Philanthropy display, noot>2:30 p.m., SUB concourse. Also, bzzr garden, 4-6:00 p.m., SUB
207/209.
ALPINE CLUB OF CANADA
Slide show presented by Greg Child on 1966
Australian-American climb of Gasherbrum 4,
(7,925m), in Pakistan, 7:30 p.m.. Tickets $3.00
per student, -M.0O general. Prince of Wales
Secondary School auditorium.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
Amiga meeting, Anson will head the meeting,
everyone welcome, noon, SUB 111.
UBC SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Noon hour concert — Gabriel Quartet with Victor Martens, violin, noon, UBC School of Music
Recital Hall.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Fellowship night, 7:00 p.m., 1866 Knox Rd.
CINEMA 16
"Entre Nous," French film by Diane Kurys, 7:00
p.m. and 9:30 p.m., SUB audrtorium.
UNITED CHURCH CAMPUS MINISTRY
Potluck dinner and discussion, all welcome, 6:00
p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
INTER-VARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Bible study and fellowship. We will discuss
Chapters 3-8 in "Knowing God," noon, SUB
119.
THURSDAY
STAMP CLUB
General meeting, noon. International House,
Boardroom 400.
UBC PERSONAL COMPUTER CLUB
Commodore meeting with Donald, topics: skiing, music and games, noon, Buch B319. Also,
Apple meeting, William's merry meeting. "Let's
discuss Robotech," noon, SUB 213.
WALTER QAQE TOASTMASTER8' PUBLIC
SPEAKING CLUB
Campus wide open speech contest, noon, SUB
audrtorium.
TEACHING ASSISTANT UNION
Annual general meeting, noon, Grad Centre,
Garden Room.
ISMAILI STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
General meeting for election nominations and
candidate speeches, noon, SUB 209.
AMS INTEGRITY IN ACTION CLUB
Talk by Bill Wilkinson, "Steps to Mastery," step
one — be there, noon-1:20 p.m., Buch B22S.
CENTRAL AMERICA AWARENESS GROUP
"Where the Mountains Tremble," a film about
^ Al^
&
GRADUATE
STUDENT
SOCIETY
Nominations are now open for the positions of:
President
Vice-President
Secretary
House Director
Programmes Director
Finance Director
Closing date February 27, 1 p.m.
Nomination forms and further information can be obtained
at the GSS Office 228-3203.
'c^SN
esm^e
presents a
UBC COMEDY SPECIAL
starring
MARTY POLLIO
FROM L.A.
featured on Johnny Carson & David  Letterman
with special guests
BARRY KENNEDY & DAVE CAMERON
THURSDAY, FEB. 26-8 P.M.
ADVANCE
SUB TIX:$3.50
BALLROOM AMS Box Office
rams
#>
nms
M,
APPLICATIONS
NOW AVAILABLE
for
FOUR STUDENT-AT-LARGE
POSITIONS
on the
CAPITAL PROJECTS
ACQUISITION COMMITTEE
APPLICATIONS DEADLINE
4 P.M. FRIDAY
MARCH 6
FORMS
AVAILABLE
SUB 238
human suffering and political repression in
Guatamal with commentary by Guatemalan exiles in Vancouver, noon, SUB 111.
UNIVERSITY CHRISTIAN MINISTRIES
There is an alternative to feeling trapped by
anger, guilt snd reaentmentl Robb will speak
about the "Freedom of Forgiveness," noon,
SUB 206.
INTER-VARSITY CHRI8TIAN FELLOWSHIP
General meeting, speaker Michael Green former
rector of St. Aldate's (Oxford), noon, Chem 250.
UBC SCHOOL OF MU8IC
Harpsichord concert — performed by Doreen
Oke, harpsichord instructor, students, and guest
artist Gary Dahl, baritone, noon, UBC School of
Music Recital Hall.
PIT PUB
Mystery Dance Partner Contest, 8:30-1 :X a.m.,
The Pit.
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL OF UBC
Change in the USSR? Guest speaker Paul
Marantz explains the present human rights situation in the Soviet Union, noon, SUB 211.
CYCLING CLUB
General meeting for racing clinic. Last day to
register, meet Peggy Maass, noon, Hennings 30.
CAMPU8 CRUSADE FOR CHRIST
General meeting and talk, "Using the Four
Spiritual Laws Booklet as a Witnessing Tool,"
noon. Wood IRC #4.
FRIDAY
ASTRONOMY AND AEROSPACE CLUB
General meeting, also, Enrico will dazzle and
amaze you with his image processor! 5:30 p.m..
Geophysics Building 142.
POLITICAL SCIENCE STUDENTS'
ASSOCIATION
John  Fraser (Speaker of the House) will be
speaking on Reform of Parliament, 10:30-12:00
p.m., SUB 207-209.
PRE-MEDICAL SOCIETY
Gym night: volleyball and badminton and pizza,
5:30-7:X p.m., Osborne Gym.
hot flash
The cruise missile is being tested in Alberta today even though the
weapon is expected to spur an escalation of the arms race. Protest today and Thursday, noon, in Robson Square. Be there if you value your
life.
i
W UBC OPEN HOUSE ™
MARCH 6.7, 8
NEEDS STUDENT VOLUNTEERS
TO
ACT AS HOSTS AND GUIDES
For more information, and to sign up, contact Intramurals at
SUB 66, or your Undergrad Society.
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines, 1 day $2.75; Additional lines, 60c. Commercial -
1 day $4.75; Additional lines, 70c. Additional days, $4.25 and 65c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the day before publication.
Publications, Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van,, B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders Over $10.00 - Call 228-3977 ,
COMING EVENTS
70 - SERVICES
85 - TYPING
ATTENTION ALL NEW
APPLICANTS TO
STUDENT HOUSING FOR
1987/88 WINTER SESSION
Application forms & brochures for
the Sept. '87 Winter Session for
Student Housing are available from
Student Housing Office, 2071 West
Mall. First return date is Mar. 2,
1987. Office hrs: 8:30 a.m.-4:00
p.m. weekdays.
NOTE: Current residents will receive
their reapplication forms & information sheets in their mailboxes.
RUNNING LOW ON CASH?
A little short for that post
mid-term weekend blitzkrieg
in Vegas? Or just too plain
lazy to fill out your income
tax return?
Come see
STUDENT TAX
DISCOUNTING
Wed., Fri., SUB 213
Mon., SUB 205
11 a.m.-2 p.m.
Bring your tax slips, I.D., and we will fill out your
tax return for you and give you 85-90% of your
tax refund NOW!
20 - HOUSING
ROOM ONLY AND ROOM/BOARD avail
able for immediate occupation in the Single
Student Residences: Fairview Crescent,
Walter Gage, Place Vanier & Totem Park.
Contact Student Housing Office at 2071
West Mall, 228-2811, 8:30-4:00 p.m.
weekdays.
ROOMS FOR RENT March 1, $200 (no
utilities). 224-2662 or 732-0529 John. Near
campus.
SHARED    ACCOMODATION    SERVICE.
Small fee for months of listings. Compatible
roommates found. Ready Services,
298-6000.
41st & GRANVILLE. Female share 3 bedroom, 2 bathroom hse. 5 appl. & furnished.
On 41st bus rte. to UBC. $185. 266-2636
(Tom).
Get More Job Offers
And Interviews
Impress Resumes
301 -1847 West Broadway
Pick Up Your Free
Resume Book Today
731-3675
MINIMUM NOTICE REQUIRED - Essays,
term papers, resumes, editing. UBC location. 224-2662 or 732-0529.
ARE YOU LOSING MARKS BECAUSE
OF YOUR WRITING STYLE? Call a pro
fessional writer with M.A. for quality word
processing, editing & writing services.
Resumes, theses, essays, letters, etc. Hand
in work you can be proud of! 324-9924.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST. 30 yrs. exp.
Wordprocessor & IBM typewriter. Student
rates. Dorothy Martinson, 228-8346.
UNIVERSITY TYPING - word processing.
Papers, theses, resumes, letters, P-U & der.
9 am - 10 pm. 7 days/wk. 734-TYPE.
STU DENT/FACULTY RATES: $1.50/pg.
dble spaced text. Equations & tables:
$14/hr. Resumes: $5/pg. 50 personalized
form letters only $35. Cerlox Binding &
photocopying. Fast professional Service.
Jeeva's Word Processing. 201-636 West
Broadway. 876-5333. M/C & Visa accepted.
ADINA WORD PROCESSING for resumes,
essays, theses. Discount for students, 10th
& Discovery. Phone 222-2122.
WORD   PROCESSING   SPECIALIST.   U
write,  we type,  theses,  resumes,  letters,
essays. Days, eves., wknds. 736-1208.
JUDITH FILTNESS
Quality Typist
263-0351
30 - JOBS
BABYSITTER - My place - Mon., Wed.,
&/or Fri. or part days (flexible) 224-6674.
(Non-smoker).
35 - LOST
PENTAX CAMERA in the Pit Wed., Feb. 4.
Call Sandra 266-6524. Reward offered.
LOST —One "Big Fred"; 18" long,
4" diameter, 5 pounds, pink. Last given to a
group of fraternities (on variety night)
whose names will be published if he is not
returned. We don't know what you're doing with him, but bring Big Fred home!
KEYS ON A KEYCHAIN somewhere btwn.
B-lot & Osbourne gym area Thurs., Feb.
19. Call Karen 7 p.m.-10. 274-6579.
A.
THE ANGLICAN STUDENT
MOVEMENT AT UBC
CHORAL EVENSONG
7:30 p.m.. Alternate Sundays
SUNDAY, MARCH 1
following the service
A TRUMPET RECITAL
by
Dave Shaw, UBC
Dept. of Music
For transport from student residences call
224-2568. 4:30-6:30 p.m. Sunday.
Everyone is Welcome
ST. ANSELM'S CHURCH
University Blvd.
75 - WANTED
70 - SERVICES
AMS CUSTOMER OPERATED
WORD PROCESSING CENTRE
Lower Level SUB Rm 56 228-5496
PREGNANT?
-free tests
731-1122
confidential help.
EXCELLENT EDITING SERVICES. Professional editing for clarity, readability,
organization. Theses, articles, etc. 327-7547
or 327-4761.
80 - TUTORING
ENGLISH TUTOR: G. Harding-Russell
(PH.D) will tutor or give help with essays.
Phone 594-0960 after 6 p.m. $10/hr.
AQUA-MIST Undergrd. Sprinkler Systems.
Independent dealers req. Your own
business, $2500. Full start-up, invent.,
training. 581-4400.	
STUDENT PHOTOGRAPHER requires in
teresting subjects for various portfolios.
You get one 8x10 as payment. Call Ed
254-6375 if curious. Limited offer.
HAVE YOU OR A FRIEND experienced any
unwanted sexual contact while dating or in
a relationship with a boyfriend? We would
appreciate being able to talk with you. We
are researching this area, & hope to create
resources for women in dating relationships. Please call the SFU Criminology
Research Centre at 291-4127 between
8:30-4:30 p.m. weekdays to set up a
TELEPHONE interview with either Karen or
Cindy. All interviews will be kept strictly
confidential.
AMS CUSTOMIZED
WORD PROCESSING SERVICE
Lower Level SUB Rm. 60 228-5640
WORDWEAVERS - Word processing
(multi-lingual). Stud, rates. Fast turnaround. 5670 Yew St. at 41st, Kerrisdale.
266-6814.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING at $1.50/page.
Dunbar area. 263-8857.
FAST TYPIST on word processor. Reasonable rates. Located near UBC, 8th Er Fir.
Maureen. 875-0064 or 736-4411.
WORD PROCESSING: Fast Ef accurate,
competitive student rates. Near City Hall.
875-0010.
ACADEMIC AND BUSINESS WORD
PROCESSING/TYPING. Quality work,
very reasonable rates. Days/eves.
263-4862.	
PRECISION WORD PROCESSING
For all your typing needs, $1.25/page. Eves.,
wknds. Call Kathy 876-9366.	
YEAR-ROUND expert essay, theses
typing from legible work. Spelling/grammar corrected. 738-6829, 10 a.m.-9 p.m.
King Ed bus rte,
K.E.R. WORD PROCESSING. 1633 E. 12th
Ave. Using IBC-XT with Word Perfect. Call
Kerry Rigby at 879-2895.
FAST.    RELIABLE    WORDPROCESSING
reasonable rates. Graphic capability. Jack, eves.
224-0486.
TYPING: Term papers etc. — I'LL
TYPE ANYTHING! $1.50/page. Anne-
Marie. 874-0036.
GET RESULTS
IN THE
UBYSSEY Tuesday, February 24, 1987
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
Field men win Collegiate Cup undefeated
By STEPHEN INGVALDSON
The UBC men's field hockey
team returned home from Berkeley,
California last week, winners of the
1987 Collegiate Cup. Undefeated,
the 'Birds were the class of the tournament which involved Cal
Berkeley, Arizona State, and Stanford.
UBC's opening game against Cal
resulted in a disappointing 1-1 tie.
The 'Birds dominated the game but
were unable to score more than
once.
However, UBC's scoring drought
did not last long. In their second
game against Arizona the potent
UBC offense, led by centre-forward
Dave Ancrum, scored 11 times to
down the hapless Arizona team
11-0. In their third and final round
robin game, UBC used their
superior skills to play a short passing game and beat Stanford 5-1,
clinching a berth in the final with
Cal.
The tournament final was the
game of the weekend, but unfortunately was not without controversy. Cal got two questionable goals
at the outset when the umpires
allowed two blatant hand-stops on
short corners. Quick to capitalize
on their advantage, Cal scored once
again   to   make   the   score   3-0.
Frustrated and in disarray, the
'Birds were penalized for calling into question the integrity of the umpires and had to play short-handed
for five minutes. This marked the
turning point in the game as UBC
woke up and began to play hockey.
With 20 minutes left in the game,
the 'Birds began a remarkable comeback with Doug Fraser scoring the
third and tying goal on a great individual effort with under three
minutes remaining. Tied 3-3 at the
end of regulation, two 10 minute
WILD STICK SWINGING barbarians beat the ground with heavy sticks
trying to become boys once again.
1 +
Employment and
Immigration Canada
Emploi et
Immigration Canada
CAREER RELATED SUMMER JOBS AVAILABLE
Employment and Immigration Canada is presently recruiting Student
Placement Officers to work in local Canada Employment Centres for
Students throughout Greater Vancouver.
If you have experience dealing with the public and would enjoy
marketing the CEC-S services to the community, contact your On-
Campus Canada Employment Centre immediately for more information.
Interested applicants must be full-time students intending to return to
school in the fall. Application deadline is Friday, February 27, 1987.
Canada
JOIN THE 1987-88
INTRAMURAL MANAGEMENT TEAM
Applications are now being accepted for the following Senior Executive positions of Canada's largest Intramural Sports Program (information and application forms for all Intramural positions may be obtained from the Intramural
Office Rm. 66, Lower Sub Concourse)
Positions Available
Student Director (Co-Rec and Contract Programs)
Student Director (Runs/Cycle and Racquet Sports Programs)
Director of Finance
Director of Recognition
Director of Advertising and Promotions
Editor-in-chief, Sports Publications
Director of Computer Applications and Programming
Director of Video Taping and Filming
Director of Event Staging and Distributions
Director, Market Research
Director, Intramural Business Enterprises
Application deadline Friday, February 27
Interviews Saturday, February 28
Note: The junior administrative positions will be advertised Tuesday, February
24, with application deadline Friday, March 6 and interviews March 9-13.
UBC hAamAaw... jfo aw/ stxft&•.-
overtime periods were played. With
two minutes remaining in the final
overtime, Stephen Ingvaldson converted a short-corner lifting the
'Birds to a 4-3 victory and the tournament title.
While the Thunderbirds won the
tournament,   individual   honors
went to UBC's Doug Fraser who
was named the tournament MVP by
the Organizing Committee.
UBC now gets back to their
struggle for a play-off berth in the
competitive Vancouver League.
The 'Birds are currently in fifth
place with three games remaining.
1987-88 INTRAMURAL
JUNIOR EXECUTIVE
POSITIONS
The Intramural Program is now taking applications
for the following positions. Forms and information
can be obtained from the Intramural office, Rm. 66.
Lower SUB Concourse.
Positions Available
Sport Management
Asst.
Dir.
Program                                         Admin.
Asst.
Dir.
Promo.
Sen.
Sports
Writer
Sports
Writer
Program
Assist.
Team Sports Program
Fort Camp Hockey        3
2
1
1
Cross Volleyball             3
2
1
1
Nitobe Basketball          3
2
1
1
Handley Cup Soccer
and Ball Hockey         3
2
1
1
Individual Sports Programs
Runs/Cycle                     2
2
1
1
Racquet Sports              2
-1 for
| each
2
Special Events
Program                     4
2
Co-Rec Program         2
2
1
2
Contracts                       2
2
SPORT SUPPORT SERVICES
(number of position)
Finance
1. Assistant Director (1)
Recognition
1. Assistant    Director   Recognition    (Awards   &
Records) (1)
2. Assistant Director Recognition (Individuality) (1)
Advertising & Promotions
1. Assistant Director, Advertising (1)
2. Assistant Director, Promotions (1)
3. Production Managers, Advertising (6)
4. Graphic Artists (2)
Publications
1. Assistant Editor-in-Chief (4)
2. Journalists (3)
3. Photographers (6)
Business Ventures
1. Assistant Directors (2)
Event Staging and Distribution
1. Assistant Director (1)
2. Staging and Distribution Staff (8)
Computer Application and Programming
1. Assistant Director (1)
Video Taping
1. Production staff (4)
Application deadline,  Friday,  March 6 with
interviews March 9-13, 1987.
USC ifdhomJuds... fa aood gpcnfi Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, February 24, 1987
Bench boosts b-ballers to finals
By CHEW WONG
This weekend in Canada West
men's semi-final basketball play the
UBC hoop group eliminated the
University of Saskatchewan
Huskies, two games to none. The
two victories have qualified the
Thunderbirds for their first appearance in the CWUAA championship in twelve years.
On Saturday night the 'Birds
defeated Saskatchewan 95-75 in a
very physical game where a total of
56 fouls were called. It was a game
in which the starters laid down the
tracks and the bench carried UBC
on to victory.
The starting line-up paced the
'Birds in the early stages of the
game. Midway through the first
half co-captain Kevin Hanson went
on a three-pointer spree that left the
Huskies bewildered.
Hanson hit three three-pointers
in a row to bring UBC from a narrow 22-19 lead to a comfortable
31-21 margin.
With eight minutes left in the first
half, and fouls piling up, UBC head
coach Bruce Enns made several key
substitutions that preserved the
UBC lead.
"The foul situation forced me to
go to the bench," said Enns.
Players who have seen limited
playing time so far this year came
off the bench to perform admirably.
Jamie Boulding rebounded with a
tenacity that was not evident earlier
in the season; Gord Matson played
defence with the fervour of a man
possessed; Ken Scott shot well, and
Maurice Basso played virtually
turnover-free ball.
The 'Birds may need this strong
play from their bench again in the
next round of play-offs as starting
forward Aaron Point suffered a
broken hand in Saturday's game. It
is uncertain whether he will play or
not in next weekend's games.
On Friday night UBC defeated
Saskatchewan  92-79  in  a  tighter
game.
Point led the 'Birds with 23
points and 14 rebounds. After a
slow start, where they were down 16
to four early, the 'Birds picked up
the tempo and the win.
"We're peaking at a perfect
time," said guard Basso.
The two victories have pushed the
'Birds up a notch to the number
three ranked team in this week's national poll, and placed them in the
CWUAA finals against the defen
ding national champion University
of Victoria Vikings.
The winners of next weekend's
finals, along with the five other
conference champions, will receive
a berth in the March CIAU national
basketball championship. Two
wildcad teams will then be selected
by the ranking committee to complete the field of eight teams.
Should the 'Birds lose next
weekend, the possibility exists that
they will still be invited to the national championships as a wild card
team based on their number three
ranking. Enns obviously wishes to
travel the winner's route.
"If you don't win the league then
there's no guarantee about what's
going to happen," said Enns.
UBC will host next weekend's
finals at War Memorial Gym on
Friday (7:30), Saturday (7:30), and
Sunday (2:00) if necessary.
Swim 'Birds make a splash
By IAN ROBERTSON
For the fourth consecutive year
the UBC women retained their first
place position in the Canada West
Swimming and Diving Competition.
The 'Birds racked up 517 points
this past weekend to second place
Calgary's 368, while the Universities of Alberta (281), Manitoba
(149) and Victoria (125) rounded
'Birds slip twice and advance
By NEIL PHILIP
The Thunderbirds lost two
hockey games to the University of
Saskatchewan Huskies at Thunderbird Arena this weekend, but still
managed to make the Canada West
playoffs for the first time in 10
years.
On Friday, despite outshooting
Saskatchewan 26-22, UBC lost 2-1
on a late third period goal. The
teams hit hard throughout the
game, and neither could easily
penetrate the other's blue line.
The 'Birds defensemen were
outstanding, particularly Steve La-
Pointe who scored UBC's lone
goal. Carl Repp was also brilliant in
goal.
On Saturday UBC again outshot
Saskatchewan 34-31, but lost 4-1.
Players on both teams unleashed
stunning body checks, and their impassioned indignation accounted
for a total of 60 penalty minutes,
and an amazing slash-and-chase
scene.
Because the Brandon University
Bobcats lost both their weekend
games to Lethbridge, Brandon and
UBC end the regular season in a
20-point tie. But because UBC has
outscored Brandon 17-16 in the
four games they split 2-2 this year,
the 'Birds will advance to the
playoffs.
The real difference between this
weekend's games was the Saskatchewan goaltending, according to
UBC captain LaPointe.
"Last night Makay played well
for the Huskies. But Holtby was
outstanding for them tonight, he
won the game for them."
Saturday's game was decided
when Saskatchewan made it 3-0 only 59 seconds into the third period.
After a UBC defender lost the puck
in his corner, it slid through the slot
towards the blue line. A Saskatchewan player fanned on an attempted shot in the slot before the
puck was slapped from the point
past UBC's Repp.
"I was looking around my
defenseman," said Repp. "But I
was looking to one side and the
puck came on the other side. I
didn't see it."
UBC's scorers were frustrated on
the weekend due to the tight checking of the Huskies' defense. But
UBC's head coach Terry O'Malley
insisted "we were not out-played,
but we had gold opportunities to
score and didn't."
Next weekend when fourth place
Saskatchewan plays the second
place Manitoba Bisons, fifth place
UBC will play in Calgary against
first-place Dinosaurs.
Although UBC lost all four
games against Calgary this season,
the 'Birds seem convinced they can
win.
"We'll play in a European-size
rink," said LaPointe, "so our
quick, mobile forwards will be able
to move more easily. I'm totally
confident . . . One has to be to survive."
out the score.
The male Birds (239 points)
didn't fare nearly as well, placing
fourth behind Calgary (647), Alberta (378), and Victoria (280), but
beating Manitoba (123).
The 400 metre free relay team of
Janet Oakes, Nadeane Holley,
Angie Haveman and Gwen
Chambers came first.
In the individual events the
women were led with second place
finished by Alison Gilbert (50 metre
free), Holley (200 metre free),
Oakes (100 metre free) and Jen
Good (100 metre breast). Third
place finishers for the Birds were
Good (200 metre breast), Fiona
Waddell (800 metre free), Anne
Martin (50 metre free), Sandra
Mason (200 metre fly), Niki Bennett
(200 metre individual medley),
Stephanie Brown (100 metre back)
and Haveman (100 metre free).
In the women's diving events
Trish Murphy was second on the
three metre board.
"I was a little disappointed there
were so few female participants in
this event, and also that two of our
girls came close but failed to make
the qualifying standards. Overall we
swam extremely well, but we are going to have a hard time retaining
our national title against Toronto,"
said head coach Jack Kelso.
In the men's events UBC started
off extremely well. Chris Bowie set
a new Canada West record in the
500 metre free, while Dave Young,
Andrew Huige and Simon Cassidy
all managed to qualify for the
CIAU championships in Halifax.
The Birds were unable to maintain
the pace, however, with Kevin
Draxinger's second in the 200 metre
back and Michel Hameury's third
on both one and three metre boards
the only other medal wins. Also
qualifying for the Halifax meet
were Geoff Grover and Cling Hirst.
"We didn't swim all our top
swimmers, and our men's team
placing reflected this. We used this
meet mainly to get as many men as
possible qualified for the national
championship, and we did that.
Despite the placing I am very happy
with the team's performance," said
Kelso.
The women have 12 swimmers
and three divers, and the men 11
swimmers, qualified for CIAUs,
March 6, 7, 8.
Soccer 'Birds blast Shooters
By ANGIE NORMAN
The UBC women's soccer team
defeated Langley's Keg Shooters
5-0 in the third round of league cup
play Sunday at UBC.
UBC took charge of the game
right from the opening whistle with
midfielder Mitch Ring capitalizing
on a cross from Zabeen Janmoham-
med, who minutes later tucked in
goal number two.
UBC striker Colleen Quee set up
the next two goals, laying off neat
backpasses to Nancy Sutherland
and Carole St. Arnaud. Christine
Pinette was credited with the fifth
goal after she beat the Langley
goalkeeper on a breakaway.
UBC have won all their games so
far in cup play and are shooting for
the provincial championships this
year.
"I see no reason why we can't go
all the way to the finals," said UBC
head coach Brian Thomson.
"We're training hard and the team
is playing together very well right
now."
UBC is hosting the University of
Victoria's women's soccer team at 4
p.m. this Friday for an exciting exhibition match at Todd Fields.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubysseynews.1-0126518/manifest

Comment

Related Items