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The Ubyssey Oct 3, 1972

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Array New student union to avoid CUS mistakes
By KEN DODD
The proposed National Union
of Students will try to avoid
becoming political quicksand
like the now defunct Canadian
Union of Students, says Teri
Ball, Alma Mater Society
external affairs officer.
Ball, one of several AMS
representatives attending the
union's founding conference in
Ottawa this fall, said Monday
the re-emergence of a mass
student movement in Canada
still depends on overcoming
many problems.
When student representatives from 26 Canadian
universities met in Windsor in
May to discuss plans and goals
of the new movement the overriding feeling was for any new
union   to   be   largely   non-
political and avoid taking the
controversial course of the
CUS, Ball said.
The new NUS will deal with
academic problems, she said.
The most important issue at
present is clearing up
problems regarding student
loans and financial aid from
the federal government,
particularly the requirements
of proof of identity and need,
Ball said.
A revised CUS would also
deal with the questions of
faculty tenure, course
evaluation and universal ac-
cessability and unrestricted
transfer of credits from one
university to another, she said.
Ball said the new
organization would try to
avoid politics except when its
academic interests required
involvement with various
governments.
She said the new
organization was important
because it "allowed students to
register their protests en'
masse rather than as individuals. When this relates to
government then it's
political."
Response to the proposed
union has not been
"satisfying" so far, she said.
Universities in Ontario,
Quebec   and   the   Maritimes
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LIV, No. 7       VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1972
48     228-2301
have been especially
unresponsive, Ball said. She
said she hoped these universities will show greater interest once they're convinced
the union is viable.
"Lots of campuses haven't
participated so far because
they want to see what will
come of it," she said.
Ball said the AMS would
probably join the union this
year.
"The general view on council
is favorable to membership,
and I expect a motion
proposing the AMS join NUS to
pass at Wednesday night's
council meeting," she said.
Fees won't be levied this
year, but next year there will
likely be a 10 to 15 cent fee per
student, Ball said.
HOW TO REALLY CLEAN UP for no fun and the little profit that comes from selling
rotten bananas. Litter around SUB appears to be increasing since the takeover of the
cleaning contract by Best Cleaners. The conversation pit, where this photo was taken, has
always been bad but lately students have reported sighting seven-foot crawling slimy
black baterial growths. See story on Best, page 8.
—ed dubois photo
Dailly promises BoG changes
By JAN O'BRIEN
VICTORIA — Legislation designed to
restructure the UBC board of governors will be
proposed in the spring session of the legislature, the
new provincial education minister said Friday.
"The present board does not represent a broad
enough sector of society. It is my intention to introduce legislation in the spring session which will
completely overhaul the board," said Eileen Dailly,
New Democratic Party education minister.	
See page 6 for text.
In an interview with The Ubyssey she said the
Universities Act would be changed to allow faculty,
students, labor and persons from the community at
large to sit on the board.
Under the present act faculty are ineligible to act
as members of the board and students can only get
on the board if elected as representatives of senate.
At this time the board is heavily weighted toward
the business community and is composed of corporate lawyers, judges, a financier and representatives from the forest industry.
Dailly said she introduced legislation five years
ago as a member of the opposition which asked for a
change in the Universities Act in order to allow
faculty to sit members. However, it was defeated by
the Social Credit government.
"Before proposing the legislation I plan to discuss
it with students, faculty and other interested
groups."
She said the recent appointment by the Social
Credit government of three board members was "a
very ungracious thing to do when a new government
was taking over.
Dailly said she plans to set up standing Royal
Commissions this fall which will look into financing,
junior colleges, philosophy of education and
assistance to students.
These commissions will not have student
representation because much of the travelling and
work will be done during the school year, said Dailly.
They will need a lot of feedback, however, and
will try to meet with groups, including students, from
all over the province, she said.
She would not say anything specific on financing
until she has time to go over the Perry report on
education, commissioned by the Social Credit
government five years ago and never released.
However, she did say regional colleges should
ultimately be financed in the same way as any other
form of higher education with grants from both the
provincial and federal governments removing local
tax support.
She added: "A formula type of financing is
needed for universities.
"Regional colleges are in a chaotic mess. A
commission will go into the whole matter of structuring junior colleges, using the example of colleges
in other provinces.
"It will take considerable time.
"It" it also important to do a statistical study on
education five years in advance.
"Research has been haphazard and policy hit and
miss. We need some hard research to tell students
where they are needed."
Dailly said the NDP government has a responsibility to look into financial assistance for students.
"No one who has ability should be denied the right
to an university education because of financial need.
"If students are not going to school because of
straight economic reasons government assistance
should be given."
She was not sure what form this assistance would
be take but suggested it could be loans, equalization
grants for out-of-town students or outright living
grants.
Dailly said the brief presented last spring by the
UBC women's action group dealing with the lack of
women in key university positions was an excellent
documentation of UBC's situation.
"Things can be done. For, example, in the U.S.
grants are tied into number of women in key
positions."
She believes women students will be one of the
groups helped under a provincial government
financial assistance program. ,
"Women's studies is a valid area of study and
should be accredited," said Dailly.
Currently, women's studies is an extracurricular
program at UBC. Application for accreditation has
not met with success. Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 3,  1972
AMS to help tenants
A counselling service for
student tenants will be set up
next month by the Alma Mater
Society, AMS external affairs
officer Teri Ball said Monday.
The student-tenant liaison
committee, the first to be
established by the Vancouver
Tenatns Association, will
provide information and legal
conselling for students
unaware of their rights as
tenants, Ball said.
The tenants association
decided the AMS would
organize the service at a
meeting held Sept. 27 at UBC,
she said.
The committee will talk to
Vancouver landlords, about
discrimination against
students and problems
students face renting rooms
for seven or eight month
terms.
"There is a definite need for
such a service to be available
and I feel this type of service
will eventually become a part
of other universities," Ball
said.
"Students are uneasy about
having to go to the Vancouver
grievance committee and will
receive more individual attention from the new on-
campus committee," she said.
The funds for the committee's operation will come
from the civic and federal
budget issues, Ball said.
Undercut big success
This Year
Ubyssey Tree Bureau
Undercut, forestry's
traditional phrenological
discussion was even better
than last year.
Forestry president Doug
Baker said the discussion was
lively yet contained, with
fewer than usual confrontations. Several individuals demonstrated the
development of the bump by
dropping from wooden fixtures. Other, less enthused,
walked on tables to get that
necessary view of the skull.
Politics are
Irish trouble
Conflict in Ireland is "not essentially religious, but a
political struggle for power," Alan Buchanan, Archbishop of
Dublin, said Monday.
"Political differences correspond to the religious differences," said Buchanan, head of the Church of Ireland. But
the real cotentions, are over social conditions and civil rights.
"Real settlement is possible in Ireland," he said. "There's
no question but the majority are sick, sore, and tired. The
'movement of women' gather to force peace even if only for a
few days," he told a small group of students and professors in
SUB 207.
He said he has seen "Chains of peace" formed preventing
gangs from clashing.
"Church leaders now are speaking with one voice," he
added. "No responsible church leader will have any truck with
violence."
Archbishop Buchanan insisted on keeping most of the
meeting off the record. Conditions are so tense he felt, "a word
indiscretely dropped could spark violence. In chances of a
truce, shut your mouth tight."
Watch
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OPEN THURSDAY AND FRIDAY UNTIL 9 PjM Tuesday, October 3, 1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
'Now is time for change'—Young
By SANDY KASS
Suspended principal John
Young said here Monday he is
confident of regaining his job
at Campbell River senior
secondary school.
Young, 50, known widely as a
progressive in the education
field, was suspended as
principal Aug. 31 after a yearlong dispute with the Campbell
River school board about
provincial accreditation of his
school
In a speech to more than 400
students and faculty packed
into Ed. 100, Young said he
"expects to be back in the
education business at one level
or another" before very long.
He  declined  to  say   what
-kini mcdonald photo
CONTROVERSIAL TEACHER-PRINCIPAL John Young visited UBC Monday and says he is confident
he will regain his position as principal of a Campbell River high school. Young labelled the Socred
education administration "failure oriented", "absurd" and "bad".
Exposure
By ART SMOLENSKY
Included in the flurry of
cabinet orders about a month
ago was the appointment of
three persons to the UBC board
of governors, Paul Plant, Bev
Lecky and Thomas Dohm.
Now to add to these appointments are the three, out of
11, board members to be
elected by senate.
Essentially three informal
slates have evolved out of the
eight candidates.
The Conservative slate is
headed by geology building
fund raiser Aaro Aho and also
consists of Dave Williams,
socred appointee on the last
board and, for my money,
Frank Walden, ex-alumnf
association president and
socred public relations man.
In the liberal slate (read also
large L) are union buster
Chuck Connighan, former AMS
lawyer Ben Trevino and
alumni association president
Bev Field.
The final slate is a student
one composed of Svend
Robinson and long-time
politico Stan Persky.
Probably the most interesting factor in all the
political manoeuvering is who
nominated who and who is
connected to whom.
For instance, education dean
Neville Scarfe was involved in
the nomination of Aho and
Walden. The third member of
the conservative slate,
Williams, was nominated by
academic planner, and well
known   Conservative,   Robert
Clarke and former justice
minister in the Diefenbaker
government, Davie Fulton.
Connaghan, president of the
Construction Labor Relations
Association of B.C. is a socred
appointee to the senate.
The amazing thing in this
case is that libertarian
socialist economist Gideon
Rosenbluth was one of Con-
naghan's nominators.
In many Conservative senate
circles this spelled the kiss of
death for Connaghan.
Note that if Connaghan is
elected the provincial
government will have placed
seven of the nine members that
it could possibly ever put on the
it-member'board.
Incidentally arts dean Doug
"levels" are open to him if a
current appeal of his
suspension to the provincial
board of reference fails.
He said he would rather work
as a principal, but added he
would "consider" teaching at a
university.
Young, a New Brunswick
native educated in B.C., was
hired as principal in Campbell
River in 1965. The school's
accreditation was revoked in
August, 1971, by the Social
Credit government
The accreditation, which
grants schools the power to
recommend grade 12 students
not write final government
exams, was restored
provisionally last June.
Young paused several times
to greet former students in the
audience.
One of them, Neil Campbell,
ed 3, described Young as "fair,
friendly, sincere" and not as
authoritarian as the average
junior secondary principal.
"But I figured something
like this would happen.
Campbell River is a mill town
and people there just don't
approve of changes," Campbell said.
Young agreed it's "easier to
land a man on the moon than to
bring about change in the
school system".
"Society takes the same
view of education as it does of
the law or religion — society is
impervious to change."
During his speech and the
question period following,
Young described what he
called "modest" changes at
Campbell River secondary.
"Basically we tried to give
students more responsibility
and to reduce the fear level
between them and teachers.
"Teachers and school administrators seem to surround
themselves with rules and
regulations to avoid dealing
with students as individuals. In
most cases the rules are stupid
and an affront to students'
dignity."
Classrooms with seats in
circles instead of rows,
voluntary attendance, a
commercial cooking class
taught in local hotels, and
sociology, philosophy and
hobby courses taught by
teachers are among the
changes Young described.
Following the meeting, he
said most of the new programs
were discontinued after his
suspension.
The school, which ran on a
semester system, didn't fail
students, but recorded unfinished courses as incomplete.
"There are a variety of
reasons for students not
completing courses — many of
them personal — so why should
a person be victimized for the
rest of his life by having a
capital "F" on his permanent
school record."
Young said his non-failure
policy "really bugged" the
education department,
because provincial regulations
read 20 per cent of all students
are expected to fail.
Young lashed out at the
school system calling it
"failure-oriented, utterly
absurd and just plain bad, bad,
bad".
"It has alienated 40 per cent
of all students over 15 who drop
out (according to provincial
records) every year," said
Young.
"The system is obsessed
with order, discipline and
middle-class values. It
tragically neglects the real
needs of the students."
He accused the B.C. school
curriculum of being
meaningless and putting more
emphasis on the War of the
Roses than the Vietnam war.
He later said the removal of
accreditation from his school
and his own suspension were
"blatant political acts on the
part of (former education
minister  Donald)   Brothers."
The audience applauded
when Young said: "Boy was I
glad when Brothers took a
nose-dive," adding he thinks
the NDP will "do better":
The position of principal at
Campbell River was
blacklisted by the B.C.
Teachers' Federation.
It is now held in an acting
capacity by Walter Fogg,
director of instruction for the
Campbell River school
districtt.
Young, who said he is an
expert at being hassled by
"Rednecks", advised potential
radicals in education to "play
it low for a couple of years until
you get your permanent
teaching certificate."
If the controversy hadn't
broken out at Campbell River,
said Young, it would have
happened somewhere else.
"Now is the time for change
in education."
Kenny was Connaghan's other
nominator, a fact that
Rosenbluth did not know when
he submitted his nomination.
Speaking of Trevino note
that he was the lawyer for
CLRA during the spring
lockout in the construction
industry.
While some faculty are
making a big deal out of
students being nominated to
the bo&rd for the first time it
really means very little.
Of the students only Svend
Robinson has a slim chance.
Stan Persky won't be elected
basically because most of the
faculty senators fear him.
He is a rough, tough intellectual opponent as well as
an articulate speaker. He has
more smarts than a good
number of the deans and the
department heads.
Robinson doesn't stand much
chance because he is a student.
Students, says classics head
Malcolm  MacGregor,   "don't
have enough time to devote to
the job; they should be too busy
studying."
By way of comparison,
Simon Fraser University, like
most other Canadian
universities, has an undergrad
student on its board.
There are two possibilities.
Either the conservative slate
will get in — lock, stock and
barrel — or enough lower
echelon faculty senators will
pick a salad of Aho, Trevino
and possibly Robinson.
All of this manoeuvering,
however, is probably
academic. According to
education minister Eileen
Dailly the entire Universities
Act will be rewritten and
enacted by next spring so as to
completely restructure the
board.
I think it fair to expect
socred Allan McGavin, among
others, will be tossed out and
replaced by students and
university non-academic staff. Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 3,  1972
Women
The extracurricular women's studies program starts its
second year at UBC tonight.
Yep, it is still a non-credit course offered by students.
For the uninitiated, women's studies is an
interdisciplinary study of the history and contemporary
situation of Canadian women.
It's offered as a credit course at the Universities of
Toronto, Waterloo, York, Ottawa, Sir George, Simon
Fraser and literally hundreds of universities in the U.S.
It's a non-credit course at UBC because the majority
of faculty on UBC campus do not believe women's studies
is a serious area of academic study.
When presented with a proposal for an accredited
women's studies course, the arts curriculum committee
was blandly ambiguous, refusing to discuss it as an issue.
They would argue about faculty release and financing,
and the chairman of the committee would call the women
presenting the proposal girls, but they would not discuss
women's studies as a valid area of study.
So instead of an interdisciplinary women's studies
course UBC ends up with a bad second, a group of arts
courses which deal somewhat with women.
Included in this group is contemporary women
writers, population in history, problems in ethics in social
philosophy, developmental psychology, the political
economy of capitalism and sociolinguistics.
There is certainly support for women's studies. More
than 500 people enrolled in the course last year and now
education minister Eileen Dailly has said women's studies
is a valid area of academic study and should be accredited.
It won't be long and meanwhile students will continue
to offer a course open to the whole community.
$5?
Hmmmmm. Well, maybe. But then again, maybe
not. You see, we have this problem. There's this group
of refugees from Madison Avenue who want students to
hand over $5 a year for the next 20 years to help build a
covered pool.
"This," they tell us, "is what we need."
But some students we know aren't convinced.
Take Bernie Bischoff for example. He doesn't need a
covered pool. He doesn't even need the one we've got now.
Howcum? Well, it seems Bernie Bischoff can't swim.
So it's a cinch he doesn't need, or even want, to spend $5.
Then there's Irving Fetish. He was around a decade
ago when student politicians were trying to get money for
a student union building.
"Vote Yes!" Irving was told. So Irving voted "Yes!"
Now he's playing $15 a year for almost forever to buy
a building which looks as if it were designed for the
Chatanooga Choo-Choo rather than students.
Says Irving: "Give these guys $1.6 million and we'd
probably end up with the world's only three-sided
Olympic swimming pool."
There are also various people who'd like to know why
a slick ad campaign is necessary to sell the pool.
And also what the AMS is planning on doing this year
other than spend money to tell students they need a new
swimming hole.
But that doesn't provide a solution to the immediate
problem. Is the spending of $1.6 million for a covered pool
in the students' best interests?
Well, a recent poll disclosed that 75 per cent of
Ubyssey staffers can swim. And at least 50 per cent have
earned $5 or more during the past year.
So we decided to give the question an unqualified
"Yeah, we guess so."
And now that that's over, there's this guy we'd like to
introduce to the AMS executive. It seems he doesn't need
this real swell bridge he owns in Brooklyn and . . .
THE UBYSSEY
OCTOBER 3, 1972
Published Tuesdays and Fridays throughout the university year by
the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the writer and not of the AMS or the university
administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey
publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The
Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial departments, 228-2301; Sports, 228-2305; advertising,
228-3977.
Co-editors: John Andersen, Jan O Brien
Our masthead tonight takes place in an abandoned mine shaft on the
edge of the page where Art Smolensky, Mike Sasges, John Andersen, Kent
Spencer, Jan O'Brien, Ken Dodd, Forrest Nelson, Steve Morris, Larry
Manulak, Gary Coull and Brent Thompson have clustered to see Dirk
Visser, Kini McDonald, Karin Nielsen, Darryl Tan and Vaughn Palmer who
have gathered to hear Lesley Krueger remark on how clever it was to cram
all those names into the first few lines leaving all this room for witty
remarks and
Bihes
Try this for size: how many
smashed bikes and broken
bodies will accumulate before
the administration
acknowledges the existence of
cyclists and help pay for cycle
paths and storage facilities?
In a classic arse-up, head-
deep=in-sand posture, the invariable response to two mass
protest rides, a $6000 transportation study, not to
mention deaths and injury on
University Boulevard, is —
"University Boulevard is not
our jurisdiction".
A fine legal defence no doubt,
but I rank the administration a
D on assesment of priorities
(not to mention their
responsiveness to the expressed needs of the people).
While UBC could spend
nearly $17,000 this summer
removing underbrush and
dead trees from areas on South
Campus, "with the object of
reducing fire hazards and the
danger of falling trees" (UBC
Reports), they have zero
money for a cycle path which
could reduce travelling
hazards for hundreds of
cyclists.
The entire cycle path with
connector paths right to
Wesbrook could be built for
less than $15,000. Seen any
falling trees lately?
All concerned cyclists must
Letters
get together to plan the next
round. Please come to SUB 215,
Thursday, 12:30 p.m.
Wren Green,
grad studies
Gay
Gay liberation will be an
issue on campus this year, if
the attendance at the second
meeting of UBC's new gay
group gives any indication.
The group, tentatively named
Gay People of UBC, drew 23
people to its meeting last
Thursday at noon hour.
After general discussion
about the aims and direction of
the group, a draft foundation
was adopted in principle.
The statement poses the
need for gays to make friends
with themselves and with their
sexuality, and to work towards
the education of heterosexuals.
It also places the group in
complete opposition to all
forms of anti-gay prejudice
and discrimination, and indicates the group will actively
oppose any such prejudice on
campus, for example, anti-gay
lies found in text-books or
courses. The statement also
calls for a gay studies
program.
As well, the meeting took
nominations for president and
members of the steering
committee, before adjourning
until this coming Thursday, at
12:30 in SUB 213.
The backward reaction of
many students at the Stanfield
meeting when the issue of gay'
rights was raised indicates
that gay liberation still has a
long way to go on campus. The
foundation of a gay
organization at UBC is a big
step in the right direction.
Randy Notte,
arts 1
Clubs
Your article, Something for
everyone, neglected to mention
several things I felt were quite
important.
One was the excellent job of
co-ordinating clubs day done
on only three weeks notice by
Phrateres and Pat Fletcher in
particular.
The second was the list of
winners of the judging of
overall quality — Varsity
Outdoors Club was first, Aqua
Soc second and Chinese
Varsity Club third. Two
honorable mentions were given
to Campus Cavaliers and El
Circulo. Also, CYVR had a
very well operated contest in
which I won a pair of pants.
Robert Angus
Alma Mater Society
co-ordinator Tuesday, October 3, 1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters
Socialist
Re: your students or the
board of governors editorial in
Friday's paper.
One of the primary functions
of a socialist student running
for the board is to increase
understanding among students
generally as to the nature of
the board and the university.
The board of governors is
composed primarily of
representatives of the ruling
class. The board is an
executive committee of that
social class. Their task
(although they wouldn't put it
in these words) is to see that
the university serves the interests of their class. The
university does this in two
ways: 1) it trains incoming
members of that class, and
more importantly, 2) it
'teaches' a thought-system
that preserves the present
class structure. The board, it
will be remembered, appoints
the direct administrators of the
ol' U.
The goal of a socialist (to put
it straight-forwardly) is to
transform the class structure
of our society so that the
working class achieves
political and economic power.
The task of a socialist in the
university is to democratise
the institution and to struggle
against what is presently
taught and to eventually see to
it that the university teaches
the truth about the nature of
our society. Thus, in the period
prior to the political-economic
transformation of the society,
the socialist tries to transform
the university into an active
institution that helps bring
about the necessary changes.
The university, in short, ought
to aid the working class.
All this, obviously, doesn't
happen overnight. It takes
place, in stages. The socialist
tries to raise the level of
political understanding. That
is one of the meanings of a
student running for the board.
Representation on the board
' by students and faculty would
be an improvement.
An important question to ask
is: why is there so much
resistance to having students
on the board?
Do you believe it has
anything to do with the idealist
answers we're given, like
students are "immature" or
"not competent", or do you
think that the ruling class and
their local representatives
understand that the presence
of students and teachers is a
(admittedly, small) challenge
to their power?
Stan Persky,
student senator,
candidate for the
board of governors
Idiocy
I can no longer remain silent
about the massive expenditures of student funds
proposed by the present
student government.
In my opinion, the plans for
student takeover of food service in SUB ($500,000) and the
proposed construction of a
covered pool (about $1 million)
display not only lack of
imagination and perspective,
but a lack of concern for the
real issues facing students on
this campus.
I hasten to amplify.
To demonstrate lack of
perspective, only consider tile
consequences, if similar
policies were advanced by five
student councils in the years to
come, before any of these loans
were retired. Assuming an
equivalent fee increase of $5
were required to finance each
of the five successive
megalomanical schemes at the
end of that time the Alma
Mater Society fee would have
risen to $54.
Now, less than $10 of the
current fee is discretionary
spending; $14 is allowed to pay
for SUB (inherited from
similar student governments
in the past, one presumes), $5
is allocated for sports and The
Ubyssey receives about $2.
I note in passing the totally
contradictory nature of a
policy that on the one hand,
urges massive expenditures
and AMS fee increases and yet
seeks to save a miserable 60
cents or so by drastically
slashing The Ubyssey budget.
In any case, the result is a
council chronically powerless
for lack of funds or rather, lack
of control of funds. And the
above example is hardly
farfetched. In the last few
years the AMS fee has risen
dramatically to $29. Massive
capital expenditures -are
almost wholly responsible for
this increase. And now we are
aksed, once again, to support
this idiocy.
I question the morality of a
constitution that allows a
transitory student body and
council, the right to commit the
funds and to thus strangle the
aspirations of future student
bodies and student councils, in
this fashion.
In my opinion, this lack of
discretionary spending power
is a fundamental weakness of
the AMS. And with every new
commitment of student funds,
and concomitant AMS fee
increase, discretionary funds
decrease as a percentage of the
total AMS fee. Student
resistance to fee hikes grows.
The council becomes ever less
capable of providing services
which I believe rate far higher
than a swimming pool or
student ownership of one food
service outlet.
I suggest daycare, the
student bookstore and financial support of Karl Burau's
Experimental College, as
worthy alternatives, that could
be financed for less than 75
cents per student per year.
That is about $15,000 per year.
I suggest that a stipend of a
mere $5,000 per year — an
amount regularly frittered
away by council, year after
year — would perhaps provide
some incentive for this controversial philosopher to
remain at UBC to continue to
expound a rational alternative
philosophy of education and
society.
I have spent more than one
lunch hour in SUB 111 and I can
vouch for the fact that Burau's
opinions are far more
provocative of real thought
than almost any lecture I have
attended or than any of the
banal conversations that can
be overheard anywhere else in
SUB at that time.
There is no doubt in my mind
that we would have real value
for the 25 cents it would cost
each of us over the school year.
I see that I have passed
perceptibly from the criticism
of lack of perspective, for that
of lack of imagination. On this
latter point I have more to say:
much of the present debate
about these incredible expenditures has centered
around the amount of interest
that will have to be on the
necessary loans. The debate is
somewhat academic, in that if
you borrow money, you must
pay interest at the going rates.
Now, I can easily imagine
projects, more worthwhile
than the two I have criticized,
which might require similar
expenditures of funds: a
student owned co-operative
store in SUB or perhaps, a
student owned public broadcasting station, that would
make student opinion a real
force in the larger community.
I submit that to attempt to
finance such expenditures by
continually raising the AMS
fee is not the solution.
I submit that a more
imaginative solution to the
problem of financing such
projects is to create a student-
owned credit union and to lend
ourselves the money we need,
in the future.
Credit union deposits are
fully guaranteed by the
government — just like those
in any chartered bank. All the
profits and advantages of
ownership would accrue to us,
not anonymous stockholders
and boards of directors, who
are usually somewhat distant
from the student viewpoint.
There is plenty of expertise
available at other B.C. credit
unions to ensure the
managerial success of such a
venture. Only note that the
campus already supports three
banks; there is certainly
enough business to support one
credit union should students
commit themselves to doing
business with the credit union.
Let me turn now to my third
criticism.
I believe I have said enough
to indicate what I think some of
the real issues are: lack of
intellectual honesty, student
apathy, lack of progressive
services and the inability of
students to control their own
funds, and thus their lives.
I could go on — the administrative bodies of the
university are grossly
unrepresentative, for example — but I think it is clear that
a covered swimming pool or
token student ownership of one
food service are not among
them. Not yet.
I look forward with considerable anticipation to the
replies to this letter. I believe
my major criticisms are incontestable, in every case I
have offered constructive
alternatives.
Furthermore, I state
categorically that this
criticism is not directed to
individuals so much as the the
situation. I conceive (sic) most
of our student representatives
to be only moderately well
informed; harried by
destructive, rather than
constructive criticism; and
faced with the impossible task
of attending to a full-time
schedule of courses as well as
the duties of their offices.
This latter I consider an
unjust and stupid requirement.
I think participation in student
politics should be recognized
as an activity worthy of credit
by the administration. If
course credit is not sanctioned,
it should be at least accepted
that no representative can
perform well in his office while
at the same time carrying a
full academic load.
In regard to the imminent
elections and referendum, I
can state that I demand more
perspective, more imagination
and more concern for the real
issues, than any of the candidates or incumbents have
demonstrated.
I demand more value for my
AMS fee. And I'm damned if
I'm going to vote for people
lacking the former and for ill-
conceived schemes that won't
deliver the latter.
In conclusion, to forestall the
type of response I would not
deem worthy of a reply, I can
state categorically that neither
Burau nor any credit union is
aware of my actions. These
ideas originate solely with
myself.
Leo Fox
science 5
Candidates' statements
David
Varnes
Essentially, the position of
the ombudsperson was created
because, at times, students feel
that they have not been treated
fairly by some segment of the
university organization (either
student or administration run).
The ombudsperson is the
students' equalizer, hopefully
being able to obtain straight
answers as to why a certain
policy was applied in a certain
manner. I have found by
practical experience, however,
that this function is not as
straight-forward as all  that.
The student provides the
ombudsperson with his
complaint, and it is then
necessary to pin the complaint
down precisely with respect to
the situation. The ombudsperson will have to confront the particular officer in
an organization with the
specific conmplaint, thereby
obtaining both viewpoints of
the confrontation. From the
facts that are available, the
ombudsperson must assess: a)
if the student's complaint can
be resolved b) if the officer of
the particular organization has
the authority to make ac-
ceptions (for I have noted that
most problems come not from
situations that can be defined
by rules, but that problems
arise from situations that are
not defined by rules, the officer
preferring the safety of the
rules as defined) and 3) if
some kind of compromise is
possible between the two
positions.
I view the position of ombudsperson as an objective
investigator of student complaints and as a searcher of
alternatives within situations
defined by rules. My practical
experiences come from two
years on a union committee
handling employee complaints
in a large corporation. I ask
you to consider my viewpoint
and qualifications for the
position of ombudsperson.
Douglas
MacKay
Two common questions
asked during Alma Mater
Society elections are: What is
an ombudsperson? and Why
should I vote for you?
The ombudsperson is the
students' only direct channel to
the university bureaucracy. It
is important that this channel
is maintained and made more
accessible to the student. I
intend to do this.
This office should be filled by
a student who is concerned,
independent of any political or
pressure group on the campus
and willing to do the job. .<
I am concerned, independent
and willing to work.
Although the AMS is the
students' government, elected
and maintained by students,
most students do not identify
with it. The AMS appears to be
similar to any other
bureaucratic institution. When
you need it you are usually in
the basement and it is on the
second floor. The ombudsperson should be aware of
this problem and personally
available to solve it. I am
aware and available.
For a more personal approach to student problems
and students themselves, elect
a competent ombudsperson,
Douglas MacKay.
Coreen
Douglas
The university is not an ivory
tower, separated from and unaffected by issues which are of
great concern to large numbers of people in society.
Issues like the war in Indochina, and the oppression of
women, for example, affect
society in general, but have
their own effect on students
and the universities.
The fact that Canadian
women have a second class
status in society, and in particular do not have the basic
democratic right to control her
own body, effects student
women, as they are forced to
drop out of school because of
unwanted pregnancy.
These issues pose the basic
question of the priorities of this
system, the war spending or
educational spending, how will
the resources of this university
be used, for war research, or to
organize against the war. Who
should decide these questions,
the big business board of
governors or the students and
faculty of the university?
Another issue in this election,   is   the   referendum   on
See page 12: CANDIDATES Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 3,  1972
OH DAD, POOR DAD
by Arthur Kopit
An M.A. Thesis Production
Directed By Allan Gray
October   11-14 —   8:00   p.m.
Tickets: $2.00 Students: $1.00
Reservations - Room 207 - Frederic Wood Theatre
UBC Somerset Studio
CBC  RADIO   !   !   !
A   new  type   of
Television   without  pictures   !   !   I
See Dr. BUNDOLO'S
PANDEMONIUM MEDICINE SHOW
October 4, 8   P.M.
Recital Hall, Music Building
FREE!!!
featuring Steve Woodman,
Ted Stidder, Maria Gropper
and the Don Clark Band
ATTENTION
ALL
STUDENTS
GET OUT AND VOTE!
There will be elections for the following positions on
Wednesday, October 4 & Thursday, October 5, 1972.
Ombudsperson
Arts Senator
Grad Studies Senator
At the same time, students will be asked to vote on two
referendums:
Indoor Pool Referendum
Constitutional Amendments Referendum
Polls will be open as follows:
Thursday, October 5 — 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
BUCHANAN MacMILLAN SUB SOUTH
ANGUS MAIN LIBRARY SUB NORTH
CIVIL SEDGEWICK WOODWARD
LIBRARY LIBRARY
Advance Polls will be open as follows:
Wednesday, October 4—11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
SUB
EDUCATION
LAW
MEDICINE
WAR MEMORIAL
GYM
. .. and from 5:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.
PLACE VANIER
TOTEM PARK
GAGE
BRING YOUR AMS CARD
TAKE AN INTEREST
YOUR VOTE COULD BE VITAL
The littl
Eileen Dailly, 46, became B.C.'s new minister of education
after 12 years as an elementary school teacher, 10 years as a
school trustee and six years as an MLA.
Dailly entered provincial politics after her experiences as
a school trustee convinced her that the important decisions
concerning education were being made on the provincial level.
She ran successfully for the New Democratic Party in the
Burnaby-North riding in 1966.
During her six years on the opposition side of the
legislature she specialized in criticizing the education policies
of the former Social Credit government.
Philosophy
My own philosophy is to produce a student out of our
system who has a good self-concept and can come out with a
sense of self-confidence in his or her own abilities. We've had
too many students go through our system where, because they
fail a subject, they feel they are a failure.
I feel we've been too subject oriented in our system. I think
today, with all the vast changes in your type of work that are
going on outside of school, the emphasis on teaching subject
matter has become almost irrelevant. I think you can teach
the subject matter and teach certain trades but once you get
out of school things have changed so fast in society that they
may be of no use.
There has been an overemphasis on the thinking that the
more education you get the better chance you have of getting a
job. I don't think that's the idea.
We've been trying to train for jobs rather than educate the
person. And I think the latter is far more important because I
think you should produce this individual with a self-concept, an
ability to think for themselves, an adaptable person. The work
they enter into with a specialized knowledge isn't going to be
as important as the ability of the individual to adapt.
I don't think this system has changed very much since the
days that I went to school, which was many years ago. I think
this is a very sad reflection on the lack of philosophy of the past
government in the matter of education.
What I plan on doing is set up another commission — there
seems to be commissions all over the place — but one of the
first things this commission would do is discuss the philosophy
of education.
Policy
It is the policy of this government to get standing committees really active and moving around the province.
You know they sat just briefly for the two months or so we
were in session and thatwas it,which was ridiculous. You just
began to probe an issue and that was it, you were out and
finished. I think the government will be making a^tatement in
due course on what kind of committees, how they are going to
function and so on.
We don't believe in having a whole string of backbenchers
just sitting there. I mean, they're elected people and they
should have a real function other than just getting up to make
the odd speech.
It should be like the federal house. Their committees
really function, they really work. Of course, they're there all
year long but we'll probably be ending up with two sessions
anyway so it will give us an opportunity of getting them functioning.
The past government seemed to use education for their
own stor>go building thing. Where I criticized them greatly
was that in the long run they were costing the tax-payers more
money because, particularly with site purchases, they kept
putting delays and freezes on the construction of school sites
and now the costs have escalated so much it's costing far more
money.
I've asked for a report on the whole matter of the
The follow ii
transcript o
made Frida
elected educ
Eileen Dailh
view with U
Jan O'Brier
Andersen
DAILLY
capital costs of construct
referendums which have be(
not passed through here, thr<
This gets you into the wh
long-term financing and func
of the backlog of building w:
pressure on the minister of fi Tuesday, October 3, 1972
THE       UBYSSE
Page 7
pink schoelhouse
s a partial
atements
y newly
>n minister
an inter-
sey editors
id John
self concept
want to see how  many
oved by the taxpayer have
e government end of it.
a of the money market and
this. My hope is that some
eked up. I just have to put
;o release funds for me.
Colleges
We've inherited a mess, an absolute mess and its not
something you can correct overnight. What we're going to have
to do here is appoint specific people to go into the structure of
the regional colleges.
Regional colleges must be given full academic accreditation
so you can move from there to the university.
Our government is on record as stating we believe regional
colleges are simply another form of higher education and
should be financed as such which means the ultimate removal
of local taxation in the financing of regional colleges.
I have spoken in the house on the need for a formula type of
financing so that the universities know just where they stand.
Teachers
I have talked to a number of unemployed teachers and they
have pointed out how discouraging it is to work for your degree
and then try to go into teaching and find that you're unemployable. They implied that some of them might not have gone
into teaching if they'd known it.
I'm bringing in legislation in the special fall session which
will allow for budgetary increases by school boards which we
.hope will enable them to hire more teachers. I have also asked
the school boards who are in extreme difficulty right now with
some very heavy class sizes to contact me and I'm dealing
with them individually. From the information I get at these
meetings I hope we will be able to give-the go-ahead for
changes in some of those bad situations which hopefully means
more teachers will be hired.
Help
One thing we've lacked is equalization grants for students
who have to come down to a university from the north or a
rural area. But I realize there are also students in Vancouver
who have the same difficulty in getting there because of the
cost of living and so on.
I would say that is something that a New Democratic
government would consider very important to look into. What
the means will be, whether outright grants or living bonuses or
what I can't say at this time but I think we have a responsibility to see that students are not prevented from going
because of economic reasons.
I don't know if you've read John Porter's The Vertical
Mosaic but it certainly pointed that out — that it's still the
middle income and upper bracket that goes.
High Schools
I think there are some students in our secondary schools
who are literally just sitting there.
What I would like to look into is the matter of apprenticeship. I do think that in the secondary school we should
try to open up the right for students of 15, maybe even 14, to
move out into the community into some type of apprentice
work.
I wouldn't want it to be implied that education should stop
at age 14, but I would like it to be more relevant to that particular person.
There are some students who would like to get out. I've
talked to a lot of these young people in high school and they say
'we feel this is a bit irrelevant to us right now, we'd like to get
out in the community and do some work'. I'd like to see that
encouraged but also with that must go an acceptance by the
community at large that it must take a part in finding positions
for these young people.
Also, we want to keep an open door policy so that a young
person who has gone out and worked in the community for a
while can always come back in to a learning situation.
Women
I'm very concerned about the lack of representation of
women on key positions in university faculties. And we had an
excellent brief on that from a UBC women's group. It certainly
documents the situation there.
I'm sure there are a lot of capable women who are simply
being passed over because of the fact that they're women. And
it just doesn't go for the university, it goes for all areas. You
just have to look at the government departments and where do
you find a deputy woman minister. It's the whole attitude of
society — that woman basically is the home-maker and should
be in the home.
I understand that there are, down in the United States, actual tie-ins the amount of grants to universities and the
number of women on key positions. I'm not saying that this is
the policy of this government but I think that it is something
that would be worth looking into.
University
Another area I want to look into is this open university
concept. Britain pioneered that, under the Labour government.
The open university concept from what I gather is that you
take the university to the people, through television, for
example. You know you can get your whole degree in England
through television, now. You can get a BA right through
television.
I think that a lot of people are barred from university
because of this matter of having to work. They're at an age
when they don't want to give up work so let's give them a
chance to still get to university.
About five years ago as a member of the opposition I
brought in a private member's bill which asked for a change in
the Universities Act in relation to the structure of the board of
governors.
At that time I simply asked that the faculty be allowed to
sit on it. Following that I made a number of speeches in the
house in relation to what I considered to be the very
inadequate structure of the board of governors. I didn't feel
that it was representative of a broad enough sector of society.
If you look over the occupations of the board of governors
throughout the years you can see there is a pattern. We have
suggested that there be labor and students (on the board).
It is my intention as minister to introduce legislation with
reference to changes in the structure of the board of governors
at the spring legislature. Page 8
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 3,  1972
CUPE, AMS ask who
Best Cleaners is best for
OPTOMETRIST
J.D. MacKENZIE
E ye   Examinations
Contact   Lenses
3235   W.   Broadway
732-0311
The   Abominable
Dr.   Phibes
S.U.B. AUD.
Oct. 5-8
By STEVE MORRIS
In whose best interest was Best Cleaners
hired?
The university contracted Best Employees
Ltd. for SUB janitorial duties at $1 per hour less
than Canadian Union of Public Employees
members received.
The contract, which runs from May 1, 1972 to
March 31, 1973, supplanted the physical plant
employees who worked in SUB since it opened.
Physical plant maintains about 350 janitorial
employees. All are CUPE employees, while
Best Cleaners employees are members of the
Building Services Employees Union.
Physical plant services all buildings owned
by the University.
Specific buildings are not individually contracted.
Duties include sweeping up, cleaning windows, walls and desks, replacing towels and
toilet paper in washrooms, setting up chairs
and furniture: in short, general maintenance.
In December 1971, William Morrison, CUPE
Local 116 president, was told that within three
months the administration would replace
CUPE employees in SUB with an off-campus
company.
Morrison started an injunction against the
plan, but withdrew it on the guarantee that all
CUPE SUB employees would be offered other
campus positions.
Deputy president William White said the
purchasing department received public tenders
from four companies, and chose Best at lowest
bid, at $140,000.
Alma Mater Society treasurer David Dick
estimated the University will save between
$60,000 to $80,000 with Best.
Morrison said the physical plant SUB cost
estimate used by the administration to compare against Best's was not a true one.
"I believe they padded the estimate. I don't
think it was a fair one," he said. i
Morrison said the university estimate was
based on inaccurate man-hours, and should
not have included the area supervisor's salary.
"I don't see how the University will save
money.
The contract obliges  Best  to replace the
exact number of men CUPE had in SUB.
"None of the men formerly in SUB were laid
off. So really the administration is paying more
to get the job done," said Morrison.
He said the injunction against the university
would have been unsuccessful. SUB is student
owned and so is not included in the physical
plant-university agreement.
SUB manager Graham Vance said he
thought what the administration did was
legally correct. The AMS had no control over
who they hired for janitorial duties.
The university agreed to provide the service
in SUB, as well as other basic facilities such as
heating and electricity, he said.
Vance claimed he was not contacted until the
arrangements with Best were completed, but
physical plant supervisor Nevil Smith said the
AMS was informed about the changeover.
"We didn't arbitrarily do it. The AMS knew
that negotiations were under way," Smith said.
University economics is one possible explanation for the switch-over. Another is CUPE
incompetence.
White said he had received several student
complaints about building cleanliness.
He said it wasn't as clean as he had hoped,
and it was generally untidy.
"In part it was dissatisfaction from the
students, and the opportunity to compare
costs," Smith said.
Vance said the AMS "absolutely" did not
exert any pressure on the administration
regarding CUPE.
An official, who asked not to be identified,
said he was unaware of any major student
complaints about CUPE employees in SUB,
and the ones he did hear would not justify a
staff change.
Neither did Morrrison hear of any serious
complaints.
Vance said he regrets the change of personnel because the CUPE employees were
familiar with the students, the building and the
AMS. It takes time to build up these relationships, he said.
Morrison said the CUPE employees had an
esprit-de-corps and pride in their work which
off-campus companies cannot duplicate.
PUBLIC  SERVICE   CANADA
These positions are open to both men and women.
The  Foreign Service offers a challenging career  in one of the
following departments:
EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
INDUSTRY, TRADE AND COMMERCE
MANPOWER AND IMMIGRATION
Representatives from these departments will hold an information
seminar.
Location:    Angus 110
Date: October 4, 1972
Time: 12:30 P.M.
ATTENTION
ALL STUDENTS
OPEN HOUSE '72
Applications are now being received for
Open House '73 executive positions
VICE CHAIRMAN
TREASURER
RECORDING SECRETARY
FACULTY COORDINATOR
CLUBS COORDINATOR
SERVICES
TOURS AND GUIDES
TRAFFIC AND SECURITY
HIGH SCHOOL TOUR
PUBLIC RELATIONS
Those interested please write to:
Chairman, OPEN HOUSE, Box 61, SUB, U.B.C.
or see John Keatings in SUB Room 230A, 9:30-11:00 a.m.
POOL REFERENDUM
bOOr BELEBEMDflN
A YES VOTE (Wednesday & Thursday) on
the INDOOR POOL REFERENDUM MEANS:
(1) Free swim time for ALL students during most hours of operation.
(2) Greatly increased intramural programs.
(3) A  needed recreational, athletic and educational facility for the
campus.
(4) An addition to the student social/recreational core on campus.
Your $5.00 per year INDOOR POOL LEVY will allow the A.M.S.
to borrow $925,000 to match the contributions from the Board of
Governors   and   from   the   outside   community.   By   showing   our
willingness to put up 1/3 of the cost, the A.M.S. can point to strong
student interest in the project in its efforts to raise more than 1/3 from
outside sources (thereby reducing needed student contributions.)
REMEMBER the 1/3 share we are asking for from students is a
maximum figure — we are confident that we can raise enough from
others so that the student share will be much less than 1/3.
If you believe U.B.C. needs this year-round facility VOTE YES on
Wednesday and Thursday.
VOTE   YES  AT  THE   FOLLOWING  POLUNG  STATIONS:
WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 4th 11:30 - 3:30
SUB Law Education Medicine Gym
And from 5:00 - 7:00
Place Vanier Totem Park and Gage Towers
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 5th 10:00 - 4:00
Buchanan Angus Civils MacMillan Main Library
Sedgewick Library SUB North and South Woodward Library Tuesday, October 3, 1972
UBYSSEY
Page 9
40 attend noon-hour
senate hopeful meet
By LAWRENCE LEADER
Emptiness was the atmosphere in SUB auditorium
noon Monday when only about
40 persons attended the
meeting of candidates running
for grad studies senator, arts
senator and ombudsperson.
All eight candidates gave
brief but interesting speeches
but, as ombudsperson candidate Douglas MacKay, arts 3
said: "This turnout is only too
typical of UBC"
Candidate for ombudsperson
besides MacKay are Coreen
Douglas, arts 2, and David
Varnes, arts 3.
Douglas talked about oppression of women — saying
women cannot control their
own bodies — and how the
university should be used for
social change: anti-war and
anti-war research movements
and women's liberation
movement.
"The NDP are going to be
our biggest ally in getting
control of the university," she
added.
Douglas did not relate these
issues to the role of the ombudsperson but encouraged
students to "vote socialist".
MacKay said the ombudsperson is "the student's
only direct channel to the AMS
council."
He said The Ubyssey could
also be important in exposing
popular student problems.
Candidate Varnes said the
ombudsperson must "know all
about the university's
bureaucracy and AMS constitution.
"I'd like to use my experience
with the bureaucracy in
helping people involved in
bureaucratic run-arounds," he
said.
Competing for grad studies
senator are Allan Davis, grad
studies 9; James McEwen,
grad studies 2; and S. J.
Rosval, grad studies 10.
Davis said he wants to expose controversial issues
which department heads try to
cover up and to reform grad
studies' prerequisites which
are inappropriate to the
student's studies.
"I'm for more interdisciplinary studies," Davis
said.
McEwen, previously applied
science senator for two years,
is "concerned about fragmentation of the university."
He said in the last four years
$66 million has been spent on
construction at UBC while >
little attempt has been made to
"improve the quality of
communications."
Rosval said he supported
reform of departmental
chairmanships.
He opposed "lifetime" appointments   in   departments.
Rosval said he would accept
grievances from students and
said a senator should be
"experienced".
Running for arts senator are
Jay Munsie, arts 43and John
MacLachlan, arts 3.
Both candidates declared,
"I'm going to talk about
issues," and remarked on the
impotence of student senators
since they have only 12 of the
senate's 98 votes.
Munsie said he is against
compulsory courses for arts
students.
"Compulsory courses
contradict the purpose of a
university to foster study of
individual interests," he said.
He also said the importance
of a student senator is not in his
voting power in the senate but
in his participation in committees.
MacLachlan said student
senators need more support
than "merely putting an X on a
ballot a couple of times a
year".
Advance polls will be held
11:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 4 in the education
building, War Memorial Gym,
law school, medical school and
SUB.
On Thursday, Oct. 5, election
day, pools will be open 10 a.m.
to 4 p.m. in Buchanan, Angus,
Civil, MacMillan, main
library, Sedgewick, SUB and
the Woodward library.
Left politics
The socialist studies centre,
a discussion and study group
for students and faculty interested in politics from a left
wing perspective, will hold an
organizational meeting noon
Friday in Buch. 104.
A FILMSOC Presentation
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THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 3,  1972
Tween classes
TODAY
GERMAN CLUB
Meeting, noon. International House,
404.
CAMPUS CRUSADE
Leadership training classes, 7 p.m.,
SUB 215.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Kubicek  and   Burau   on   university
reform, noon, SUB 111.
CUSO
Information    meeting,    7:30    p.m.,
International House 402.
HILLEL
Learning, noon, Hillel House.
WOMEN'S STUDIES
Barbara     Todd     on    "Women     In
Canadian History," 7:30 p.m., SUB
Auditorium.
CONTEMPORARY DANCE
Workshop,   5-6:30   p.m.,   new  P.E.
complex, gym E.
CANOE & KAYAK CLUB
Meeting, noon, SUB 125.
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Charles    Anderson    on    the    new
testament,  noon,  Lutheran Centre.
Eucharist,   noon,  Lutheran  Centre.
WEDNESDAY
VOC
Meeting, noon, Angus 104.
HILLEL
Hot lunch, noon, Hillel House.
FREE MOVIE
Civilization, noon, SUB auditorium.
INTERNATIONAL FOLK DANCING
Every   Wednesday,    7:30-10   p.m.,
International  House,   lower lounge.
SPORTS CAR CLUB
Meeting,  8 p.m., SUB, upper clubs
lounge.
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Eucharist,   noon,  Lutheran  Centre.
Political action and new testament
thought, noon, Lutheran Centre.
Lutheran centre.
Sensitivity   group,   3:30-5:30  p.m.,
Lutheran Centre.
THURSDAY
ASIAN-CANADIAN COALITION
Meeting, noon, SUB 105.
KARATE CLUB
Demonstration,        noon,        SUB
ballroom.
CAMPUS CRUSADE
Meeting, 8 p.m., 1962 Acadia Road.
VCF
Concept      communication,      noon,
SUB auditorium.
CYCLISTS
Meeting, noon, SUB 215.
CVC
Meeting, noon, SUB 205.
KUNG FU
Practice, noon, SUB ballroom.
CAMPUS CAVALIERS
Square   dancing,    noon-2:30   p.m.,
SUB 207-209.
GAY LIBERATION
Meeting, noon, SUB 213.
FILM SOC
Meeting,    new   members   welcome,
noon, SUB 247.
STAHELM ORGANIZATION
Avalon   Hill   replayed,   noon,   SUB
119.
FRIDAY
YOUNG SOCIALISTS
Public       meeting       with       Blanca
Muratoria   and   Isolde   Belfont   on
repression    in   Argentina,    8   p.m.,
1208 Granville.
PRE-SOCIAL WORK
Speakers    from    school    of    social
work, noon, SUB 105B.
Hot flashes
Women in
history
The first meeting of the
women's studies program will
feature teacher Barbara Todd
speaking on women in Canadian
history.
The lecture at 7:30 p.m. today
in the SUB auditorium costs 25
cents if you are not registered in
the program.
Fall registration for 10
meetings costs $2.
Open house
The student's open house
committee needs executive staff,
says committee chairman John
Keating.
And after December, Keating
said Monday, more people will be
needed as guides, to operate
displays and supervise parking.
The last open house in 1970
involved about 5,000 students,
said Keating.
He said the university
administration is supporting open
house, but it wants more student
participation.
The administration has a
steering committee which
provides liaison between such
groups as the traffic office and
physical plant.
Council meet
Student council, since the
people won't come to it, wilJ be
going to the people Wednesday.
Wednesday's meeting, usually
held in the SUB council chambers,
will meet at 8 p.m. in the Place
Vanier common block.
EdSA meets
Representatives from the New
School, Waldorf School, Ideal
School and City School will
present panel discussions and talks
noon, Tuesday-Friday in the
Education Lounge.
The discussions are presented
as part of the awareness workshop
II program of the Education
Students Association. Everyone is
welcome.
f POINT
-shCLX
3-Speeds
$69.00
FREE — FREE
w*  10-SPEEDS
Fenders - Carrier - Light Set
We're Overstocked!
STUDENT DISCOUNT
Theft Insurance — Cables — Locks
3771 W. 10th (near Alma)
224-3536
(Steaks-Pizza-Spaghetti-Lasagna-Ravioli-Rigatoni-Chicken Cacciatorell
OPEN
Mon. - Thurs.
11 a.m.- 3a.m.
Fri. - Sat.
11 a.m. -4 a.m.
Sun.
11 a.m. -1 a.m.
DINING
LOUNGE
FULL
FACILITIES
3618 W. Broadway.1
______ (at Dunbar)
HOME DELIVERY  738-9520    738-1113
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
Karl Burau on Germany, noon, SUB
111.
SOCIALIST STUDIES CENTRE
Organizational       meeting,       noon,
Buch. 104.
SKYDIVERS
Meeting, noon, SUB 125.
It's the third quarter. Your
team is surging ahead. Your
cheers are lifting their spirits.
They depend on you. And
during football season, with
games every weekend, there's
just no time out for your
period. Tampax tampons
were made for that reason.
And for all the jumps, splits
and turns you have to
execute.
Because Tampax tampons
are worn internally, you can
move in comfort and confidence. And they expand in
three directions to really
protect you.
When your team's depending
on your "GO, GO, GO!"
its good to know you can
depend on Tampax tampons
— and really go.
Our only interest is protecting you.
DEVELOPED  BY  A  DOCTOR
NOW   USED   BY   MILLIONS  OF   WOMEN
TAMPAX  TAMPONS ARE   MADE ONLY   BY
CANADIAN TAMPAX CORPORATION LTD..
BARRIE.   ONTARIO
The  Abominable
Dr.   Phibes
S.U.B. AUD.
Oct. 5-8
rushant
■* CAMERAS     *
4538 W.10 224-5858
NEVER UNDERSOLD!
iVfcfr^
Ghmfied'«&. ate im-xqeeptecl by ts&bkom find ate payobfy in
■\    '. tuL#tW*9<ffi-% Room 341 S.4/.8T. VBC. Vag. &4C ,
ANNOUNCEMENTS
DANCES
11
Greetings
12
SATURDAY SALE 100 PUR COATS,
Jackets, many vintage items, $29
or less — all day Saturday, 10 a.m.
6   p.m.    Pappas    Bros.    Furs,    459
...Hamilton Street at Victory Square.
Phone 681-6840 weekdays 12-6 p.m.
Lost & Found
13
Rides & Cax Pools
14
NEED   RIDE   TO    VERNON    FOR
Thanksgiving.     Will     share     expenses.   Phone   Rick,   228-9542.
RIDE NEEDED TO POWELL.
River tor Thanksgiving weekend
(Friday). Will help pay expenses.
Phone  872-1832.
Special Notices
15
THURSDAY, OCT. 5th, CHRISTIAN
Science Lecture. "Are You Living
In The Present?" — Josephine
H. Carver, 12:30, Club's Lounge,
S.U.B., sponsored by Christian
Science Organization, UBC.
$75 FOR 75c. WATCH FOR B.C.
Bonus Coupons coming early
October  .
DISCOUNT STEREO. EXAMPLE:
AM-FM receiver, turntable, base,
cover, cartridge, two speakers, 2-
year guarantee, list $200, your
cost $125. Carry Akai, A.G.S.,
Zenith  TVs.   Call  732-6769.
PRISON: WHAT        CHANGES?
What's the community's role?
Clinton Duffy, former warden
San Quentin, will address public
meeting on prison reform Hebb
Theatre, Oct. 3, 8:00 p.m. Panel
of B.C. corrections specialists
will respond. Free. UBC Prison
Project/ Seventh   Step.
DR. BUNDOLO'S PANDEMONIUM
Medicine Show — First 300 admitted free — the rest will* be
paid! October 4, 8 p.m., Recital
Hall,   Music   Building.
Travel Opportunities
16
Wanted—Information
17
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
1968   VOLKS.    RADIO,   $900.
263-5008
Autos Wanted  22
Automobiles—Parts 23
Automobile!—Repairs 24
Motorcycles 25
BUSINESS SERVICES
Art Services
31
Babysitting & Day Care
32
Dance Bands
33
Duplicating & Copying 34
Photography
35
i^tljp %tm anb gutter
Cameras!
RKULA FLASH
CLEARANCE
VARIANT FP $35., FT $41.,
CP $48., CT $60.
All Fully  Rechargeable!
Have We Got A Flash  For You!
VIVITAR, METZ,  BRAUN,
TOSHIBA, etc.
3010 W Brdwy.    736-7833
Scandals
37
HOLLYWOOD THEATRE
3123 W  Brdwy.    738-3211
Adults and Students $1.00
OCTOBER 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7
ACADEMY   AWARD   WINNER
"SHAFT"
9:15   p.m.
also
"GIRLS IN THE
BIG DOLL HOUSE"
7:30 p.m.
Both Shows  Restricted
FIGHT BACK AGAINST CORPOR-
ate welfare bums. Support Ron
Johnson. Meet the candidate.
Wednesday, Oct. 4, 1972, 8 p.m.,
1956 West Broadway, Vancouver
Centre  Federal  N.D.P.
Typing
40
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
PART - TIME BABYSITTING
sought for two small children.
Pleasant home 37th & Dunbar.
Tina  Scull.   266-9765.	
Public Service of Canada
METEOROLOGY VACANCIES
This Competition is open to both
men and women.
Attention graduates in Physics
and Mathematics.
The Atmospheric Environment
Service of the Department of
the Environment is responsible
for the provision of weather ser-
ices in Canada. The service is
interested in receiving applications from men and women graduating in the spring of 1973.
Apply no later than October 16,
1972, Competition 73-140. Further
information is available from your
Placement Office (Office of Stu-
dent  Services).
PUBLIC SERVICE OF CANADA "
offers careers in the field of administration in various Federal
Government Departments to both
men and women.
A briefing- session/career hour
will he held at 7:00 p.m., Thursday,  October 12  at  Buchanan  106
Work Wanted
52
INSTRUCTION & SCHOOLS^
Music Instruction 81
CLASSICAL GUITAR AND LUTE
with former S.F. Conservatory
instructor,   733-6888.
Special Classes 62
LEARN CHINESE DANCING AND
Mime.   Phone  261-5918.
83
Tutoring Service
Tutors—Wanted
84
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
CO-ED ROOMS-KITCHEN — CAMPUS, $60 mo. 5745 Agronomy, 224-
9549.
Room & Board
82
Furnished Apts.
83
Houses—Furn. & Unfurn.
86
THREE GTRLS TO SHARE LARGE
house near UBC gates. Own bedroom. Available immediately.
Phone   224-0230.
Use Ubyssey Classified
TO SELL - BUY - INFORM
The U.B.C. Campus
MARKET PLACE Tuesday, October 3, 1972
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 11
/<«_p_kv '7"?v.;.v.
By SIMON TRUELOVE
Our lovely new eight-lane
indoor pool will be voted on
Wednesday and Thursday. If
you don't get over to SUB and
vote, it could be a long, long
time before we have another
chance to get such a facility for
UBC.
Football is still going strong
with St. Andy's beating
commerce 13-0. The Betas
destroyed Sigma Chi 24-0, and
Alpha Detls edged out
Recreation 1-0.
Softball had another
delightful Sunday afternoon.
Forestry are in the lead after a
6-5 decision over Dentistry.
Other memorable struggles
were: Commerce six, Science
five, and Alpha Delts 21, St.
Andrews 10.
Wednesday at 12:30 p.m. the
eager competitors for the
turkey trot will take off on a 2.5
mile run around campus. The
route was shortened (we don't
expect any complaints about
that) and it's up on the notice
board in SUB.
If your name falls in the A-M
category for badminton play
and you haven't played your
first game, you missed it
Monday. However, it won't be
counted as a default. M-Z's
play Wednesday at Mem. Gym
7-9 p.m.
Entry deadlines for hockey,
basketball, and soccer are
Friday, so get your team
together right away. Anyone
can form a team to play at any
level. Just come in and contact
us in Mem. Gym 308.
The  Abominable
Dr.   Phibes
S.U.B. AUD.
Oct. 5-8
rushant
** CAMERAS     *
4538 W.10 224-5858
NEVER UNDERSOLD!
• CAMPUS LEAGUES •
TENNIS
Mon., Oct. 2nd
in the armouries
4:30-7:00
Balls and rackets provided.
General knowledge of rules.
For further information phone
Sue Nicolls
266-8082
VOLLEYBALL
For men and women.
Tues., Oct. 3
at 8:30 -11:30
in Gym A or B
Contact
SHARON WORTON
732-7153
SP0R TS
'Birds win again
In exhibition football over the
weekend, the UBC Thunderbirds easily diposed of
Whidbey Islanders x9 0 at
Thunderbird Stadium.
UBC quarterback Ten Hon
Choo tossed for two t.d.'s, with
one going to slotback Bob Wells
in the first quarter and the
other to flanker Henry
Thiessen in the third quarter.
Place-kicker Bruce Kiloh
added a second quarter field
goal and one convert while
punter Thiessen scored a
single. Bill Grist notched a
safety touch to complete the
scoring.
In other conference play, the
Alberta Golden Bears and the
Calgary Dinosaurs each posted
wins to move into a second
place tie.
Manitoba remains in first
place with a 3-1 record followed
by Alberta and Calgary with 2-
1 records. UBC is in fourth
place with a one win and two
losses, and Saskatchewan
brings up the rear with no wins
in three starts.
UBC's next game is Saturday    against    Calgary    at
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PRICES "^
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WORKMANSHIP     •
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(Our top sub agent earned $2500 last year)
Be an Authorized Sub Agent
for the distribution of
CANADA SAVINGS BONDS
—contact—
KEN  HARRIS
McLeod, Young, Weir & Company Limited
681-0111
Thunderbird Stadium. They'd
like to have another win in that
one.
Intramurals
Attention all Managers!
Please note that all women's
flag football games are to be
played Thursday at 12:30 p.m.
at the Mem. soccer fields. Pick
up the revised schedule in
Mem. Gym 202.
There is an important
Manager's meeting Friday in
Mem. Gym 213. The swim
meet, badminton, and T-shirts
will be discussed at this
meeting.
AU swim meet entries are due
no later than Tuesday, Oct. 10.
Rugby
UBC Rugby teams were 2-2
following weekend play .The
Thunderbirds deafeated the
one Georgian team 43-12 and
the Totems beat another 6-4,
but Frosh lost to a third
Georgian team 22-6.
UBC rugby fans will be able
to see the 'Birds play Capilano
Wednesday at 6:15 p.m. on the
Thunderbird rugby fields.
sports light
By KENT SPENCER
Ubyssey Sports Editor
Some of The Ubyssey's sports fans may have
noticed the small size of the sports section this year.
Maybe you've also noticed the small number of
sports that are covered and the lack of consistent game
reporting.
Today's issue is a good example. The report on the
football game is small and short because there is no
football reporter this year. One or two people have come
by and left names, but no one has made a commitment
to cover the team.
Rugby teams, field hockey teams, and other
campus sports have been featured little or not at all
because no one has shown interest in covering them. I'd
be happy to have a game report on any UBC sports
event that a person is interested in covering.
Intramurals and soccer have received some coverage
this year because two people have come forward and
offered to write about them. Women's sports are rarely
(if ever) found in The Ubyssey sports section because it
seems no one cares to follow a team and write about it.
The Ubyssey sports section will continue to have
small, skimpy, articles as long as people sit back on
their butts and wait for some one else to do it.
But if there's anybody who is interested in sports
reporting and doesn't mind working a little at it, please
come see me Monday or Thursday afternoons in SUB
241K.
tSKUTSL.
--October   5   to   "_7--
PRE SEASON SKI CLEARANCE!!
Clothing -  up to 50% off
■ TYROL,   ANBA,   MOSSANT
JACKETS     1/3 OFF
■ SKI PANTS  l/l- 1/2 OFF
■ TYROL WARM-UPS   25% OFF
■ SWEATERS     I/3 OFF
■ '73 CLOTHING      10% OFF
Skis
■ ROSSIGNOL $175 11000
ALAIS MAJORS
qq95
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160        $110 7995
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■ SW1NGER:$I35.. 10500
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Poles  $6.95 595
I   *AY   A«E            J Page   12
UBYSSEY
Tuesday, October 3,  1972
From page 5
political clubs having the
rights to run in their own
name. For free, democratic
elections, Vote yes!
The NDP is the working
class alternative to the big
business parties, it will be the
best ally in our struggle for
control of our university.
Vote socialist!
•t&.*   .*
!£-&*<
Jim
McEwen
I am concerned about the
concerning intellectual and
physical fragmentation of the
university community and I
need your help in order to do
something about it.
In the past four years alone,
for example, over $66 million
has been spent on new
buildings and related
development at UBC.
However, there has been
comparatively little improvement in either the quality
of the teaching-learning environment or in the degree of
interaction among the various
faculties. I will press for immediate improvements in
UBC's disappointing building
program.
The board of governors must
become more responsive to the
needs of people within the
university community and to
the needs of people in the
larger community which
supports this university. The
first step in this process will be
to put student representation
on the board.
Support must be given to all
interdisciplinary programs
and courses which bridge the
gaps existing between
traditionally defined areas of
knowledge.
Students should also ask
senate to undertake an investigation with a view to
developing comprehensive, coordinated academic and
emotional counselling services.
If you support my position on
these issues, I urge you to
demonstrate your support in
the forthcoming elections.
Jay
Munsie
As candidate for arts student
senator I. am emphathetic
towards the academic needs
and wants of the arts students
enrolled at UBC. My primary-
concern is the first and second
year students. It is in these two
years that arts students are
subject to very inflexible rules
regarding courses, faculty
requirements and credit
transfer.
As many students are aware,
transferring, either faculties
within UBC or from another
university can be needlessly
costly in terms of time and
degree credit. Apart from
requisite courses, some of the
current restrictions could be
reassessed.
A bachelor degree from UBC
is rapidly losing its esteem as a
crutch in our society. It is not
viewed as a vocational tool but
rather as a reference of
commitment. Aware of this,
an arts education should be
used by the student to objectify
his learning abilities.
It is because of this attitude
that I feel student senators
should work, not against the
(majority) faculty senate
members, but with them. I am
prepared to constantly make
the faculty and other senate
members aware of our needs
and problems within the
academic structure of the
university.
John
MacLacMan
We have been concerned, as
students, with the attainment
of power, yet we find ourselves
now as powerless as ever. We
have said that if we could have
representation in administration our problems
would be solved. Our problems
are not solved.
So we say student
representation is not great
enough. But more representation does not solve our
problem either: look at the
AMS — total student government, and total problems.
So where have we gone
wrong?
We have lost control of our
lives because we gave up our
power, long ago, to a ballot
box: we have forgotten that no
student can represent us all if
we do not all first represent
ourselves.
We are our own jailers: we
abdicate our responsibility to
help our brothers and sisters;
we abdicate our humanity by
shoving our burden on
someone else.
We must realize now that our
only true power lies within
ourselves, and in the degree of
our commitment to one
another. It doesn't matter how
many of us sit on senate; it
matters how many of us are
together as people. I promise
you nothing; nothing more
than you promise yourselves.
Get up off your ass and vote.
I-WJ1*' *.! if-v
■«.t  :.\
Alan
Davis
I support the senate as a
student recourse to arbitrary
departmental policy and
unresolved conflict. For
example, grad students in
some departments can't
choose their own supervisor.
Airing of these disputes can
often force action that
otherwise would never occur.
I support change in
educational philosophy, —
elimination of degree mill
approach; less specialization,
no unnecessary prerequisites,
and more inter-disciplinary
programs.
I support environmental
planning. The present concoction of architect's private
dreams and administrators'
public memorials is a mess.
There should be more concern
about totality, — the relationship of new buildings to
their surroundings. For instance, the Gage towers cut off
the view of the sea and
mountains for half the central
campus.
I support democratization of
the university administration
system, — more faculty and
student involvement in the
choice of department and
faculty heads, review and
possible election of these heads
at regular intervals, — say
every five years, and student
and faculty representation on
the board of governors.
I reject the tokenism
argument of student
representation on senate.
There are now 12 student
senators out of a total of almost
100. This can represent a very
considerable force in closely
matched,  contentious   issues.
Jtosvaf
Present   University   Status:
Candidate for the degree of
PhD, department of Slavonic
studies, UBC.
University Education:
University of B.C.; Oxford
University, Brasenose
College; University of
Moscow; Charles University,
Prague, Czechoslovakia;
Jagellonian University of
Cracow, Poland.
Experience:
1) Present director of Thea
Koerner Graduate Students
centre.
2) Former president Oxford
University Postgraduate
society, Brasenose College.
3) Former secretary Oxford
University Postgraduate
Society, Brasenose College.
4) Chairman of Modern
Languages Week, University
of Calgary.
5) Executive member of
International Education Week,
University of Calgary.
6) Co-founder and chairman
of Group '67, University of
Calgary (student and faculty
discussion group).
7) Co-ordinator of United
Appeal Fund, Modern
Languages dept., University of
Calgary.
8) Organizer of first tour of
the Soviet Union by Canadian
university students under the
auspices of the University of
Calgary.
9) Debater for the Canadian
Humanities Society —- "What
is the Goal of a University
Education in Today's
Society?"
10) Member of a counselling
team that visited Calgary's
high schools establishing
contact with prospective
students. The purpose of the
committee, which was
associated with the Canadian
Humanities Society was to
meet and discuss with high
school students the academic,
social and professional
problems which would effect
the students at the post-high
school level.
"I will speak for those who
cannot speak for themselves" — with apojogies to the
SPCA!!!
PUBLIC   SERVICE   CANADA
This Competition is open to both men and women.
CAREER   OPPORTUNITIES
FOR
SCIENCE  GRADUATES
For    further    information    regarding    positions   and    required
specializations, contact your PLACEMENT OFFICE.
Application deadline: OCTOBER 23, 1972
Dr. Sidney B. Smordin
and Dr. Susan K. C. Chow
announce the relocation to new offices
for the practice of Dentistry
at 4433 West 10th Avenue
Vancouver 8, B.C.
Effective approximately October 10th, 1972
Telephone remains Two Blocks East
224-3205 of present Location
CAMPUS MINISTRY
Anglican-United-Lutheran
Study   and   Discussion
Begin   Today
Radicalism & Biblical Thought — G. Hermanson. A construction,
of ethical framework based on biblical and political concepts of
liberation, power, and commonity. Wed. noons or Thurs. 3:30.
Gospel Perspectives on Jesus — Charles Anderson views about
Jesus, his views about God, discipleship ressurection. Tues. 12:30.
Growth Group — D. Johnson. An opportunity to explore the
dynamics of relating in a group. Learning occurs through
experience. Wed. 3:30.
Old Testament — P. Fribley and C. Armerding. 5 topics to be
probed like Abraham and election - Moses and Exodus to help
one to see the Old Testament as a resource for today. Tues. at
4:30.
To sign up Ph. 224-1614 or come to the
Lutheran Campus Centre
I
CP AIR PRESENTS A SUPER SERIES
it's your century
and your music
come hear
the sound of the symphony:
20th century style
the Vancouver symphony orchestra
SUPER CONDUCTORS
AARON COPLAND    KAZUYOSHI AKIYAMA
and SIMON STREATFEILD
and great guest artists
perform four far-out concerts starting OCTOBER 6
SUPER LOW STUDENT PRICE
for all 4 concerts
or $2 per concert
concert one    October 6 jc simon streatfeiid conducts -^
norman nelson performs the BERG violin concerto -^ the
orchestra also plays STRAVINSKY * MURRAY SCHAFER
• KURT WEILL
DON'T MISS this exciting series of concerts for young
people. A thrilling experience! For full programme
call 682-8531. TICKETS NOW at the Vancouver Ticket
Centre or call 683-3255 to charge to your Eaton account.
CP
Air
this series sponsored by CPAir
L<

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