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The Ubyssey Oct 16, 1987

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 the Ubyssey
Mugabe says
use guns to
end violence
by Mary McAlister
"When you are fighting an evil
system which is using violence, I
believe that you have a moral duty
to use the gun in turn? said Zimbabwean Prime Minister Robert
Mugabe.
With these words Mugabe
made a sound endorsement of
armed struggle for the oppressed
peoples in his address to UBC
students on Wednesday.
Many students were turned
away from the auditorium in the
Student Union Building, where a
polite audience of 400 waited an
hour for Mugabe while he was
caught up in Commonwealth discussions on South Africa.
But the crowd was rewarded
when the Prime Minister arrived
to give a personal account of his
own experience with armed resistance, putting the problem of
South Africa in a regional perspective.
Mugabe described the African
peoples'peaceful protest in the
former Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe)
for decades against the racist
white minority government in
power.
"The defiance campaigns that
expressed themselves in many
parts of the country (and in South
Africa), were thwarted. People
were shot in the back as they ran
away from places of demonstration?
He said that passive resistance
does not work in a situation where
those in power are vicious people.
"They shoot recklessly, they shoot
to kill?
"When the whites regard you
as pigs, animals, they conclude
that what they are shooting are
creatures whose life is not as valuable as their own, and they shoot
with ease? he said.
Mugabe explained that a
peaceful method of change would
be the most desirable but it didn't
work for the blacks in Zimbabwe
and "it didn't work in Mozambique, it didn't work in Angola,
and in Guinea-Bisseau and
against this background we feel
that the South African blacks are
entitled to resort to armed
struggle? he said.
He issued a challenge. "If our
brothers and sisters in Canada
feel a little uneasy about our resort
to armed struggle, I would request
that they study the situation properly? Mugabe said.
The regional situation is an
alarming one, he said. "They have
rendered the entire sub-continent
a region in crisis. This is because
the Pretoria regime, which has
never accepted the sovereignty of
it's majority-ruled independent
neighbours, wants to dominate
the entire region economically,
politically, and militarily? said
Mugabe.
He said that South Africa
would like to reduce all the Frontline States to the level of Bantus-
tans so they would be unable to
support the African National
Congress, the main liberation
movement working for a free
South Africa.
Pretoria's other strategy is to
undermine regional efforts to develop a transportaion and communication infrastructure entirely
independent of South Africa.
Zimbabwe's trade routes, via
Mozambique, to the Indian ocean,
are being attacked by South African backed bandits said Mugabe.
Mozambique provides natural
routes to other land-locked countries in the region.
"We of the frontline states will
continue to insist upon comprehensive and mandatory sanctions
against Pretoria, no matter how
much of a sacrifice we will be required to make? said Mugabe.
«$*■
"™sf
ROBERT MUGABE SPEAKS to a crowd of over 400 people in SUB auditorium Wednesday    Catherine monk photo
Thatcher against sanctions
By Mike Gordon
Vancouver (CUE) — Canada must
push ahead with comprehensive,
mandatory sanctions against
South Africa, despite stiff resistance from British Prime Minister
Margaret Thatcher, said a Carleton University professor attending the Parallel Commonwealth
Conference this week.
"The foreign policies of Canada and (commonwealth countries) should not be held hostage to
Great Britain's determination to
do nothing," said Linda Freeman,
associate professor of political science at Carleton University in
Ottawa.
While Thatcher and Prime
Minister Mulroney came to blows
on the issue, only blocks away
Freeman   and   representatives
Volume 70, Number 12
from groups like the African National Congress (ANC), South
Western Africa People's Organization (SWAPO), and the Congress
of South African Trade Unions
minced no words in calling for full
sanctions against the Pretoria
Regime andeconomic and military
aid to the frontline states.
Freeman, who is writing a
book on Canada and Africa, said
even conservative 'fact finding*
delegations like the Eminent Persona Group, which included former British Tory MP Tony Barber,
and conservative ex-Prime Minister of Australia Malcolm Fraser,
point to the need for outside pressure on the Apartheid regime.
"If they can say that then
there is no denying it? she said.
Given its dominant colonial
role  in   South  Africa's  history,
Freeman says it is not surprising
that Britain is reluctant to give up
its estimated $11 billion trade and
industry links to the region.
But the situation in South
Africa is becoming more volatile,
intensifying the need for outside
pressure through sanctions, she
said.
Quoting the latest ANC figures, Freeman said over 3,000
blacks have died in South Africa in
the last 2 years, with over 30,000
people detained - 8,000 of whom
are children under 15.
The situation has gone past
the point, she said, where Western
governments like Canada can
shirk any action santioned by
groups like the ANC because of
their violent nature.
"The ANC tried non-violence
for 50 years? she said.    That
ended in Sharpeville? referring to
the 1960 incident where 69 blacks
were killed and 178 wounded by
the military in a protest against
the pass laws.
"Mulroney evokes ( the nonviolence of Mohatma) Ghandi ...
but then backs the U.S. bombing of
Libya? she said.
Though limited in scope,
Canada's sanctions have not only
helped weaken the South African
economy, she says, but served as
an important political gesture.
"We have interfered with the liberal principles of free trade," she
said.
But without pressuring the
regime to halt its campaign for
destabilization - South Africa,
Canadian and British aid to the
frontline states "is like fattening
us for the slaughter," said
Zambia's Kaunda.
Though Mulroney has been
out front on the issue of sanctions,
Freeman said Canada's foreign
policy on the frontline states
shows contradictons.
For example, External Affairs
Minister Joe Clark who has opposed the Prime Minister on the
issue of sanctions, "has said that
economic and military aid to the
frontline states is not in Canada's
practice? But between 1965 and
1971 Canada trained Tanzania's
air force, she said.
She also pointed out that
though Canada sits on a five-nation contact group on Namibia, in
Southwest Africa, the committee
has been unable to deal with South
Africa's expansionist military
aims.
In 1966, the U.N. declared
South Africa to be illegally occupying Namibia.
Meanwhile, Canada is contravening a U.N. special charter barring any extraction of Namibian
resources, by allowing Rio Algom,
a Canadian crown corporation, to
mine uranium from the country.
Vancouver, B.C. Friday, October 16,1987 Cattle Prods? Bubble Gum? No-stick tape? Dead
Animals? The debate continues. Is it, you wonder,
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Page 2
THE UBYSSEY
October 16,1987 Muinanga concerned about
Mozambique education
Apartheid groups disagree
By Katherine Monk
"How do you approach the
education of children who have
seen their parents brutally murdered ?" asked Mozambique's education minister, Paulo Muianga.
Speaking to approximately
one-hundred UBC students
Thursday, Muianga said he must
deal with a generation brought up
in violence.
"Every hour children are
dying violently in Mozambique?
said Muiarfga. "What are you
going to teach these children about
mankind when they see people
dying around them every day?"
Many children are no
longer able to go to school as over
four hundred schools have been
totally destroyed, said Muianga.
Even the children who are
able to go to school are pulled out
earlier and earlier because there is
simply not enough manpower to
keep the country going, Muianga
added.
Education minister Muianga
spoke after a film presentation in a
forum sponsored by AMS Speakers, WUSC, UBC Students for a
Free South Africa, and Students
Support Mozambique.
The   South   Africa   backed
RENAMO ( The Mozambique National Resistance) guerrillas and
their assaults on the civilian population, as well as on
Mozambiques's main trade routes,
were some of the main problems
i%" y
Paulo Muianga
illustrated in the introductory
film.
Mozambique is located to the
north of South Africa and provides
an important link to ports for the
interior southern African states.
Mozambique gained independence from Portugal in 1975
after a violent revolution, and has
since been struggling to maintain
sovereignty in the volatile south
African region.
" It's only been twelve years
since independence in a very
troubled situation? said Muianga.
"We've decreased illiteracy by
twenty percent," he said. But with
continuing unrest the progress
which has been made towards the
development of a true democratic
government and reformed education will always be put after national defense, added Muianga.
The post-revolution socialist
government signed a friendship
treaty with Botha's South African
government in an effort to stop the
South African support of the rebel
forces.
The treaty was supposed to
put an end to the bloodshed in exchange for Mozambique's refusal
to harbour NAC activists. Unfortunately, said Muinanga, the powerful business concerns in
Mozambique, Portugal, and
South Africa have kept the RENAMO active.
Muianga said the quicker the
Pretoria government is forced out
of office, the sooner Mozambique
will have peace.
Prof fears deal will bring
standardized education
By Ross McLaren
Anti-apartheid groups
brought their struggle to UBC this
week, but instead of fighting racists, they ended up fighting among
themselves.
The African National Congress and the Black Consciousness Movement were invited to
speak on Tuesday at an AMS
Commonwealth Public Forum on
South Africa and Namibia.
Posters advertised the ANC,
BCM, and the South West African
National Union as speakers but,
at the last moment, the ANC
pulled out.
According to the ANC chief
representative in Canada,
"the ANC doesn't want to debate
fellow South Africans. Those Canadians who wish to hear from
other SA organizations have a
right to do so."
"It is the prerogative of the
ANC to decide with whom it will
appear or not appear," said Yusuf
Saloojee.
But Michael Moeti, a UBC
student and BCM member, be
lieves the ANC refusal to share a
platform highlights the undemocratic nature of the ANC.
"The ANC decision not to show
up shows they have something to
hide. They want to have a monopoly over the struggle and over Canadian support. This is reprehensible," said Moeti.
But according to several professors conversant with South
African politics, the ANC speaks
for most South African blacks.
John Saul, of York University,
said "the BCM is a minor trend in
South Africa. This group doesn't
represent much support... the
ANC is the strongest strand of
resistance in South Africa?
"There are no real grounds for
discussion between the groups.
The ANC has made it clear that
once apartheid is overthrown
there will be an open political process," said Saul.
Steve Gelb, South African
economist and professor, supported Saul's assertion claiming
that "the majority of (black) people
support the ANC position."
OTTAWA (CUP) — The Canada—U.S. free trade agreement
signed October 3 means university education in the two countries will eventually become
standardized, says an opponent
to the deal.
University of Ottawa political science proiessor ana Liouncn
of Canadians Policy Chair John
Trent said that since the agreement helps more Canadian professionals enter the U.S. service
industry, the result will be a
trend toward the "harmonization" of qualification examinations, potentially resulting in a
common education system.
ifent saia a recent agreement between the Royal Archi
tecture Society in Canada and its
American counterpart that standardizes professional requirements in the two countries will
likely be echoed in other fields,
like medicine and engineering.
And while he admits it has
some fine architects, Trent said
with its small population relative
to the U.S., Canada will not be the
one that determines the standards.
One of the few sectors in
which the U.S. has a trade surplus is the service industry and
Canada is a prime target for
expansion, Trent said.
Once the merging of Canadian and U.S. professional is
complete, he said it won't be long
before the two countries share
labour unions and, eventually,
crime rates.
"The danger we face is the
Americanization of Canada,"
Trent said. "We're opening the
door to the importation of American standards and culture."
Trent is a spokesperson for the
Pro-Canada Network, an umbrella group ot opponents to tree
trade started last March, which
claims a total membership of 10
million.
It comprises 15 trade organizations, including the Assembly of
First nations, the Canadian
Labour Congress, the Church
Coalition for Economic Justice,
the Canadian Teachers' Federation and the National Farmers'
Union.
The goal of Pro-Canada Network, Trent said, is to turn Cana-.
dian public opinion against the
free trade deal, which it believes
will mean the large-scale loss of
Canadian jobs and sovreignty.
Funded by a $1.5 million
grant from the Canadian Labour
Congress, the organization holds
debates and advertises in the
media to get its message across to
the public.
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October 16,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 3 Hockey team
loses cup
By Brent Lymer
Last weekend at the UBC
winter sports complex the Thunderbird ice hockey team hosted the
Empress Cup, a tournament designed to iron out any pre-season
problems.
The tournament, which featured teams from the University of
Calgary, the University of Regina,
and the Southern Alberta Institute of Technology (S.A.I.T.), followed a round-robin format that
would, if all things went according
to plan, feature U.B.C. and Calgary in a tournament deciding,
final match.
Fortunately, things went according to plan. On Friday, Calgary manhandled S.A.I.T. in a 7-2
victory and U.B.C. kicked
Regina's butt by the same score.
On Saturday, Calgary and
Regina ignored defense and decided to shoot it out; but, Regina
had difficulty keeping up with
Calgary's open ice play and lost
9-6.
Meanwhile, U.B.C. faced-off
against S.A.I.T. in the day's second match. Fine goaltending and a
strong offensive punch brought
U.B.C. its second victory of the
tournament as they downed
S.A.I.T. 3-0.
U.B.C.'s second victory tied
the 'Birds with tournament leading Calgary with four points, and
guess what?
Surprise, surprise, Sunday's
championship match featured
UBC and Calgary.
Although U.B.C. played
strong throughout the final
match, Calgary's depth was too
much to handle as they downed
the Birds 6-3. This was Calgary's
fifth Empress Cup victory in five
years.
Top scorer of the tournament
was Calgary's Terry Houlder, who
notched ten points. The top Bird
was everyone's favorite flying
"munchkin" Mark Trotzuk, who
bagged five points.
Tact over tension:
Ombudsoffice open for bitchin'
By Corinne Bjorge
The AMS Ombudsman wants
to solve students' problems.
"It's not an official role? said
Ron Paton of his new position. But
Paton feels a high profile for his
office will help accomplish his
goals. If students know the office is
there, they'll use it.
And Paton says there is real
potential for change, especially
within the AMS. "Since it (the
ombudsoffice) is an AMS service, I
have the power to obtain documents within the AMS."
The AMS Vice President is
the person in charge of the ombudsoffice, but Paton insists that
the office must be independent.
"(There should be) little contact with executive members if
there is a complaint. It's (important) to maintain the image that
we are very separate. Appearances are important? said Paton.
Paton said there were several
complaints over the summer
about parking, and this will be a
key area of concentration this fall.
"The regulation about having to
pay a fine before (lodging) an appeal is very unfair and probably
unconstitutional," said Paton.
"If it's not resolved suitably,
then I'd try to make a point of
going out and looking for other
complaints," said Paton.
Paton is also interested in
helping the Disabled Students
Association get a higher profile on
campus. "It's ironic that they give
an honorary degree to Rick
Hansen...but don't have full access
to the Gallery and the Rt? said
Paton. "Hansen deserves the degree, but they (the administration) are not looking after the disabled students at the university?
he said.
Paton said the ombudsoffice
was quite active in the early '80s,
but hasn't had a very high profile
for the past few years. Partly Paton attributes the inactivity to
conflict between the ombudsperson and the AMS executive, but
Paton also blames the low honorarium.
"It's peanuts? said Paton.
"That, I'm sure, is part of the problem."
The ombudsperson currently
receives an honorarium of
$300.00.
Paton compared UBC's part-
time position with the full time
position at Simon Fraser University. "They have the time to keep
up everything. I was surprised at
first when I saw a small university
with more (hours) than a bigger
university, but the student base
(at SFU) has a reputation of being
more radical."
Soccer 'Birds trail UVIC by single point in the west
By Sean McLaughlin
The UBC men's soccer team
remains hunting for a berth in the
CIAU playoffs after battling to a
scoreless draw with the UVic Vikings on the Point Grey Campus
Wednesday.
With a record of 3-0-2 head
coach Dick Mosher's Thunderbirds still trail the rival UVic
squad (4-0-1) by a single point in
the Canada West race.
After 45 minutes it looked as
though UBC would have to settle
for crumbs instead of the half loaf
they walked away with at full
time. The Vikings dominated and
created half a dozen solid scoring
opportunities during the first
stanza.
UBC goalkeeper, Rob Zambrano, was steady throughout the
contest.
The 'Birds did not hesitate to
provide explanations for Victoria's
early dominace.
"UVic kept the ball on the
carpet and played impressive one
touch soccer? said veteran UBC
defender Alec Percy.
The 'Birds tried to counter
with long-balls from the back line
to frontrunners Fred Torres and
Kevin Reilly. The strategy was
more wishful thinking than effective play on the part of the Thunderbirds.
Mosher was able to reorganize his troops for an impressive
second half rally. Substitute Tom
Kim  distributed  the ball  effec
tively from the midfield while
Mike Mosher and Colin Pettingale
penetrated the Vikings back line
for a number of scoring chances.
UBC's best chance to- break
the deadlock came in the 52nd
minute when midfielder Joe Pesht
sent a through ball to Mike
Mosher and tested the UVic
keeper with a low hard shot at
close range.
Tough tackling by midfielder
Ken Moysiuk and defender Gregor
Young as well as an incredible goal
line clearance by Percy in the 65th
minute helped preserve the tie.
UBC captain, Kevin Colbow
knows how to conquer the Vikings
in their next confrontation.
"If we play a full game with
the intensity and resolve which we
demonstrated in the final 30 minutes today we can pick up two
points in Victoria."
The 'Birds travel to the University of Calgary and the University of Lethbridge this weekend.
1987-88 BUDGET FOR THE ALMA MATER SOCIETY
INTRODUCTION
Every student enrolled in a credit course at U.B.C. automatically becomes a member of the
Alma Mater Society. The A.M.S. is a large and diverse organization which provides a comprehensive array of student services. Often the A.M.S. provides the services that the
University is unwilling or unable to provide.
Each year the A.M.S. collects a fee of $32.50 from all full time U.B.C. students, and a proportionate amount from part time students.
From this fee, $15 is alloted for capital building projects such as a daycare centre, Student
Union Building expansion, south campus barn renovations, athletic facilities, etc. $4.50 is
alloted to support the major costs of the U.B.C. Intramural Athletic Program. A further
$0.50 is used to sponsor two U.N. refugee students here at U.B.C. The A.M.S. is left with
$12.50 of the original $32.50 to subsidize our many service organizations and student government. The breakdown of student fees reflects the traditional support given by U.B.C.
students to campus activities.
There are some aspects of this year's budget which should be highlighted. Although no
increase is expected in the amount of student fees collected, the set-up and operation of an
A.M.S. Typesetting and Graphics facility has enabled us to achieve substantial costs
savings in our publications and in-house literature production. These savings and the
consistent increase in business revenue have made increases in the funding of all A.M.S.
services possible. They have made possible the recommitment to allocations pledged to
the CITR High Power Reserve. They have also enabled the A.M.S. to increase all levels of
honoraria currently granted AMS officials and service organization volunteers. Most
notably the A.M.S. has taken HUGE steps in granting $10,000.00 in honoraria to the
editors of The Ubyssey.
The A.M.S. continues to expand the services it provides to the students of U.B.C. Our
commitment to entrepreneurial growth in commercial ventures must be continued
unabated. Only through these long-term commitments can we hope to increase our levels
of service. As one of the strongest and most active student societies in Canada, we must be
wary of the erosion of the commitment to what we can achieve. An inability to recognize a
Trojan invasion of apathy, complacancy , short sightedness and conservatism could prove
to be the A.M.S.'s Achilles heel. Likewise, the A.M.S. must be ever-watchful of following
leaders who are commited to anything other than the growth of the A.M.S.
Working from our position of strength and stability we can mature into a student body
which no longer craves for student involvement and spirit, but effectively inspires it. Our
only limitations are the limits of our energy and persevence and the fear of what others
say cannot be done.
Sincerely,
Don Isaak
Director of Finance
REVENUE
Fees
Investment
Building
Commercial Bookings
Copy Centre
Games Room
Gallery Lounge
Pit Pub
Snack Attack
Tortellini's
Vending
Subcetera
Summer Film Series
Used Bookstore
Office Services
Total Revenue
Non-discretionary Allocations
AMS Bursury Fund
Art Fund
C.P.A.C. Reserve
Intramurals
Refugee Student Fund
Registration Photos
Sub Management Reserve
SUB Renovations & Replacement Reserve
Total Non-Discretionary Expenses
Revenue Sub-Total
Less Constitutional Margin (5%)
Total Discretionary Income
SUBSIDIES
Student Government
Art Gallery Committee
AMS Burary Committee
AMS Women's Committee
External Affairs
Gays & Lesbians
High School Conference
Homecoming Committee
Job Link
Ombudsoffice
Programs
Speakeasy
Student Administrative Commision
Students' Council
Volunteer Connections
Disabled Students' Association
First Year Students Committee
Publications
Ubyssey
Inside Ubyssey
Summer Ubyssey
Publications Committee
Typesetting & Graphics
CITR Radio
CITR Radio Station
CITR Disco
CITRDiscorder
CITR High Power Allocation
Ancillary Operations
Business Office
Food & Beverage Administration
Stores
Whistler Cabin
Workshop
Total Expenses
Net Income
Discretionary Allocations
Net Income After Allocations
AJVLS. BUDGET
1986/87 ACTUAL
749,043
99,663
119,284
53,456
( 2,359)
63,106
4,820
30,104
(8,095)
2,212
11,648
156
1,559
(22,527)
1,102,110
11,500
1,500
351,114
104,377
11,618
5,342
12,497
9,966
507,914
594,1 96
29,710
2,248
633
2,224
4,846
250
(2,271)
2,203
11,489
836
18.483
4,346
23,671
62,671
1,072
74,767
1,769
9,465
0
70,579
(11,893)
1,915
5,000
240,861
0
0
24,387
 0_
549,551_
~"i 4",935_
\ 4,408_
"527
1987/88 BUDGET
750,000
80,000
151,000
22,950
9,200
61,200
8,916
16,500
1,000
1,000
6,000
183
(2,095)
(9,000)
1,102,854
11 ,500
1,500
351,000
105,000
11,620
6,000
11,620
8,000
56(5,240
59G.614
566.783
2,418
0
2,297
7,445
715
250
1,062
14,075
1,562
20,000
4,400
33,515
81,870
1,891
220
208
31,287
4,400
9,379
0
10,280
77,115
(15,450)
285
20,000
232,000
0
0
21,500
      0
_565,724
l",059
_'_     ' 0
f.059
29,831
Page 4
THE UBYSSEY
October 16,1987 THE ALMA MATER SOCIETY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Balance Sheet
April 30,1987
(with comparative figures for 1986)
Assets
123Z
i_a_
Liabilities and Surplus
General Funds
1987
1986
Current assets:
Cash and term deposits
Accounts receivable:
Publications advertising
Sundry accounts and advances (Schedule 1)
Accrued interest (Schedule 2)
Inventories
Loans to student society's and other
organizations, current portion (Note 2)
Prepaid expenses
658,821
18,775
80,545
979
214,362
10,074
950
396,117
30,479
54,816
2,078
184,513
23,900
596
Current liabilities:
Acounts payable and accrued charges
Due to clubs and societies (schedule 3)
Total current liabilities
Special purpose reserves and provisions
(Schedule5)
554,038
259.076
813,114
823,284
627,244
168.696
795,940
797,350
Total current assets
984,506
692,499
Total current liabilities and reserves
1,636,398
1,593,290
Investments, at cost (market value - $9,400;
1986-$9,400) (Schedule 2)
9.775
9,775
Retained income, per accompanying statement
133,400
132,873
Total current assets and investments
994,281
702,274
Contributed surplus - Art Collection
495,250
444,800
Loans to student societies and other organizations,
non - current portion (Note 2)
775,517
1,023,889
Ait Collection
Total general funds assets
495.250
2.265.048
444.800
2.170.963
Total general funds liabilities and surplus
2,265,048
2,170,963
Student facilities, at cost less
depreciation (Note 3)
4,564,216
4,821,510
Student Facilities
Loan from General fund (Note 2)
640,525
938,374
Equity in student facilities (Schedule 7)
3,923,691
3,883,136
Total student facilities liabilities and equity
4,564,216
4,821,510
Commitments (Note 4).
6.829.264
6,992,473
6,829,264
6,992,473
Revenue:
Student fees
Aquatic Centre levies
Refugee Student levy
Grad class fees
Graduate Students'
Association levies
Undergraduate Societies
fee levies
Investment income
Business operations, net (Schedule 8)
Used Bookstore
Rental income
Sundry
Non-discretionary allocations:
Refugee Student levy
Grad class fees
Graduate Students' Association
Intramural fees
Undergraduate Societies fee
levies, including special levies
Registration photos
S.U.B. Art Fund
A.M.S. Bursary reserve
A.M.S. Bursary reserve - rentals
Capital projects acquisition reserve
Management reserve
Repair and replacement reserve
Discretionary allocations:
Special purpose reserves and
Provisions (Snedule 5)
Expenditure:
Student government (Schedule 9)
Publications (Schedule 10)    ,
C.I.T.R. Radio (Schedule 11)
Administration, student
activities (Schedule 12)
Whistler Cabin (Shcedule 13)
Excess of revenue over expenditure
Statement of Revenue and Expenditure
Year ended April 30,1987
(With comparative figures for 1986)
1987
1986
$749,043
11,618
29,516
4,149
134,690
99,663
251,429
1,599
27,298
1,309,005
756,824
5,121
11,567
29,736
4,242
115,774
115,947
206,446
(323)
7,795
 17
1,253,146
$11,618
29,516
4,149
104,377
134,690
5,342
1,500
11,500
27,298
351,114
12,497
703,567
605,438
59,000
546,438
11,567
29,736
4,242
104,258
115,774
5,419
1,500
2,500
7,795
348,648
12,668
11,595
655,702
597,444
25,500~
571,944
Statement of Changes in Financial Position
Year ended April 30,1987
(With comparative figures for 1986)
General Fund
1987
1986
134,062
86,002
60,598
240,861
24,388
545,911
$     527
162,737
80,857
58,158
242,202
27,499
571,453
491
Operating activities:
Excess of revenue over expenditure
Add (deduct)
Net changes in non-cash working
Capital balance:
Current assets
Current liabilities
Cash applied to operations
Investing activities:
Decrease in investments
Decrease in loans to student societies, and
other organizations, net
Increase in special purpose reserves and
provisions
Cash provided by investing activities
Increase in cash and term deposits, during the year
Cash and term deposits, beggining of year
Cash and term deposits, end of year
527
(29,303)
17,174
(11,602)
248,372
25,934
274,306
262,704
396,117
658,821
491
(30,903)
(261,793)
(292,205)
50,000
141,608
136,991
328,599
36,394
359,723
396,117
Schedule of Student Government Expenses
Year ended April 30,1987
(With comparative figures for 1986)
1987 1986
Student Government expenses:
Council:
Constituency aid $
General
Job link
External affairs
Student leadership
Homecoming committee
High school conference
Food bank
S.A.C.:
Security
Travel grants
Special projects
General
Election
Art Gallery
Service organizations:
Speakeasy
Volunteer connections
Women's committee
Summer film series
Ombuds office
Programs:
Coordinator
Concerts
Orientation
Speakers
Special events
Video/Program
2,250
2,400
60,785
72,918
11,489
12,391
4,846
2,647
2,745
1,234
2,203
8,301
(2,271)
1,995
(467)
-
81,580
101,886
3,500
508
2,280
3,915
2,077
2,060
10,001
9,328
5,813
5,560
2,008
3,867
25,679
25,238
4,346
4,476
1,072
950
2,224
4,341
(157)
(146)
836
790
8,321
10,411
30,520
22,430
(13,150)
(1,656)
(674)
880
2,476
3,710
-
1,509
(690)
(1,671)
18,482
25,202
134,062
162,737
Publications
Year ended April 30,1987
(WUh comparative figures for 1986)
1987
1986
Expenditures:
Administrative
Salaries and benefits (Summer)
Bad debts
Distribution
Sales commisions
Printing
Photography
Mailing
Honoraria
Telephone
CUP membership fees & conference
Stationary & supplies
Staff meals
Sundry
Student handbook (Inside)
Revenue:
Alumnni - W. Gage grant
Display advertising:
A.M.S.
Local
National
Classified advertizing
Subscriptions
Student handbook (Inside)
Excess of expenditure over revenue       $
53,580
56,099
5,496
4,670
2,063
2,382
7,175
8,246
7,547
5,100
148,669
149,401
1,365
1,380
2,039
1,775
2,124
1,472
3,764
2,852
20,329
19,636
774
956
3,508
3,381
521
899
32,966
29,749
291,920        287,998
1,000
1,000
18,655
17,994
102,757
111,887
23,966
26,051
10,491
8,850
170
147
48,879
41,212
205,918
207,141
86,002
80,857
C.I.T.R. Radio
Year ended April 30,1987
(With comparative figures for 1986)
C.I.T.R. Radio:
Salaries and Benefits
Administrative
F.M. Equipment
Conference
Music Department
News Department
Sports Department
Engineers Department
Membership
Miscallaneous
Engineering/Promo Revenue
Grant-U.B.C.
C.I.T.R. Disco:
Salaries and Benefits
Administrative
Shindig Prizes
Promotion
Equipment
Miscallaneous Revenue
Disco Revenue
Shindig Revenue
C.I.T.R. Publications:
Salaries and Commisions
Administrative
Press Costs
Miscallaneous Revenue
Advertising Revenue
Excess of expenditure over revenue       $
1987
37,883
41,119
10.46B
7,097
7,970
11,594
1,770
1,838
7,626
6,504
8,341
8,783
2,429
625
2,985
6,652
(4,612)
(4,069)
542
(5,237)
(3,275)
(2,600)
(1,500)
-
70,577
72,306
15,825
14,921
1,764
-    2,158
906
1,102
478
776
2,618
220
(75)
(30,742)
(30,867)
(2,617)
(3,409)
(11,893)
(15,049)
13,749
7,092
2,033
1,319
32,082
24,821
(4,551)
(2,763)
(41,399)
(29,568)
1,914
901
60,598
58,158
October 16,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 5 Filmgoers awake
Rejoice! For once getting off your butt means staying on your
butt, or to be more precise, putting your butt down on a seat at one of
the five theatres hosting the sixth Vancouver International Film
Festival.
Over a sixteen day period (October 15-31), one hundred and
sixty films will be screened. They're organized under several themes
which have fancy titles: Cinema of the Commonwealth, The Cinema
of our Time, Silver Screen Selection, The Worlds of Asia, Canadian
Images, and Critics' Choice.
Obviously, the big problem is deciding what to see. How do you
decide? Well, first of all, get ahold of a Film Festival guide. They
cost three bucks (unfortunately) and are available around town at
various bookstores and movie theatres. Then sit down with a pot of
coffee or a jug of beer and read it.
But beware: the short descriptions of the movies are not always
accurate. Remember, they're all written by people who want you to
see the movie. So talk to your friends about movies they've seen.
Talk to the stranger next to you in the lineup. And read reviews.
Like the ones on these pages.
Now you face another decision: how do you pay for this? You'll
pay $5.50 to see a movie, unless it's a weekday matinee, which is
$3.50. Or you can get a Student Festival Pass for $80.00. Ifyou see
15 movies, you'll save money with one of these. Another option is a
Discount Pass which is good for any ten screenings. Tickets and
Passes are available at all VTC/CBO Outlets, or you can charge by
phone at 280-4444. Unless a show is sold out, tickets will also be
available at the door.
The five venues involved are: The Vancouver East Cinema,
2290 Commercial Dr. at 7th; The Discovery Theatre in BC Complex
on The Expo Site.; The Ridge Theatre, 3131 Arbutus at 16th; The
Hollywood Theatre, 3128 W. Broadway at Balaclava; and The Pacific
Cine Centre, 1131 Howe St. at Helmcken.
Twenty-Four hour Film Festival Information is available by
phoning 685-VIFF.
So get off your butt -1 mean, on your butt.
GMAT     LSAT     GRE
(Graduate Management
Admission Test)
(Law School Admission Test)
(Graduate Record Exam)
WEEKEND TEST PREPARATION COURSES
University of British Columbia
• Includes Sexton text book, lectures and ^
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q          .   • Instructors hold PhD, MBA or LLB.   ;Wf
oeXLOn Educational Centers f-  call
PROFESSIONALS IN TEST PREPARATION 222-8272
3681 West Fourth Avenue at Alma
Vancouver, B.C.
734-1205
j    This coupon is valid Mon. to Sat. /11:30 am -1:30 pm / 4:30 pm - 9:30 pm. Offer expires Oct. 31/87.    I
Movie sings mermaids' song
Sheila McCarthy
Polly Vandersma
(Sheila McCarthy), a quirky, naive
young lady, is the heart and soul
rrm of Patricia Rozema's whimsical, gently
[.[■mm probing film, IVe Heard the Mermaids
Singing.Real life is a bit beyond Polly.
She is barely competent as part-time
secretary to curator Gabrielle St. Peres
(Paule Baillargeon). Her imaginative life,
however, is rich. As she bumbles through her
work day, she daydreams, envisioning herself as
a witty, articulate art critic whom Gabrielle (with
whom she is half in love) would respect. Filmed
in pastel tints through a hazy lens, Polly's dreams
are more real than "real life* for her. In them, she
plays the central role, while in real life she is often
the voyeur.Polly's flights of fancy ara their most
fantastical when she drifts off in the middle of taking
photographs. Photography is Polly's all-consuming hobby.
Every free moment is spent clicking away on her camera,
developing film and plastering the walls of her dingy apartment with the results, all
for pleasure. Public recognition is irrelevant.
Not so for the curator. It turns out that Gabrielle is not quite as self-possessed as
her sophisticated exterior seems to indicate. She is obsessed with becoming an artist,
while transforming her intellectual apprehension of art into creative energy.
Gabrielle, it seems, can paint. She and her lover, Mary (Ann-Marie McDonald),
share a studio, at which Gabrielle unveils a great painting for Polly (represented as a
luminescent sheet of white). Polly believes that Gabrielle embodies this light - that
she is an artist of the highest order. She submits a package of her beloved photographs anonymously to Gabrielle, hoping that they can share a bond as fellow artists.
The capriciousness and cruelty of the would-be-artist who cannot be sensitive to
another's dreams is revealed when Gabrielle dismisses the photos as "the trite made
flesh". She's too harsh a critic for her own, or Polly's, good.
When the plot takes a sharp twist, the wrong done to Polly is rectified in a completely unexpected way for which you're prepared all along but in such a subtle fashion
that it still takes you by surprise.
Don't let elfin Polly fool you. When emotion and intellect confront one another in
Polly and Gabrielle, Polly won't necessarily be the loser. From which does the artist
spring? Which of them is the artist, really? And who is to judge between?
By Carolyn Sale
Preaching spoils sensitive story
Comrades, a British film written and directed by Bill Douglas, tells the
story of six English farm labourers, who, in 1834, were sentenced to seven
years transportation in Australia on trumped up charges of "administering
illegal oaths". -
The film is an expansive, impressionistic work that relies more on nuance,
gesture and indirection than on dialogue, action and narrative. The film's
subtlety, however, is hindered by a preachy and maudlin final speech, delivered by actor Robin Soans as George Loveless, the unofficial leader of the organizing farmers. Moreover the farmers, known as the Tolpuddle martyrs,
and their families, are portrayed as too wholesome, too honest and too good
to be altogether beliveable.
Comrades does, though, have much to say about shifting class values in
19th century England and the emerging consciousness of an oppressed, but
not necessarily uneducated, labouring class.
The film tends to drag in parts, as when the camera endlessly travels from
object to object in the little hamlet of Tolpuddle, supposedly impressing upon
the viewer the 'feeling1 of the town, and itis uncomfortably manipulative in
others, as when a reformed ne'er-do-well expounds to a boy the beauty of
having a soul that no one can-take away from you. Ultimately, though,
Comrades is a beautiful film to look at. Gsile Tattersall's cinematography, suggesting a Hardyesque landscape in tones of amber and grey, is superb.
The large cast of this three hour long film features unknowns who
are all equally fine in their understated portrayals of peasants living simply
off the land and by the fruits of their extensive labours.
This movie grows on you gradually after you have left the theatre. Its
careful attention to detail creates images that linger once the film has ended.
By Steven Chess
A prize winner? No surprise!
The Kid Brother, directed by internationally
acclaimed Canadian filmmaker Claude Gagnon,
was the first Canadian film to win the Grand
Prize at the Montreal World Film Festival, and
that is not surprising. The film is an intense
family drama, about the stress of having a
severely handicapped child in a poor working
class family.
Kenny Easterday plays himself, a 13-year-old
boy who had his legs amputated at a very young
age due to a spinal defect. He walks on his hands
and gets around by pushing himself on his
skateboard, and does not perceive himself as
handicapped. He rebels against wearing artificial
legs to high school so that he will appear more
normal to others, and argues that wearing his
legs only makes everyone else more uncomfortable.
The family characters are somewhat stereotypical; Sharon Kay is the older sister who left
home at the age of six to live with her grandparents, claiming that after Kenny was born she
ceased to exist for her parents.
Kenny's real-life brother plays himself as a
troubled,sullen adolescent. The mother is a suffering working-class mom who keeps the family
together despite years of hard knocks and setbacks. The performance that makes the film is
that of the father, a janitor who worries about all
his kids, and brings home a shopping bag full of
books, convinced that getting an education is
their ticket to "getting out" of constant poverty
and emotional hardship.
When a French film crew comes to make a film
about Kenny, the family is turned upside down.
Sharon Kay, the older sister, returns home to keep
up appearances, and in the hope that this will be
her showbiz break, and suddenly the family is
forced to pretend that they are all well-adjusted to
Kenny's illness for the sake of the director's
creative vision. The scenes with the film crew are
humorous, and question the integrity of documentary filmmaking.
As the filming comes to an end, the family
begins to break up under the pretense of their
idyllic life. For the first time we see the siblings'
view of Kenny, as a rebellious, spoiled and manipulative boy. Kenny is desperate to keep the family
together, and forces his brother and sister to
express their anger towards him. Each kid
realizes that they are not alone in their guilt
towards their dysfunctional family.
The only problem with the film is the hoky
music track. The Beachcombers-like music
undermines the dramatic possibilities of the film,
preventing it from being a sophisticated, well-
crafted family study.
The Kid Brother is a film that will be ?
talked about for a long time. It reflects the common
problems of the families, and shows us how a
tragedy can be a learning experience, as well as a
means of drawing a family closer together.
By Lisa Doyle
Miracles
When film director Saul Rubinek was a c'hild, his
parents had nightmares about the war. Now that
he's grown up, he's drawn on the stories they told
him of their frightening experiences during the\
holocaust to make a movie. The result, So Many
Miracles, produced so many tears in the audience .
that a dozen Kleenexes are recommended.
For twenty- eight months, the Rubineks (then 22
years old) were hidden by Sofia, a Polish villager
they barely knew, who constantly fought with her
husband over turning the Rubineks in. Several
times they were nearly discovered, but always
survived through what Mrs. Rubinek says were a
"series of miracles".
This film recounts the Rubineks' period of hiding
and chronicles their return to Poland forty years
later to see Sofia and her son, Maniek, before they
die. The film is narrated by the Rubineks, who
reminisce about what it was like to hide in fear, and
to take each day as thanks for being alive.
The journey is important for their son Saul, too,
because finally the questions that he felt would be
too painful for his parents to answer are answered.
It is not overly sentimental, but it is moving,
simply because we see the Rubineks coming to terms
with their nightmarish past, and we see Saul
gaining a sense of belonging.
One gets the feeling that,after the Rubineks have
finally been able to thank the people who saved their
lives, Saul's connection with his parents will be
tighter, and their nightmares will be less.
By Lisa Doyle
#»
'#* -"«r. • *** ■
•N^i '^%*W ..»'
*..
\"y
4 ?-?-?. J
Christine Lahti as Sylvie in Housekeeping
Keeping a
singular house
Housekeeping, the latest movie from director Bill Forsyth
("Gregory's Girl", "Local Hero", "Comfort and Joy"), is the tenderly-
crafted portrait of Sylvie (Christine Lahti), a free spirit who, after
living for years as a solitary itinerant, attempts - hopelessly - to
provide a home for her twice-orphaned nieces, Ruthie and Lucille.
Completely oblivious to social norms, Sylvie is incapable of
moulding Ruthie and Lucille into conventional young adults, a failing for which neither Lucille nor the society of the small town Fin-
gerbone will forgive her.
She wanders around town improperly dressed and errandless,
passing her time riding the freight cars in and out of town, fraternizing with the hobos. Or she boats across the lake to an abandoned
homestead in a valley that the sun never reaches to try to catch the
children that she imagines live in the quiet woods.
Crazy? Madness is simply a matter of perspective as a priceless
moment in the film illustrates. As Sylvie and Ruthie row away
across the lake in a boat that Sylvie has found covered in branches
("Someone's gone to a great deal of trouble to hide this", says Sylvie),
a man runs along the lakeside waving fishing gear and hollering.
"He does this every morning? says Sylvie, unperturbed.
"It must be his boat," from Ruthie.
"Either that or he's crazy," as she rows calmly away.
For Lucille and the people of Fingerbone who cannot understand that Sylvie's wandering is emblematic of a search for spirituality, her behaviour is scandalous.
Ruthie, however, shares Sylvie's sensitivity. They are both
haunted by their tragic family past - the death of their grandfather
when a train derailed and plunged all its inhabitants into the lake,
and the suicide of Helen, Sylvie's sister and Ruthie's mother.
Ruthie is pulled between this kindred spirit and the sister who
has been her sole companion for over ten years. She wants both
their loves but must choose between subscribing to Lucille's rigid
model of how young ladies must dress, think and talk pretty, or
running free with Sylvie.
Andrea Burchill is strong as the prim and self-righteous Lucille.
Sara Walker is tremulous and uncertain as Ruthie making Her seem
weak-minded rather than sensitive. Christine Lahti gives us a
touching Sylvie, full of the courage it takes to create one's self
according to no pattern but one's own.
By Carolyn Sale [
Page 6
THE UBYSSEY
October 16,1987
October 16,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 7 Most art
pales next to Mozart
Requium evokes visions of angels and flaming hell
Something Big happened over at the Orpheum last weekend. Approximately 250
men and women got together and performed Mozart's last work, the great Requiem
Mass (for the dead - but really for those left behind) in D minor.
To make this Requiem, have 150 people bellow at the top of their lungs according
to certain precise mathematical relationships, add one small orchestra with stick-
waver, throw in liberal doses of solo bellowing by four specialists, and then cook for at
least 45 minutes in Mozart's oven. Yields: a rather startling effect.
Yes, the Vancouver Bach	
Choir makes a big noise; at times SYMPHONY
overwhelming, here and there Vancouver Symphony Orchestra with
ethereal. Conductor Bruce Pullan, The Vancouver Bach Choir & Guest Soloists
the VBC's music director, fared  ,	
surprisingly well despite the technical problems involved in conducting both choir and
orchestra at the same time. Whereas a choir responds to rolling oceanic invocations,
orchestras prefer to know where the beat is. Pullan's stick-arm administered the
beating while his left arm did the caressing, and a rather nifty compromise was
achieved. Clearly, this work was right up his alley.
The four solo singers - Rosemarie Landry, soprano; Sandra Graham, Mezzo-
Soprano; Richard Margison, Tenor; Don Gerrard, Bass - were visually and aurally
fascinating: visually because to sing is not merely to bellow but also to be a philosophy
with one's body, making particular use of the vocal chords and chest (just as in dance,
the whole body is used); i.e. one's body becomes an instrument to be played by the
composer (or choreographer).
Veteran Don Gerrard, with his deep dark voice, his silver hair and his regal
dignity, was the right man for a work as grave as the Requiem.
As for rising yoting Canadian Richard Margison, feisty and bald from all those
high notes, apparently he wanted to demonstrate that if one is too short to touch the
roof, at least one can raise it with loud noise. The enthusiasm was admirable but
perhaps better suited to the opera, the "power-station of emotions", to quote filmmaker Alexander Kluge.
Oop, and then there was Sandra Graham. From the balcony, she appeared as a
precocious, glittering young mermaid surrounded by admiring sailors. ITiis reviewer
smelt something that didn't belong - namely sex - but he liked her warm mellifluous
warbling.
Rosemarie Landry should have stood next to Gerrard: with her 'well-fed, well-read'
aristocratic look and Gerrard's stern, commanding presence, the two together might
have governed the United Federation of Planets.
Landry's voice had a slightly unpleasant brittleness - like her limbs, no doubt -
but she captured the Requiem's mood more successfully than did the two younger
singers. Persons who are closer to death appear to know more about it.
Not to mention the VSO, who played cleanly and unobtrusively - much to their
advantage - and Greg Cox's unlikely trombone solo, which was lovely.
Altogether, this was Something, something grand and suggestive, evoking visions
of angels, of flaming hell, of the squirming, squabbling squadrons of the hot damned.
Everyone liked it, because it was good.  By Martin Dawes
Something New Is
Happening at UBC
A NEW TOUCHTONE PHONE SYSTEM which is being installed in stages
from Sept. to Dec. 18th 1987. The new phone system is a state of the art
Touchtone direct dial system (SL-1) which is replacing the old, out-of-date,
rotary, Centrex system.
HOW IT WILL AFFECT YOU:
TEMPORARY DIALING PLAN: Effective: September 19th, 1987.
Centrex phone calling SL-1 phone or
SL-1 phone calling Centrex phone
Dial 82 = 4 digit local or
Dial 9 = 22X-XXXX
There is a limited number or 82 - tie trunks available
If you are in doubt when calling someone, dial 9 + 7 digits. On December
19th, 1987 the dialing will revert to A digit locals.
Some buildings have already been changed over to the new system. Some
are in the process of change. Here is a list of the change-overs for October:
OCT. 17   -        CHEMISTRY
OCT. 23   -        GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION BUILDING
- AWARDS & FINANCIAL AID
- FINANCE
- GRADUATE STUDIES
- INTERNAL AUDIT
- REGISTRAR'S OFFICE
- MAIL ROOM
OCT 31 - BUCHANAN BLDG
- ARTS FACULTY - DEAN'S OFFICE
- ARTS COMPUTING
- CLASSICS
- COMPARATIVE LITERATURE
- INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
- CREATIVE WRITING
- HISPANIC & ITALIAN
- LANGUAGE LAB
- LINGUISTICS
- PHILOSOPHY
- POLITICAL SCIENCE
- RELIGIOUS STUDIES
- SLAVONIC STUDIES
OCT 3T - BUCHANAN TOWER
- ECONOMICS
- ENGLISH
- FRENCH
- GERMANIC STUDIES
- HISTORY
- FOOD SVC
Sponsored by Communications Department
University of British Columbia
Mil CO-OP OUTDOOR
vy aii!An ewAO
GEAR SWAP
Here's your chance to get rid of those
boots that seem to have shrunk a
half size or that pack which just
isn't big enough anymore or
maybe pick up some
experienced Tele skis.
The Co-op's Fall 87 Outdoor Gear Swap is the answer.
Call 872-7858 for more details.
P.S. you don't have to be a
Co-op member to
participate.
Win a
Pentax
Zoom 70 Camera
When you come to the Gear
Swap be sure to enter to win a
Pentax Zoom 70 Camera to be given
away at 2 PM the day of the Gear
Swap. No purchase necessary to
win. Camera is courtesy of
Pentax Canada Inc.
A
MOUNTAIN
EQUIPMENT
CO-OP
Gear Swap
Sunday, Oct. 18, 10 AM-2 PM
Victoria Drive Community Hall
2026 East 43rd Ave., Vancouver
1/2 Block East of Victoria Drive
Page 8
THE UBYSSEY
October 16,1987 Play is genuine
fake art
The title of John Lazarus'
new play, Genuine Fakes,
presents a paradox: how can
something be genuine and fake
at the same time?
A similar question could be
asked of the play: how can something contain so many genuine
and relevant ideas, messages, social commentary and literary
craftmanship, and yet come
across as contrived, synthetic,
cold...fake?
THEATRE
Genuine Fakes
By John Lazarus
at The Arts Club Granville
Island
This is not a rhetorical question. If we could figure out
exactly why a play that has so
many good qualities fails so
utterly to reach its audience,
we'd be doing the theatrical
community a big favour. Genuine Fakes comprises a big waste
of considerable talent and
energy.
Genuine Fakes is a play
with a purpose: it warns us of
the evil influence of pop culture
on the individual. This warning
is given form through the story
of Sharon, a seemingly unremarkable 20 year old who works
in a bookstore.
Finished with High School
and not yet into University or a
career, she's not yet decided
what she wants to do or who she
wants to be. However she's
spared this painful but necessary
soul searching by a picture in
America's People magazine.
Sharon sees a face that looks just
like her own, but it belongs to
Hollywood's hottest new star,
Lacy Medallion.
Sharon transforms her unremarkable and unfocussed life by
dressing up as Lacy. She wins a
lip-synch contest and in the process discovers a passion for performing—as Lacy, not as herself.
She signs up with a talent
agency and soon is hooked on
playing Lacy all the time.
As Lacy she gets showered
with attention, especially
from males, and she's
free to act as outrageous
as she wants.
She's
dynamite in
bed.
People ask her for autographs.
Finally she's Someone.
But in the meantime her
own identity dissolves as the
Lacy character engulfs her.
Eventually, in a melodramatic
denouement (worthy of a TV
miniseries starring, perhaps, a
Joan Collins lookalike), Sharon
and the audience discover that
'Lacy Medallion' is an empty
image manufactured by ambitious publicists and the media—
an image that proves even more
destructive to the original Lacy
than to Sharon.
The moral message is
clear—too clear. And for those
who still don't get it, Vera,
Sharon's mother, in the guise of
giving her daughter advice,
explains exactly the moral issues
of the play: learn to know and
value reality over fantasy, accept
your own and life's limitations,
read college catalogues not
trashy American magazines...
This is all valuable advice
but the play presents it so
explicitly that it has all the
impact of little wooden wall
plaques with trite homilies burnt
into them—the kind you see,but
never buy, in tacky souvenir
shops.
Indeed the play could be condensed into a series of homilies
organized around a series of
Major Themes (reality vs.
illusion; art vs. image; Canada
vs.America; identity). The story
and the characters exist only to
illustrate the Themes and
Messages, and although they do
so deftly they fail in all other
respects—in particular, credibil-
ity.
The play never moves
beyond an academic exercise,
albeit a very interesting one. It
engages the mind but does not
touch the heart. The audience is
never inspired to care about the
characters, except as a means of
answering certain thematic
questions.
This is not enough. You
might as well stay at home and
read a book of social criticism.
Social commentary and moral
messages, however relevant and
heartfelt, do not a work of art
make.
To have characters and plot
subservient to a political, moral,
or philosophical message, is to
put the cart before the horse.
When a message is embodied in
characters who, since they
inspire neither belief nor
concern, are ultimately negligible, the message itself becomes
negligible.
The final product is suffused
with creativity, but with
sterility.
Laura Busheikin
Alphonse was at a loss +0 explain
why his studits tnade him So thirsty
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Jennifer Clement and Bill Dow in Genuine Fakes
October 16,1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 9 Chuck, Linus, pumkin
pie and Pachabel
Can you smell it yet? The smell of burnt
leaves, pumpkin pie, and the last barbequed
wienie of the year? There's iust something
about fall which makes you happy to put on
that cozy wool sweater which still reminds
you of your great grandad and curl up with a
good book, or even a trashy one, after a nice
walk through the crunchy leaves.
Yup, fall is jumping into the red foliage
which somebody spent hours raking and
countless neighbourhood dogs have visited
before you. Fall is waiting for Linus in the
pumpkin patch, and Lucy scooping the ball
away from Chuck yet one more time. So what
if we've seen it all a thousand times before?
That's what fall is all about: cliches and
flashbacks. After all, isn't it "spring forward,
fall back?"
Fall was meant for all you people who
liked "Little House on the Prairie", and can't
wait for another late night repeat of "Casablanca". Can you imagine anything touching
and emotional happening in the full summer
sunshine? No, of course not. Timothy Hutton
running down a small Vermont street to the
sound of Pachabel's Canon contemplating
suicide just wouldn't have had the same
emotional impact in "Ordinary People" if the
street had been full of spring blooms.
Does this sound a little commercial? Of
course it does, because just as every other
season, even depressing fall has been bottled
by the advertising agencies on Madison
Avenue to market everything from diamonds
to powdered ersatz international coffee beverages.
Well, let's let the leaves turn colour, and
the posties strike, because we can always just
go home and reminisce about our first
Hallowe'en and carving the pumpkin while
mom watched on, holding her camera poised
for us to look cute in our costumes. Soon
enough the rain will settle in to stay, and we'll
forget how nice the summer was. The wool
sweater is there, and the photo album waits
on the bottom shelf.
So happy fall, or how about happy-but-bitter-sweet fall to all of you out there watching
the parades and re-reading "Catcher in the
Rye   for the third time.
For Jen
We at The Ubyssey have more to be grateful for than most following the Thanksgiving
long weekend. The Ubyssey's city editor,
Jennifer Lyall, was spared death after a
violent car accident Sunday night. Jen is
recovering in Vancouver General Hospital. We
grind on without her. presence, but with her
spirit. To Jennifer we dedicate this issue.
A luta continual
THE UBYSSEY
OCTOBER 16,1987
The Ubyssey is published Tuesdays & Fridays throughout the academic year by the Alma Mater Society of th University of British Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of
the staff and not necessarily those of the university administration, or of the sponsor. The Ubyssey is a member of
Canadian University Press. The editorial office is Rm. 241k
of the Student Union Building. Editorial Department, phone
228-2301/228-2305; advertising, 228-3977.
Mary McAlister, Katherine Monk, and Randy Shore sat on several
tuffets, eating their curds and whey, and deliberating the type of prize to be
given to Ubyssey Hallowe'en Contest winners. "Perhaps," suggested
Corinne Bjorge, who was still dangling from the ceiling in her ill-fated
attempt to imitate Lionel Ritchie, "we should give them kitchen utensils."
"You mean like, forks?" chimed Carolyn Sale and Kathy Young in marvelous unison. "Or a potato masher?" piped Michael Groberman, hopefully.
"No, No, No," roared Martin Dawes in a falsetto, "Give them something
useful, like a chainsaw, or a lawn-mower." "Don't be foolish," whispered
the disembodied voice of Jennifer Lyall, "Give them drugs - I know what
kind..." Sean McLaughlin, Lisa Doyle, and Ross McLaren curled up in fear
and embarrassment. What a horrible image for The Ubyssey to promote.
The awkward silence was broken by Victor Chew Wong, who suggested
giving the winners book-prizes or concert tickets. Chris wiesinger moaned
loudly: "Who the hell would want books?" Mandel Ngan, dressed in a Hulk
Hogan body suit with a Ronald Reagan head, belched. He was of no help.
Maybe, Deanne Fisher suggested with a knowing grin, he's taken on the
characteristics of the soon-to-be-late President of the USA. Brent Lymer
looked demure. Sailen Black stormed into the room screaming about being
chased by a mutated Fruit Loop. He was ignored. There were more
important matters to discuss. "What about a shrunken Head?", asked
Justine Brown, looking at Randy Shore in a conspiratorial way. Everyone
looked at Steven Chess...
GraphicAhe Peak
Letters
Forester wants
multiple-use for
Stein
I would like to respond
to several points Annette
Garm made in The Ubyssey
October 9 Terspectives' column.
Firstly, it has yet to be
proven that the Stein is "a
unique ecological environment". There are many valleys in BC which bear a
great resemblance to the
Stein, to the point that very
few readers could differentiate between them which are
unique enough to form the
basis of land use decisions.
I challenge the statement that "There's no way
logging can take place without permanently damaging
the valley". There are numerous examples in BC of
areas which have been noticeable (parts of South
Moresby come to mind).
Most of the timber in the
Stein is less than two
hundred years old, , and if
we could return there two
hundred years after it is
The Ubyssey welcomes letters on any issue. Letters should be as short as possible and may be edited
for brevity as well as for sexism, racism and homophobia. Bring them in person with your ID to the Ubyssey
Office, SUB 241k.
logged, we would be hard
pressed to tell that it had
been.
It is important to note that
the Wilderrtess Advisory
Committee recommended
that parts of the Stein be
preserved and this has been
done (ELUC reserves).
They also recommended
that logging proceed in the
identified commercial timber, mostly situated in the
main valley.
Ms. Gam's economic arguments are flawed in many
respects, especially in her
assessment of the present
and future growth for the
forest industry. 1986 saw
the BC forest industry sell
more than ever in its history, and 1987 promises to
improve on that. It is not a
sunset industry and will
continue to perform well as
long as the forest base is not
removed for single-use purposes.
The provincial government, forest service, and the
companies have agreed on a
multiple-use plan for the
Stein   which  compromises
between all uses in an attempt to maximize the total
benefits to society. This has
been endorsed by the Wilderness Advisory
Committy. Itis apian which
will allow logging on only 9%
of the land, and will leave
around a quarter of the land
totally untouched.
In this type of conflict we
must make compromises in
order to accomodate the
needs of all groups. I think
that it is time that the
people of BC matured
enough to accept these compromises.
Kevin Kriese
Forestry 4
Passed over
politician replies
Lest I come across as
one with an axe to grind, I
must clarify that the October 14 article "Passed over
politician pissed off was a
Ubyssey-inspired article. In
fact, I was the last person
notified/interviewed and
was quite surprised of the
newsworthiness of my predicament. Nevertheless, although I have a high regard
of the AMS Selections
Committee in general, I still
maintain that they demonstrated questionable judgement and rationale in their
Senator-at-large selections.
Gary Mark
Arts 3
Direction
requested
The AMS Council recently
struck a Committee to
evaluate the honoraria paid
to the AMS Executive. The
Committee will be comparing data from other universities and formulating recommendations. We would
like to receive written submissions from students who
want to provide input on
this issue. Comments or
questions can be directed to
me at SUB 262 or 228-6101.
All submissions will be held
in confidence.
Simon Seshardi
Committee Chair
Perspectives
Some things are just
too good to give up
With middle age around
the corner, I feel younger by
the day. Ieatabalanceddiet
and exercise regularly. I
feel invigorated and am in
top physical condition. And
I think young.
But it's not my good
health, high energy level, or
mental attitude that makes
me feel like I'm getting a
second helping of those
teenage years. No, it's much
simpler than that. In fact,
my fountain of youth is so
glaringly obvious, it stares
me in the face every morning when I look in the bathroom mirror.
I'm talking pimples: the
curse that makes being a
teenager almost unbearable. Well, I've still got'em.
I don't mean the rare occasion when a single blemish rears its ugly head, or
those timely monthly flare-
ups. I'm talking major
breakouts   that   strike   si
lently and sinisterly, and
literally force me into hibernation.
Adolescence had its ups
and downs. The braces I got
on my sixteenth birthday
didn't rank among my all-
time favorite presents, but I
was promised straight
pearly whites if I endured
them for a year. A metallic
smile for only three hundred
and sixty-four more days.
No sweat!
And the first time I ever
kissed a boy was not a show
stopping performance, even
though I'd rehearsed it
enough times in private. I
thought it would be impolite
if my tongue touched hi s and
I guess that hampered my
style.
Highschool dances were
always painful because the
boys were shy and nervous
and the girls were shy and
nervous and no one wanted
to   make   the   first   move.
Even then we were afraid of
commitment. So each sex
lined up on opposite sides of
the gymnasium until the
long awaited first snowball
broke the ice.
While these are not the
fondest of memories, nothing compares to the horror of
teenage pimples. I'd scrub
my face raw but by mid-
morning it was an arabian
oil well. I wouldn't wear my
glasses at school because I
thought the lenses magnified the bumps. The lotions,
creams, and gels which
caused my skin to itch,
flake, and shrivel up were
nothing more than devious
pharmaceutical ploys to
take my mind off the real
problem: I had zits. I remember my mother saying:
"If your don't touch them,
they'll go away." Sure.
Pimples would have been
more aptly named "pickles"
or "Squeezies".
That's why I couldn't
wait to grow up. Not because I could drive, or vote,
or go to bars, but because my
pimples would magically
disappear. It was that belief
that kept my spirits up. I
was sure that on my twenti
eth birthday I'd wake up and
presto! they'd be gone. But
it didn't happen, and I'm
still waiting.
I know I'm getting older.
I've already paid homage to
the first grey hairs. I can see
the beginnings of what will
develop into a double chin
and I've got creases around
my eyes that don't go away
when I've finished smiling.
But on top of it all, I've got
pimples. It must look like
I'm having an identity crisis
or in some cruel form of
purgatory. People must
wonder, "Is this a maturing
woman clinging desperately
to her youth or a teenybop-
per who pencils in crowsfeet
to look legal?"
I've decided to colour my
hair and have emergency
plastic surgery on the
wrinkles. I know it's playing
God, but I don't care. As for
the pimples, the question I
ask myself each morning as
I reach into the medicine
cabinet for that all too familiar tube is, "Will I ever be
able to cancel my prescription to Clearasil?"
LORI EWERT is a woman
who feels in the pits when she
has zits.
Page 10
THE UBYSSEY
October 16,1987 Spira inspires
Need a break from the visual onslaught of Artropolis? Stroll down
Beatty Street to the Jaqueline M Gallery, where Maurice Spira's
"New Works" are on display. British-born Spira, a longtime resident,
presents us with a wonderful group of paintings and prints.
The collection
VISUAL ART - JAQUELINE M. GALLARY
302 - 560 Beatty Street
Closes Sunday.
consists of eight
large acrylics and
five tiny prints
mounted on white.
Spira's juxtaposition of styles is singularly interesting. The work
falls loosely into two lines of imagery, which might be informally
labelled "conscious" and "subconscious".
There is on the one hand an expression of the oppressiveness of
daily modern life ; "Work" represents a grey, dehumanized group of
proles, shaved concentration camp-style. An exhausted shell of a
man faces another over a cafe table with "Grill", his face twisted and
grimacing. Viewer perspective is often remarkable in Spira's work-
we sit just over a shoulder or come in at awkward angles.
"Beach" stands out from the group because of its setting, though
the same jaundiced eye is at work here. Bodies drape heavily about
on the sand like logs. The yellow-purple colour scheme, ponderous
dark lines and general weightiness about the painting produce a
strong, almost queasy effect. Not your average sunny beach scene.
A certain delicateness characterizes the other works, though
much of the imagery is disturbing in content. There is a neatness in
Spira's lino cuts, a perfection of composition that is hypnotizing.
These are organic forms,somewhat abstracted, such as appear in
dreams.
"Dry Gulch" is the skeleton of some invented animal standing
upright in the desert. "Repressive Dream" shows two amoeba-like
creatures in linked attitudes, instantly recognizable as mother and
child in spite of their bizarre looks. They are feelings given form,
strangely moving.
Spira combines his lovely colour scemes with precise lines, and
the result is fascinating. Don't miss this fine show.
By Justine Brown
Silencers surprise
The Silencers are a largely
unknown quartet of musicians,
and unfortunately their performance at 86 Street last Friday
won't help their quest for fame.
They played to an audience of
too many boozers, and they had
the Northern Pikes as an
opening act.
The Saskatchewan based
Pikes have had
more Canadian
airplay than the
Silencers, who
originated in
Scotland; this led
some to believe
that the Pikes
were the headline
act.
In other
words, the Silencers were in the
wrong venue.
The 86 Street
music hall, with
its spinning spotlights, fog machines, and black-light effects, is
more a disco than the performance hall its name suggests. The
crowd danced harder to the
records played between sets than
to either of the live acts.
At midnight, the real head-
liners entered. Lead singer
Jimme O'Neill's accomplished
singing was a thankful improvement over the Pikes'. On songs
like "I Can't Cry? O'Neill showed
his range, extending the word
"cry' into a long, keening note.
Collapsing and rising on the
stage, he led the two backing
guitarists and drummer through
a cinematic, emotional, and
political set of blues and rock—
as their press kit promised.
The title track off "A Letter
From St. Paul" suffered from the
sound system at 86 Street. The
overdubbed female voice reading
a letter was distorted and lost in
the mix.
At times it was like the PA
was set for a
simple bar band,
which the
Silencers are not.
Their use of
overlain guitars,
spoken word
tracks worked
into songs, and
an emphatic
harmonica set
them apart from
a generic Bryan
Adams rock
style.
Jim O'Neill of The Silencers Eventually
O'Neill and company warmed up,
in spite of the thinning crowd.
The encore, brought out by a few
insistent (if sozzled) fans, was
both the zenith of their set and
an unfortunate end - unfortunate
because it took them all night to
work up to it, but the zenith
because they built the last song
into an uplifting release of
accelerating, frenetic blues harmonica and guitar.
Released from their obligation to hold an indifferent crowd,
the Silencers played out their
true potential before leaving the
stage for the second and last
time.
UMc
FACULTY OF LAW
Information Presentation
to UBC Students
If you are contemplating attendance at Law School at
Victoria or elsewhere in the fall of 1988, come to an
information presentation hosted by Professor Lyman
Robinson, Chairman of the Admissions Committee.
1988 Admissions packages and LSAT Applications
will be available.
Brock Hall 106
Thursday, 22 October, 1987
at 1:00 p.m.
CANADA WEEK
AT SUBWAY CAFETERIA
OCTOBER 19-23,1987
MONDAY
TUESDAY
WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
FRIDAY
MENU FEATURES
ATLANTIC CANADA
Atlantic Cod and Scrunchions
Cod Tongues, Fiddleheads
LA BELLE PROVINCE
Tourtiere, Cassoulet
Sugar Pie
INCREDIBLE ONTARIO!
Cheddar Pumpkin soup
Canadian Back Bacon
Corn Fritters
Elmira Peach pie
THE PRAIRIES
Buffalo Steak, Kulbassa
Pyrogies, Plum Kuchen
Saskatoon Berry Tarts
BEAUTIFUL BRITISH COLUMBIA
Salmon on Indian Bread
Dim Sums, Olde English Tea
Indian Curries & Much More!
COME AND ENJOY THE VARIETY THAT IS CANADA!
CANADIAN FOOD * CANADIAN MUSIC * CANADIAN GIFTS
WIN! WIN! WIN! WIN! WIN! WIN! WIN! WIN! WIN!
A Return Trip For Two To Toronto
Courtesy of Air Canada And P. Lawson Travel.
JOIN US FOR ALL THE FUN
AND BRING A FRIEND!
Ubyssey   Announcements
News Writing Workshop
Sun staff reporter Kim Bolari
gives a workshop on news writing
on Wednesday, October 21, 1987,
at 3:30 p.m., at the Ubyssey office,
SUB241K. No refreshments. No
free boxes of Rice-a-Roni. This
event is restricted to human
beings.
Hallowe'en Ghost-writing contest
The IJbyssey announces its annual
ghost story, graphic, and photograph
Halloween Contest. Open your anxiety closet and share your deepest, vilest fears in a typed, double-spaced,
expos tion of about 1500 words length.
Drop "t off by 12:00 noon, October 28,
1987 at SUB 241K, or don't drop it off
at all. Ifyou don't submit a story, you
won't have a chance in hell of winning
our secret prizes, which are awarded
to the first place entries in all three
categories. If you do, you will. So it's
simple. Do it. What arc the secret
prizes? How can you ask that when
you haven't even started writing your
story? Get outta here. We might tell
you next week. By the way, ifyou win,
you'll have 15000 copies of your story
printed in the October 30 edition of
The Ubyssey. To send lo your mom, of
course.
October 16, 1987
THE UBYSSEY
Page 11 fTVork'/ Work
UUcarhou/e
Working hard doesn't mean giving up comfort and style. For
the quality and fit you want, there's only one choice: Levi's Red
Tabs. 501 's for men, 531 's for women. And they last as long as
memories. Mark's Work Wearhouse carries Levi's Red Tabs in
a full range of styles and sizes. And this semester, at any Mark's
Work Wearhouse store, your student card lets you enter to win
one of 20 $1,000 scholarships* from Levi's and Mark's.
Levi's 501's for men. $44.95
Levi's 531's for women. $44.95
* No purchase necessary. See your local Mark's Work
Wearhouse for details.	
$1,000 SCHOLARSHIP DRAW ENTRY FORM
To enter, drop this form off at any Mark's Work Wearhouse store
prior to November 15,1987.
Name	
Address	
More than just great workwear.
Telephone	
University, College or
Technical Institute	
Student I.D.
Draw will be made December 15, 1987. Winners must correctly answer a time-limited skill testing question.
Page 12
THE UBYSSEY
October 16,1987

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