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The Ubyssey Feb 10, 1976

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Array Police end N.B. student occupation
FREDERICTON (CUP) -
Five hundred chanting New
Brunswick students confronted 50
local police outside the provincial
government administrative'
building here Monday after
police ejected them Sunday.
The students, who have been
occupying the building here were
evicted after the local police chief
read the riot act.
The students had been occupying the building since Jan. 28
to press their student aid
demands. They had voted the
previous Friday to reject a
government offer and stay until
their demands were met.
The government had offered to
strike a committee to investigate
and recommend changes to the
aid system, but gave no
guarantees that any changes
would be made.
Youth minister J. P. Ouellette
confronted the students in the
lobby of the building 3:30 Sunday
afternoon and told them they had
15minutes to vacate the building.
The students tried to phone their
legal counsel, but all lines in the
building were suddenly shut
down.
The students then refused to
leave.
Fifteen minutes later the riot
act was read. Fifty Fredericton
police then entered the building
and began to carry the students
from the building.
The government had rented 15
to 20 school buses to carry the
students back to Moncton and
other points in the province from
which they came.
The students refused to board
the buses and instead accepted
the invitation of a local Catholic
church to spend the night in the
church basement.
At latest report, there were
more than 500 students ringing
the government building singing
and chanting, with 50 local police
lined up in front of the doors to
the building.
The students are adamant that
they will continue their protest
and are urging still more
students from N.B. schools to join
them.
From all reports the government buildings are totally
inaccessible and the whole administrative operation of tthe
government has halted.
Some of the students will spend
the night at the Catholic church,
others at a local family centre,
and others in rooms on the
University of New Brunswick
campus. The number of students
has increased since the eviction,
largely because almost a third of
them had left the scene of the
occupation on Friday to go back
to their schools and organize
more students to join the occupation.
DEEP IN SHIT ALREADY following antics of engineering week, gears are now up to their soles in paint,
applied Friday by unknown vandals to three floors of civils building. Floors and walls were covered with
painted slogans alluding to aggies' alleged greatness and gears' lowliness. Aggies denied knowledge of caper.
Gears may pay for paper mess
By RALPH MAURER
The Engineering Undergraduate Society may have
to pay the cost of cleaning up the mess caused by
gears draping toilet paper over trees Feb. 1.
Administration president Doug Kenny said Monday
this alternative was being considered as one way of
combatting vandalism at UBC.
Cost of cleaning the toilet paper off the trees is
unknown.
Meanwhile, in apparent open defiance of a
statement by Kenny Thursday denouncing vandalism
in the guise of pranks, unidentified individuals Friday
night painted slogans on three floors of the civil
engineering building with latex paint.
Thursday, Kenny had lashed out at "damage done
to public and private property . . . (and) physical
assaults on faculty members" and what he called
''criminal hooliganism."
In his statement Kenny said he has "begun a
systematic exploration of possible measures to deal
with the problem."
But he emphasized Monday that most of these
measures would be long-term.
He said groups or individuals would only be forced
to bear the cost of any damage if their guilt could be
firmly established.
Kenny said he doesn't necessarily approve of
punitive action, but hoped a solution te the problem
could be found by educating people.
"I would hope new traditions would be developed
that are acceptable to all, not just myself," he said.
Kenny had taken particular offense at two
engineering week traditions of long-standing the
Lady Godiva ride and the Red Rag, which he called
"an offensive and demeaning attack on women."
"There is a long educational task ahead of us," he
said Monday. "The emphasis is on the education of all
instead of trying to control human behavior by
punitive measures."
What is the educational task referred to?
See page 2: KENNY
B.C. student unions
behind strike call
Student unions across B.C. .are
joining to support a province-wide
boycott of classes to protest car
insurance rate increases.
At least three B.C. post-
secondary institutions have joined
the UBC Alma Mater Society in
calling for a one-day strike and
others are holding emergency
meetings to decide whether to
follow the AMS's lead.
And the student union at Simon
Fraser University is urging SFU
students to join a UBC demonstration Thursday at the Henry
Angus building where Pat McGeer,
minister responsible for the Insurance Corporation of B.C., will
be opening building additions.
UBC survey
Page 3
Lindy Severy, acting president of
SFU's student union, said Monday
the student union is spending
money to publicize the demonstration sponsored by the UBC
Alma Mater Society.
McGeer is scheduled to arrive at
the Angus building at 3:30 p.m.
But McGeer's executive
assistant Jim Bennett, when
contacted by The Ubyssey Monday, did not rule out the possibility
McGeer would cancel his UBC visit
because of the demonstration.
Bennett said McGeer has not yet
decided whether he will attend the
ceremony at the Angus building
how that he has heard of the
demonstration plan.
AMS president Jake van der
Kamp said Monday: "The last
word is still that McGeer is
coming. If he doesn't show up it
really shows him up as a chicken."
"With the NDP government,
every single minister would go
onto the steps of the legislature and
talk to protesters and face the
music. It is a good question
whether the Socreds will do the
same thing."
Van der Kamp said the committee for a democratic university,
led by himself, political science
prof Phil Resnick and Ian
Mackenzie, president of the
Association of University and
College Employees, local 1, has 20-
25 people organizing the demonstration.
The AMS voted Wednesday to
ask all UBC students to stay away
from classes this Friday, the day
before the mid-term break, to
protest the ICBC premium increases, which are highest for
male drivers under 25 years of age.
Student unions at SFU, Capilano
College and Douglas College have
all -voted to ask students to support
Friday's boycott.
And four community colleges —
Fraser Valley, Northern Lights,
North West and New Caledonia —
are holding emergency meetings
before Friday. A total of 11 B.C.
student unions represented at a
B.C. Student Federation meeting
Saturday and Sunday voted to call
a province-wide boycott of classes.
The strike is planned to coincide
with a B.C. Federation of Labor
rally at the legislature in Victoria
Friday and the BCSF is urging
students to attend.
BCSF staffer Lorna Philipzig
said Monday she expects at least
2,000 students to attend Friday's
rally.
Linda Severy, acting president of
SFU's-student union, said Monday,
about 500 SFU students will travel
to the rally against ICBC rate
increases. "We want to get across
to the government that we won't sit
still any more," she said.
Severy said the SFU student
council sent a memo to the
university's department heads
Thursday asking them to cancel
classes Friday so students can go
to the Victoria rally.
But she said the boycott of
classes will go ahead whether the
department heads give students a
day off or not.
Gordon Wright, a member of the
University of Victoria's ICBC
protest committee, said Monday at
least 800 students from UVic will
attend the B.C. Fed rally.
But Wright, also a staffer for the
Martelet student newspaper, said
it would be pointless to call a strike
Friday because UVic students only
need one or two hours of the day to
travel to the rally.
Van der Kamp said he will try to
get McGeer to speak to demonstrators at UBC Thursday. But he
added the purpose of the demonstration is not to disrupt the
ceremony that will be going outside the Angus building.
Why is this man smiling? He
probably couldn't think of
anything else to do. See Page 3. Kenny hit unpunished
From page 1
"You build kinds of traditions we
can all be proud of, that are in
keeping with the goals of the
university. It's as simple and
complex as that."
As an example of a good
tradition to build up, Kenny cited
an engineers' stunt of several
years ago when they assembled a
number of statues and placed these
around the campus.
A few weeks later, during
engineering week, the engineers
systematically destroyed all their
statues, much to the shock and
dismay of those who thought the
statues had come from anonymous
donors and were works of art.
"That kind of prank is enjoyable
and joyful and has an intellectual
message," Kenny said. "It asked:
what is art? What is not?"
Kenny said the EUS would
receive a bill for the toilet paper
cleanup only if it could be
established that they were
responsible.
But he said he wished to avoid
"blanket guilt" if the people in the
organization were not totally
responsible.
He also said no measures
whatsoever are being taken
against two engineering students
who recently attacked him with
shaving cream pies and doing so
caused some property damage in
New housing minister
starts off on right foot
B.C.'s new housing minister says
he "recognizes the need" for
improved student housing at UBC
but he doesn't yet know how he will
tackle the problem.
Hugh Curtis, who was given the
dual portfolio of municipal affairs
and housing after the December
election, also said he hasn't been
able to find any records of actions
by the former NDP government
about student housing.
In a telephone interview Friday,
Curtis said policies to increase
student housing will "come out in
the normal course of legislation,"
but he added legislation may not be
forthcoming in the upcoming
session.
"I recognize the need (for
student housing) at two campuses
at least," he said. He said the
universities with housing problems
are UBC and the University of
Victoria.
Curtis said he doesn't know of
plans by former housing minister
Lome Nicolson for "a total integrated housing development
near the (UBC) campus," which
Nicolson expressed in an October
letter to The Ubyssey.
(Nicolson's vague proposal was
reiterated in November by former
NDP resources minister Bob
Williams,   who   told   a   tenants'
CORKY'S
APPOINTMENT SERVICE
731-4191
3644 West 4th Avenue
At Alma
Take a
Then  SEE IT ALL
in the
SUB THEATRE - 12:30 - 1:30
TODAY & FRIDAY!
meeting in the University Endowment Lands that he envisaged
some UBC campus lands being
used in the future for housing.
Williams did not provide specific
details of the proposal.)
Curtis said Nicolson may have
taken files relating to the proposed
project with him when he left office.
"I've had some very significant
briefings from officials in the
departments of housing and
municipal affairs," he said. "That
(student housing) hasn't come
up."
Curtis was asked if the Socreds
lack a policy about student
housing.
"If I say no — it's not a question
of no policy, we're reviewing all
policies," he said.
lelltfat
*       dfcecial <to*Hea*te
Ai    tfat ytuc
his office in the old administration
building.
It is not known who the vandals
were who attacked the civil
engineering building late Friday
night and painted slogans and
obscenities all over lockers, walls,
windows and floors.
The incident occurred while
engineers were celebrating their
annual ball at the Pacific National
Exhibition grounds.
The slogans, in blue and white —
agriculture undergraduate society
colours — included Aggies Rule the
World, Aggies Rule UBC, Plant
Sciences, pre-vet rules.
The vandals had even painted
Aggies 78 on the outer wall of the
office of applied sciences dean of
Liam Finn.
Most of the slogans were anti-
engineer: Gears drink piss,
engineers fuck camels and gears
blow dead yaks were three
prominent examples.
Philip Johnson, Aggie rep on
Alma Mater Society council,
Monday denied that the aggies had
any hand in the attack.
For terrific
hair time
after time
after time
- -. /
Right on campus first floor behind Bank of Commerce
2154 WESTERN PARKWAY 224-7514
Path of Total Awareness
"The sun that never sets is visible to
the   naked  soul   and   my  music is
audible to the spiritual ears only."
Paul Twitchell,
The Tiger's Fang
INTRODUCTORY LECTURE
12:30 Tues. — Feb. 10
S.U.B. 215
SCIENCE STUDENTS
This is to notify all Science students of a fee levy
referendum and the Science Undergraduate Society
elections to be held tomorrow, Wednesday February 11,
1976 at Woodward Library. The poll will be open from
10 a.m. until 4 p.m.
Listed below are samples of the referendum and election
ballots.
FEE LEVY REFERENDUM
ALL SCIENCE STUDENTS, PART TIME AND FULL
TIME, SHOULD BE LEVIED A FEE OF $1.00 (ONE
DOLLAR) PER PERSON, TO BE REVIEWED
ANNUALLY.
YES
(Mark with an "X")
NO_
SCIENCE
UNDERGRADUATE SOCIETY
AM.S. REPRESENTATIVES
Vote for not more than FOUR
(Mark with an "X")
.BERRINGER, Ross 4.
FLEMING, Blake 5,
HALLIN, Aksel 6..
KATRICHAK, Anne
TYNAN, Brent
ZOEHNER, Kerry R.
PERMANENT JOB
OPPORTUNITIES
ARE AVAILABLE FOR:
B. of Com. — Accounting, Marketing
B.Sc. — Computer Science, Math, Physics
B.A. — Economics
The position is MARKETING REPRESENTATIVE in
the field of Information Processing, with a top
COMPUTER company.
BURROUGHS will train you completely to be a
successful Salesman within one year. Continued
training is offered for personal growth leading to
Management and executive positions.
For more information see BURROUGHS literature in
the Reading Room, Placement Office on your
campus, or phone our office in Vancouver —
688-2431 — and ask for Branch Manager.
We will visit your campus on February 24-25, 1976.
Please make an appointment on or after February
13th at the Campus Placement Office.
We will be pleased to tell you all you want to know
about us.
BURROUGHS BUSINESS
MACHINES LTD.
1255 Burrard Street, Vancouver
(604) 688-2431 Tuesday, February 10, 1976
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
Trudeau admits his ignorance
By CHRIS GAINOR
Prime minister Pierre Trudeau
officially opened the TRIUMF
cyclotron Monday despite the fact
he did not know what it is.
And the fact that the Tri
University Meson Facility has
been in operation for a year didn't
seem to bother Trudeau either.
He and a group of 10 cabinet
ministers took part in a quickie
promotional tour of B.C. in an
attempt to revive interest in the
much-neglected western federal
Liberal party.
When Jrudeau arrived at the
ceremonies on the western edge of
the UBC campus, a group of 50
packed a huge Trident monster,
protesting construction of a
nuclear base in Bangor, Wash.,
just south of the Canada-U.S.
border.
Trudeau unveiled a plaque
opening the $36 million nuclear
research centre after a light-
hearted speech that included
several pauses while he appeared
to be at a loss about what to say
next.
"I'm excited that Canada has
one of. . . uh . . . these things," he
told a crowd of 700 at the opening
ceremonies.
"I'm not sure if I could understand this even if we spent some
time inspecting it," Trudeau said
as the crowd laughed.
After the ceremony, Trudeau
went on an hour-long tour of the
facility. When asked by a Ubyssey
reporter after his tour if he understood how TRIUMF works, he
replied: "Perfectly. I'm going to
work here after I'm no longer
prime minister."
Trudeau made frequent
references in his speech to difficulties with his economic policies
and to what he was "supposed to
say" at the ceremony.
Referring to a speech by administration vice-president Erich
Vogt, Trudeau said the scientists at
TRIUMF are exploring new
worlds.
"From where I come from, new
worlds and new societies are not
popular," he said.
He added that he would like to
take the cyclotron to Ottawa so he
could "inject new ideas into the
kind of society I'm running."
Reading from a prepared text,
Trudeau said federal government
policy is to fund high-priority
scientific projects during times of
economic difficulty and to fund
projects which have the "greatest
value."
He announced the federal
government will grant additional
funds to TRIUMF to allow "full-
beam power operation" of the
cyclotron, but admitted the
amount of funding is less than what
TRIUMF officials had requested.
Trudeau congratulated the four
participating universities for
joining together to produce one
facility of high excellence.
Also present at the ceremony
were justice minister Ron Basford,
Bud Drury, secretary of state for
science and technology, trade
minister Allistair Gillespie and
Liberal senate leader Ray
Perrault.
Attorney-general Garde Gardom
(a former Liberal B.C. MLA) represented the provincial government, and administration officials
from the four participating
universities also attended.
TRIUMF's associate director
Brian Pate said TRIUMF, which
began construction in 1968, has
been operating for a full year.
Socreds to continue
summer job program
The provincial government's
summer job program for students
will be continued at the same scale
as last year, the B.C. labor
department announced Friday.
And Lake Sagaris, chairwoman
of the B.C. Students Federation,
which opposed any cut in the
program, claimed the decision by
labor minister Allan Williams is a
direct result of pressure put on the
government by students and the
press.
Williams ordered a halt to the
program Jan. 21 while the new
Social Credit government assessed
the value of the program.
Under the NDP the program,
then known as Careers 75, paid for
part or all of the wages of 11,500
university, college and high school
students.
A press release from William's
office said the program, known this
year as Work in Government, or
WIG, program, will pay for part of
the summer wages of 7,800
students working in WIG jobs for
small businesses, farms,
municipalities, regional districts
and universities.
The   program   will   also   pay
complete summer wages for any
students employed for the summer
by the various government
departments.
The number of government jobs
will be determined when government departments submit their
budget estimates to the cabinet,
Robert Exell, executive assistant
to Williams, said Monday.
He said these government jobs
will be carefully examined because
one of the aims of the progf am is to
eliminate what the release called
"make-work" jobs and make sure
all students are employed in
"worthwhile" jobs.
"In previous years certain
departments were asked to provide
jobs," Exell said. "They would
contrive projects to hire students
whether or not these projects
would be needed."
This year, he said, the departments are simply being asked how
many jobs they need filled and the
labor department, through the
WIG program, will hire that many
students.
But Exell said the program will
hire "at least as many (students)
as last summer."
"Now we're ready to step up the
action and this is the right minute
in the life of the project for the
prime minister to dedicate it," he
said.
Drury added: "The government
is very much aware of the
problems (of inflation) and is
concerned to find ways to help
scientists survive these difficult
times-."
Trudeau entered the building
mid-way through the ceremony,
tripping on the stairs as he
mounted the platform.
Before entering the building,
Trudeau's motorcade passed
between rows of 50 demonstrators
protesting the Trident submarine
base being built in Bangor, Wash.
The demonstrators, carried the
550-foot long Trident monster,
which represents the length of the
submarine, and chanted "stop
Trident now" cis the motorcade
passed.
Trudeau did not speak with the
demonstrators but was given a
letter of protest when he arrived in
Vancouver Monday morning.
The Trudeau government has
refused to make any statement
opposing construction of the base.
TRIUMF is a joint project of
UBC, the University of Victoria,
Simon Fraser University and the
University of Alberta. The latter
joined after the project had
started, but the convenient
acronym was not changed.
The four universities have
provided $6 million to TRIUMF
and the federal government
contributed $30 million over six
years.
The facility, one of three in the
world, will be able to produce
subatomic particles called mesons,
thought to be the particles
responsible for holding the
nuclei of atoms together.
They are produced by the
collision of a high energy particle
with the nucleus of another atom.
The problem, however, is how to
get a high energy particle.
This is done by accelerating a
negative hydrogen ion in a
cyclotron, the major structure at
TRIUMF. The ion, introduced into
the cyclotron,  is forced  into  a
circular orbit by an intense
magnetic field.
The speed of the hydrogen ion is
then increased by accelerating the
ion in an arrangement of electric
fields, producing an atom particle
high in energy.
The high energy hydrogen ion is
then removed from the cyclotron
and smashed against the nucleus of
another atom, producing a meson,
which is unstable and exists only
briefly.
Experimental equipment then
uses the mesons to probe the
structure of atoms and also their
properties for various applications. TRIUMF will also be
used for cancer research.
Sixteen-foot thick concrete
shields protect the scientists from
radiation during experiments.
The plant was turned off during
Monday's ceremony to protect
those attending the opening from
radiation.
The facility will be used by
scientists from around the world
for analysis of various materials
for industrial and scientific applications.
—doug field photo
"AND UP HERE, PIERRE, we have the ceiling. It's quite a neat invention, dreamed up some time in the
Middle Ages, I believe. It keeps the rain out and the heat in during the winter, when it can get quite
chilly . . ." "Yeah, I've heard of them. By the way, what are all these plastic sheets held up with masking tape
doing in a multi-million dollar nuclear research project?"
Students will boycott to ski—poll
By WARD WEBBER
and AL PETERSON
If you decide to skip classes
Friday you won't be alone.
A random sample of students
polled by The Ubyssey Monday
showed that most students won't
attend class and agree in principle
with the Alma Mater Society
boycott of classes to protest the
Insurance Corporation of B.C. rate
hikes.
But they'll be taking a five-day
weekend holiday instead of joining
a protest rally in Victoria or
picketing ICBC claim centres, as
the.AMS intended when it called
the strike. -
"I'm going to strike — my insurance is sky-high," said John
BCSF reps meet feds, but little accomplished
By SUSAN ALEXANDER
Representatives of the B.C.
Students' Federation met with four
federal cabinet ministers Monday
to discuss a number of student
problems but according to one
representative, little was accomplished.
The cabinet ministers were
justice minister Ron Basford,
urban affairs minister Barney
Danson, fisheries minister Romeo
LeBlanc, and Bud Drury, minister
of science and technology.
The BCSF presentation outlined
several student problems and
suggested how the federal
government could find solutions to
these problems, said delegate Stew
Savard. It was met Monday with a
vague statement by the ministers
saying that they would take the
proposals into consideration, but
felt most were out of their
jurisdiction, he said.
Another issue presented was the
federal cutback on student summer employment. Because the
federal government has chopped
its employment programs the
BCSF delegates suggested it help
fund the provincial government
employment program.
"We're pushing for meaningful
working relations among feds,
provincial     government     and
students," said Savard.
Financial aid and the Canada
student loan plan were other issues
presented. BCSF delegates said
the cutback on summer employment would hurt students,
applying for loans since one of the
loan requirements is summer
employment.
"We asked for representation on
the Council of Education
Ministers," said Savard. This
would give students a chance to
express there views on the council
which has control of the student
loans, he said.
The CME is made up of the 10
provincial education ministers.
The BCSF said in their
presentation that the" federal
government should look into ICBC
rates and their effect on students.
The delegation said federal wage
and price controls should be applied to the ICBC rate increases.
Other issues brought forward by
the BCSF were student
representation in dealing with the
Fiscal Arrangements Act and
housing problems. They also
suggested the federal government
look into Canada Manpower
training programs and establish
student representation on appeals
boards.
Pearson, arts 1, in a fairly typical
response.
Pam Sherwood, arts 3, said:
"It's a good idea, but it won't help
the ICBC situation — minister
responsible for ICBC Pat McGeer
really has made up his mind."
"I don't think it (the strike) will
have any great effect. From what I
have seen McGeer has made up his
mind and will not soften the blow.
The main value it could have is to
maintain pressure on McGeer,"
she said.
"No, I am taking a week off to go
skiing. I don't care because I don't
have a car, but I feel sorry for
those who do," said Sue Alexander,
arts 1.
Opinion was divided about the
demonstration against ICBC
director McGeer, to be held during
his visit here Thursday.
The remark that "McGeer
should be lynched," by Susan
Borys, arts 1, summed up one point
of view, but other students
disagreed.
Barbara Powis, arts 3, said "he
should be given a fair hearing" and
not drowned out by abuse. Page 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday,   February   10,   1976
Honesty,
at last!
There's something to be said about honest politicians.
Not much mind you, but something.
The case at hand was Monday's appearance at UBC of
the Liberal mission to the West.
A casually dressed Pierre Trudeau led several top cabinet
ministers to the opening of impressively complicated
TRIUMF building on the south end of campus.
It has been running for sometime now, moving tiny
little particles at great speeds for practical and applied
research purposes. The areas being studied by the
white-coated types who run the cyclotron range from nuclear
science to cancer therapy.
So the scene was set, beautifully orchestrated by
ceremonies director Malcolm McGregor to include every
nuance of protocol.
Enter Pierre Trudeau, prime minister of eastern Canada
and definitely making an effort to capture the West.
Now most politicians would, as many did, make up
some profound comment about nuclear research, the great
achievements made by the universities involved. In short,
they'd try to fake it.
But not Pierre.
"I'm excited that Canada has one of. . . uh . . . these
things," he told the bemused crowd of academics and
TRIUMF supporters.
The PM continued. "I'm not sure if I could understand
this even if we spend some time inspecting it."
Amazing candor. Not your average every day politician
who would fake it.
Now if only he would stop kidding us about his
inflation program, the economy generally and his plans for a
so-called "new" society.
Kenny
hit
So administration president
Doug Kenny wants the Alma Mater
Society to take disclipinary action
against the engineers. His intentions, at least on the surface,
are admirable; for the engineer's
Godiva Ride and Red Rag are
anachronistic as well as
degrading.
However, up until Friday, Kenny
had shown next to no concern with
sexism and discrimination against
women on campus (e.g.:
discriminatory wage
classifications in AUCE contract).
It seems that a pie in the face and
the removal of the door to his inner
office has rendered him socially
conscious after all these years.
Could it be that the dear man has
an ulterior motive? Could it be that
he is trying to have the two
organizations most opposed to his
policies, the engineers and the
AMS, at each other's throats; to
divide and conquer?
Every student leader on this
campus must realize that, should
Kenny's actions succeed, it will
only be a matter of time until their
own programs will be subjected to
the same. It won't be hard to drum
up some applie pie issue to
eliminate any and all social
protests.
BUI Broddy
arts senator-elect
not the number of people
protesting that seems to impress
them, but rather from which
economical bracket they are
protesting from. In contrast, when
a few bosses of private industries
scream about "insufficient profits,
this government is sure to listen
because these bosses have the
power to threaten with the "consequences."
Why can private enterprises be
subsidized in one form or another,
but public car insurance not?
Finally, it is our tax money that is
being redistributed so that the
existing inequalities of income can
be balanced to some extent.
It is time for the students to
recognize their rights and interests, to organize, and to stand
up and fight for them. Pat McGeer
will be on campus on Thursday and
we will be heard.
If he still attempts to ignore us,
some of us hopefully will be
provoked to take more serious
action. Then we will have to protest
not only the ICBC rate increases,
but the general attitude which is
demonstrated by our elected representatives of the Socred Party.
Fritz Smith
science 1
, Uwe Fischer
artsl
A wipe
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AND CM6H(q!E YOUR   BASIC
CLASSIFICATION •• •
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Letters
Red Rag
The Red Rag published Wednesday by the UBC engineers
undergraduate society is an act of
violence second to nothing I have
seen on a university campus in the
last 20 years.
Are the engineers on this campus
so locked into stereotyped thinking
that there is no hope of ever
"breaking the mould?"
1975 was a year designed to raise
consciousness about the "second
sex." Women the world over are
struggling to achieve respect as
persons in their own right. It is
therefore incredible that in the last
quarter of the 20th century,
university students should perpetrate this kind of sexual assault.
Clearly what is needed is not
women's liberation, but men's
liberation. Perhaps it is time the
engineers used their energies in
more creative activities than
strewing the campus with toilet
paper — an act which, in itself,
seems symbolic of their level of
awareness.
Perhaps it is time they engaged
in some discussions to determine
where the human race is at. Why
not a series of seminars which
would challenge those limited
either/or concepts?
Women are not either sisters,
wives, mothers, or sluts,
prostitutes, sex objects. They are
neither saints or seductresses.
They are whole persons.
People committed to the
women's movement, which is
ultimately a process designed to
help the whole human race and
mature, very well know that
embedded in sexism is racism,
ageism, violence, war, competition, aggression, environmental destruction, economic
exploitation, and ecological
disaster. Until sexism is uprooted
in our society, there is no hope of
achieving the goals of International Women's Year —
development, equality and peace.
E. Margaret Fulton
dean of women
Pooh!
Male drivers under 25 are getting
hit harder than anyone else, and
now they're complaining fer-
verently. Do these people not know
that statistics prove the majority
of vehicle accidents are caused by
drunk male drivers, under the age
of 25?
ICBC
We are very glad to acknowledge
the support the Alma Mater
Society and The Ubyssey is giving
to the ICBC protest movement. We
must let the students here at UBC
know the facts which show that
they are getting ripped off by the
bourgeois Socred bunch.
To this government of ours it is
As I strolled to work across
campus this Monday morning, I
noticed thousands of feet of toilet
paper strewn in many places: up in
trees, around statues, etc.
"Wasteful," I thought, "but
biodegradable, I suppose. Unsightly, nevertheless." Purpose for
putting it there? Who knows.
Whoever did it, however, must
either be or have the largest
collective group of assholes on
campus in order to have that much
bum wad to spread around so
freely.
Rob Jordan,
music library
THE UBYSSEY
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 10,1976
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the AMS
or the university administration. Member, Canadian University
Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary
and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located in room
241K of the Student Union Building. Editorial departments,
228-2301; Sports, 228-2305; Advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Gary Coull
The Gary Coull and Chris Gainor duo with the horrific slug: GxCxG.
Marcus Gee (not again!). Susan Alexander who, as far as Sue Vohanka is
concerned, has the decency not to be known as Sue. Doug Field, who, as
far as Doug Rushton is concerned, is most inconsiderate in choice of
moniker. New kids Ward Weber (well, we're weaning him now) and Al
Peterson Dave "Chuckles" Wilkinson. Hardened pros Heather Walker and
Gregg Thompson. Matt King and Deryl Mogg got lumped together in the
masthead again. Mark Lepitre, Avtar Bains and Bob Rayfield gave notice
they would complain about being lumped together in the Masthead again.
Anne Wallace lent moral support; Carl Vesterback lent immoral support.
Ralph Maurer lent both kinds of support, but at prohibitive interest rates.
I see them every night, out on my
street, cases of beer in the back
seat, driving fast and wreckless,
thinking they're having a hell of a
good time. But they're the killers.
And that's a fact. Not a supposition, or an acusation, but a
fact. I am ashamed to be a female
of the same age bracket, to be in
any way associated with such
mental midgets.
And while I'm in the mood, I also
want to say my laundromat no
longer has a telephone. The owner
won't have another one in the
place.
And we all know why, don't we?
UBC male residence occupants rip
the phones right off the walls, so
they too can have their own
telephone beside their cribs in
residence.
Dana Vogel
physical plant
Disgusted
The Women's Office would like to
make its annual protest against
Lady Godiva's ride and the
publication of the Red Rag. Our
censure is not against the women
who is forced by pecuniary
necessity to participate in this
event but rather those students of
the engineering faculty who
support and encourage this type of
blatant sexism.
The Women's Office is voicing
the reactions of many women on
campus who are not prepared to
take the 'humor' of either Lady
Godiva's ride.not the Red Rag in
'the spirit in which it is offered.'
To accept this spirit is to denigrate and demean ourselves.
Women make up an integral part of
the university system, despite this
and other more subtle forms of
discouragement.
We therefore strongly recommend that 1976 be the final year
that this offensive sexism be
allowed to take place on the UBC
campus.
the women's office collective Tuesday, February 10,  1976
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Form a disappearing commit fee
A teaching evaluation primer
By SUE VOHANKA
Students on tenure committees?
Students having a real say — that
counts — in evaluating the
teaching by their profs?
Everyone knows it isn't true. But
students aren't the only factor
missing from UBC's tenure
granting and teaching evaluation
processes.
Take the case of the missing
presidential committee on
teaching evaluation.
Several years ago, some people
on UBC's senate thought it was
time for an examination of how
teaching is and should be
evaluated at UBC. An ad hoc
senate committee was struck.
When the committee presented
its report to senate in early
December, 1974, it recommended
the president's office establish a
permanent committee of representatives from each faculty,
responsible for evaluating
teaching.
Senate also wanted that committee to set up a series of short
courses, staffed by volunteer
faculty, which would help profs to
improve their teaching methods
and skills.
However, a Ubyssey reporter
who tried last Thursday to get the
names of the people on this committee was told by a woman in the
president's office that the committee "hasn't been set up yet."
And by Monday, the committee
still hadn't been found, if it ever
was actually set up.
"We're just in the process now of
tracking it down," said Donald
Soule, assistant to administration
president Doug Kenny,  Monday.
"If there's something that hasn't
been done that should have been
done, we'll rectify it," Soule
hastened to add.
Asked if there are lists of
presidential committees filed in
the president's office, Soule said:
"There are about 16 lists of committees all over the place — that's
where the tracking is done."
Even if the committee eventually does turn up, it's not likely to
have accomplished very much.
Committees that exist and work
are usually known about by the
people in the president's office.
The committee might have been
useful in providing some sense of
direction of uniformity to the
widely differing teaching
evaluation methods used
throughout UBC.
Teaching evaluation is particularly important for profs who
are being considered for tenure at
UBC.
Decisions on whether or not to
grant tenure, or indefinite job
security, are based on research
accomplished by a prof, his or her
competence in teaching and service to the university and community,
Senate clerk Frances Medley
said Thursday that after senate
recommended the new committee
be set up, then-administration
president Walter Gage sent letters
to each faculty asking deans to
nominate faculty members to the
committee.
She said several nominations
were received, but added that she
had no record of the committee
actually being formed.
And Medley suggested the
committee might have got lost in
the shuffle last summer when
Kenny became the new administration president.
But committees aren't always
the solution to problems and issues
like teaching evaluation anyway.
When the senate committee gave
its report to senate in 1974, the
report didn't seriously consider
student input into evaluation of
profs.
And now, there is still no
guarantee that the teaching
evaluation forms filled out by some
students (they're optional in most
departments) will be considered
when a prof is being considered for
tenure.
A recent agreement between the
faculty association and the administration says only that student
input "may" be considered when
teaching ability is evaluated.
The 1974 report didn't even seem
to take the whole question of
teaching evaluation very seriously.
It began: "To distinguish good
teaching from bad has been for
mankind a long-term endeavor, an
endeavor attended with limited
success, in spite of elaborate
inquisitions, careful assessments
and remedial measures that have
included burning at the stake."
From the very start, the report
asserts that it is impossible for a
university to apply uniform
standards in evaluating teaching.
"A single frame of reference
within which to judge teaching
performance is probably unattainable. Skills or qualities of
character useful in one field or at
one level may be valueless or even
detrimental somewhere else," the
report said.
And the report did not seriously
consider that there is a place for
student input into evaluation of
profs students have to listen to and
hopefully learn from.
"What students think of a
teacher, how well they do under his
guidance, what his peers think of
him and what the administrative
or supervisory staff think — these
turn out to be not quite the same
thing," it said.
"There is even lack of
agreement between graduate and
undergraduate students."
The report added: "Doubts were
at one time entertained as to the
validity of student comment obtained by the questionnaire and the
query arose: do students evaluate
most highly teachers from whom
they by no means learn the most?"
Much of the report was devoted
to describing teaching evaluation
procedures used in various
faculties. It revealed that student
questionnaires were used to
varying degrees in different
faculties — they still are.
And the various faculties had —
and still have — very different
rules about who gets to see the
results of student questionnaires.
The report included some interesting comments on the nature
of teaching evaluation in principle.
——*\*—1»—
Please crumple evaluation
forms carefully and file
randomly in receptacle
provided below.
-Jk
<&£
rmm -m
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"In any discussion of teaching
evaluation, time must be taken to
recognize a small but persistent
vein of objection to the whole
concept.
"There are staff members who
regard academic teaching as a
communion of minds, to be judged
by its ultimate benefits, which may
for the time being remain hidden.
A brisk assessment of their visible
procedures and the compiling of
immediate tangible scores offends
their sense of the innate values of
teaching."
And the report added that even
when profs are evaluated and
found to be bad teachers, there are
no guarantees teaching will improve.
"Alteration in teaching, as a
result of evaluations, is seldom an
overnight occurrence," the report
said.
"In practice, departments hope
that the next time round will reveal
that improvement has taken place
or that it has been found feasible to
transfer an instructor to a course
where his strengths are best
displayed."
What "evaluation" there is
seems to be done mostly by other
profs within the department or
faculty concerned — even though
those profs may not be better
teachers than the ones being
evaluated.
And, the report said, some
departments within the arts
faculty don't even like evaluation
by colleagues who attend lectures.
"Classroom inspection is in some
departments not favored, because
of faculty hostility. There are some
staff members who would like
more frequent, open and objective
evaluation and rating.
"They are, however, a minority,
at the opposite pole from those who
dislike formal evaluation on
principle."
The single thing which becomes
clear from a reading of the 1974
report is that UBC does not have
uniform standards or procedures
to use in evaluating teaching by
profs.
Yet the conclusion the report
reached was that things are just
fine as they are — no changes are
needed to the arbitrary and
somewhat incomprehensible
process that is used now.
"A clear and simple conclusion
emerges," the report claimed,
"that there is no need to alert
faculties and schools to their responsibilities in the matter of
teaching evaluation, nor is there
any possibility of imposing upon
them from without a common
method of tackling the problem."
The report did add that "what is
required is some means of interchanging the experience and
opinion of the various faculties and
schools."
But there's at least one senator
— student Ron Walls — who thinks
an overhauling of the current
teaching evaluation process, not
just an interchange of opinion, is
needed.
Walls has already given senate
notice of a motion that it strike an
ad hoc committee to examine the
procedures used to measure the
teaching effectiveness of profs.
And he thinks students should
provide, through mandatory
questionnaires and voting positions
on tenure committees, a
significant input into evaluation of
teaching.
His motion will be discussed at
senate's Feb. 18 meeting.
If such a committee is approved,
it will hopefully make more
progress than the committee that
may have been formed through the.
president's office.
From everything The Ubyssey
has been able to find out about that
committee, a new one certainly
couldn't do any less.
Required reading
for February 14
The Shoppers Drug Mart Money saver.
Crammed with ideas to help you make your
mark on Valentine's Day.
Special gift suggestions. Special ways to
save. Pick up your Money saver at the
Shoppers Drug Mart store near you.
DRUG MART
Canada's Drugstore
® A trademark of Koffler Stores Limited. Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  February   10,   1976
Hot flashes
They are available at the school
of social work, Graham House
114, and at the door on a first
come first serve basis.
Speak up
Lost? Confused? Befuddled?
Speakeasy exists to help you.
For information about events,
phone 228-3777. If you just want
someone to talk to the number is
228-3700.
Speakeasy is located in the
SUB main foyer. Feel free to drop
Lewis on
social welfare
David Lewis, former leader of
the federal NDP party, will speak
at UBC on social welfare in
Canada in retrospect and
prospect.
Lewis will speak at 8 p.m.,
Feb. 24, in lecture hall 2 of the
Instructional Resources Centre.
Tickets are $3 for adults and
$1 for students and are selling
fast.
Mountains
The Varsity Outdoor Club is
presenting a movie for
mountaineers.
John Amatt and his film, The
Magnificent Mountain, will be
shown at UBC Wednesday. The
film won an award as best
mountain and exploration film at
theTrento Film Festival.
Time is 8 p.m. Wednesday in
the Instructional Resources
Centre lecture hall 2. Price is $1
for students, $2 for others.
'j^fe™*,;
Tween classes
TODAY
UBC SKI CLUB
General meeting, noon, Angus 104.
CUSO
Two   free   films   on   China,   noon,
MacMillan 158.
ECKANKAR
Introductory    lecture,    noon,   SUB
215.
KAYAK AND CANOE CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 205.
CHARISMATIC
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Prayer and sharing, noon, Lutheran
Campus Centre conference room.
wusc
Applications   available   for   Guyana
seminar        until        Thursday,
International House.
PRE-MED SOC
Dr.    Peter    Coy    of    B.C.    Cancer
Institute        speaks        on        cancer
treatment, noon, IRC 1.
PSYCH STUDENTS
ASSOCIATION
Psychology  social  evening,   8 p.m.,
SUB 212.
COMMITTEE FOR A
DEMOCRATIC UNIVERSITY
General   meeting   to   discuss   ICBC
protest, noon, Bu. 100.
WEDNESDAY
CLASSICS DEPARTMENT
David     Campbell     on    Alcaeus    in
particular and in general, noon, Bu.
202.
CLASSICS CLUB
David       Campbell       on       musical
accompaniment  to  Greek poetry, 8
p.m., 4495 West Seventh.
SAILING CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 200.
DEAN OF WOMEN FREESEE
Free    film,   The    Ascent    of   Man,
noon, SUB auditorium.
voc
General     meeting,    slide    show    on
Yukon    and    St.   Elias   mountains,
noon,   Angus   104;  film   with   John
Amett, The Magnificent  Mountain,
8 p.m., IRC 2.
FEMINIST KARATE
ASSOCIATION
Practice, 8 p.m., SUB 207-209.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
ORGANIZATION
Testimony meeting, joy, noon, SUB
212.
PSYCH STUDENTSASSOCIATION
General  meeting, noon, Angus 223.
CCCM
Eucharist, 8 p.m., Lutheran Campus
Centre chapel.
NEWMAN CLUB
Meeting, noon, SUB 205.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Confarence de Poesie donnee par
Pierre Nepveu, noon, International
House 402.
THURSDAY
CHARISMATIC
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Weekly fellowship meeting, all
welcome, 7:30 p.m., Lutheran
Campus Centre lounge.
CHINESE CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Testimonies by members, noon,
SUB 205.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
John Stewart talks about what
makes a good marriage partner,
noon, SUB clubs lounge.
PSYCH STUDENTS' ASSOC.
Rod Wong speaks on early
experience and animal behavior,
noon, Angus 223.
WOMEN'S OFFICE
Eve Zaremba, editor of " The
Privilege of Sex, speaks on dilemmas
in the women's movement, 7:30
p.m., SUB 212.
FILMSOC
General      meeting,      orgy,      noon,
clubroom.
IVCF
New   general   director   Don   Mcleod
speaks, noon, Chem 250.
FRIDAY
THE CENTRE COFFEE HOUSE
Fine folk guitarist Fred Booker,
8:30 p.m.-l a.m., Lutheran Campus
Centre.
BAHA'I CLUB
Talk on mythology, noon, Gage
182.
ECKANKAR
Path of Total Awareness
INTRODUCTORY LECTURE
12:30 Tues. Feb. 10
S.U.B. 215
SOFT   LENSES
*13950
HARD
CONTACTS
$59.50
FRAMES
as low as
$5-95
Glass lenses
start at
Locations
Van.-N.West/
Eye Examinations Arranged '
For Information & Appointments "
PUBLIC
CONTACT LENS CENTRE
1557 W. Broadway, Vancouver - 732-3636
552 Columbia St.. New Westr. - 525-2818
$y.00
per lens
P
BIRD CALLS
""S
Reg. $2"     ^QW
ONLY
9.5
plus tax
L
CLEARANCE SALE
WEDNESDAY & Thursday
— WHILE THEY LAST —
Buy one and get $60 worth of Coupons
from Yellow Pages Advertisers
AVAILABLE ONLY AT
THE BOOKSTORE AND S.U.B. FOYER
OR PUB. OFFICE RM 241 S.U.B.
rd
hair studio inc..
UNISEX HAIRSTYLES
FOR APPOINTMENT
224-1922
5784 University (Next to Bank of Commerce)
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:   Campus - 3 lines, 1 day $1.00; additional lines 25c.
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $1.80; additional lines
40c. Additional days $1.50& 35c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, S.U.B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
5 — Coming Events
SPECIAL    NITE-TIME   TAPING   of   Dr.
Bundolo   this   Wed.,   Feb.    11,   7:30,
SUB Theatre. It's Free!
FOR VALENTINE'S DAY tell that
special someone that you really care.
Use the special Ubyssey classified
section this Friday. Deadline Thurs.
11:00 a.m.
50 — Rentals
WUSC Summer Study Seminar applications at International House, Thur.,
Feb.   12.
11— For Sale — Private
DYNACO STEREO.80 power amplifier,
perfect condition, $130. Also Sony
TC-124 cassette stereo with speakers,
carrying case, $120. Call Jim, 228-
0352.
240Z 71 white tape $54,000 miles, very
sharp, $2900. Camero 72 metallic
green, 37,000 miles, auto, well kept,
$3000. Own two cars, must sell one.
Best  offer  takes.   321-0656.
ATTRACTIVE SEMINAR ROOMS to renL-
— blackboards and screens. Free use
of projectors. 228-5031.
60 - Rides
WHEELCHAIR    STUDENT   at   9th   and
Blanca needs ride Thursday evenings.
Phone 224-1683 before 6:00 p.m.
65 — Scandals
15 — Found
SPECIAL   NITE-TIME   TAPING   of   Dr.
Bundolo this Wed., Feb. 11, 7:30,
SUB Theatre. It's Free!
YOU'VE   HAD   YOUR   PEEK!   Now   see
it all. The UCLA Student Film Festival, SUB Theatre, 12:30-1:30, today,  Thurs.   &  Friday.
SUBFILMSOC "offers": 'The Godfather
Part II". Showtimes, Thur./Sun., 7:00;
Fri.-Sat, 6:00 & 9:30 in SUB Aud.
Please bring 75c, AMS eard and two
bottles of tranquilizers, plus Italian
accent for your protection.
FOUND BEFORE XMAS in Language
Laboratory: One man's Seiko wrist-
watch and One man's Timex wrist-
watch. Contact Mr. Johnson, Bu. 112.
20 — Housing
FEMALE preferred, non-smoker student required to live in. $75.00 per
month. Room and board plus three
evenings babysitting for two boys
aged 7 and 11. 261-0746 after 5:00
p.m.
ROOM & BOARD Kerrisdale home.
Mature responsible student, male
preferred, reference, $150. Available
March 1. Evenings, 261-0156.
GRADUATE STUDENT wishes to sublet apartment/small house from mid-
May till mid-June. Call Alan KcKin-
non at 224-9720 after 7 p.m.
25 — Instruction
O U I T A R LESSONS: Classic Folk
Theory. Beginner and Intermediate
levels. Phone Barry Cole. 731-8076.
30-Jobs
WANTED: Watts Costumes, 217 West
6th Ave. helper. Male preferred,
minimum wage to start. 876-5611.
ONE SILVER hooped pierced earring,
within vicinity of Main Library and
Grad  Centre.   Call   733-1753.
EARN $3.00 for a Fast hour In a
Psychology Experiment. Sign up
Tuesday, Feb. 10 at 12:30 Henry Angus Room 13 in Basement.
35 - Lost
LOST FRIDAY afternoon, one pair
children's prescription mirrored sunglasses on campus. Reward. Ph. 228-
1161.
40 — Messages
THIS    SECTION     IS     RESERVED     for
special Valentine messages, Friday,
13th. Don't delay. Deadline 11:00
a.m. Thursday, Feb.  12.
70 — Services
EXPERIENCED MATH TUTOR will
coach 1st year. Calculus, etc. Evenings. Individual instruction on a
one-to-one basis. Phone: 733-3644. 10
a.m. to 3 p.m. daily.
CUSTOM CABINETRY & woodworking.
Renovations, additions, new contraction done anywhere. Guranteed work,
free   estimates.   689-3394.
80 — Tutoring
BOGGLED MINDS & WISDOM HEADS:
Call the Tutorial Center, 228-455?
anytime or see Ian at Speak-Easy,
12:30-2:30 p.m. $1 to register (refund,
able).
85 — Typing
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING, my
home. Essays, thesis, etc. Neat accurate work. Reasonable rate* —
263-9317.
99 — Miscellaneous
AUSTRALIAN law hopeful in yellow
Mustang: Will you return black rim
glasses   to   Architecture   School?
^r=^P=^r=^r=ir=ir==ir=ir=ir==ir=ii
VALENTINE
MESSAGES
For Friday Classified
must be in by
11:00 a.m. Thursdav
Feb. 12
DON'T DELAY! Kage 7
V'ballers capture CWUAA crown
By MARK LEPITRE
The Thunderbird volleyball team
became the first UBC team to
capture the Canada West crown
this season with a win over the
Alberta Golden Bears here this
Saturday.
The win, by scores of 15-3, 15-4
and 15-13, gave the 'Birds a perfect
record of eight wins and no losses
for the season. The UBC team will
travel to Winnipeg to compete in
the Canadian Intercollegiate
(CIAU) on February 26, 27.
The 'Birds have dominated the
Canada West league from the start
of the season and have had little
trouble in defeating their competition. In. fact it took three
matches before the opposition had
scored enough points on the 'Birds
to win one game. The 'Birds won
all eight matches three games
straight.
The 'Birds should do well in
Winnipeg. Scouting reports indicate that some of the eastern
teams that were strong last year,
such as Sherbrooke, are weaker
this season.
The team will also be getting a
lot of game practise before leaving
for Winnipeg. This Saturday the
UBC International Tournament
will be on. Multnomah Athletic
Club (Macs) are entered as well as
Vancouver Volleyball Club (VVC).
The Macs are ranked as one of the
best club teams in the U.S. and
WC is one of Canada's best.
The Canadian National Women's
is also entered and should offer
some strong opposition.
The 'Birds desperately need the
competition this tournament will
offer a n d the experience will be
valuable.
The 'Birds played two matches
against the University of Southern
California Trojans and the added
experience should help. The
Trojans are a strong outside hitting
team, something the 'Birds had not
seen much of this season.
In the first match, played in
Mission, the 'Birds' blocking was
very weak. Blocking is what the
'Birds rely most heavily on for
defense and the Trojans took advantage of the weakness, winning
three games straight.
In the second match things
started out the same way. The
Trojans easily took the first game
15-3 and squeaked by in the second,
winning 17-15.
Finally, after losing five games
in a row, the 'Birds decided to play
volleyball. The spectators at War
Memorial Gym' were the
benefactors as they were rewarded
with some excellent volleyball
action. The games were close but
the 'Birds managed to take the last
three games to win the match.
Scores were 15-11, 15-13, 15-12.
The 'Birds will have to be at their
best if they hope to win in Winnipeg. They have the skill and the
experience so all they have to do is
get everything going at once.
The Thunderettes also took on
their Alberta counterparts
Saturday. The Thunderettes are in<
first place and can clinch the title
by winning both their matches next
Saturday and Sunday against
Calgary and Lethbridge. The
Thunderettes defeated the Alberta
Pandas in four games on Saturday.
Scores in the game were 15-7, 15-7,
9-15, and 15-3.
Tonight the Thunderettes play
the Chimos, Canada's top cup
team, in an exhibition match.
Game time is 7:30 in War
Memorial Gym.
Hoop 'Birds take second
By AVTAR BAINS
The Thunderbird basketball
team took on the University of
Victoria' Vikings in two crucial
games here Friday and Saturday
nights.
The most significant outcome is
that the 'Birds swept both games
thus gaining second place and
enhancing their hopes for the final
playoff spot.
UBC's Mike McKay led the
charge both nights as he played
two solid games both in the scoring
and rebounding departments.
On Friday night the 'Birds had
the game from the opening tipoff.
Executing their full court zone
press* with great success they
rolled to an early 15-5 lead. The
'Birds pulled away and UVic could
not recover from their early
deficit.
Ralph Turner and David Craig
hit for 19 and 14 points respectively
while McKay collected 15 points
and also grabbed 20 rebounds. The
'Birds romped to an easy 84-58
victory.
Saturday night was an entirely
different situation. UVic, feeling
the embarrassment of the previous
night, came out ready to avenge
their loss.
Viking guard Rob Parris led the
way breaking the zone press with
some nifty dribbling and passing.
The Vikings penetrated the 'Birds
zone defense getting the ball into
Lee Edmunson, who seemed to be
the only Viking forward-able to
cope with UBC's superior height.
The Vikings outhustled the
'Birds and came away with a 32-23
halftime lead.
The turn started, as it usually
does, on defense, Chris Trumpy
playing the middle of a 2-1-2 zone
intercepted, knocked down and
tipped away Viking passes inside
to Edmunson. UBC recovered the
ball and started chipping away at
the UVic 9-point lead.
Then with 6:10 remaining in the
game Trumpy sank an outside shot
to send the 'Birds into the lead for
the first time in the game at 56-54.
The Viking hopes to regain the
lead were shot down as UVic
centre, Lee Edmunson, fouled out
of the game with 3:29 remaining in
the contest.
Along with Edmunson went a
healthy bulk of UVic's shooting and
rebounding as he ended with 18
points and 11 rebounds.
The 'Birds ended up winning the
game 59-54 and shattering. the
Viking hopes for a playoff spot.
The 'Birds were again led by
McKay as he struck for 17 points
and grabbed 10 rebounds. Jan
Bohn chipped in with 13 points.
GAGE SOCIAL & SPORTS PRESENTS
VALENTINE'S DANCE
SEMI-FORMAL
SUB BALLROOM
8:30- 1:00
Tickets in advance Tues.
DANCE TO "CIRCUS
Thursday Feb. 1:2
FULL FACILITIES
Thurs. at noon in Walter Gage foyer
Single        Couple
With Res. Card  .$2.00 $3.50
Without Res. Card $2.50 $4.50
WUSC
GUYANA SEMINAR
Applications at
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
till Feb. 12
Your Official
U.B.C.
Graduation
Portrait
Photographers
Since 1969
t^^clicl ^tudU±
3343 W. Broadway
732-7446
SPACE IN SUB
Does the space in SUB serve your group's needs?
How can it be improved?
Written suggestions may be submitted by Thursday,
Feb. 12, 1976 to the Committee investigating the use of
space in SUB. Your recommendations are needed to
evaluate the present use and possible future uses of the
building.
Ellen Paul chair
SUB Space Demand CommitteeRm 250 SUB
Arts Undergraduate Society
ELECTION
For SRA Representatives
Tuesday, Feb. 10, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.
POLL BOX WILL BE LOCATED IN BUCHANAN
OUTSIDE LOANS OFFICE
UBC'S MERV MOSHER (one) andOlli Korhonen (6) overpower a lone
University of Southern California Trojan player as all three block at
once. 'Birds took on Trojans in two matches. Trojans took first three
straight while 'Birds took second by winning last three games.
HILLEL HOUSE PRESENTS
RABBI MARVIN HIER
'EIGHT QUESTIONS PEOPLE ASK ABOUT JUDAISM"
Who needs organized religion or Jewish Laws
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 10
12:30-1:30 P.M.
Lunch Available
DR. BUNDOLO
S.U.B.
THEATRE
FREE
LIVE RADIO COMEDY
a CBC production
WEDNESDAY
FEBRUARY 11, 1976
7:30 P.M.
Broadcast:
Sat., 11:30 a.m.—CBU 690 Page 8
n c
u d t o o c I
Af Simon Fraser University
Women's study launched
An Arts and Humanities
|| II Bookshop
By HEATHER WALKER
Simon Fraser University has
established a committee to investigate the status of women at
SFU, a committee member said
Monday.
Lynn Rutherford said the
president's continuing committee
on the status of women at SFU
plans "to take action as well as do
research."
Rutherford said the committee
wants to examine wages at SFU as
well as "send a letter to all women
at every sector of the university —
that is, staff as well as faculty —
which will be a personal inquiry
into their relationships with the
administration."
The committee had its first
meeting last week, Rutherford
said, and "discussed how they
thought the committee should
work. Half of its member thought it
should be remedial and correct
problems which exist, such as
unequal wages, and the other half
wanted to prove that there were
inequities."
She said the committee members would talk to "the administrators involved (in any
inequities) and report to the
president, who will try to initiate
changes."
Rutherford said the committee's
10 members were all appointed by
SFU administration president
Pauline Jewett and include staff,
faculty and two students.
She said she was appointed
because of her involvement in
SFU's women's office, of which she
is a former member.
"I think we should be able to
accomplish something (in improving the status of women at
SFU) because Pauline Jewett is
very interested in the position of
women," Rutherford said.
UBC will also investigate
discrimination against its women
staff, faculty and students through
a series of committees.
Donald Soule, assistant to administration    president    Doug
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Kenny, said Monday one ad hoc
committee will look into
"arranging pension for sessional
workers."
Sessional workers, most of whom
are women, are hired on an eight-
month basis, and are not eligible
for pensions even though they may
be re-hired for many years.
Soule said two small ad hoc
committees will Took at the
possibility of offering graduate
study fellowships to women who
have been out of school for more
than five years and scholarships
for women taking residency
training in medicine.
Another committee, under administration vice-president Chuck
Connaghan, will investigate
discrimination against non-faculty
women in the areas of wages,
promotion and job opportunities.
Soule said Kenny has not yet
appointed anyone to the committee, but will do so within the
next two weeks.
Connaghan said Monday he had
not yet made any appointments to
his committee.
One committee consisting of four
members of the board of governors
has already been established.
Its members are George Hermanson, Clive Lytle, Pat Chubb,
and Sadie Boyles. Hermanson is
the chaplain of the Lutheran
Campus Centre. Boyles is a retired
education professor, and Chubb
and Lytle are both involved in
trade unions.
Hermanson said the board
committee's function will be to
"check out things as they implicate
the board, which will be in
financial matters.
"The board has power over the
programs which will be funded, but
not over academic programs," he
said.
Hermanson said the board would
be involved in the committees
investigating pensions, wage
inequities, scholarships, and in
another proposal to provide money
to attract top ranking women
academics to UBC.
PRINTS
SALE
FEB.
7-14
138 Richards St., Vancouver.    688-7415
WUSC Study
Seminar to Guyana
Applications at:
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
till Thursday, Feb. 12
Physical Education
Undergraduate Society
NOTICE OF ELECTIONS
Nominations will be accepted for Physical Education
Undergraduate Society Executive including:—
PRESIDENT
TREASURER
VICE-PRESIDENT
SECRETARY
YEAR REPS (4)
SOCIAL COORDINATOR
PUBLICITY
Forms available in Room 301 War Memorial Gym and
nominations will be closed on Feb. 20, 1976 at 1:00.
The election will be held on Monday, Feb. 23, 1976.
CUT IT OUT!
Great Britain.
Great Price.
Great planes, too—Laker Airways'
DC-10 jumbo-jets. So besides a good
dinner (usually steak) with wine, dessert,
and liqueurs, you also get stereo and
movies at no extra cost. And an open bar.
And oodles of room. Nice. Prices are
fantastic. Compared to regular airline
fares, you could save from $55 to $400 or
more! And look at the choice of flights! All
you have to do is book early: 30 days
ahead for May; 45 for June; 60 for all the
rest. So when can you go?
fVANCOUVER
[ TO LONDON (GATWICK) DIRECT—STAY FOR 2, 3, 4 MONTHS OR MORE!
Depart
No. of
Return
Price
Book    1 Depart
Before  Q
No. of
Return
Price
Book    II Depart
No. of
Return
Price
Book
Days
Days
Before  ||
Days
Before
Fri. Apr. 16
28
May 14
$364
Feb. 16
Fri. June 18
14
July   2
$439
May  4
Fri. Aug.   6
125
Dec. 9
$489
June   7
Fri. Apr. 16
49
June 4
$364
Feb. 16
Fri. June 18
35
July 23
$439
May  4
Fri. Aug. 27
Fri. Aug. 27
21
Sep 17
$439
June 28
Fri. Apr. 16
98
July 23
$389
Feb. 16
Fri. June 18
49
Aug. 6
$439
May  4
42
Oct.   8
$439
June 28
Fri. Apr. 23
21
May 14
$364
Feb. 23
Fri. June 18
91
Sep. 17
$459
May  4
Fri. Aug. 27
63
Oct. 29
$459
June 28
Fri. Apr. 23
42
June 4
$364
Feb. 23
Thur. July 1
62
Aug. 31
$489
Apr. 30
Fri. Aug. 27
104
Dec. 9
$459
June 28
Fri. Apr. 23
70
July 2
$389
Feb. 23
Fri. July 2
21
July 23
$469
May   3
Fri. Sep. 3
14
Sep. 17
$409
July   5
Fri. May 21
14
June 4
$409
Apr. 21
Fri. July 2
56
Aug. 27
$489
May   3
Fri. Sep.   3
21
Sep. 24
$409
July   5
Fri. May 21
49
July 9
$409
Apr. 21
Fri. July 2
66
Sep. 3
$489
May  3
Fri. Sep.   3
35
Oct. 8
$409
July  5
Fri. May 21
77
Aug. 6
$429
Apr. 21
Fri. July   9
14
July 23
$469
May 10
Fri. Sep.   3
104
Dec. 16
$429
July   5
Fri. May 21
105
Sep. 3
$429
Apr. 21
Fri. July   9
28
Aug. 6
$469
May 10
Fri. Sep. 17
21
Oct.   8
$409
July 19
Tue. June 1
85
Aug. 24
$429
Apr. 16
Fri. July   9
56
Sept. 3
$489
May 10
Fri. Sep. 17
42
Oct. 29
$409
July 19
Tue. June 1
99
Sep. 7
$429
Apr. 16
Fri. July   9
70
Sep. 17
$489
May 10
Fri. Sep. 17
90
Dec. 16
$429
July 19
Fri. June 4
14
June 18
$439
Apr. 20
Fri. July 23
35
Aug. 27
$469
May 24
Fri. Oct.  8
21
Oct. 29
$389
Aug.   9
Fri. June 4
28
July 2
$439
Apr. 20
Fri. July 23
63
Sep 24
$489
May 24
Fri. Oct.   8
41
Nov. 18
$389
Aug.   9
Fri. June 4
Fri. June 4
35
63
July 9
Aug. 6
$439
$459
Apr. 20
Apr. 20
Fri. July 23
Fri. Aug. 6
146
21
Dec. 16
Aug. 27
$489
$469
May 24
June  7
Fri. Oct. 29
Fri. Oct. 29
20
41
Nov. 18
Dec. 9
$389
$389
Aug. 30
Aug. 30
Tue. June 15
71
Aug. 24
$459
Apr. 30
Fri. Aug.   6
28
Sep. 3
$469
June   7
Tue. June 15
85
Sep. 7
$459
Apr. 30
Fri. Aug.   6
63
Oct. 8
$489
June   7
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