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The Ubyssey Oct 5, 1978

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Array THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXI, No. 11
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, OCTOBER 5, 1978
228-2301
WALTER HARRY GAGE (J 905-1978)
'Seductive' agency sells plan
By HEATHER CONN
A controversial insurance agency
which offers "highly seductive"
rates for international students is to
be handled with caution, according
to Simon Fraser University's
medical services director.
"They put on such a big campaign. I've never encouraged
students to use the plan," Ed
Lipinski said Wednesday of M.H.
Inle and Associates Insurance.
"But if students are laying out
money, they should be sure they
know what they're getting. It's my
responsibility to caution students."
The insurance agency, which
advertises in B.C.'s three university
student newspapers, offers more
attractive hospital and medical
insurance rates than any other plan
he knows of, Lipinski said in a
letter appearing in the SFU
student newspaper The Peak Sept.
22.
But he warned students to read
the fine print with particular care.
"For the past four years I have
sought specific information from
M.H. Ingle and Associates
regarding the company in order to
determine their record of account
payments ... and have been unsuccessful in obtaining the
requested information," he says in
the letter.
"Lipinski's letter is misleading,
totally biased and unfair to
students," M.H. Ingle and
Associates manager Donald
Kopplin said Wednesday.
"If you took a survey of
hospitals and doctors I'm sure
you'd see our plan works better
than any others."
He said his agency is under
Commercial Union, one of the
largest insurance companies in the
world, and handles insurance for
the Commonwealth Games, B.C.
Lions and B.C. Teachers'
Federation.
"McGill University, which has
over 3,000 overseas students, has
been using our plan for five years.
There's no doubt our plan looks
after the student."
Kopplin said his agency had
made several attempts to approach
Lipinski about their insurance plan,
but the director refused and "put
up a wall."
"Lipinski wouldn't listen to us.
It was a stalemate situation."
He called Lipinski's letter
"unfortunate publicity" and said
the agency is submitting a written
rebuttle to The Peak today.
But Kopplin admitted there had
been problems in the past.
"We didn't use to have a
Vancouver office and students
always had to call long-distance.
We've had letters to Action Line
and people complaining that their
claim hadn't been paid yet, but
most of the time it's not the insurance company's fault."
Lipinski said students at SFU had
trouble collecting their bills from
M.H. Ingle agency. He added one
student   approached   him   about
three weeks ago and said he would
not buy the Ingle plan because he'd
"been stuck" by the agency in the
past.
"It seems a very strange thing to
me for the information not to be
made available. I called the agency
and they said 'Oh no, that's
confidential.' I'd think if they ran
an honest show they'd let people
know it. It's very suspicious."
UBC health services director
Archie Johnson said the plan is not
all it appears to be.
He said in 1963 when the
university dealt with M.H. Ingle
and   Associates,   the   agency   far
See page 3: INSURANCE
Curtain falls
on Gage age
By STEVE HOWARD
It's hard to avoid superlatives
when speaking of Walter Gage,
who devoted most of his life to the
UBC community. He was well
known and loved by many people,
not only for his teaching and administrative skills, but also for his
social involvement.
Walter Harry Gage died from
cancer in UBC's Health Service
Hospital Tuesday at the age of 73.
UBC's sixth president entered the
hospital full-time at the beginning
of August. Previously he had intermittently undergone treatment in
the Vancouver General  Hospital.
Classes will be cancelled from
3:30 to 5:30 p.m. Tuesday to allow
members of the UBC community to
attend the memorial service, which
will be held at 4:15 p.m. in the War
Memorial gym.
There will be no funeral, and no
flowers should be sent to the
memorial service. In lieu of
flowers, he asked that donations go
to the Crane library for the blind.
Donations may be sent to the
Walter H. Gage Memorial Fund,
Cecil Green Park, 6251 Cecil Green
Park Road, Vancouver, B.C. V6T
1X8. Requests for specific information will be handled by the
Alumni Association at  228-3313.
He is survived by his 103-year-old
mother,   Mrs.   Ann   Gage,   who
resides at St. Vincent's extended
care unit in Vancouver, and a sister,
Mrs. Elsie Harvey, also of Vancouver.
Retired English professor
William Robbins was a student of
Walter Gage's in 1927 and 1928 at
Victoria College, and he recalls that
the young teacher revolutionized
the place.
"It was a quiet place. He had a
way of making mathematics interesting. It became the most exciting subject in the college."
Robbins said he thinks many
students were inspired by Walter
Gage to go into mathematics,
although they were not considering
it previously.
"He struggled to help those who
were having trouble, whether they
were good in math or not, or
whether or not they were carrying
on in math."
Robbins says the willingness to
sincerely care for the students was a
pattern that he carried to UBC,
along with his interesting lectures
and fine teaching ability.
Robbins also recalls his
generosity. In addition to giving
money straight out, he gave personal loans, says Robbins, who
once received one himself.
"I asked him once what happened to them (the loans) and he
See page 2: DEAN
British chiseler
sculpts salary
A UBC fine arts professor has
been paid at least $5,000 even
though he has yet to put in any
work for the university, The
Ubyssey learned Wednesday.
Geoffrey Smedley was hired
three months ago as a sculpture
professor, but has been unable to
enter Canada because of immigration problems, fine arts
department head George Knox said
Wednesday.
"There's no work he can do (for
the university) right now."
Knox said he expects Smedley,
who was hired July 1, will arrive
sometime within the next week.
"We have not received any information on his status at this time,
but he should be here soon."
Knox denied that there was any
impropriety in Smedley being paid
three months' salary while he
languishes in England.
' 'Do you want him to work in the
post office for three months?"
asked Knox.
The department has hired
another professor to teach
Smedley's first-year class, which
means two  professors are  being
paid for the work of one, a source
in the fine arts department said.
"The other sculptor is taking
some of his (Smedley's) courses
until he gets here," she said.
An immigration department
spokesman said Smedley completed
his final interview on Sept. 26.
"All of the processing takes a bit
of time. Apparently Smedley didn't
respond quite as quickly as he could
have" he said.
Arts dean Robert Will was
unavailable for comment and
associate arts dean Peter Remnant
declined to comment on the
situation. Erich Vogt, vice-
president for faculty and student
affairs did not return any calls
made to his office regarding the
matter.
Herbert Gilbert, a fine arts
professor, said Smedley's absence
was not causing too many
problems.
"Several people have been
helping out, taking his classes for
him. A graduate student has taken
one of his courses," he said.
When asked if any problems
could arise in the future because of
Smedley's absence, Gilbert said:
"It shouldn't be a critical thing."
AMS honors Walter H. Gage
The student representative assembly voted Wednesday to donate $500 to the Crane library on behalf
of former president Walter Gage.
A plaque will also be placed at an appropriate spot
on campus to honor Gage, who died Tuesday of
cancer at the age of 73.
The assembly then stood for two minutes of silence
in memory of Gage. The AMS will also send letters of
condolence to Gage's sister and mother.
A motion to discuss the new constitution proposal
submitted by engineering undergraduate president
Brian Short was tabled until Oct. 18 to give the AMS
lawyers time to decide if the document is legal.
Former AMS president Dave van Blarcom said the
SRA should know what it is doing before the students
vote on whether or not to adopt the constitution.
"A large part of the campus has been excluded from
discussion on this issue. We should postpone
discussing this ourselves until we have thoroughly
analyzed the contents (of the new constitution)." van
Blarcom said.
A motion that no part-time student employee of the
AMS can be a member of the student administrative
commission, SRA or any committee that sets pay or
working conditions in SUB was defeated.
In other SRA business a motion that the Norman
Bethune Club be exempt from submitting membership
lists to the AMS was passed.
Membership lists are open to the general public, and
some foreign student members feared that their home
governments could retaliate against them upon their
return for belonging to the club. Pag* 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 5, 1978
Dean of everything passes on
From page 1
said, 'Oh, they all came back.' But
then I found that they all went out
again. It was sort of a "Gage
Rotating Fund."
Robbins says Prof. Gage, who
himself played the piano for many
years, helped to get the Vancouver
Symphony on its feet.
"He bought large numbers of
tickets to help get things going,"
says Robbins. "He gave many
tickets to students."
Robbins said Prof. Gage also
helped with the defunct Players'
Club and Mussoc, both of which
existed on campus to provide
entertainment before there were
music or theatre departments.
"Walter directed plays for many
years. Naturally, as he became a
dean, he gave less time."
As dean of interfaculty affairs
Walter Gage talked to all the first
and second-year students during
registration, recalls retired classics
professor Malcolm McGregor.
"But then the university grew
and he couldn't talk to them all,"
said McGregor. "He was extremely
reluctant to give that up."
"He had enormous energy and
was always cheerful; a joke here
and a witty remark there. He was a
big man and he had a voice to
match. He was a very strong man
and he was also a man of peace.
"The 1960's were a difficult
time," said McGregor. "I think it
was Walter Gage who restored the
university to its stability. I think
students were always reluctant to go
against his policies, not that they
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shouldn't  criticize.   They   should
always criticize."
"He always looked after the
students. He was most reluctant to
raise fees."
McGregor recalls that Walter
Gage was a shy man inside, a man
who tried to refuse personal glory. .
He said Gage refused to pose for
the bust which now stands in the
Gage residences main concourse
See page 7: HE
OPTIC
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Student Discounts
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CASH Oft CERTIFIED CHEQUE
WE'RE YOUR AAAS
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"THE PLANET MARS EXPLORED"
NASA Scientist,
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speaks on
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BY THE VIKING EXPEDITION"
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 10     12:30 - 1:30
HENNINGS 200
Sponsored by the SUS and the Science Faculty
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IN WINNIPEG, WE ARE INVOLVED IN DESIGN, DEVELOPMENT, AND MANUFACTURE OF COMPUTER
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presents
BURTON CUMMINGS
UBC WAR MEMORIAL GYM
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15, 8:00 P.M.
Tickets:   $6.50 UBC Students AMS Office
$7.50 Non Students Woodword's Concert Box
Offices, Ernie's Hot Wax & Quintessence Records
TICKETS MOW ON SALE Thursday, October 5, 1978
THE      UBYSSEY
Pag* 3
If AMS gets act together
Campus to rock with concerts
— doug ward photo
SMOKEY THE BEER goes for brew to quench raging thirst brought on by forestry week activities. Would
Smokey guzzle? Does the bear beer-fart in the woods? Fuzzy-wuzzy was on hand to spread word that forestry and
home economics students are sponsoring hot dog and pop lunch for United Way campaign today from 11:30 a. m.
to 3 p.m. at SUB mall.
will secure human rights'
The issue of human rights should
be based on justice and not the
"band-aid" solutions of middle-
class charity, an Anglican minister
said Wednesday.
Rev. Peter Davison said middle-
class church members have to open
their eyes to the reality of Third
World poverty and injustice.
"The church is much stronger in
the Third World nations. There has
been a challenge of the Third World
theologians to the first world
nations about human rights," the
St. Faith's Church pastor said.
"We can no longer maintain a
Insurance
firm says it
is not unfair t
way of life at the expense of the rest
of the people of the world. We have
to be able to say that it's not good
enough to sit in our middle-class
comfort and satisfy ourselves with
band-aid solutions."
Davison said this human rights
debate extends to issues like
Noranda's  investments in Chile.
"Some people believe that the
church has no right raising such
issues, but there is no one Christian
position," he said.
From page 1
exceeded its. expenditures and left
students without payments.
"We had so much difficulty. We
had to make countless phone calls
to Toronto to try and settle claims.
And who gets stuck with the
payments? The students."
"They (the agency) weren't even
making their stationery expenses,"
said Kathleen Boyle, UBC health
services nursing supervisor.
UBC health services used M.H.
Ingle insurance plans before 1972,
but discontinued because the
agency would not process claims,
payments were not made and
students sometimes had to wait up
to six months for payment, she
said.
■T - ■ ■. -i *■
DAVISON
no band-aids
Davison said the church's world
role has changed in the past and will
have to continue changing to
support individual human rights.
"In the past the church blessed
battleships and armies, and then
came the the disestablishment of
the fifties and the issue of pacifism.
"Today the role that the church
is playing in society is being
challenged. I think this is a healthy
thing," Davison said.
"People have to be prepared to
face issues of human rights. The
church must be identified with the
poor and oppressed, especially in
the Third World countries."
He said the church considers
overseas investment policies important, especially because the
World Council of Churches has
granted money to the South-West
Africa People's Organization.
"The church has been criticized
about this matter. People have said
the church has been naive believing
that the money went to health care
facilities," Davison said.
By GLEN SCHAEFER
Rock concerts will be held
regularly on the UBC campus if the
Alma Mater Society can develop a
standardized handling procedure,
AMS financial director Glen Wong
said.
"If students want these concerts
we (the AMS) can handle them," he
said Wednesday.
Any promoter wishing to stage a
concert at the War Memorial Gym
will have to contact the AMS
programs committee. The AMS will
then "sub-contract" the concerts to
groups on campus who want to
sponsor them, said Wong.
The AMS will coordinate the
concerts and be the link between the
promoters and the campus groups
to avoid "internal squabbling"
amongst organizations on campus,
he said.
A dispute arose last week between the students administrative
council, the rugby club and the
engineering undergraduate society
over who would sponsor the Burton
Cummings concert at UBC.
The EUS has since received SAC
approval to sponsor the concert.
"It seems pretty straightforward
now," said EUS president Brian
Short. He said the engineers are
interested in sponsoring more
concerts, possibly in cooperation
with the rugby club.
Short said he will be meeting with
the AMS programs committee, Isle
of Man productions and
representatives of the rugby club
today to discuss future UBC
concerts.
Wong said the AMS should have
some control over student sponsored functions at UBC, because
the AMS assumes most of the risks.
"If something happened at one
of the concerts and someone sued,
the AMS would be the one to get
sued."
Wong said all the paperwork for
concerts and all dealings with
promoters should be handled by the
AMS to stabilize relations with the
promoters.
"Promoters can be slippery," he
added.
Ed Mint of Isle of Man
productions agreed.
"If word gets out that concerts
can be held at UBC, the AMS will
be flooded with fly-by-night
operators," he said.
Mint said Isle of Man is interested in producing concerts at
the War Memorial Gym if the AMS
can work out a formula to speed up
their decision making process.
He said UBC has not had any
major concerts for the past few
years because of a lack of
organization on the part of the
AMS. Mint said he would like to
produce two or three concerts per
term at UBC, and Isle of Man
wants "right of first refusal" with
the AMS for UBC concerts.
"We have a repertoire of about
40 major acts and we could bring
some very fine artists out (to
UBQ," he said.
Students will pay $6.50 per ticket
and will be able to buy two tickets
each upon presentation of their
AMS library card.
MP hits secrets
By GEOF WHEELWRIGHT
It's no secret the federal Liberal
government will not make major
changes in the Official Secrets Act,
a Progressive Conservative MP said
Monday.
Ged Baldwin (PC-Peace River)
said changes will be slow because of
the arrogance and insensitivity of
Pierre Trudeau's cabinet.
The government's proposals for
increasing freedom of information
will be ineffective, Baldwin told 30
people in the Law building.
"I'm sure it will be a lousy bill,
with loopholes so big you could
drive a caterpillar tractor through,"
he said.
Baldwin said the government has
no intention of changing the act.
The exemptions in the current act
are so broad a cabinet minister can
easily withhold information and be
legally immune to prosecution, he
said.
Baldwin said ministers can file a
non-appealable certificate to
prevent the release of information
to the general public.
The government does not seem to
see any need to allow the public
freedom of information, he added.
Trudeau and a few ministers are
the only MPs who do not actively
support freedom of information,
said Baldwin.
New wave can solve energy crises
If the power generated through  waves can be   low tide,
harnessed, the world will never have to face another      The stored energy is then used to drive large tur-
energy crisis, a UBC professor said Wednesday.        bines.
"Power from the ocean should ideally be clean, But the huge costs of developing potential ocean
powerful and safe," Paul Leblond of the physics and energy might make the projects economically un-
oceanography departments said. feasible.
Ungava Bay in Quebec and the Minas Basin and      Leblond also said this resource development can
Chignecto Basin in Nova Scotia are prime sites for create a detrimental environmental effect,
construction of tidal generating installations, he said.      "By constructing tidal barriers in one location, tides
Leblond said tidal power is based on the principle of in another area may be effected."
harnessing  potential  energy  in  tides by  building     He said the relationship between the environment
barriers across  areas which experience high tidal and tidal generating installations is not yet fully un-
^amplitude, which is the difference between high and derstood   by   ecologists   and   oceanographers. ~
Baldwin said the reason for this
lack of support is that governments
feel they will be embarrassed by
information that in some cases may
show their actions to be incompetent.
Baldwin said people have been
seriously affected by the rash of
scandals and political corruption in
this decade.
"At the present time there is a
feeling of cynicism and mistrust,"
he said.
"If we are going to have honesty,
we've got to have freedom of information," he added.
He said the Tories have their own
freedom of information bill which
is supported by 50 organizations,
including the Canadian Labor
Congress, Canadian Management
Association,, and the Canadian
Daily Newspapers Association.
These groups represent a total of
three million people, he said.
Baldwin also spoke about the
Peter Treu case as an example of a
court case involving freedom of
information.
"What happened to Peter Treu
shouldn't happen to anybody," he
said.
Treu was communications expert
working on a project for the North
Atlantic Treaty Organization when
his company dropped the project
and Treu was asked to take it over,
said Baldwin.
The mistake the Canadian
government and NATO made was
in not clearing Treu through
security or debriefing him on the
secrecy of the project, added
Baldwin.
Baldwin said the government
might have been looking for a
scapegoat for a $4.5 million investigation ot tne project. Treu was
used to justify the expense, he said.
Treu was tried in secret and
sentenced to a two and a half year
sentence, said Baldwin. He said
Treu was the victim of government
bumbling and stupidity. Pagt 4
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 5, 1978
Never to
be forgot
In an age of the jaded and self-satisfied, how is it
that a man can stand out in a community of 30,000?
Walter Harry Gage was a selfless man, one who
had wide interests, but could still concentrate his
energies within a UBC career. He was one whose
work life was his whole life, a life in which although
he filled the roles of student, teacher and administrator, he always felt himself first a teacher.
He was full of cheer, but a patient man, even in
his last year, during which he suffered greatly from
the ravages of cancer.
His life was one of continuous involvement in
university affairs, but involvement at the base of the
pyramid, even when he reached the top at UBC.
He understood students' dreams and he tried to
help.
And his love of teaching lit up his lectures. When
he stepped down from the administration presidency in 1975, he wanted to continue to teach and to
help in any way possible on the campus.
Even while in the hospital he continued his social
life, receiving guests for as long as he could.
He showed, through his works, that one can give
one's best. He probably smiled as he marked those
countless Math 100 exams, as he followed the progress of those who would take his place. In this way
he instilled a little of himself into each of those he
advised and taught.
As the university has grown to many times its
size since he first entered the Fairview campus in
1921, its development has been guided to such a
degree by Walter Gage, that his legacy will continue to influence UBC for years.
Council slams federal cutbacks
This perspectives article is an
open letter to Bud Cullen, federal
minister of employment and immigration from CP. Neale, general
secretary-treasurer of the Vancouver and District Labor Council.
The Vancouver and District Labour
Council is dismayed with nearly all
of the federal government's!
proposed cutbacks in a time of
extremely high unemployment
across the width and breadth of our
country. They can only result in the
loss of "thousands more jobs and a
corresponding reduction in the
purchasing power of the working
people of this country, which will,
f By CP. NEALE ")
of course, create more unemployment in the manufacturing
section of industry.
We are even more dismayed to
learn of the proposed changes in the
Unemployment Insurance Act. We
feel  that  your government,  in a
blatant attempt at re-election, is
prepared to attack the unemployed
in Canada by a cynical appeal to the
rednecks in this country.
We are convinced that the past
policies of your government are
primarily responsible for the fact
that we now have, according to our
Vander Zaim is taking
the opposite approach
by attempting to drive
the native Indians back
to their reservations.
information, well over one million
unemployed, and that your
proposed amendments are an attack on the unemployed, instead of
an attack on the problem of
unemployment.
Your plan is, obviously, to cut as
many people off benefits as
possible, and to use the $700
million to $800 million saved to
create jobs under government
auspices,  at the  minimum  wage
THE UBYSSEY
OCTOBER 5, 1978
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the
AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in
room 241K of the Student Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301; Advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Mike Bocking
Chief executive officer Mike Bocking III called the shareholders' meeting to order. First vice-
president Chris Bocking addressed the assembled capitalists. "Bourgeois friends," he began, as communist agitators Tom Hawthorn and Bill Tieleman threw up in disgust, "we gather here tonite to
decide where to invest the profits of Ubyssey Inc." Corporate directors Heather Conn, Jeff Rankin and
Glen Schaefer sat up and took notice. "General manager Verne McDonald has suggested putting the
funds into Cannabis Ltd. and watching our money grow but our management consultant team, headed
by Peter Menyasz, Chris Gainor, and Geofand Julie Wheelwright advise against it." Dave Ward, Kevin
Griffin and Peter Stockland brought a proposal from the floor. "Invest the bucks in a slimy, capitalist
beer firm that deals in areas shunned by the rest of humanity," they shouted gleefully. The
shareholders chortled and voted to put Ubyssey Inc. behind Howard's Treefrog Beer, a Canadian subsidiary of Steve Howard Associates.
level. The unemployed would then
be forced to accept these starvation
wages or apply for social welfare,
which is partially funded by the
provincial and municipal governments, thus reducing the financial
outlay of the federal government in
this area.
I would like to point out that our
provincial minister of human
resources, Mr. William Vander
Zalm, is taking the opposite approach by attempting to drive the
native Indians in Vancouver back
to their reservations, so they will be
removed from the partially-funded
social welfare rolls, and the total
cost of their maintenance would
revert to the federal government.
He has also refused welfare
payments to indigents living near
agricultural land, unless they accept
employment picking fruit, or
vegetables, at wages well below the
poverty level.
The government in a
blatant attempt at
re-election, is prepared
to attack the
unemployed by a
cynical appeal to the
rednecks.
The unemployed are now being
squeezed between your desire to
appear concerned about saving the
taxpayers' money and the
provincial minister's desire to show
a surplus in his department. We are
positive that if you are both successful in your efforts, you are
sowing the seeds of the whirlwind
you so rightfully deserve to reap.
If the information we have
received is correct, the proposed
changes aimed at making it more
difficult to qualify for benefits will
result in 263,000 applicants being
refused in the first year, forcing
them to apply for social assistance,
which, in the main, is considerably
less than unemployment insurance
benefits. This, again, will reduce
their purchasing power, and, again,
help to increase the unemployment
rolls.
Your plan is to cut
as many people off
benefits as possible.
Probably the most callous, and in
our opinion, most absurd proposal
is to cut benefits from 66 2/3 per
cent to 60 per cent, which amounts
to a 10 per cent cut in purchasing
power.
Any Canadian on unemployment
insurance or social welfare must, by
necessity, spend all his income on
the bare essentials, and cannot save
any of it.
It does not take an economist to
realize that deleting 10 per cent of
four billion dollars (the average
total payout of unemployment
insurance benefits), for a total of
$400 million dollars from the
purchasing power of working
people, can do nothing but increase
unemployment in Canada.
The Vancouver and District
Labour Council would request you
to urge the cabinet to reconsider the
proposed cutbacks and get on with
the job for which they were elected,
You are sowing the
seeds of the whirlwind
you deserve to reap.
namely, attacking inflation and
creating employment for the
unemployed, rather than using
them as sacrificial lambs in your
cynical lust to retain power.
perspectives
_.AH> AfTER HE WENT ON ABOUT HOW
HE WAS GOING- TO CREATE MORE JOBS,
FIWfT INFLATION, STRENGTHEN   INTERNATIONAL
TRAINS- ANJv REWE PA1MENT IMBALANCES..
HE TRIEi> TO WALK ACROSS THE
OTTAWA RIVER.... (Thursday, October 5, 1978
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Is student leadership black hole
Student leadership at UBC is a black hole
which swallows up aspiring young do-
gooders and perspiring young glory seekers
and spits out people who have little to be
remembered by other than occasional
notoriety.
The amount of time wasted by student
administration on procedural disagreements
and petty personal grievances is astonishing.
In the meantime relevant issues languish
indefinitely and end up being resolved by
ineffective compromises which neither please
nor satisfy anybody.
c
By
KEVIN MCGEE
)
This is a result of over-zealousness on two
sides. The conservative element of the
student representatives see themselves as
watchdogs protecting Alma Mater Society
money and maintaining smooth relations
with the administration. As a consequence
they are hesitant to move on an issue with the
result that little happens.
On the other side we have the crusaders.
Leaning towards the left, they watch as their
grandiose plans get bogged down by the
watchdogs. In a sense they have no one but
themselves to blame for this, as their impatience with their conservative members
often comes across as not so subtle condescension. This us-against-them attitude is
the greatest stumbling block in the way of
responsible decision-making.
freestyle
It is rare that student representatives come
along who are more relaxed and less rigid in
their views. Unfortunately people who fit
that mold are the only ones who can break
the existing polarity and start students
working   together   instead   of   competing.
What is really needed in the AMS is a sane
sense of what its priorities should be.
Instead we see a constitutional battle on
the horizon. One controversial new constitution is presently being debated and yet
another new constitution is being drafted by
four past and present student representative
assembly presidents.
With any luck this bureaucratic bunk will
be resolved by Christmas and we can get on
with important issues.
Reports have come back to this office about
numerous complaints against The Ubyssey aired at the
recent leadership conference in Camp Elphinstone.
One of these was that the paper was too concerned
with world affairs and ignored campus events.
By JEFF RANKIN
Apparently one person went so far as to hold up a
copy of the paper, point to an article on Tanzania and
say something to the effect of "who the hell cares what
happens in Tanzania, anyways!"
Right. Who does care what's going on in Tanzania,
or Rhodesia, or South Africa, or even Quebec for that
matter! Never mind all this politics and human rights
bullshit, I want to know who won the fifth annual commerce egg and spoon race!
What does The Ubyssey think this university is,
some kind of centre for concern over human rights?
How passe!
It's time we took a tip from People magazine and
The National Enquirer, and started writing about what
really matters! All of the criticism we have been getting
is well deserved, never mind that The Ubyssey is one of
the most, if not the most respected and widely read
university papers in Canada. The Elphinstone delegates
should know better.
Letters
^v
Who won egg and spoon race
Short's constitution welcome, SRA irrelevant
After reading the article by Glen
Schaefer in Tuesday's Ubyssey and
following the comments made by
Mr. Dave van Blarcom, I feel that it
is time to say something in defence
of the constitutional proposals put
forward by the professional
faculties.
As a student senator who has sat
through many tedious and childish
student representative assembly
meetings, I welcome Brian Short's
proposals with heartfelt thanks. I
ran as a student senator because I
was interested in representing my
faculty on the senate and I wanted
to work with other faculties in
handling the affairs of the
university which concern both my
faculty and students at large.
I have found that most of the
SRA meetings which I was required
No thanks, John
John Waler's letter in the
Tuesday Ubyssey ignores at least
three relevant points:
The irony that an organization
alleged (or actuallly) involved in
anti-left-wing activities has paid
The Ubyssey to run an advertisement for them. The student
paper in turn is using its advertising
revenue to help legitimize many of
those same left-wing groups
through numerous (if often trivial)
articles supportive of them.
2. Freedom of speech. Does John
seriously suggest that the RCMP
should have any less right to express
themselves (re. advertise) than
anyone else? What is needed is
more communication, not less, so
that our government agencies do
not become even more isolated
from the people.
3. That university students are
STARTS TONITfc
At Sub Theatre
LED-ZEPPELINl
THE SONG REMAINS THE SAME
This motion picture record of the
groups   explosive    1973   Madison
Square Garden performances took
three  painstaking years of precise |
work to produce.
Incorporating live concert footage,
fantasy sequences, back stage |
glimpses of the band, and a persona)
view of them at ease at home, 'The
Song Remains The Same" is a rare
look at four explosive rock musi- \
cians: Jimmy Page, Robert Plant,
John Paul Jones and John "Bonzo"
Sonham.
supposed to be adults (educated
ones at that) and therefore should
be quite capable of making their
own individual value judgements
without any "assistance" from
John or any other individual who
would censure certain
"disagreeable" information.
Brent Collinson
commerce 3
to attend as part of my job, were
irrelevant in regards to current
campus issues and largely
represented a forum for worn-out
student hacks to express their views
and listen to the sound of their own
voices. Mr. Short's proposal would
allow me to spend more time
working on senate where my interest and involvement truly should
lie.
In addition I think that Mr. van
Blarcom is misguided in believing
that the proposal will lead to an
"executive clique". I feel that this
situation already exists, as the real
power of the SRA belongs to a
handful of arts, science and law
students. By having the presidents
of the undergraduate societies form
a student council, the Alma Mater
Society will be stripped of the petty
undergraduate society power
struggles which do exist.
I believe that by increasing the
student representation of the larger
DESSERT PARTY
LUTHERAN CAMPUS CENTRE
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 5, 7:30 P.M.
BERNICE GERARD
GUEST: ALDERMAN, CJOR OPEN-LINER
SPONSOR-CHARISMATIC CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
879-4085   266-7607
faculties, democracy in the AMS
will be effectively destroyed. Any
democracy which now exists is very
limited as members tend to vote,
along faculty lines. Increasing
representation will only serve to put
arts, science and law in complete
control and wipe out any say the
smaller professional and more
importantly, the more active,
societies might have.
What Mr. van Blarcom and his
cronies in fact are proposing is a
constitution filled with legal. gib-
SOFT
CONTACT
LENSES
Per pair
All Fees
Inclusive
$75
.00
&UP
berish and gobbledegook that
resembles the federal constitution
such that we, the smaller
professional faculties like British
Columbia, get screwed by the
bigwigs in Ottawa (arts, science and
law).
Why can't the SRA be more like
the Senate, where votes are evenly
distributed and each faculty has an
even voice in  University affairs?
Jeff Barnett
student senator for pharmaceutical
sciences
EYEGLASSES
$29-95&up
Student Discount
Available on Eyeglasses
From
Bausch & Lomb SOFLENS also available
Phone for appointment - Anwar Jessa
(Contact Lens Specialist - European Trained)
KAUFMANN & JESSA OPTICAL SHOP
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i Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 5, 1978
'Tween classes
33333333333333333333
UJ
TODAY
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Women's drop-in, noon. SUB 130.
SUB ART GALLERY COMMITTEE
Leslie Poole's studio show, 10:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.
SUB art gallery.
CCF
Slide show, noon, SUB 125.
MUSSOC
Theatre lighting workshop, noon, SUB 115.
CSA
Social gathering, 8 to 10 p.m., SUB 205.
Dance class, 6:30 to 8 p.m., SUB 205.
GAY PEOPLE
M.  D. Jaime Smith speaks on gay oppression,
noon, SUB 119.
AUDIO-VISUAL LIBRARY
Nova and Hitler's Secret Weapon, 8 p.m., IRC
building room B-80.
INTER-VARSITY CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Irving Hexam speaks on the War in Rhodesia,
noon, Angus 104.
DEBATING SOCIETY
Guest lecture followed by qualifying debates,
noon, Buch. 204.
MY JONG LAW HORN KUNG FU
Practice, 5 to 7 p.m., SUB party room.
LIBERTARIAN SOCIETY
General meeting, noon, SUB 224.
PRE-DENTAL SOCIETY
Dr.  Yeo speaks on admissions and  Peter Nash
speaks on the D.A.T., noon, IRC room 1.
LSA SPEAKER'S COMMITTEE
Free Canadian feature film on the Berger Report
into the Mackenzie Valley Pipeline, noon, Curtis
Law Building room 101.
AMNESTY UBC
General meeting, noon, SUB 212A.
UBC POTATO PEALERS
Tuber party, noon, International Potato Centre.
UBC PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVE CLUB
Election of executive and delegates to provincial
convention, noon, SUB 213.
WOMEN STUDENTS' OFFICE
Panel discussions on careers in government, noon,
Buch. 106.
CHARISMATIC CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Fellowship gathering and dessert party, 7:30 p.m.,
Lutheran Campus Centre lounge.
PRE-VET CLUB
Introductory lecture, noon, MacMillan 160.
UBC NDP CLUB
Quadra NDP candidate Alan Bush speaks, noon,
SUB 212.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Women's drop-in, noon, SUB 130.
FRIDAY
DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY
Arthur Blanchette, Canadian envoy to the Organization of American States, speaks on Canadian
rule in Latin America, noon, Buch. 104.
HANG-GLIDING CLUB
Meeting and slide show, noon, SUB 205.
HILLEL HOUSE
Soviet Jewry committee meeting, noon,
Hillel House.
PHILOSOPHY STUDENTS' UNION
General    meeting    and    elgiptions,    noon,
Centre upstairs lounge.
DEBATING SOCIETY
Qualifying debates, noon, Buch. 204.
UBC SKYDIVING CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 212.
ATA
General meeting and elections of officers, noon.
Graduate Student Centre garden room.
SATURDAY
CSA
Disco Fever part 2, 8 p.m., SUB ballroom. Sports
night, 7:30 p.m., Thunderbird Sports Complex.
SILLY STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Rally, 5:30 p.m., Trutch House.
TUESDAY
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
General meeting, noon, SUB 130.
SCIENCE U.S.
The Viking Mars exploration, noon, Henn. 200.
WEDNESDAY
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Lesbian drop-in, noon, SUB 130.
STEREO
SERVICE CENTRE
A worn needle can ruin your records
"Free" Inspection
Most popular style in stock
1988 W. 4th Ave. 731-9813
Grad
Hot flashes
You can bank on
volunteer jobs
No one works for free these days,
right? Wrongo.
The counselling centre in the office of student services at
Ponderosa annex F has set up a
volunteer data bank where students
can get information on volunteer
jobs that can provide them with
career related experience or just
something    to   do.
Lip service
Do you move your lips when you
read?
If so, why not put your mouth to
work. Crane library needs good
volunteer readers to record text and
research materials for blind
students.
Readers are most urgently needed from now until Christmas and
are asked to give two hours a week
on a regularly scheduled basis. Call
the library at 228-6111 for an audition appointment.
Trudeaucracy
Do you love governmental
bureaucracy?
If so, there may be a career in the
field for you. A panel discussion on
career opportunities in government
will be held at noon today in Buch.
106.
CAREERS IN
BUSINESS MANAGEMENT
Back to school. Exams. Christmas. More classes, more
exams and graduation. And next...
Right now you are probably thinking about the past several
years and what you have to look forward to after graduation.
While you're at it, consider the personal growth and satisfactions you could experience at Procter & Gamble — a leader in
the consumer products industry. We regard training and
development as our most basic responsibility because we
promote strictly from within Procter & Gamble. We know of no
way to train people to become managers other than to have
them learn by doing.
Economics, history, psychology — our managers include
diverse backgrounds. More important than your specific field
of study are such basics as intelligence, leadership ability,
innovativeness, and a solid track record of achievement.
Prior to on-campus interviews, representatives from Marketing, Finance, and Sales will be visiting your campus to answer
questions and talk about their experiences at Procter &
Gamble. Specific date, place and time will be advertised soon
in this newspaper and at your placement office. The visit will
be a one-day informal session in which all interested students
can learn more about career opportunities in business
management at Procter & Gamble.
As a first step, we invite you to visit your placement office and
obtain a copy of our literature. Additional information is also
available in the library file in the placement office.
Plan to be at our pre-recruiting session — no appointment
necessary, drop in any time.
10% off
FOR
STUDENTS
WITH THIS AD
3771 W. 10th (at Alma)
224-3536
Have A Trim!
Hair cutting is one
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APPOINTMENT
SERVICE
731-4191
GAY
(3
Grad Centre
Garden Room
DISCO DANCE    0
(3
Friday 6 October        jg
9:00 p.m. - 1:00 a.m. KJ
$1.50 with AMS [£
gj $2.00 Visitors j^J
ARTS EXECUTIVE
POSITIONS OPEN
2 S.R.A. REPS/VICE-PRES., and
SECRETARY OF A.U.S.
ANYONE INTERESTED IN THE ABOVE
OFFICES, OR IN WORKING ON THE
ARTS PERSPECTIVE, SHOULD
REPORT TO THE A.U.S. OFFICE, BUCH. 107
TIL OCTOBER 6TH
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES:   Campus - 3 fines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 35c
Commercial *• 3 lines, 1 day $2.50; additional lines
50c. Additional days $2.25 and 45c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in
advance. Deadline is 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, SiU.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T UV5
5 — Coming Events
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
THIS WEEK
Thurs., Oct. 5, 8 p.m. "40 Minutes of
Silence"    —>   A   special    ephimeral
mime experience. 75c non-members,
35c members.
Fri., Oct. «, 4-8:00 p.m. "Thanksgiving Dance" — Live Band "Cudjo".
$2.00 non-members, Jl.09 members
in  advance.
IntiyM. House is located next to the
armoury. All its events are open to
U.B.C. students and staff. More info.
228-5021.
SEMINAR — By the Director of the
Canadian Institue of Ukrainian Stud-
Canadian Institute of Ukranian Studies, University of Alberta, Dr. Manoly
Lupul, on "'Ukrainian Canadians In
Our Time Of Political Crisis". To be
held on Friday, October 8, 8:00 p.m.,
Boom 157, Law Building.
HOT HOT HOTI CSA's Saturday Night
Fever Disco this Saturday, Oct. 7,
SUB Ballroom. Everybody welcome.
FREESEE: Romantic versus Classic Art
Series. Now showing erory Wed.,
12:35 p.m., SUB Aud. Free film series.
U.B.C BOWLING LEAGUE meets Mondays at 8:00 p.m. and 8:00 p.m. to
SUB Lanes. Everyone is welcome. For
further information phone Chris, at
2244539. Come out and bowl.
11 — For Sale — Private
1941 FORD VAN. $2,000 invested, city
tested, new paint, camper equip. $950
o.b.o. 291-1777.
1977    MOPED    MOBYLETTE     DELUXE
with     helmet.     Exoellent     condition.
Phone 732-8103 after 5 p.m.
20 — Housing
AVAILABLE IMMEDIATELY. Double
rooms, $75 each per mo., singles $125-
$150 per mo.; kitchen facilities. Bent
discounts possible. 2280 Wesbrook,
ph. 224-9679, Mike or Greg.
35 — Lost
LOST — Man's gold watch, in the area
of B lot. Engraved on back. Reward.
278-1908.
LOST — One Brigham briar pipe in B
lot Please phone Ian, 438-7865.
LOST — A gold wedding ring. 3rd floor
Computer Science Bldg. Unusual design. Reward. 521-0878.
65 — Scandals
10 — For Sale — Commercial
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you can assemble them yourself with our easy
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SAVE MONEY ON STEREOS
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SAVE MONEY ON REPAIRS
Specializing   in   speaker   repairs,   tape
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Additional discounts with student cards
SPEAKERLAB
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734-2823 — 734-4534       ^J
COMMUNITY SPORTS. Excellent prices
for ice skates, hockey, soccer, jogging
and racquet sports equipment. 733-
1613, 3615 West Broadway, Vancouver,
B.C.
LEO-ZEPPELIN — "The Song Remains
the Same" took three years to produce.  Starts tonight at SUB.
70 — Services
We Copy It All
For You!
1 page of notes or complete thesis
Flyers too!
REPRODUCTION CENTRE
Rm. 100A SUB 224-1011 or
845 Burrard 682-2919
85 — Typing
ON CAMPUS TYPIST. Fast, accurate.
Reasonable rates. Phone 732-3690 attar
6:00 pjn.
TYPING — 75c per.page. Fast and accurate by experienced typist. Gordon,
685-4863.
TYPING: Essays, theses, manuscripts,
reports, resumes, etc. Fast and accurate service. Bilingual. Clemy, 324-9414.
UBYSSEY CLASSIFIED GET RESULTS Thursday, October 5, 1978
THE      UBYSSEY
Pag* 7
'He was very strong and a man of peace'
From page 2
and for the portrait that presidents
traditionally sit for, which now
hangs in the Riddington Room of
the Main Library.
"The sculptor had to work from
photos," said McGregor. "That
was bootlegged. He wouldn't sit for
the painting. This kind of thing had
to be done without his knowledge."
Writing on behalf of the faculty
association, professor emeritus Roy
Daniells, who knew Walter Gage
for 50 years, says, "His peculiar
gift to this university lay in his
demonstrating the possibility of a
life of ceaseless inquiry and activity, utterly divorced from personal ambition or self-seeking; a
keen critical sense devoid of all
harshness of judgment; an
awareness of individual and institutional faults and limitations
which was never allowed to impair
his buoyant cheerfulness of spirit."
Engineering undergraduate
society president Brian Short
recalled visiting Prof. Gage in
hospital this summer.
"Throughout the summer and
into the fall he always wanted to see
people," Short, himself a former
Math 350 student, said. "He was
always cheerful. He was a hell of an
inspiration to me this summer.
"For the last couple of months
there was often a line-up to see him
(in the hospital)."'
His Math 100 classes were always
full at registration and he had a
remarkable memory for names.
"He'd remember that your father
was in his class 20 years before,"
says Short.
In the hospital he didn't give up
his interest in music, but kept a
cassette deck by his bed.
"What struck everyone, was not
only his courage, but also his
patience and good humor," said
Robbins.
As a first-year student in 1921,
Walter Gage entered UBC, which
was then located where the Vancouver General Hospital currently
stands. After receiving a B.A. and
M.A. in mathematics, he started to
teach at Victoria College, the
forerunner of the University of
Victoria, which was then affiliated
with UBC. He was also the
registrar, bursar and financial aid
officer there.
Returning to UBC as an assistant
professor in 1933, he began his long
teaching career at UBC. He was a
favorite with engineers, to whom he
lectured in Math 350, complex
variables and application, until this
March. The experimental Wally
Wagon, an economically-powered
small car, was named after Prof.
Gage by the engineers.
But despite his devotion to
teaching, he was able to keep a
handle on the administrative duties
he carried out, and filled so many
posts that he was known as "Dean
of Everything."
Besides working as director of
YOUR A.U.S. PRESENTS
SUNRISE
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OCTOBER 6
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710 YATES MALL VICTORIA 383-2144
UBC summer sessions, assistant to
the dean of the faculties of arts and
science, dean of inter-faculty affairs and administrator of UBC's
scholarships and bursaries for
nearly 40 years, he was deputy
president and then, from 1969 to
1975, administration president.
In 1953, the students gave Walter
Gage the Great Trekker Award, in
honor of his service to the
university and his participation in
the 1922 Great Trek, a student
protest march which helped convince the provincial government of
the time to complete the university.
He received an honorary Doctor
of Laws degree from UBC in 1958,
and in 1968 was the first recipient
of the Master Teacher Award,
which was established to recognize
the    best    teachers    of    un
dergraduates. He returned the
$5,000 prize which went with the
reward, asking that it be used to
buy books for UBC's libraries.
In 1971, for his services to the
country, he was named a Companion of the Order of Canada.
N0RRCS
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Are you interested in pursuing a professional career
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the wine that's a tried and true good friend
... light, fruit-flavoured and very, very refreshing.
iSfe-MicljelleWttjes Pag* 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday, October 5, 1978
CAREER ORIENTATION
FOR STUDENTS
A series of panel discussions to be held
during the 1978/79 term
'Career Opportunities
in Federal, Provincial &
Municipal Government"
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 5, 1978
12:30 - 2:00 p.m.
Buchanan Building — Room  106
PANEL PARTICIPANTS
Mr. Ray Chew, Manager, Canada Employment Centre,
UBC Campus
Mr. W. D. Frost, Regional Educational Liaison Officer,
Public Services Commission of Canada
Ms. Lynda Grauer, Regional Staffing Officer, Public
Service Commission of Canada
Mr. A. D. Davies, Regional Representative, B.C. Public
Service Commission
Melvin   Shelley,   Municipal   Manager,   Corporation
for the District of Burnaby
PANEL MODERATOR
Dennis Magrega, Counsellor, Student Services,
Ponderosa Annex F — Tel: 228-4316
Jointly sponsored by the Women Students' Office,
Student Services and Canada Employment Centre
Make $^000-$10,000
in the Summer of '79
You run your own business...
we provide the systems, training and money.
(Average summer '78 earnings were $8,000)
College Pro
Painters Limited
"...A system that will allow 19 students to run
their own painting business... College Pro will
provide the $500 to $1000 in equipment
needed to start a business, help rent a van,
establish a line of credit with paint suppliers,
help hire student employees, do central record
keeping for taxes and insurance and provide
training... a training manual outlining
advertising techniques and own system of
estimating cost of jobs... also has training film
on professional painting techniques."
Toronto Star, May/78
Qualifications
• Live in a community of more
than 30,000
• Great drive and desire.
• Want to make at least $8,000.
How to Apply
Information and applications at
your Campus Placement Centre or
write: 265 Eglinton Avenue East,
Toronto, Ontario M4.P 1L2.
All applications due Nov. 1, 1978   ,

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