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The Ubyssey Nov 30, 1971

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Array 2 prois ask complete reconsideration
Sociology professors Matthew
Speier and Ron Silvers will not
participate in the anthropology-
sociology department's
promotions and tenure
committee's plan to prepare an
"addendum" to their tenure cases,
the two announced Monday.
Instead the two profs called
upon the committee "to reopen
our cases for reconsideration
immediately and to remove the
procedural confusion that has
surrounded them thus far."
Speier and Silvers were
narrowly recommended for tenure
by the committee in October, but
the   decision   was   undercut   by
department head Cyril Belshaw's
negative report to arts dean Doug
Kenny.
Since then students and junior
faculty have urged the committee
to reconsider the cases, while
Belshaw has maintained
opposition to any new look at the
decision.
The issue overspilled
department boundaries last week
when the Canadian Association of
University Teachers and the UBC
faculty association grievance
committee were both informally
called into the cases.
The P and T committee
decided Wednesday, in opposition
to Belshaw, to appoint new
assessors for Speier and Silvers
and, using the reassessments as a
basis, to send an "addendum" to
the arts faculty P and T
committee. The move was
generally interpreted by some
members of the university
community as amounting to
virtual reconsideration of the
cases.
However over the weekend,
Speier and Silvers said they came
to the conclusion, on the basis of
various Belshaw letters to them,
that the proposed addendum
would be little more than a
whitewash.
A series of memo exchanges
Friday and Saturday resulted in
Speier and Silvers' refusals to go
along with the P and T's plan.
"According to the head's
letters of Nov. 26, the department
P and T committee will not
reopen our tenure cases, nor will
they perform a reconsideration of
them," one Speier-Silvers memo
said.
"The committee wishes to
diffuse responsibility rather than
assume responsibility for their
past omissions, unfair procedures
and   improper   handling   of our
cases," the two profs charged.
"We will not be parties to an
irresponsible venture, and we
cannot therefore in good
conscience participate ... If an
addendum is to mean a
reconsideration of our cases then
we would be most happy to
co-operate," they added.
In addition, The Ubyssey
learned that three other anthrosoc
tenure candidates — profs Bob
Ratner, George Gray and Robin
Ridington  — have already been
See page 2: BELSHAW
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Vol. LIU, No. 31      VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 30, 1971       -tUp***    228-2301
Heat's on
in search
for dean
The search committee
appointed to look for a new dean
of medicine is meeting this week
in a last-ditch effort to make a
choice before the end of
December.
It is understood the
presidential committee has
narrowed the field to four
contenders for the dean's post,
which is being vacated by John
McCreary.
McCreary was named
co-ordinator of health sciences in
early August, following a
government announcement that
more than $60 million would be
allocated for the proposed UBC
health sciences complex.
Of  the   four   contenders  for
McCreary's job,  three are from
out  of  town, and the  other is
• currently    on    campus,   The
Ubyssey has learned.
Social event
off year set
Ubyssey staffers, like most
people on this campus, have to
write Christmas essays and exams.
So no more papers after
Thursday until Jan. 3.
However the staff, for the
benefit of all its loyal friends and
foes and tween classes followers,
is having a party Thursday at
noon in the editorial office, SUB
24 IK.
Ubyssey    editor      Leslie
Plommer    told   The    Ubyssey
, refreshments   will   be  served  to
enhance    the    much-expected
spirited dialogue.
"Our typewriters, pencils, glue
pots, a few em "rulers and the telex
machine will be on view,"
Plommer said Monday.
For those who cannot make
the party, Ubyssey staff will be
. available to meet with campus
groups next term.
"We've had a few requests in
the past for staff to talk about the
paper and we're certainly
available," said Plommer.
AMS election
said invalid
—kini mcdonald photo
GIANT THUMB helps Ken Bartesko, architecture 1, hitch rides off campus from village area. Weatherproof
fist, Bartesko says, is virtually useless for other tasks such as picking up dimes and spreading peanut butter.
Members of student court and
persons involved in an action
disputing the validity of last
Wednesday's AMS byelections
were to meet this morning to
decide on when the court is to
convene.
Depending on the outcome of
the meeting, the court could
convene later today to begin an
informal assessment of the charges
by a defeated AMS candidate of
election irregularities, and to
examine the constitutional
requirements for hearing the case.
If the court goes into open
session today, the time and
location will be available from
staff at the information desk in
the SUB foyer.
Tom MacKinnon, elected on
the first count by 10 votes but
defeated in a recount Friday by
the same margin, alleges that
voters were swayed by Students'
Coalition members manning polls.
He is also charging that ballots
disappeared between the first vote
count Wednesday night and the
recount.
"Two students were told by
those manning the SUB north poll
to vote for the candidates in
alphabetical order," MacKinnon
told The Ubyssey. "Of course,
(presidential candidate Grant)
Burnyeat's name is first on the list
and (candidate Til) Nawatzki's
name is last."
(Burnyeat was the victorious
Students' Coalition candidate.
The poll was manned by coalition
members, including vice-president
Derek Swain and treasurer David
Dick.)
MacKinnon said this is
representative of the conduct of
students manning this and other
polls during the presidential and
secretarial elections.
"The students there had vested
interests, being members of the
Students' Coalition," he said.
"This disgusting practice is
inexcusable to me."
AMS ex-returning officer
Sandy Kass confirmed that 14
ballots were missing at Friday's
recount in the secretarial election.
"The ballots were gone from
the box when we opened it again
for the recount," Kass said.
The recount had been
requested by candidate Hilary
Powell of the Students' Coalition
slate after the original count
showed she lost to MacKinnon,
law 3, by 10 votes.
See page 2: BURNYEAT Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  November  30,  1971
Burnyeat charges student court fixed
From page 1
Powell won in the recount
after she gained 10 votes
legitimately, Kass said.
"If all the ballots had been
there, this 10-vote gain would
only have meant that the election
was a tie — not that Powell had
won," she said.
Kass said the returns sheet was
checked and 14 votes were not
accounted for from the SUB 1
poll, 12 of which should have
been for MacKinnon and two for
Powell according to the previous
count.
"If these votes were added to
the candidates' totals as they
appeared in the recount, then the
election would have been a tie, as
our previous figures suggested,"
she said.
An action launched by
presidential candidate Til
Nawatzki, law 3, on the same
grounds as MacKinnon's has been
abandoned.
In a letter to Garrod, Nawatzki
said he would be "an arsehole" to
insist on invalidating the election.
"Upon doing a bit of thinking,
I have come to the conclusion
that having the student court
consider the matter would be a
waste of time . .. (because) having
known Grant Burnyeat for some
time I can confidently say he
would not himself resort to fraud
merely to win an election of this
sort.
More teaching experience urged
"Pissed Off With What's Going
Down in Education?" read the
posters papering doors and
classrooms in the education
building.
Apparently some people are.
A meeting at noon Thursday
sponsored by the education
students association attracted 60
concerned students.
Education student Dave Annal
outlined the meeting's objectives.
"We would like to identify and
structure student complaints
regarding the education faculty's
programs," Annal said.
Education students, many just
returned from practice teaching,
cited a lack of methods courses ■
and the shortness of practicums as
focal points of complaint.
Dean Neville Scarfe, who
attended with two other
education professors, answered
many complaints.
Yes, said Scarfe, two-week
practicums are too short.
"I would prefer to see a
four-week period," he said.
Replying to a question on the
lack of methods courses, Scarfe
outlined his own philosophy.
"Methods courses are the crux
of teacher education around
which other courses should
revolve and draw from," Scarfe
said.
To combat growing complaints
about the length of practicums
and the lack of methods courses
Belshaw 'to stay'
From page 1
approved by the arts faculty P and
T committee.
The possibility of the
Speier-Silvers academic records
being compared to the records of
other candidates is thus
considerably lessened.
Among his most recent memos
Belshaw issued one denying "the
possibility that I am thinking
seriously of resignation."
Belshaw told members of the
department: "It would be utter
irresponsibility on my part to
even contemplate resignation
when the department is faced
with malignant attacks from the
outside ...
"A time of crisis and concern is
a   time   to  see  the   department
through to more creative and
happier activities."
Belshaw claimed: "Remarks
that I may have made about by
intentions and concerns have been
interpreted with utter naivety."
The remarks Belshaw referred
to are contained in a statement he
made to faculty in mid-November.
At that time Belshaw said: "It
has been my wish and the wish of
this department that the headship
should be for a five-year term at
the end of which there is an
examination of continuation or
non-continuation.
"It has been my intention to
offer my resignation to the dean
in December, and I will still try to
do this although it has been made
more difficult by all the pressures
and politics lately."
Eco-barrels here
Barrels bearing the Joshua Co-operative label for recyclable
paper have been placed in UBC department offices, marketing
manager Lynn Vickson said Monday.
Barrels have been placed in all departmental offices in
Buchanan, Angus, Forestry, Electrical Engineering, Geo-Physics, old
and new administration buildings and the animal resources hut.
University janitors deposit the recyclable waste from the barrels
in UBC garbage rooms where Joshua workers collect it.
Acceptable paper includes general office paper such as lecture
notes and exam booklets, computer cards and run-off, envelopes
without stamps or cellophane windows, old files, brochures and file
holders.
Items such as kleenex, lunch bags and paper towels cannot be
used because they present health hazards.
Newsprint and cardboard are too expensive-to handle unless
brought directly to the warehouse. Styrofoam cups and cellophane are
not recyclable.
.•I- 5^6»;,
.!»   -
r->>«s^K*. \
Need some
n
money
Take advantage of our
Rebate policy.
* Rebates on all Bookstore and
Armoury purchases made between
April 1st 1971 up to and including
December 1st 1971 will be given
beginning December 6th.
*To obtain rebates, please present
your cash register receipt slips
(receipts for special sale goods
excepted) and your A.M.S. card to
the Bookstore.
* All registered students including
Graduate and Undergraduate
students are eligible.
for fifth year transfer students,
fifth year transfer rep Jim Laing
has sent around a questionaire for
students to complete next week.
As a result of the complaints in
one fifth year transfer class, a
student-faculty steering
committee has been set up to hear
grievances, generate ideas, and
recommend   curriculum   changes.
Students interested in working
with the committee should
contact Laing in education room
one.
Burnyeat said Monday he plans
to try and get the student court to
declare itself biased and unable to
decide on the question presented
by MacKinnon.
Burnyeat said the reason he
considers the court to be biased is
because they were all picked by
Nawatzki in his official position as
president of the law
undergraduate society.
Powell's representative would
have to present a motion to the
bench asking them to declare
themselves unable to rule
effectively on the motion because
of bias.
"There is little likelihood of
them doing this — it has no
precedent in UBC history,"
MacKinnon said.
He said he does intend to
resign his seat before the action
comes before the bench.
Since Nawatzki has withdrawn
his action, Burnyeat plans to take
office Wednesday.
— o light comedy before exams —
PHILLIPE DE BROCA'S
KING OF HEARTS
with ALAN BATES
FRIDAY 3rd & SATURDAY 4th                  ^                      SUB THEATRE - 50c
7:00 and 9:30                                  *"                                        •
SUNDAY 5th — 7:00                                                                            a SUBFILMSOC presentation
the bookstore
It's the re;
vOKGi
Trad© Ma* Reg.
Both Coca-Cola sod Coke are registered trade marks which identify only the product of Coca-Cola LW. Tuesday,  November 30,  1971
THE       UBYSSEY
'age
ARCHIE LESLIE, DOUG MOORE . . . moving goose pie to SUB ovens.
-terry   young   photo
Eighteenth century returns live, in color
By SANDI SHREVE
The 18th century will return
live and in color to Cecil Green
Park Tuesday at 7 p.m.
The century's arrival is in
response to organized efforts of
English 380, 389 and Fine Arts
337 students to recreate the era.
Dinner will feature a 65-pound
goose pie stuffed with hare,
turkey and chicken.
A suckling roast pig, special
18th century sausages as well as
crabs and prawns made 18th
century style will also be served.
"We are using recipes from a
genuine 18th century cookbook,"
Margaret Young said Monday.
Young, one of the event's
co-ordinators, said the goose pie
was made at a friend's home but
because   of  its   size  has  to  be
transferred to the large SUB oven
to be cooked.
She said in previous years roast
beef and ham were served "but
this year we thought we should
have something less commonly
encountered."
But the 18th century chefs
delight dishes are only the
beginning.
The UBC theatre department is
scheduled to entertain diners with
scenes from Wicherley's "The
Country   Wife"   while   a   music
department ensemble will provide
18th century background music
throughout the evening.
A ballet studio will
demonstrate the minuet and then
attempt to teach the skill to
randomly chosen guests.
Young said most guests will
appear in costumes to add to the
evening's atmosphere.
Tickets to witnesses and
participants in the century were
sold out Monday.
Corporation awaits craft decision
By TRICIA MOORE
The management of the Thunderbird Shop
is waiting for the new Alma Mater Society
executive to make a decision on non-student
crafts displays in SUB.
"We would like the AMS to decide to
control the type of people selling and the
number of people allowed to sell their wares
in SUB," said Bob MacKerricher, managing
director of Collegiate Advertising Ltd. which
owns the shop.
MacKerricher said Monday that the large
number of people selling wares in SUB and
not paying rent is unfair to the Thunderbird
Shop, which must pay $750 rent each month.
Collegiate Advertising has alleged the AMS
is breaking the 1968 lease in allowing
non-students to sell their wares in SUB.
MacKerricher refused to say if the
Thunderbird Shop will use its contract if the
company does not agree with an AMS
decision.
People sought for SUB committee posts
The SUB management committee
wants you, Alma Mater Society
co-ordinator-elect Rick Murray said
Monday.
Murray said Monday people interested
in working on the committee should leave
a letter of application at SUB 250 by
Friday or come and see him between
1:30 and 3:30 this week in SUB 250.
"I'm expecting some people to leave
the committee — such as (crafts store
manager) John Cull, because he's not a
student," said Murray.
"Ex-co-ordinator   Sue   Kennedy   and
ex-treasurer Dave Mole will also be
automatically off the committee," he
said. "We're not sure about the rest of the
committee."
Murray, a member of the Students'
Coalition slate, took the position of
co-ordinator by acclamation.
When the Thunderbird Shop first
complained about the craft tables in the first
week of November, many non-student
craftsmen were not allowed to set up their
tables in SUB.
This week they are back and have not
encountered any problems as the AMS
decision is awaited.
Meanwhile the AMS-sponsored craft store
in the south alcove of SUB is expanding and
now has facilities for ceramics and batiking
and will soon have them for candlemaking.
Students may use the facilities and then
sell their products in the store if they wish,
manager John Cull said Monday.
Cull said he also plans to set up facilities
for woodworking and clothes making, and is
willing to handle second-hand goods.
However Cull does not want production to
be the primary aim of the store.
"I want this to be craft therapy for people
who work a lot with their minds and want to
work with their hands as well," Cull said.
Sk consumer column
By ART SMOLENSKY
Auntie CBC, who has for a long time
presented a sort of positive consumer
image now has a menu for greater
Vancouver residents.
Unlike other "you can do it on $10 a
week" menus put out by Safeway or
Super-Valu to promote themselves, the
CBC menu will have you crawling
through the_ east end of downtown for
some really super prices.
The menu, complete with costs and
where to buy each staple, may be
obtained from Good Morning Radio,
CBC, 747 Bute, Vancouver 5.
Reprinted here is a list of places where
bargains abound.
Cheap Food Sources
Do not go to specialized small shops
(except butchers for free soup bones -
but ask for dog bones, same thing).
• Famous Foods Ltd., 1315 East
Hastings. Buy all bulk staples here —
cheaper in the long run.
• For vegetables go to: Sunrise
Market, 300 Powell, or Dart's Enterprise
Ltd., 267 East First, North Vancouver, or
Chinatown.
■ • For tinned (canned) goods go to:
Paramount Salvage, 339 Railway (for
damaged goods), or Dart's Enterprise
Ltd., 267 East First, North Vancouver,
also for damaged-crushed cans, etc.
goods).
• For nuts and spices to to Galloways,
1084 Robson.
• For reject meats and sausages (due
to shapes and size) go to Freybe's Mfg.
Ltd., 325 Railway, Vancouver.
• For eggs to to Dart's Enterprise Ltd.,
267 East First, North Vancouver.
• For cheese and all kinds of damaged
food   to   The   Lido,   Broadway   and
Columbia.
• ■ For fish go to Kay's Sea Food, 335
Powell; Sugita Shoten, 332 Powell.
• For tea go to Dart's or Paramount,
or Murchies, 1008 Robson, or 1036
Mainland, or Woodward's Mall, West Van,
Park Royal.
Re: Bookstore Rip-Off
The Great Ascent, Sub: The Struggle
For Economic Development in Our Time
by Robert L. Heilbroner.
Published by Harper & Row the
printed price is $1.60. Pasted over that
price (representing the Canadian
middleman's profit?) is a bookstore retail
price of $1.85. The ticket, incidentally, is
last year's variety of sticker. This year's
variety of sticker, being larger, obscures
that unreasonable increase.
This larger sticker, however, quotes a
price of $2.65.
Perhaps the bookstore has discovered
an ingenious method of providing for
projected inventory build-up.
Ripped off
Letter
Yes the great monsoon season has
come again upon the western forest, and
with it, come the bookstore and The
Thunderbird Shop hawking umbrellas.
The T-Bird enterprise is selling one
number for $3.95. The identical umbrella
sells in the bookstore for $3.25.
The bookstore may be a perpetual
rip-off but there's always one worse —
and this under the roof of our beloved
AMS.
I've been soaked
Arts 2; Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  November  30,  1971
For as long as anyone we've ever met can
remember, The Ubyssey has been evil.
We've been absolutely unrivalled on the UBC
campus when it comes to cultivated debauchery.
Liberal politicians, moral re-armament types,
parents and the Women's Christian Temperance
Union have been unanimous in their
condemnation of the educated degenerates whose
home has moved from the old auditorium
through the Brock basement to its present littered
locale in the northeast corner of SUB.
It will come as no shock to most that we
revel in the slimelight of sin. We frolic atop the
festering footlights of fornication, delight in our
own peculiar brand of depravity.
But, as someone remarked a few days ago,
this is 1971. Almost, it follows, 1972.
Times are changing. The new replace the old,
and long-cherished traditions are vanishing before
our very eyes.
The Ubyssey had decided that it, too, must
change. For too long have we languished in our
wretched state of wickedness and perversion,
thinking only of our own uncontrollable desires.
Squalor
For too long have we staged our own
exclusive snobbish orgies, where passionate,
nubile young bodies writhe in ecstasy and
drunken minds create literary history.
And for too long have our brains allowed
themselves to turn inward under the influence of
mind-altering drugs, taken in order to forget our
chequered and sordid past and the bleak future
that lies before us.
No, times are changing. And with them The
Ubyssey.
Our exclusivity, our snobbishness, our
ivory-tower mentality are things of the past. No
longer will we continue our futile attempt to hold
on to something so base and vile that only the
most daring and outspoken pioneers of the
psychosexual revolution would presume to
espouse it.
And   so   it   is   with   trepidation,   but   as
visionaries of the future, that we publish on page
1 of today's commie house organ the answer to  *
every voyeur's dream: an open invitation to that
most repugnant of Ubyssey rituals, the party.
We have decided that the lust and degeneracy
which set our twisted minds on their deviant
paths are too good to keep to ourselves.
It has occurred to us that deep down — nay,
perhaps even close to the surface — there lurks a
Ubyssey staffer in every agglomeration of mind
and matter that daily stalks the soggy Point Grey
campus. We have also come to realize that there
lies within us more filth and degredation than we
could ever hope to express by ourselves.
As   the   proprieters  of  this  surplus  social
gangrene,   we  are  sharing  the  squalor   of our •
habitat with all and sundry Thursday noon.
If you want free refreshments (heh heh) and
a guaranteed shit-kicking pre-exam bash,
complete with real live Ubyssey staffers, come to
SUB 241-K any time from noon on.
Governor Les Bewley might even be there.
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Aislin, Last Post
Letters
Aid
In the issue of Friday, Nov. 26,
you ran an item asking for
volunteers to canvass for the
Children's Aid Society of
Vancouver Christmas Fund. I also
placed an ad in the Classified
section requesting the same.
The campaign was to run from
Dec. 1 to Dec. 8, as I promised
Lorna Kirkham of Children's Aid.
However,    my    problem    is
that not one person responded to
my plea — not one phone call.
What is wrong with the students
of this campus? The lack of
response didn't shock me as much
as it depressed me.
How do 1 tell 700 children that
not one of 20,000 mature,
well-to-do students wanted to
volunteer their help so that those
less fortunate than they could
enjoy Christmas? I just don't
know.
M UBYSSEY
NOVEMBER 30, 1971
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the writer and not of the AMS or the university administration.
Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a
weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices are located
in room 241K of the Student Union Building.
Editorial    departments,    228-2301,
228-2305; advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Leslie Plommer
"Allright you arse creepers, let's get-the lead out," yelled Paul Knox
as Stan Persky attempted to do just that on Leslie Plommer. Lesley Krueger
told Sandi Shreve Grate Burnfat was a swine. Tricia Moore and Art
Smolensky said they agreed as did Conrad Winkelman who thought the
whole show had gotten out of hand and of course it was with the likes of
Vaughn Palmer, Sandy Kass, Lawrence Leader and John Sydor around.
Vaughn Nelson said he needed a job. Gord Gibson certainly looks like he
could use one.
Kelly Booth and Terry Young said all those print freaks blew. Kim
McDonald agreed.
Maurice came down to printers for a brew and Mike Sasges told him
there was none. Urp!
And Kass reminds all to sign up for the nocturnal broomball game —
Almost forgot!
228-2307;    Page    Friday,    Sports,
It is not too late to volunteer a
small amount of your time
towards a most worthwhile cause.
I can't do this alone—I need your
help. Please call Ted at 261-5820
between 2 - 6 p.m. and 685-7812
after 6:30. PLEASE. Thank you.
Ted Daly,
Arts 3.
Peeking
It was not without alarm that I
received the news of the
disturbance at the Coliseum on
Nov. 20.
As is well known, the
youngsters in attendance were
driven wild by the atmosphere.
The wild infectious music and the
drug L.D.O., known in drug
jargon as "Pot", combined to
drive the young people beserk and
an orgy of violence and
destruction ensued.
It is not the violence that
worries me, it is the fact that this
is a symptom of a deeper malaise.
Behind this incident, and I remind
you that this is one of many such
incidents, I detect the sinister
lurking figure of international
communism.
Through my impartial research,
funded by the J. Birch Society, I
have  discovered  a  plot  by  the
communists to destroy our way of
life. By using this diabolically
infectious music, which I refer to
as "jungle music", and this L.D.O.
Pot stuff, the communists are
planting the seeds of chaos in the
minds of our youth.
These seeds wait only for the
command from Peeking or
Muskow to erupt into revolt. The
communists are well known for
their brainwashing and this is the
technique they use on our
youngsters. I'm not sure of the
exact way they are doing this but
they must be stopped before it is
too late!
To do this we must cancel all
future "jungle music" concerts to
prevent the enslavement of any
more innocents by the twisted
minds in the "Red" capitals. In
conjunction with this we must set
up "Camps" to disindoctrinate
those already tainted with these
perversions. A ^
Engineering,
Class of '33,
Buenos Aires.
Crunch
Friday, while driving home
from UBC after dark and in the
rain, two cyclists seemed to
appear   from   nowhere   as   they
crossed my path just a few feet in
front of my car.
I swerved to miss them, and
was sickened by the crunch and
crackle of breaking bones beneath
the car. The victim was a dog
belonging to one of the cyclists —
it could just have easily been a
third cyclist or an innocent
pedestrian.
Please, please, please cyclists:
put lights on your bike and wear
something that can be seen if you
must ride after dark! More than
that — ride defensively —
sometimes you're difficult to see.
I realize you have just as much
right to the road as I, but if I
don't see you in time, you're dead
— and I have to pay for it.
Bob Parrott,
Arts 4.
Skagit
It is not my intention to get
involved in the different opinions
expressed recently in the letters
section by Allan Duguid and
David Lee concerning the Skagit
Valley. Nor is it my intention to
defend the field of community
and regional planning.
It is my intention to take to
task any student including one
David Lee, who, on the basis of Tuesday,  November 30,  1971
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters
one planning student's opinion is
ready to debase an entire field of
study.
I'm not a lycanthropist, nor, I
believe, is David Lee. The latter is
of course a prime example of
naivete and narrow-mindedness,
which puts him in a class with the
Tom Campbells and the Phil
Gaglardis. These persons evade the
real issues and attack institutions
which are always vulnerable.
Skagit is worth saving for its
own sake.
God help us though if there are
more David Lees in the world!
Henry Ropertz,
Chairman,
Planning Students' Association;
Consume
Yes, once again it's nearly
December and you are beseeched
by the legend of Santa Claus, that
cheery old man, to do unto
others. The season is upon us to
be jolly and to celebrate our long
and arduous struggle from Day
One, and once again we shall all
go out to the stores and play our
vital roles as consumers,
ostensibly in the name of
Christmas.
And it's true, actually, that
Christmas time is a period for
consumption of goods and
services like none other in the
year.
For one, let's say, the chances
are that most of us will consume a
lot more and different kinds of
food than we usually do. F is for
fat "which is what you'll add on.
Visions of sugar plums and
chestnuts roasting on an open fire
are really just visions revived, and
who could forget that
scrumptious Christmas dinner last
year and the ticklish sensations of
the effervescent Bromo-Seltzer
which followed it.
U stands for unsettled, which is
what your stomach was.
Then, too, perhaps there are a
few former residents of Place
Vanier around who will fondly
reminisce the vicious maladies
that followed Christmas dinner in
1968. Even Food Services' Ruth
Blair must still chuckle at the
thought of the dramatic food
poisoning that eventful evening
which sent dozens of students
reeling to the toilets, flashing all
the way.
And then there are tickets, the
kind many of us will be buying on
snowy mountain tops for the use
of brightly colored chairlifts and
glove-reducing rope tows. Few
will contest that skiing is a
consumer sport — if you ever
want to turn someone off on
winter skiing, just tell them how
much they can expect to spend on
warmth alone.
C is for choked up, which is
what they'll be.
But in terms of consumption
of goods, skiing is strictly for girls.
A matron was once heard to
admonish the weaker sex: "Take
care of your body, girls, it's the
most important part of your
capital." True, matron, but it will
have to look good first before
anyone will care to peruse it, and
that means the proper clothing.
On the slopes my dear that's
fashionable snug sweaters and the
tightest ski pants — you might
even meet one of those handsome,
weather-beaten ski instructors in
the apres lounge.
K is for knocked-out, which is
how you'll want him to be
impressed.
And then there are colds, the
kind of consumption most of us
tend to go into once a year. E is
for emasculated, which is how
they make many of us feel. Best
of all, however, is liquor — and
God knows, we'll probably all
consume plenty of that.
D is for drunk, which tends to
be the case.
So what do you have when it's
time to welcome in the New Year
and you list your consumptions?
Well, add it up:
Fat
Unsettled
Choke d-up
Knocked-out
Emasculated
Drunk.
Jim Nelson
Kraft
Re: your Nov. 23 article about
subversive activities against Kraft.
It is obviously the work of
illogical thinkers as Kraft does not
suffer when its cheese is
pencil-punched, but rather the
store    owner    (who    is    not
necessarily a member of a large,
grocery chain but may be a small
businessman) and the consumer
who is forced to pay eventually
for this mindless destruction.
And why is it that the workers'
are always 100 per cent right?
What about management's side of
the story? I'm not saying that
management or labor is right, but
why not give us both sides of the
story and let the individual
decide?
Mark Wilson,
Science 3.
Lead on
Congratulations fellow
students!
After a month of student
political activity at UBC we find a
student government (with
policies and programs which may
not have been the best) has been
given a vote of non-confidence.
Now, bloc voters, what have
you replaced it with? A
government? No, unless you
classify acclaimed candidates as a
true contended representation of
the students. Or if it is a
government perhaps it is the one
we deserve?
Maybe if emotional voters and
bloc voters spent less time figuring
out the slope of their foreheads
and more time using what's
behind it we would not have
taken a step back to the dark ages.
In the meantime, lead on
sheep!
Brian Sketchley,
Arts 2.
Help
'Don't judge all engineers
by the actions of a few'
The following opinion piece was written by
a second-year engineering student who is a
member of the staff of The Ubyssey.
By CONRAD WINKELMAN
Recent events on campus indicate that the
nature of engineers and engineering stunts
need some clarification.
The prime function of engineering stunts is
to bring out the characteristic that makes the
engineers a distinct group.
If a group is not unique it will diffuse into
the rest of the society and form part of a
conglomerate of people that have no common
goals. In this respect, engineering stunts are, in
principle, identification marks of the
engineering student body.
The Nov. 18 beard-shaving escapade in the
SUB cafeteria was a stunt and as such it
deserves no special attention. However, the
reaction in the letters section of The Ubyssey
reveals the bad image the engineers have on
account of their hell-raising behavior. This
image must be changed.
In the Nov. 19 Ubyssey it was reported
that there was a rumor that the victims of the
stunt were stooges, planted for the occasion.
Indeed they were. But I gather that this was
not at all clear to many students.
First of all, the denial by engineering
undergraduate society president Doug
Aldridge that the victims were planted tended
to drag all engineers through the mud and
label them as .unscrupulous liars. There are
more than 1,000 on campus but only between
50 and 75 took part in the stunt. It is not
correct to assume that all engineers endorsed
Doug's denial. Most of us would rather speak
the truth.
Had Doug not been confronted with the
stooge question there would have been no
reason to tell the truth at once. The stunt
would have been funny and harmless. When
faced with the question however, Doug should
have told the truth and explained the
significance    behind    the    beard-shaving
ceremony. He would have gained some
respect, not only from the engineers but also
from other students.
Although Doug did not lose his beard that
day, he did lose face by failing to represent
the engineers in an honorable way. This
failure is a weakness in his leadership. Doug
Aldridge should be condemned for his
statement that the stunt was not a set-up,
first, because it is a lie, second, because it does
nothing to improve the bad image the
engineers already have.
Who the hell are the engineers anyway?
Each one is himself. As a human being he is
unique, meaning that his guts are not like a
transmission and his head is not like a clock.
Without his red jacket he might be taken for a
law-man, or even a poet.
In his group of fellow students he talks
about celestial mechanics, bending moments,
force-fields, and only god knows how many
coefficients. When he dons his red jacket he
does not lose his identity but only tells the
world about his occupationsl goals.
Some charge engineers are perverted.
Others say they are immature.
If this is so, engineering objectives are no.
more the cause of it than the mechanics of
ballistic missiles were the cause of the Cuban
missile crisis.
The cause must be in the fact that
engineers are not immune to the ills of the
society just because they are a part of it.
The letters to The Ubyssey about the stunt
are cause for concern.
They expose deep antagonistic feelings
towards the engineers that are not fully
justified. They indicate that all engineers are
judged by the irresponsible actions of a few.
This is to be expected, since only those who
create a disturbance are remembered. The
silent majority is usually not known.
The letter Humor is disturbing indeed, not
because it attacks the engineers but because
the writer draws a parallet between the Nazis
in pre-war Germany and the engineers on
campus. This parallel in itself is perhaps
legitimate but the writer, whoever he is,
proceeds to question the courage of rabble
rousers while hiding in anonymity of "Name
withheld".
The writer's own courage is far from
sublime; nevertheless, it provides food for
thought. The very reason why the Nazis in
Germany were able to stay in power and bring
upon the world the horrors of the Second
World War was that the German people who
opposed the Nazis were hiding.
They did not openly reject and oppose
Nazi oppression and therefore it continued.
They spared themselves physical harm but in
its place they put much responsibility for the
slaughter that followed. Their physical
well-being was paramount.
Although it might convey scorn to criticize
the writer's fear of his physical well-being, it
does not. His fears are understandable.
In the past the engineers have carried out
reprisals that showed irresponsibility and hate.
Not to mention bad taste. Nevertheless, the
criticism is justified because anonymous
opposition to a lurking danger is as effective
as no opposition at all.
Finally, if any student is concerned about
our behavior he or she should not hide in
anonymity because if we get out of hand and
become a real threat there will be no way to
organize opposition against us. Then, when it
is too late, you will be plagued by a guilt
complex because you did nothing to stop the
evil you feared.
Therefore, if it is our contention that we
wish to live in a democratic society that, in
principle, grants us the right to express our
opinion against, and organize opposition to
those elements within the society that tend to
dominate and bully us, then we must not
forfeit the foundation of our freedom by
hiding in anonymity of "Name withheld".
Help, I've been cleaned out.
Has anyone found a bed,
clothes (both clean and dirty), a
desk, or my alarm clock?
Rumor has it that the red coats
have borrowed my possessions to
furnish their president's new
apartment. Keep my books, but
please return my beer and teddy
bear. I can't  sleep without her.
Gord Blankstein, Agriculture 4.
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THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  November  30,  1971
for
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MURRAY GOLDMAN
Sorting mai
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By VAUGHN NELSON
A number of students will walk from exams to
part-time jobs at the post office, restaurants,
supermarkets and other places this Christmas.
Others won't.
Many who have been working part-time throughout
the year will continue to work during the holidays.
Others will be registering with Canada Manpower
and the UBC placement office for any work they can
get.
"About 300 students will work at the post office
over the Christmas holidays," says UBC placement
officer Cameron Craik.
He says he does not believe the need for money to
be critical.
"The money a student earns over the holidays is not
going to make a hell of a lot of difference over whether
he stays in university or not," says Craik.
"If students are seeking jobs to purchase luxuries
they will probably find it more convenient to do
without the luxuries."
He says he did not know the number of women
applicants.
"People assume that when you separate people by
sex statistically, you separate them when you place
them," he says.
Craik says the post office usually gives the heavy
lifting jobs to men and lighter work to women and that
most women prefer not to work on the night shift.
"We are in the process of registering students who
do not have exams," he says. "We will register others
when they can tell us the date of their last examination.
"I would advise people desiring work outside
Vancouver to check into the Manpower office or else go
direct to the post office as soon as they arrive."
M,
lanpower counsellor Charlie Todd, in charge of
Christmas hiring for the post office, says 6,000
applicants have registered.
He says 4,000 will be hired early in the season but
that this number can increase.
"It depends on the volume of mail 1
will receive this year," says Todd.
"We do not ask applicants to state th>
but a healthy percentage of them look like
Although a large number of applicati
accepted it is still not too late for student;
job.
"A student should register with the I
office rather than register with us," says
she has a better chance of getting. Oi
university."
Mail sorters earn $1.75 per hour anc
and mail handlers earn $2 per hour.
"We make no distinction between se
"No previous experience is required."
H,
lugh Ross, employment manager fo
that the load on most large stores bu
middle of November.
He said a large number of students 1
for part-time work throughout the year.
"We are looking for students interes
Thursday and Friday evenings and on Sat'
eight months," says Ross.
"They can become proficient and th<
means something to them."
A spokeswoman for Woodwards say
receives a large number of applications
students during the year — not just aroun>
holiday season.
"An equal number are assigned jot
and in the stockrooms," she says. "Studi
every department, including offices.
"Many work on Thursday and Friday
as on Saturdays."
White Spot restaurants do not signif
their Christmas employment, says perso
Walter Fraser.
"Our volume of business over the h(
lower than it is during the tourist season,'
"People tend to dine  at home or
wher
v_ Tuesday,  November 30,  1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
te.
L*
post office
occupation,
udents."
isjiave been
) apply for a
C placement
odd. "He or
through the
:tter carriers
' said Todd.
'he Bay, says
s up in the
e been hired
1 in working
'ay for six to
smployment
he company
m university
le Christmas
3n the floor
s are used in
ights, as well
ntly increase
:1 supervisor
:ay season is
: says.
ith relatives
So far,
no one
has applied
to be
Santa Claus.
during this period. If anything, employment increases
just prior to the holidays.
"Many summer students working at the White Spot
continue to work on the weekends during their
Christmas holidays."
B
'iruce Hawkshaw of Canada Safeway Ltd. says: "At
Christmas we don't get a rush for employment since we
hire a large number of students throughout the year.
"Students, not having classes and needing money,
want to work the extra hours," says Hawkshaw.
Safeway also has a relief staff employed full-time.
Because most holidays are taken during the summer,
the relief staff is available to handle much of the extra
work.
"We like to hire students during the year and give
them work when they need it most, such as during the
summer, at Christmas, and at mid-term breaks.
"If they help us when we need them then we try to
help them whenever we can."
Applicants ask for work as meat cutters, cashiers,
and food clerks.
Students wishing to drive taxis must have a "B"
licence which may take three to six weeks to obtain.
A spokesman for Yellow Cab Ltd. says it always
uses students through the summer and through the
Christmas holidays.
However this early in the month they have a long
list of spare drivers waiting for work.
Students seeking more glamorous work at ski resorts
earn little money.
The ski patrol is usually a volunteer service and
ski instructors work on a casual basis if they are
unwilling to endure the entire holiday period.
Who-you-know and what-you-know are the rules.
The last two weeks of December do not seem to be
the best time to seek employment because most
shopping is done before then. For those in need of
money, however, work can still be found.
"In the past some students have asked for work on
Christmas Eve or Christmas Day," says Craik. "If we
were lucky we may have found them a bartenders'job at
a party."
So far no one has applied for a job as Santa Claus.
e will you work
this Christmas?
Tansar
we sell
handmade things
by local craftsmen.
2002 w. 4m. avenue
Christmas
is for
little
people
&~  JtL, 2k- ^C JtL
MAKE IT SPECIAL WITH
CHILDREN'S BOOKS
from
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Bernard and Gilles will
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ft/Witt
I     University Square
For appointment
224-5540 Page  8
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  November  30,   1971
Goyer gumshoe exposed by Halifax left
HALIFAX (CUP) - Solicitor-
general Jean Goyer's security
services department was hard at
work here when one of its agents
was recently found out.
Dave MacKinnon, a well-,
known figure in left-wing circles,
was exposed recently as a
conscious paid department agent.
He was a member of the New
Morning Collective, one of the
organizations Goyer said . the
department would investigate.
MacKinnon started working for
the security and intelligence
branch of the RCMP in June,
1971. At that time, the central
staff of New Morning in Halifax,
and leaders of the Vancouver
Partisan Party and Red Morning in
Toronto, knew of his actions.
He was operating as a double
agent, giving only general
information on the left to the
department and collecting
information about the security
force for future use by the left,
New Morning claimed.
Because of his activities, the
New    Morning   concluded   that
MacKinnon is either a conscious
police agent, or is so "screwed
up" that he must be treated as a
spy.
One example the group cited
was a leftist Halifax newspaper,
the Eastern Front, which
MacKinnon allegedly instigated.
The small group of staffers was
responsible recently for throwing
a molotov cocktail into a Halifax
federal office building.
New Morning denounced the
act and the group as adventuristic.
As a result of MacKinnon's
actions, New Morning issued a
statement urging that "the left in
Canada do not deal with
MacKinnon as he cannot be
trusted."
SFU council ousted
BURNABY (Staff) - The executive council of the Simon Fraser
University student society resigned Friday following a non-confidence
vote Thursday at a general meeting here.
"We resigned after a brief council meeting, held to call a
byelection for Jan. 24," ex-president Linda Meissenheimer said
Monday.
The legality of the motion to impeach council, "is hard to
interpret from the constitution because it is a bad constitution," said
Meissenheimer.
The society's lawyer said the vote was legal, leaving them no
choice but to resign.
"No concrete cases were discussed," Meissenheimer said.
"The main charge was council displayed no leadership role
involving student participation in activities such as senate committees
and student departmental course unions."
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 For Your Appointment
UNIVERSITY OF
OREGON
College of Business
Administration representative will interview students interested in
graduate studies in Business on December 3,
1971. Interviews in small
groups. Make appointments at the Placement
Office.
— o light comedy before exams
PHILLIPE DE BROCA'S
KING OF HEARTS
with ALAN BATES
FRIDAY 3rd & SATURDAY 4th
7:00 and 9:30
SUNDAY 5th - 7:00
SUB THEATRE-50c
a SUBFILMSOC presentation
Moving with the Times
This year Canadian Hoechst
marks its eighteenth year of
growth in Canada by moving into
new custom-built Montreal
headquarters. The Canadian expansion has been closely linked
to the worldwide development of
Hoechst, which is now among
the world's top five chemical
companies, with worldwide sales
that last year totalled approximately 3.5 billion dollars.
In Canada, sales have almost
doubled in the past three years.
The new St. Laurent head office
and warehouse buildings will
provide space for a 100% increase in the company's head
office staff, and have been designed for expansion to accomodate increased Canadian production.
Research: Window to
the Future
Today's research creates the
products of tomorrow. One-third
of Hoechst's current sales come
from products which did not exist
10 years ago. And with worldwide sales approximating close to
3.5 billion dollars last year,
Hoechst spent close to 100 million in pure research, and on
laboratory buildings and equipment. The results of this investment decide Hoechst's position
in future markets, including
Canada.
Helping Build Canada
Products and ideas from Hoechst
have touched and improved the
quality of people's lives in every
area around the world, in a
hundred countries on six continents. As an affiliate of the
worldwide Hoechst organization,
Canadian Hoechst has a full cen-
tury of research and achievement
to draw upon. In Canada,
Hoechst is an autonomous company employing Canadians to
serve Canadian needs.
This new building is just one of
the more visible indications of
Canadian Hoechst Limited's
continuing investment in
Canada.
Hoechst in Canada concerns itself with supplying both the
present and future needs of Canadians. The range of products
and services covers the spectrum
through industrial chemicals,
dyestuffs, plastics, human and
veterinary medicines, pharmaceuticals, and textile fibres.
Hoechst products and services,
Hoechst techniques and know-
how in these fields, combined
with a large international fund of
experience, have given the Company a reputation for expertise
which takes constant striving to
live up to. Hoechst likes it that
way. So do their customers, here
and around the world. Hoechst
thinks ahead.
REG.T.M. HOECHST.
HOECHST
Canadian Hoechst Limited
4045 Cote Vertu
Montreal 383, Quebec
791-1-1
40 Lesmill Road
Don Mills, Ontario Tuesday, November 30,  1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 9
UBC OFFICE, CLERICAL & TECHNICAL
EMPLOYEES -
Have a voice in YOUR FUTURE - JOIN the
Office and Technical Employees' Union, Local IS
ARE YOU SATISFIED TO HAVE ALL
VITAL DECISIONS MADE FOR YOU ?
The Ubyssey - October 14,1971
UBC Personnel Director Colonel McLean told
the Ubyssey that grievances are first handled
by an employee's immediate superior.
If an agreement is not reached at this stage, he
said, the dispute goes up the university
bureaucracy until it reaches the department
head and McLean for a final joint settlement.
WITHOUT A UNION - THE EMPLOYER MAKES ALL OF THE
DECISIONS - WITH A UNION - YOU HAVE AN EFFECTIVE VOICE
IN ALL MATTERS CONCERNING YOUR WORKING CONDITIONS! IF
YOU CAN'T AGREE THE GRIEVANCE IS SETTLED THROUGH THE
PROCESS OF ARBITRATION.
The only union organized solely for Office, Clerical and
Technical Employees Has A Collective Bargaining Program
Designed To Meet Your Needs:
* Better salaries
* Improved paid vacations
* Fully paid Health and Welfare Plan
* Dental Plan
* Vision Plan
* Overtime pay and shift differential
* Job classification protection
* Seniority rights
* Continuing effort to raise office workers' wages to level paid
other trades and professions
* More paid holidays
* Protected pension plan
* I mproved sick leave
* Fair hearings on job grievances
* Job security
* Every other condition vital to office, clerical and
technical workers
UNORGANIZED EMPLOYEES ARE
DISCRIMINATED AGAINST!
The University of British Columbia has prepared job descriptions with
corresponding pay grades. Following are some examples and comparisons:
UBC-CLERK I, CLERK-TYPIST, SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR
PREFERRED QUALIFICATIONS: High school graduation plus business
training, some knowledge of procedures gained through at least one year office
experience. On jobs where typing is required, a minimum of 50 w.p.m. — salary:
$301 to $358.
A DISHWASHER  (NO PREVIOUS EXPERIENCE)  IN THE B.C. GOVERNMENT
SERVICE IS PAID $490 A MONTH.
UBC - SECRETARY II, STENOGRAPHER II, DEPARTMENT SECRETARY
PREFERRED QUALIFICATIONS: High school graduation plus business
training, ability to type at 60 w.p.m., and to take and transcribe shorthand at 110
w.p.m. Four years experience at the University or its equivalent — salary: $401-$495.
A CLEANER (NO PREVIOUS EXPERIENCE) IN THE B.C. GOVERNMENT
SERVICE IS PAID $490 TO $533 A MONTH.
OFFICE, CLERICAL AND TECHNICAL EMPLOYEES ARE ABLE TO
NEGOTIATE IMPROVED SALARIES WHEN THEY BELONG TO A UNION.
Following are examples of U.B.C. salaries compared to the rates of pay enjoyed by
members of our Union:
PBX OPERATOR
B.C. HYDRO
MACMILLAN BLOEDEL
CANADIAN FREIGHTWAYS
PACIFIC TEREX
NEON PRODUCTS
UBC - PAY GRADE "3"
STENOGRAPHER
B.C. HYDRO
MACMILLAN BLOEDEL
CANADIAN FREIGHTWAYS
PACIFIC TEREX
NEON PRODUCTS
UBC-PAY GRADE "13"
SECRETARY
B.C. HYDRO
YARROWS SHIPYARD
PACIFIC TEREX
CANADIAN FREIGHTWAYS
UBC-PAY GRADE "17"
$436 automatic increases to $524
418 automatic increases to 479
553 automatic increases to 649
480 automatic increases to 535
443 automatic increases to 476
301 not automatic to   358
$493 automatic increases to $591
463 automatic increases to 530
553 automatic increases to 649
540 automatic increases to 595
481 automatic increases to 533
401 not automatic to   495
$558 automatic increases to $693
529 automatic increases to   583
665 automatic increases too   725
589 automatic increases to   685
433 not automatic to   541
A salary survey conducted by the U.B.C, dated October 1971, for the position
of Intermediate Draftsman, shows that the salary paid by U.B.C. is $103 a month less
than the rate paid to our Union members. While it is not practical to compare all the
job categories in this ad, it is obvious that U.B.C. salaries are substantially lower than
those paid to the members of our Union.
SORRY FOR THE INCONVENIENCE!
The university administration refuses to rent space for
a union meeting on the campus—so we have made other arrangements.
SPECIAL MEETING
For ALL UBC OFFICE, CLERICAL <8 TECHNICAL EMPLOYEES
Place: Ironworkers' Hall, 2415 Columbia St., Vancouver
Pate: Thursday, December 2,1971 — Time: 5:30 P.M.
Send in your application card now—to the
OFFICE AND TECHNICAL EMPLOYEES UNION, LOCAL 15
146 East Broadway — Vancouver 10, B.C. — Phone 874-5201 Page  10
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  November  30,   1971
Yin, yang
come to SUB
The alternate food service in
SUB is now selling real food.
AFS co-ordinator Lyle
Osmundson has expanded his
services to include natural food.
Operator of the natural food
bar, Carmen Ferguson, said it has
been in operation in the alcove
beside the SUB art gallery since
Wednesday.
"Macrobiotic or natural foods
are real, natural food," Ferguson
said Monday.
"We use only natural
ingredients such as corn, whole
wheat and corn oil in our sweet
bread and condiments made up of
sesame seeds," she said.
Ferguson said all macrobiotic
food contains yin and yang. Yin
are the sweet parts such as fruit
and sugar. Yang are such items as
meat and rice.
"Pi/lacrobiotic food achieves a
balance of these ingredients which
is reflected in the eater's
personality," she said.
The AFS extension sells
organic bread, cookies, apple crisp
and condiments.
Torn apart
Beginning Dec. 1 The Theatre
Workshop will present The
Bacchae at the Arts Club, 1181
Seymour.
The play is a complete
reworking by the group, of
Euripedes' tragedy of Penteus,
who is torn apart by his mother
because he refuses to acknowledge
Dionysus, god of madness.
The Theatre Workshop is
composed of 10 Vancouver actors
and directors who intend to
produce new plays and reworkings
of old plays "in a style of theatre
that   Vancouver   audiences   have
Hot flashes
not been able to see at more
established theatres".
The play will run at the Arts
Club until Dec. 10.
The director is John Gray and
admission is $1.
Natives speak
A group of California Indians
has begun publication of a
monthly magazine, The Indian
Voice.
The magazine is designed to
provide a voice for Indian views
on history, religion, the
contemporary Indian scene,
political developments, and
literature by natives around the
country.
The magazine can be ordered
from the Native American
Publishing Company, P.O. Box
2033, Santa Clara, Calif., 95051.
The subscription price is $5 per
year.
Eco-art
Ecologist Dave Mason will
present a multi-media ecological
art creation called If you Look
Into the Eye of the Green
Lacewing Thursday, at 12:30
p.m., in Wesbrook 100.
Several projectors and two tape
recorders will be used during the
talk on man and his means of
destroying the ecology.
Free flicks
The Union of Radical Social
Scientists at Vancouver City
College is presenting free
documentary films Wednesday
and Thursday nights from 7:00 to
10:00 p.m.
Wednesday's theme is Struggle
in America, with films on
panthers, yippies, Berkeley and
Chicago being shown in VCC
room 136.
'Tween classes
««WK^ '
TODAY
UCC
Budget meeting, noon,  SUB 205.
KARATE CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB Z37B.
FREESEE
Civilisation, noon, SUB auditorium.
EXPERIMENTAL COLLEGE
What's wrong with The Ubyssey? Staff
invited, noon, SUB 111.
WEDNESDAY
UBCSCC
General meeting, 8 p.m., SUB 212.
THEATRE  WORKSHOP
Experimental   theatre   beginning    today, 8 p.m., Arts Club, 1181 Seymour.
VOC
General meeting, noon. Angus 104.
IL  CAFFE
IH stage, noon.
LUTHERAN   CAMPUS  CENTRE
Special    Advent    worship,    7:30    p.m.,
Lutheran campus centre.
THURSDAY
AQUASOC
General meeting, noon, SUB 211.
GAY   PEOPLE'S   ALLIANCE
Psychiatry    and    the    homosexual,    7
p.m.,   IH   400   and   an   organizational
meeting noon. SUB 224.
MARCUS   AURELIUS   SOCIETY
Ancient Roman battle, 7:30 p.m., SUB
125.
SKYDIVING CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 130.
FRIENDS  OF   FIELD  MARSHAL
ERWIN    ROMMEL
Second World War land battles, noon.
SUB 125.
CCF
Rev. Hardv speaks, noon. SUB 205
NFB
Four    free    films,    noon,    IH    upper
lounge.
VCF
Roy Bell, noon, SUB 207.
FRIDAY
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
General    meeting,    noon,    IH    upper
ldunge.
-'>"-~'33I
ARISTEDES
-,^JG3BfeiM^
INVITES YOU TO A
Greek Bacchanal
DECEMBER 11
at 6:30 P.M.
^^■"fMi
Internationa: - Between Nations t
Tickets in advance at I.H. $5.00 per person. Roast Suckling Pig
and Lamb on a spit plus many other dishes.
Thursday's theme is Struggle in
Indochina, and films will be
shown in room 130.
Mayne fines
The next reading in the
Canadian Poets series will be given
by Seymour Mayne Wednesday
noon.
Mayne will read from his most
recent works (Mouth, For Stems
Of Light, and Face) in the SUB
Art Gallery.
Men wanted
The School of Nursing and the
Canadian Council of Christians
and Jews need men for a
leadership sensitivity training
weekend.
Only women have signed up
for the course which costs $5.
For further information
telephone John Smithson at
684-6024.
Dance trilogy
Stepout, a trilogy in dance, will
be performed Dec. 14 and 15, at
8:30 p.m., in the Surrey Fine Arts
Centre at Bear Creek Park.
The experimental dance will be
performed by Ozma, a group of
six dancers, and the musical
interludes will be provided by the
Vancouver rock group Spring.
Admission is $2 for adults and
$1.75 for students.
— BRAND NAME WATCHES'—
AND WATCH REPAIRS
10% OFF WITH STUDENT CARDS
AT
YOUR CAMPUS JEWELLERS
DIAMOND ROOM JEWELLERS
UBC VILLAGE
BESIDE WORLD WIDE TRAVEL
EDELWEISS
HAUS
'Sports Specialists'
*
*
*
REIKER SKI BOOTS
WARM UP PANTS
WET LOOK 14.95
Orbus     [*
Foam Fit-«
$100.00 ^
Ladies'     r*
Fur Lined-i{
Men's      .
Non Slip it
: edelweiss :
HAUS
1230 N. State 733-3271
Bellingham, Wash.
Next To Shakey's
Money at Par
Weekdays till 9 — Sattill 6
CLASSIFIED
Rcrt*»: Compos - 3 Boot, 1 day $1.00; 3 days $250
Camnwcia! - 3 linos, 1 day $1.25; additional
Biro 30ej 4 day* pric* of 3.
CtaasiHed mda «r» not accepted by tetepttotw and an poyabf*
in advanca. Daadtine i* Ilt3Q •.m., tha day before pobBcation.
Publications OSice, Room 241 S.U.B., UBC, Van. 8, B.C.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
Greetings
Special Notices
15
ADVENT WORSHIP AT LUTH-
eran Campus Centre, Wed., Dec.
First at 7:30. This is an event of
grief because our gods have tailed.
"AT HOME"—SUNDAY, DEC. 5th.
2:00-4:00 p.m. and CHRISTMAS
CHOIR PROGRAM, 4:00 p.m. —
Vancouver School of Theology.
You are invited — 6000 lona Drive
or 6050 Chancellor.
THEATRE WORKSHOP PRE-
sents Euripides "The Bacchae"
Arts Club, 1181 Seymour. 8:30 p.m.,
December 1-1.1. Phone 687-5315.
HOW ABOUT YOUR THIRD YRAR
in Europe? Representative from
Center for International Business
Studies, University of Oregon, will
be on campus on December 3 to
discuss The 1972/73 European Exchange Program (all majors accepted). Interviews in small
groups. Sign up at vour Placement
Office.
THE GRIN BIN HAS THE UE-
gest selection in Canada of posters and pop art. Also Jokes, Gifts
and 24" x 36" photo blowups from
your own prints and negatives.
Enquiries welcome at the Grin
Bin. 3209 West Broadway across
from the T.iquor Store. Call 738-
2311.
WANTED MEN FOR LEADER-
ship Sensitivity Training, weekend
Dec. 3, 4. 5. Sponsor, Canadian
Council of Christians and Jews.
Phone John Smithson. director,
684-6024.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
AUTOMOTIVE
Autos For Sale
21
BUSINESS SERVICES
Babysitting & Day Care
32
Photography
35
Scandals
37
DO YOU DRIVE A MAZDA, TOY-
ota or Datsun? Does Henneken
Auto Service it for you? If not
you're paying too much — Call
us at 263-8121 or drop in to
8914  Oak  St.   (at Marine).
JOY MUSIC SANCTUM — ROCK
Polk records. Your kind of music
at funky prices. 6610 Main St. —
open 10 to 9.
HOMOSEXUALS AND OTHERS
interested: watch CBC. Tuesday
night, tonight, 10:00 p.m. If you
want to meet other UBC homosexuals, write Box 6572, Station
"G", Vancouver 8.
GIVE MOM AND DAD THE BEST
Christmas present ever, have your
hair styled_at Corky's Men's Hair-
styling, 3644 W. 4th Ave. Alma at
4th, 731-4717. We guarantee not
to ball up your haircut.
Typing
40
TERM PAPERS ETC. SPEEDILY
& efficiently typed. 35c page. Call
Yvonne   at   738-6874   (Kits)
EMPLOYMENT
11   j Help Wanted
51
STROBES. BLACK LIGHTS. BUB-
ble Machines. 10% off rental to
UBC students. 736-0944.
12
INEXPENSIVE. RECYCLED FUR
coats and general fur access. Pap-
pas Brothers, 459 Hamilton Street
at Victory Square. We trade. Open
Monday through Saturday 12 noon-
5:30 p.m.,   681-6840.
ESSAYS, ETC. TYPED NEATLY,
quickly and efficiently. 35c page.
Phone   224-0385  after  5  p.m.
YR. ROUND ACC. TYPING FROM
legible drafts. Phone 738-6829 from
10:00 a.m. to 9 p.m. Quick service
on  short  essays.
TEDIOUS TASKS—PROFESSION-
al typing. IBM Selectric — Days,
Evenings, Weekends. Phone Shari
at   738-8745—Reasonable  Rates.
EFFICIENT ELECTRIC TYPING,
my home. Essays, Thesis, etc.
Neat, accurate work. Reasonable
rates.  Phone 263-5317.
EXPERIENCED TYPIST—THESIS.
Essays, etc. Mrs. Brown. 732-0047.
STUDENTS WANTED: $400 MTH.
part-time in management and PR
of Anti-Air & Water Pollution
Control Products. Open for male
and female who qualify. Send resume to G. W. Oijen. 81 Howe St.,
Victoria, B.C. This is ground floor
of a $100,000,000.00 Ecology Co.
MALE STUDENTS WANTED TO
run Christmas tree lots. Phone
after  5,   733-2678.
INSTRUCTION  & SCHOOLS
Music Instruction
81
Special Classes
62
POT at  Potter's  Centre
another    11'    week    session
to    start   JAN.    10
Register   early
wheel  work,   hand   building,   etc.
for   details   phone:    261-4764
G.   ALFRED
STUDIOS V1TARIUS, 760 WEST
22nd Ave., offering following Fine
Arts courses: Sculpture, Oil Painting, Ceramics, Batic. Advanced
classes after live model. Open
house and registration. Jan. 8th
and Jan. Iith, 1972 from 2 to 6 p.m.
Artist: Rozika Vitarius. Phone
879-8570.
Tutoring Service
63
DON'T LET EXMAS GET YOU
down. Get help at the UBC Tutoring Centre, SUB 228, 12:30-2:30.
Tutors in almost eyery course.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
MEDICAL, DENTAL STUDENTS.
Skulls $30.00 to $75.00 and other
fine osteological human products
most reasonable priced — Write
to 812-55 Maitland St. Toronto
284,  Ontario.
WANTED TO BUY: SECOND-
hand metal skis, 250cm. Phone
Peter,   732-7820.
NEW ROSSIGNOL STRATO 102-
207cm, Look Nevada bindings. Call
Sven, 224-9510, Room 214, Tweeds-
muir.  Place Vanier. Cheap.
YAMAHA ELECTRIC GUITAR.
Original strings. Immaculate condition.  Phone 733-0477.
BEDS,, DOUBLE AND SINGLE —
real cheap! Also chests of drawers.
228-9616 or 731-3360.
RENTALS
&
REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
Room & Board
82
SPRING TERM HOUSING. MAKE
your reservations for January
NOW.R & B at the finest house
on campus. Hurry, vacancies) are
going! Phone 224-9691 Now. 5765
Agronomy.   Meal  passes  available.
Furnished Apts.
83
POUR ROOM APT. COOKING. PRI-
vate bath, entrance, West First,
near beach. $95 monthly. After 6.
731-3028.
ACCOMMODATION FOR RENT—
available now: Bsmt. Ste. furnished, self-contained, suit one or two
students, South Granville. $80.00.
Phone 266-6568.
SINGLE SUITE. 5 MINS. FROM
SUB. Private entrance. $60 mthly.
Single suite, 3 mins. to SUB —
private  entrance,   $60  month.   224-
4629.
Unfurnished Apts.
84
Houses—Furn. & Unfurn.
86
ON CAMPUS, 2-BDRM. TOWN-
house. Large kitchen, basement.
Available   Jan.   228-9493.   $185.00.
NEEDED TWO PEOPLE. PREFER-
ably female .to share large four
bedroom house, fireplace — 4989
Mackenzie at 34th. Now Dec. 1,
$62.  Chris, 261-8083.
Use Your
Ubyssey
Classified Tuesday,  November 30,  1971
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 11
Mud was the only winner
"GO RIGHT through those double doors, turn left, and its the first door on the right marked M-E-N," the
referee seems to say to UBC's Laurie Vanzella during Saturday's game. UBC lost 5-4 to the University of
Calgary Dinosaurs in a game that left a lot to be desired of the referee.
Dinosaurs stomp on Saturday
The UBC Thunderbird hockey
team split a pair of weekend
games.
Friday night they whacked the
University of Calgary Dinosaurs
5-3, and Saturday they were
pulled down 5^1.
On Friday 'Bird winger Doug
Buchanon. lost a contact lens but
survived long enough to dead-eye
his way to two goals, the second
on a 40-foot slap-shot, unassisted.
Richard Longpre, Bill
Cartwright and Chuck Cariginan
also scored for the 'Birds.
"I never really had the feeling
that they would beat us," said
'Bird coach Bob Hindmarch after
Friday's game. "I always thought
we had enough bench strength to
come back."
Not so Saturday. The
Dinosaurs returned to life and
spilled the 'Birds in a upset win.
The Dinnies outshot the 'Birds
16-14 in the first period and
emerged with a 1-0 lead. Ian
Wilkie's superb goaltending kept
the score close.
The 'Birds fought back in the
second with two goals by Bob
McAneeley and Longpre, and
entered the third period with a
2-2 tie.
Early in the third Calgary
jumped to a 4-2 lead on goals by
Wayne Forsey and Howie
Colborne. Colborne's goal came
when a 'Bird defenceman was
caught up ice and Calgary was
changing lines.
Tom Wiseman jumped off the
Calgary bench much to the
surprise of the 'Birds, then
grabbed the puck and skated
straight up the wing drawing 'Bird
defenceman Steve Fera and Wilkie
over. He passed it out front to
Colborne who scored.
With nine minutes left, Calgary
forward Frank Richardson was
penalized for high sticking.
But the 'Bird power play
misfired and two minutes later
Richardson jumped out of the
penalty box and beat Wilkie to
give Calgary a three goal lead.
Hindmarch said silly mental
errors and penalties in the third
period hurt his team.
Letters to Sports
i.q. of 60
Just a few words in comment
to the letter to the sports section
of Friday's Nov. 26 (to be found
on page 15 of that edition). We
are fortunate on this campus to
have access to a media such as The
Ubyssey allowing us, as students,
the opportunity to voice our
opinions and grievances so that
"the wrong may be righted" etc.
In our day to day experiences,
situations are. bound to arise that
we judge as being unfair and, as a
result, are a source of annoyance
to us.
Therefore when Misses Hellwig,
McKinnon and Field, three girls
from PE, "made public" the
remodelling problem in the
changing room of the main gym
they were taking good advantage
of their rights, voicing a valid
complaint.
It is unfortunate, however, that
their command over the English
language reveals an I.Q. of about
60. How can they expect to be
taken seriously by anyone of'
authority when they address their
remarks to "The Fucking PE
Department?" Phrases such as this
are great in informal groups or on
.a football field. But in attempting
to say something worthwhile I'm
afraid the girls have been caught
up in a fad that is even losing
popularity with the "lunch bucket
gang" they downgrade, and as a
result have said nothing at all.
Hugh Greer Ed 4
Gary Poole Arts 4
Gross
Assuming your letter wasn't a
put on, we feel'its contents left a
lot to be desired, as it has to rate
as one of the more gross efforts of
the year.
Your dissatisfaction seemed to
stem from two sources; first, your
inability to shower due to the
remodelling of the locker room,
and second, "the stupid broads in
the PE office."
Not being ones who patronize
your locker room on a regular
basis we are not really qualified to
dispute your claim, but we do
concede you have a legitimate
beef.
As for the women in the PE
office, the efficiency with wliich
they perform their job is a matter
of personal opinion. We have
found them to be quite helpful
and cooperative in the four years
we have dealt with them.
At any rate, you are not the
only ones being inconvenienced,
as there are many of us that have
lectures above the locker room
and the resulting construction
noise is annoying to student and
faculty alike.
We feel your form of protest
was in very poor taste and does
not reflect the general attitude of
the majority of PE students.
Nevertheless, you have done your
best to drag the school of PE
through the mud, enhancing the
'jockette' stereotype that we have
been trying to repudiate.
Geoff Horn PE 4
Ron McBride PE 4
Body odor
In reference to the articulate,
cleverly-contrived letter to the
editor of Misses Hellwig,
McKinnon, and Field that
appeared in the Nov. 26 issue: it is
encouraging to discover three
female PE undergraduates who are
concerned about their body odor.
R. Campbell
Law 3
UBC Braves and Meralomas
2nd played to a 0-0 draw
Saturday on a field with 6 inch
deep mud holes. The 'Birds first
division match was cancelled
because of an administrative
misunderstanding.
Saturday's rain, mud and heavy
ball resulted in many handling
errors and missed tackles in the
Braves' game. However, to the
credit of both teams, there were
numerous good scrum and back
rushes.
Hard tackling and aggressive
play, by both scrums, especially
within their own 25, highlighted
the game.
Intramurals
A chunk of finesse here and a
bit of speed there was enough for
Bill Ruby of Betas to stop
engineer's Peter Dennert in the
men's intramural badminton
championships. Dennert took
Ruby 15-12 in their first match,
but Ruby came back with 15-11
and 15-8 wins to take the title.
The score was not indicative of
the play. "It was like trying to
stop a buzz saw with your bare
hand," Ruby said after his win.
The fans were duly impressed
by the match. "You know,
perhaps intramurals isn't for the
birds after all," one wis heard to
mutter.
BILL RUBY
. . . badminton champ
BASKETBALL results.
Division 1 — dentistry 56, Dekes
10; commerce 41, forestry 28;
Totem Park 56, aggies 22; Sigma
Chi 28, Phi Kappa Sigma 19;
education 36, Beta 26; PE
21, SAM 14; St. Andy's 66,
architecture 17; commerce 51,
Totem Park 44; Fort Camp 70,
Union 14; forestry 49, arts 37;
Fijis 21, Sigma Chi 16; Beta 27,
Carey Hall 23.
Division 2 — engineers 22,
forestry 21; dentistry 39, Hillel
Club 31; Beta 49, arts 30; Place
Vanier 52, Beta 24; Fort Camp
57, Kappa Sigma 23; Totem Park
43, Fijis 29; engineers 47, Fort
Camp 25; VOC 26, arts 25; Place
Vanier 64, Union 12; Place Vanier
56, dentistry 23.
Excessive enthusiasm resulted
in Brian Coomer and two Lomas
being evicted from the game.
With a man advantage and
numerous hooks against the head
by Warwick Harivel, the Braves
carried the play to the Lomas
during much of the second half.
Only spirited hitting, by the
forwards especially, salvaged a tie
for the outnumbered Meralomas.
In other games, Lomas downed
Totems 12-3 and the Frosh
defeated the University of
Victoria 3-0.
This Saturday at Swangard
Stadium, an international match
features B.C. against Australia.
Game time is 2 p.m.
fffTWf*'
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RAICHLE SKI BOOTS *
Fiber Jets ^
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5 BUCKLE ITALIAN
BOOT 24.95
EDELWEISS
HAUS
1230 N. State 733-3271
Bellingham, Wash.
Next To Shakey's
Money at Par
Weekdays till 9 — Sat till 6
lilttllltll
ALL GRADUATING STUDENTS
A Master's Degree in Business Administration from McMaster
University School of Business could help you to achieve your
career objectives in the areas of management, administration, and
education because the McMaster M.B.A. program offers a wide
range of optional courses (that can be selected to your needs) as
well as providing a core of baisc knowledge and skills. Although
admission is restricted to those who have proven that they have
the potential and commitment required to complete a demanding
program, graduates in any discipline may be accepted.
Academic standing is not the only entry criterion but, as a general
rule, you can have a reasonable expectation of completing the
McMaster M.B.A. program if you have maintained at least a
second-class standing in the last two years of your undergraduate
program and if you can achieve a satisfactory test score in the
Admission Test for Graduate Study in Business.
Applicants for the McMaster M.B.A. who have taken relevant
course work may be granted standing in our program. If you are
interested in exploring this challenging opportunity further, fill in
and mail this form —
To: Assistant to the Dean
School of Business Please xnd me detai,s
McMaster University about yourvMBA program
Hamilton 16, Ontario
Name   	
Address    ,	
City    Province  	
University Attending      Degree Expected
When?   	 Page  12
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday,  November  30,   1971
„'">£*£
,-v,    W   - i
The young unemployed
Patchwork programs
won't solve the problem
By IAN WISEMAN
Canadian University Press
There are reasons for youth
unemployment. And the
government is going to have to
face up to them before it is too
Last of a series
late. Because, as Mel Watkins says,
when middle class
university-educated students
cannot find work, all hell is going
to break loose.
These reasons are connected
fully to the basic definitions of
university education and
unemployment. When North
American society continues ori
the basis of four-years-of-liberal-
education-for-everyone and then
throws unskilled graduates into
the labor force to sell their labor,
then there are going to be
problems whenever the economic
situation is below normal.
There are too many college
degrees on the job market today:
everyone wants to be an
intellectual and nobody wants to
be a worker. Over the past ten
years, enrolment in Canadian
universities doubled to about
299,000 but this increase in the
level of education has not resulted
in full employment and better
jobs for grads.
Quite the opposite, in 1969
when a record 66,000 degrees
were issued, the total number of
graduates hired actually declined,
especially among graduates from
the arts.
I
Ihy are Canadian graduates
unemployable? The answer to this
is again to be found in an
overview of our national
economics. Lack of research cuts
down on the employment
potential of industry. Most
Canadian industries are no more
than branch plants of American
corporations, and most of the
research done by these
corporations is done in the U.S.
Another reason for the
unemployability of Canadian
grads is the surplus of teachers
and professors. The teacher
shortage of the last generation for
primary and secondary schools is
rapidly giving way to a surplus. In
post-secondary institutions, the
lack of research being done and
jobs    through    the    Manpower
Centres.
Unless students have attended
a polytechnical institute or a
vocational school, they find it
almost impossible to benefit from
apprenticeship programs, training
in industry, or the government's
Occupational Training for Adults
(OTA) program.
Let's consider the OTA
program first. The program, set up
in     1967,     is     a     combined
federal government contracts with
private employers to hire trainees
or retrain employees. The
employer chooses the candidates
and the federal government pays
the cost. Unfortunately this
scheme sees more old employees
getting retrained than new
workers getting hired and trained.
So, all in all, there isn't much
hope for potential workers with a
full or partial university
education.    And    government
PERCENTAGE UNEMPLOYED BY AGE-SEX BREAKDOWN IN CANADA
Year
National
Males
Females
AU
14-19
20-24
All
14-19
20-24
1961
7.1
8.4
16.6
11.9
3.7
8.9
4.0
1962
5.9
6.8
14.5
9.9
3.3
7.6
3.7
1963
5.5
6.4
14.1
9.5
3.3
7.8
4.1
1964
4.7
5.3
12.2
7.8
3.1
7.6
3.3
1965
3.9
4.4
10.0
5.6
2.7
6.9
3.0
1966
3.6
4.0
9.6
5.3
2.6
6.4
2.6
1967
4.1
4.6
10.9
6.1
2.9
7.3
3.2
1968
4.8
5.5
12.8
7.6
3.4
8.3
4.2
1969
4.7
5.2
12.3
7.5
3.6
8.9
3.8
1970
5.9
6.6
15.0
10.5
4.5
11.4
5.1
Source: Statistics Canada, Labor Force Survey
the heavy influx of foreign
professors keep research and
teaching positions few and far
between.
And with a university degree,
particularly on the masters or
doctoral level, the job market
looks pretty gloomy when there
are no opportunities for teaching
and research.
There are also reasons why
young people without degrees do
not get jobs. Other than the
young workers themselves being
choosy about jobs (after all, they
usually don't have families to
support), workers under 25 do
not have any seniority rights in
industry and they are rarely
unionized.
So they tend to get hired for
short term work, by construction
firms or by companies with
unpredictable seasonal
fluctuations; and in times of
recession they are the first to be
laid off.
educational-industrial package,
funded by federal and provincial
governments, that includes
academic upgrading and technical
training. The problem for youth?
To qualify for the training
allowance, applicants must have
been in the labor force for three
years. Very few university
dropouts can claim this
experience.
Apprenticeship programs offer
an equally dismal outlook.
Applicants for these programs are
selected and certified by
provincial labor departments and
in order to qualify they must
already be employed. Oh, come
now, if a young worker already
has a job in these times of
unemployment, then retraining
him is not going to offer
employment to those who need it.
Why not offer apprenticeship
programs to unskilled and
unemployed youth?
The third scheme is training in
industry. Under this program, the
employment schemes and
economic policies are primarily to
blame for this crisis.
c,
an Trudeau's new
interdepartmental study group get
to the roots of this problem? Let's
take a quick look at their initial
proposals:
They hope to offer incentives
to industry to provide on-the-job
training and to make changes in
the rules on manpower training to
allow young people to enrol in the
programs. This proposal, if carried
out, would be welcomed by most
unemployed youth.
They hope to create local
construction projects along the
lines of the now-abandoned
"winter works projects", and set
up a loan fund to finance
provincial construction schemes,
again, this would be an
impermanent solution — what
happens to the non-unionized
young workers who have no
seniority rights after the
construction boom is over?
They have given no indication
that the utilitarian function of the
university (versus the utilitarian
function of the technical or
vocational college) will be
considered.
And they still insist that youth
unemployment is an isolated
problem, not connected with the
national and international
economic picture.
The study group's report, due
in late October, will, if adopted as
federal legislation, only provide
another short term assault on
youth unemployment. Next
summer, wait and see, will find
even higher unemployment among
people under 25 years of age.
The problem, Mr. Trudeau, is
only going to be solved when we
take a long, serious re-assessment
of Canadian economics and
education. But that solution will
be a long time in coming, because
it runs against the grain of the
entire reformist type of
government that Canada has
today.
c.
/anada Manpower Centres,
while providing good service, are
generally ignored by students who
do not realize Manpower's
potential in the labor market.
Students have not yet identified
Manpower as a social service
agency and consequently less than
10 per cent of students receiving
summer  employment  find  their
A gAD OLD,
UFE iS MoR£
HANKfB "WAN

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