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The Ubyssey Nov 2, 1965

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Array It's nice
THE UBYSSEY
to be nice
Vol. XLVIII, No. 20
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 1965
CA  4-3916
Grant jump urged now
1
'AN IDEAL1
Protests
were a hit
HAMILTON (CUP) — An
Ontario university president
says he and other executive
members of the Association of
Universities and Colleges of
Canada were impressed with
the. action of the UBC protest
marchers last Wednesday.
In a news story Friday in the
Silhouette, weekly newspaper
of Hamilton's McMaster University, president H. G. Thode,
is quoted as saying in a telephone interview:
"Executive members (of the
AUCC) were favorably impressed by the action of the
student marchers.
"In conversation with the
student leaders we (the executive) were in agreement that
equality of opportunity was
something that we should aim
for as an ideal."
Thode said protests would
lead to better understanding of
the problems associated with
modern universities.
"Student decision to concentrate on free tuition tended to
draw attention to the whole
question of student aid," he
said.
Hawkins hops
here tonight,
emotionally
The sculptor designs the
clothes, the composer writes
the music for the clothes, and
the choreographer directs the
dances around the music and
the clothes.
That's the Erick Hawkins
Dance Company, appearing tonight in the auditorium at 8:30.
"The company combines the
form of sets and costumes with
the sound of the music and the
emotion of the dancers," sponsor and special events chairman
Murray Farr said Monday.
He said: "The company attempts to combine visual,
dance, and musical beauty into
one unit.
"As well as designing costumes, sculptor Ralph Dorazio
builds the sets, and composer
Lucia Dlugoszewski has designed new wind and percussion instruments for the group."
Hawkins himself is one of
the group of three dancers.
Tickets for tonight's performance can be obtained from
the AMS office in Brock. Prices
for students are $1.50 or $1.75.
—powell hargrave  photo
A QUEEN IS NAMED. Ruthie Shaver, Miss Music, was
caught by camera at Homecoming dance Saturday night
at moment of announcement. (See also Page 2).
AUCC resolution:
'money critical'
By RICHARD BLAIR
Ubyssey City Editor
The Association of Universities and Colleges of Canada
has called for an immediate increase of $3 in the federal
government's per capita grant.
This increase, proposed by the Bladen report, would
raise the grant for education from $2 to $5.
The AUCC Friday passed a -resolution: "That the
government be urgently requested to authorize this increase
within the present fiscal year."
The resolution, moved by Dr. J. A. Corry of Queen's
University in Kingston, asked for the immediate increase
because "the present state of university financing is critical."
Gov't action 'unlikely'
Dr. H. D. Hicks, president
of Dalhousie Universilty, said
earlier Friday if the increase
doesn't come immediately it
might not come for two years.
Hicks said he felt there is
no need to wait until the proposed federal-provincial conference is held to increase the
per capita grant.
R. B. Bryce, Canada's deputy
AUCC the government is not
likely to act quickly in implementing the recommendations
of the Bladen report.
Bryce said implementation of
the commission's recommendations was a major issue of
budgetary policy.
"We must think of the priority to be given to higher education in relation to other expenditures."
Bryce also said expanded
universities might result in a
shortage of intellectual manpower, which he described as
Canada's "scarcest resource."
He said the AUCC "must
bear in mind that the federal
government is planning to devote much of this intellectual
manpower to research in Canada."
The proposals suggested by
the AMS brief and the Bladen
report about financing medical
education were criticized Friday by the Association of Canadian Medical Colleges.
The colleges objected to the
weighting formula proposed by
the Bladen report.
Under this formula, medical
and dental students would have
a weighting of three, first and
second-year arts students one,
and graduate students a weighting of five.
{Under this formula financing program, grants to universities would be based on the
number of students in graduate
and professional schools rather
than on the total number of
students in the university.)
Cash formula rapped
—bert   mackinnon   photo
BEMUSED YOUNG TAD, class of '81, watches and wonders
at alcoholic antics of grown-up football fans at Saturday's
homecoming game.
(For example, a university
with a large number of graduate students would receive
more than a university with
mostly undergraduate arts students even though the two
might have the same total enrolment.)
UBC president John Macdonald also criticizing the Bladen report for its vagueness on
the future role of provincial
governments in financing university costs.
He said figures in the report
showed the provincial percentage of university costs will
actually decrease over the next
10 years.
Macdonald said calculations
based on the Bladen report's
financing formula would make
the provincial per-pupil grant
$525.
"In B.C. this year the provincial aid amounts to $840 a
student and in most provinces
provincial aid is in excess of
$525,'' he said.
"Surely it is not the intention of the commission to re
lieve the provincial governments of their share of responsibility."
Professor Geoffrey Davie, a
member of the Bladen commission said this was not the case.
He said it had been the intention of the commission to
recommend an increase in the
federal share of higher education costs and cutting the provincial share.
But he said that this doesn't
mean that the provincial governments will be paying out
less money.
"Provincial contributions
will jump from $134 million
this year to $360 million within
the space of five years."
During the final meeting of
the AUCC Friday Dr. L. A.
Vachon of Laval University,
Montreal, was elected president of the AUCC.
He succeeds Dr. J. A. Corry
of Queen's University, Kingston.
Dr. John Macdonald was
elected as an executive head
for a two-year term. Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 2,  1965
A GREAT TREKKER, A NEW QUEEN
—bert mackinnon photo
SMILING RECIPIENT of this year's Great Trekker award is
Mrs. Sherwood Lett, wife of the former chief justice of B.C.
Presenting the award (right) is AMS president Byron Hender; looking on is president John B. Macdonald. In the
background is Main Mall's Cairn, symbol of the Great
Trek.
MISS MUSIC   WINS
Homecoming queen
has  lots of talent
How does a homecoming queen celebrate her coronation?
She attends a violin concert
the next day.
That's what this year's
queen Ruthie Shaver did Sunday.
After being crowned homecoming queen Saturday night
by President John Macdonald,
she cried, "I'm very excited,
I just hope all the activities I
will be participating in as
queen don't keep me from my
music."
Enrolled at UBC in first
year music, Ruthie plans to
become a concert pianist.
Ruthie will return to her
native Ontario next January
to enter the Miss Canadian
University Snow Queen
Pageant in Waterloo.
Jeanett Wong, 22, III nursing representing the Engineer-
students, was picked first princess and Jane Knott, 21, Miss
—powell hargrave  photo
POISED AND PRETTY,   1965  Homecoming Queen  Ruthie
Shaver, 19, smiles after being crowned. Miss Engineering,
22-year-old Jeanett Wong, is her first princess, and second
princess is 21-year-old Jane Knott, Miss Education.
78 rallyists
finish briskly
in Totem
IThere is a word for Sunday's Totem car rally — and
that word is "brisk."
A total of 84 cars booted
through the backroads of B.C.
and Washington State in the
UBC sports car club's annual
300-mile fall event.
The crew-driver and navigator — had to follow a six-
page set of route instructions
at exact average speeds between points. Fourteen checkpoints timed the cars and assessed penalties for each minute early or late.
The hills, and one road that
forded a creek, took a toll of
dented mufflers and flat tires
—but all but six cars finished
the 10-hour event.
First overall was Shell 4,000
veteran Len Houser and navigator Jeremy Greenfield, who
lost only two points in their
Dodge Coronet. Second was
Wolf Bergelt and Dale Spink
in a Volkswagen, and third
were Bob and Bill Salisbury,
also in a VW. The three first-
place cars were all manned
by outside crews.
UBC students Al Borthwick
and Art Monk were fourth
with seven points, and students
Diana and Mike Alexander
fifth with nine points.
More than 30 UBC sports
car club members manned the
checkpoints and checked out
the route. Rallymasters were
Mike Hunter, George Railton,
and Pierce Isaacs.
Education,     was     crowned
second princess.
More than 2,200 students
converged on the Armory and
Field House for the Student
Homecoming Dances held in
a Roaring Twenties theme.
The Homcoming Ball at the
Hotel Vancouver drew more
than 600 alumni. Graduates
from as far back as 1925 got
together to renew old friendships on campus and at the
Hotel Vancouver.
Scantily-clad flappers
braved the cold Saturday
morning as they danced the
Black Bottom in a parade
which started from Thurlow
and Geeorgia and ended at
UBC.
The parade circled the UBC
Stadium as a prelude to the
Homecoming football game
Manna calls
ministers
Manna is available for prospective ministers.
A faculty committee will interview students Nov. 15 for
one-year Rockerfeller Brothers
theological fellowships for
study at any accredited theological college in the United
States or Canada.
Those applying must be
expect to graduate by this
male, protestant, under 31 and
spring.
Interested students should
call 228-2721 at the university
to arrange an appointment.
THE REVEREND
I. S. Gomble
Presbyterian Minister
of Kamloops, B.C.
speaks on
"IS SPEAKING
IN TONGUES
ECSTATIC?"
NOON - WED., NOV. 3
BU. 203
Sponsored  by Associated
Full  Gospel  Students
YOUNG MEN
ANNUAL
BARNACLE  BALL
SEMI  FORMAL
3 BARS and DINNER
HMCS DISCOVERY - NOVEMBER 13th
9:00 p.m. - 1:00 a.m.
Tickets AMS and Armouries — $4.00 CPL
_J
Representatives of
THE
International Nickel Company
OF CANADA LIMITED
Will visit the university to discuss career opportunities
with graduating and post graduate students in
ENGINEERING
• MINING
• METALLURGICAL
• CHEMICAL
• ELECTRICAL
• MECHANICAL
• CIVIL
CHEMISTRY
GEOLOGY and GEOPHYSICS
Also, interviews for Summer Employment will be held
with Geology and Geophysics students in 2nd, 3rd, 4th
and  post   graduate  years.   (Assuming  4th  year  to  be
graduating year.)
On November 17, 18 and 19
We invite you to arrange an interview through
The Office of Student Personnel Services
THE
International Nickel Company
OF CANADA LIMITED
COPPER CLIFF, ONT. THOMPSON, MAN. Tuesday,  November 2,   1965
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
—bill   fane   photo
MUDDLING THROUGH, Alfa Guilia T-l of Mike and Diana Alexander blasts across mud-
hole midway through Sunday's UBC Sports Car Club Totem Rally. Mike and Diana, both
UBC students, finished  5th overall out of 84 entries.
AT MONTREAL
Paper
burned
MONTREAL (CUP) — Several thousand Montreal students Oct. 28 burned half the
copies of that day's Quartier
Latin, newspaper of the University of Montreal.
The students, mostly from
the engineering school, complained of "an attitude of morbid negativism and intransigent anarchism" in the editors
of the paper.
The editors in return called
the action anti-democratic and
pro-fascist.
The well-organized group,
led by a committee of fourth-
year engineering students,
carried signs saying "the era
of the poets is ended" and
"AGEUM yes, Quartier-Latin
no."
The committee issued a
statement saying they supported the policy of AGEUM,
the U of M students' union, in
its social and educational policies but rejected 'the ridiculous attitude of the Quartier-
Latin and condemned it as a
nuisance."
Calling the editors "paper
revolutionaries" publishing
"paranoic ramblings" they accused the paper of ignoring
campus activities of interest
to students.
Jacques Elliott, editor of
the Quartier-Latin said:
"Actions like this reverse
five years of student unionism
and reinforce the positions of
the Claude Wagners."
However, the engineers'
statement said:
"We recognize that students
must enter into the social and
national struggle of today's
Quebec."
The committee's statement
originally attacked the paper
for "systematic defamation of
Quebec politicians, principally
justice minister Claude Wagner," but this was deleted
after consultations with engineering students.
What is UNAN?
What is UNAN?
UNAN is poor.
Tuberculosis kills at UNAN.
You can help UNAN.
^>tf*    *
***** .%
—bert   mackinnon    photos
CR-E-E-E-E-K. Prime Minister Lester Pearson bent to sod-
turning task Friday at Varsity stadium as he officially began construction of new Student Union Building.
Dance chairman
hits floaters
Irresponsible action 'by float builders doubled the cost
of preparing the armory for the homecoming dance, chairman Doug Hart said Monday.
"The   armory   was   littered (~r~        „ „* «,~  j      ~
J who sang at the dance en-
with broken beer bottles, the
stage was splashed with paint
and the decorations had been
torn down to decorate the
homecoming floats," Hart said.
He said the mess took a
group of buildings and grounds
workmen four hours to clean
up.
"This was the action of a few
individuals and not the entire
group of float builders," Hart
said.
Folksingers Bud and Travis
countered difficulty with the
amplification system and had
to cut short their performance
at the armory.
They promised to return to
give a free performance sometime in the future. The date
has not yet been set.
Ruthie Shaver, music queen
candidate was crowned homecoming queen with Miss Engineering, Jeanette Wong and Miss
Education, Jane Knott, princesses.
MACDONALD
... a joke
AUCC president
was impressed
UBC march made its mark
on university leaders
By PAT HORROBIN
The retiring president of the Association of Universities
and Colleges of Canada said Friday that the march of UBC
students to the Bayshore Oct. 27 made its mark on Canadian
University administrators.
Dr. J. A. Corry told delegates no AUCC member who
sat in the Bayshore Oct. 27
will ever forget the feeling of
knowing that 3,000 students
were standing outside in a
downpour of rain waiting for
answers to their questions
about the future of Canadian
education.
Corry said because of the
AUCC's brief to the Bladen
Commission he was unable to
address the crowd with anything but motherhood phrases.
"It was agreed I would address the marchers, because
someone had to come out and
do it," Corry said. "I did it
with great reluctance, and it
turned out my reluctance was
well  taken.
"Because the AUCC had decided against any stand on the
Corry challenged
eventual abolition of fees, my
speech had to consist of rolling platitudes.
"And after each platitude,
someone would call out 'Yeah,
but what are you going to do
about it?"
Corry said it became clear
from the line of questioning
the critical problem would be
to disentangle himself from
the crowd before either the
meeting became rowdy or he
actually had to say something.
As a result he agreed with
the leader of the student
group, AMS president Byron
Hender, to meet with a group
of leaders of the march. Who
would give details of What the
students wanted to know.
"Some details arose about
the make-up of the group —
I don't want to go into that,"
Corry told the delegates.
Referendum
(Two students representing
what they called a "conservative" viewpoint insisted on toeing seated.
(Their seating was backed
by UBC president John Macdonald, and agreed to by Corry
and Hender, over protests of
ad hoc March of Concern Committee members Randy Enomoto and Gary Taylor and
western regional president of
the Canadian Union of Students,   Ed  Lavalle.
(When Lavalle said the penny - throwing " conservatives "
should be considered as a joke,
Macdonald asked, "You don't
think it's possible the others
came  down  as  a joke  too?"
(Lavalle, Enomoto and Tay-
ler left the meeting.)
Corry said several of the
students in the delegation pressed to find out what stand the
AUCC would take in the
future.
"They wanted to know; is
this body of delegates resolutely set against abolition of
HENDER
. he stayed
all fees at any time in the
future?" he said.
'They asked if there couldn't
be some exploration of the
question. And since I talked
to them about priorities, they
asked; could this body try to
place the priority of the abolition of fees — exactly what
will have to happen first?"
Corry said he pledged to the
students he would bring this
up before the main body of the
delegates, and that a resolution shortly would be coming
to the floor from the AUCC's
student   aid   committee.
A resolution from the AUCC
student aid committee was
read which mentioned neither
abolition of fees nor the establishment of priorities.
A member of the resolutions
committee said terms of reference of the student aid resolution were sufficiently broad
to ensure an adequate exploration of the question.
The resolution passed without discussion. mutrssn
Published Tuesday, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those ot the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3242,
Loc. 26. Member Canadian University Press. Founding member, Pacific
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and news photography.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 2,   1965
"The tigers of wrath are wiser than the horses
of instruction." -Wm. Blak*.
Knute bad
When it's raining outside, who isn't glad to come
in out of the rain.
And for 2,800 UBC students, coming out of the
rain means going into UBC residences.
And this year, the residences are under control of
a man called Knute Buttedalil. And with the appearance
of kettles and coffee cups in the Lower Mall men's
residence kitchenette areas this weekend, we'd like to
say a hearty "well done" to Mr. Buttedahl.
In past years, the UBC Housing administration has
been, shall we say, not the most satisfactory from the
student point of view.
When Mr. Buttedahl took over last spring, no one
knew what tack he would take toward the situation.
But time after time this year, student-suggested
improvements in residences (like the kettles and cups)
which previously were "impossible" for Housing to
implement, suddenly have been done.
Like the lounges installed in the men's army huts
in Fort Camp at the beginning of the year and the
replacement of the long list of uiunforeeable rules for
residence students by a set of four looser, but more
positive, standards.
Best of all, at Housing there is a new spirit of willingness to listen to justifiable complaints and suggestions.
And we are sure that this attitude is helping to correct
that feeling of frustration often felt by residents with a
problem.
A feeling of frustration often taken out in destructive acts or other anti-social activity in residences,
thereby making every student's life there that much
poorer.
Mr. Buttedahl is also to be commended for recognizing that with the camp and dormitory system in use
at UBC, certain forms of residence living in use at other
universities are not our brand of milkshake.
For example, at Toronto's Sir Daniel Wilson men's
residence, supper is done up in style. The undergraduates, suitably gowned, march over by house to the
mealhall.
There, after a grace is said in Latin, they are waited
on throughout the meal.
We're glad in a way that Mr. Buttedahl resisted any
temptation he might have felt to radically alter the basically free-and-easy residence life now enjoyed.
(We have a kind of recurrent nightmare about Fort
Camp meal hall at 5 p.m. with everyone in academic
gowns).
Instead Mr. Buttedahl has worked well within
UBC's existing Housing setup this year, time after time
correcting unhealthy situations and attitudes which had
seemed permanent.
At the present time, Mr. Buttedahl's appointment
appears temporary, however. He intends, we understand
to leave next year for an Indian university where he
will help establish an extension department, similar
to the one he now heads at UBC.
In view of what he has accomplished so far, it
seems obvious that if Mr. Buttedahl were to stay,
Housing would continue to be one of the most satisfactory branches of the administration from the student
point of view.
We hope he stays.
IPRWEPOWKTO
threw mm,
U&T Y&K	
EDITOR: Tom Wayman
News Ron Rlter
Associate George Reamsbottom
City Richard   Blair
Photo Bert  MacKinnon
Sports Ed  Clark
Dan  Mullen
Robbi West,
Al  Donald
Ass't News
Aset City _
Page Friday
Managing 	
Feature* 	
CUP  	
John   Kelsey
Norm   Betts
Mike Bolton
 Don  Hull
Oops again! But anyway photo
was Dennis Gans, Collin Byfleet,
Kurt Hilger, Joe Varesi. And
newiswise, Pat Horribin, Rosemary
Hyman, Bruce Fenton, Sue Grans-
by, Claudia Gwinn, Carole Mc-
Farlane, Danny Stoffman, Carole
Anne Baker, Doug Halverson,
Dennis Wheeler, Margo Korsmch,
Doug  Moser,  and Lebedoff.
Letters
ahp m
swxwn?
VOW WW
VcES««.
I'M WINS
OUT.
EXCEPTION
Editor, The Ubyssey, Sir:
We take exception to your
editorial of Thursday, Oct. 28.
As members of a group which
had put long hours of work
into considering the fee situation from every angle, we are
disappointed that The Ubyssey
could offer no rational argument but only childish insult
to our effort.
Many students seem to feel
that a university education
should be free; we would like
to present our view:
A fundamental economic
decision which men frequently face is whether or not it is
advisable to forego present
consumption for future production.
If a man has a sum of money
remaining after paying his income tax, he faces a choice of
spending it now or of investing it in securities in order to
derive a greater return in
future.
A university education is an
investment, and its value must
be calculated in the same way
as the value of an investment
in securities: "Is it worth to
me what I must give up in
order to get it?"
Would it be fair for a student to demand that taxpayers
be obliged to provide him
with money for investment in
the stock market?
Similarly, how can a student demand that taxpayers
be compelled to pay for his
investment in a university
education?
The extortion of money
from taxpayers to provide free
education for others is clearly
tantamount to theft.
We propose that the government stop giving handouts to
universities and instead leave
the tax money spent for this
purpose in the hands of its
rightful owners, the taxpayers.
Universities should be private institutions operated on
revenue from fees, not on tax
money taken from people not
attending university.
In this way, the individuals
deriving benefits from, a university education, and only
the individuals deriving benefits from a university education, would pay for those
benefits.
It is only fair.
We wish to make it clear
that the Great Pumpkin and
lesser pumpkins were not
members of our company.
THE UBC SQUASH CLUB
A group of concerned students
PEOPLE!
Editor, The Ubyssey. Sir:
To the People of Canada:
There is no use pretending
you do not see me; I am one
of thousands of young men
and women starting out on
the threshold of life.
I am not very wise yet, but
I am wise enough to see what
you are doing to the country
in which I must grow up and
support my family. When I
do that, will I be allowed to
be myself or will I be a social
security number in a government file?
When I get sick, whose doctor can I go to, my doctor or
the government doctor?
When my children go to
school, who is going to decide
what they learn, my wife and
myself or a government bureau?
If there were another place
in the world where government wouldn't plan my life
for me even more so, it wouldn't be so bad, but Canada is
the only place left — and look
what you are doing to it.
R. H. MacKENZIE
LAW III
mmmm
BIG  DANNY
BY  DANNY  STOFFMAN
Turn that sod down, boy!
Sod-turning is one of our
most enduring tribal rituals.
Visitors
from alien
cultures are
always amazed when they
find our most
exalted personages d i g -
ging dirt in
front of STOFFMAN
crowds  of  joyous  onlookers.
Queen Elizabeth, the avid
monarchists boast, turns as
much sod as the average
ditchdigger.
In fact, observers close to
the royal family report the
decision to send Prince
Charles to a rugged school in
the Australian bush was based
solely on the need to toughen
the flabby youth up for a
lifetime of royal shovel-
swinging
President Kennedy quarrelled with Nixon, Kruschev and
Pearl Mesta, dealt with Cuba,
Laos and Vietnam, and emerged physically unscathed.
•      •      •
But the combination of an
Ottawa sod-turning and a
camp xenophobe from Saskatoon was too much for even
JFK —  he  badly  reinjured
his back.
It was at this sod-turning
that Dief found the president's note sizing up the PM
as an SOB.
Friday Prime Minister
Pearson showed up at UBC to
turn a sod in the football
field for the new Student
Union Building.
AMS council members considered inspiring the PM in
his shovelling toy appearing
at the event in bow ties, Pearson's favorite piece of haberdashery.
All except Byron Hender
decided against it, realized
such a misdemeanor would
be severely punished by their
respective frats.
(Lester B. might have a
Nobel Peace Prize but even
that wouldn't help him if he
showed up at a rushing function in a bow tie).
•      •      •
Although connoisseurs
found it dull, the sod-turning
went off smoothly. LBP glanced around to see if there was
anyone behind him worth
dropping the dirt on.
The only ones there were
a skinny kid in a bow tie
named   Hender   who   kept
mumbling he was available
for a cabinet post and a grinning young man wearing an
aggie sweater, white socks,
and a Plymouth Brethren cap.
Recognizing a Socred, LBP
dropped the dirt on the kid in
the aggie sweater who didn't
even notice it and didn't stop
grinning.
The PM accidentally dropped a note meant for an aide
and Hender picked it up. The
note read "What the hell is
a Hender? Who is SUB?"
•      •      •
Hender, remembering the
JFK note calling Dief an SOB
misread the Pearson note and
thought the same thing had
happened to him.
Hender had never thought
himself important enough to
be called an SOB by the PM
and was hysterical with joy.
He embraced Pearson and
ran from the field screaming
"Elbee Pee called me SOB!
Elbee Pee, SOB!"
Sir Ouvry Roberts overheard, thought a UBC free
speech movement was starting and arrested the hysterical Hender. Then his frat
fined him for wearing a bow
tie.
There's always a loser at
a sod-turning. Tuesday,  November 2,  1965
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 5
FOR EC B O UND
'March slogan: Were confused'
By MIKE BOLTON
Ubyssey Features Editor
Now that the dust has settled we should attempt some
reappraisal of last week's
march fiasco.
Modern history at UBC reveals a march can be effective strategy.
The Back Mac campaign
proved this. President Macdonald himself has said the
march prompted the provincial government to increase
aid to higher education.
In 1963 when UBC students
5,000-strong marched with
impact — they elicited a public response of sympathy
and more monies from government coffers.
• *     *
What about the UBC students marching 3,500-strong
in 1965?
Was their impact as good
as their 1963 counterparts?
I think not.
Why?
One reason for the lack of
effect this time was gross confusion of objectives.
One objective was clearly
universal accessibility.
But was this to be achieved
by holding the line on fees
and increasing student aid or
by instituting tuitionless education. Who knows?
And what happened and
who led the march are matters equally blurred.
• •      •
The AMS wanted the
march at the outset of the fee
fight, but later rejected it.
The so-called ad hoc committee seized on the march
concept and gave it new birth.
This group deceived a sufficient number of students
about its objectives and got
the march ratified by popular referendum.
After the referendum, councillors were left without a
choice — there had to be a
march.
And it proved untimely.
The AMS accepted plans
already set in motion by the
ad hoc committee.
Activist students were ripe
for   action.
• •      •
It seemed right to capitalize on the mature moment.
The AMS had joined with
the ad hoc group with a proviso that the central theme
be universal accessibility to
higher education, rather than
the much more radical, left-
wing policy of tuitionless education.
But the ad hoc group was
a more cancerous growth than
council had  anticipated.
Abolition was the original
AMS policy, but the referendum called for universal accessibility.
When the marchers reached
the Bayshore,  they  found  a
CLASSICAL GUITAR
Tuition   up   to  Advanced
Level   -   Segovia Technique
W. PARKER
Recltalist. 682-1096
PETER HYNDMAN
. . . nitpicking
group of students awaiting
them, throwing pennies to
vent their annoyance at not
being represented.
Few people will oppose the
judgment that throwing pennies was in bad taste.
But fewer yet will con-
end these people had no right
to express their view.
Most certainly they did
have a right to show their
dissent.
March enthusiasts have
been bitterly critical of these
dissenters, alleging they made
the students look disorganized
and ruined the effect of the
march.
•      •      •
When the various groups
met in the AMS chambers
Oct. 25, order las lost, prompting Law Student Association
President Peter Hyndman to
say: "Don't degenerate into
nit picking."
Nit picking, Peter, was a
mild description of the situation.
Obviously, the AMS march
protagonists and the ad hoc
element •were having much
difficulty agreeing among
themselves.
It was a weak group of
councillors who could not
prevail over the socialists'
aims.
There are many students
in sympathy with these dissenters, and who question the
necessity of tuitionless education for universal accessibility.
And we who oppose tuitionless education thought we
were voting for a march proclaiming universal accessibility.
Now we're having misgivings about the strength and
sincerity of our AMS repre-
sentitives.
Victoria president says
Pubsters educators
The following is an excerpt
from an address by the president of Victoria College to
the western section of the
Canadian University Press
meeting in Victoria Oct. 22.
By  MALCOLM  TAYLOR
President, Victoria College
It seems to me that you
are partners in this great
task of the University.
You have, I believe, far
more influence that you suspect. It is imperative therefore that you, especially you,
have a vision of the greatness of the university, of the
high ideals for which it
stands, of its conception of its
role in the affairs of man.
It is this environment, in
a community with such ideals
and such a mission, that you
are partners.
Don't be misled that not
all presidents, not all faculty,
not all Boards of Governors,
not all students, are dedicated
to these ideals.
Only a few ever measure
up to man's greatest creations
—whether they be great religions, great philosophies,
great systems of jurisprudence, great universities.
But it is especially encumbent upon us — upon you,
and me, and my colleagues
—   to   strive   toward   these
DR. MALCOLM TAYLOR
. . . sacred trust
ideals because we are, as I
said, in a privileged position
to influence men and women
and their thoughts.
You and I and my colleagues are engaged in working
to the same ultimate objective—enlightenment. Whether
you admit it or not, you are,
in fact, educators in that
unique setting, the university.
Moreover, there is one other important way in which
we are  linked,  arising  from
please turn to Page Eight
SEE:  PRESS
SPECIAL
EVENTS
PRESENTS
Evening  Performance
8:30 Auditorium
Students $1.50-$1.75
Tickets at A.M.S. or Door
Free Lecture  by Erick Hawkins
"Aesthetics of Contemporary Dance"
Auditorium — Noon — Free
Lecture Demonstration by Composer
Lucia Dzugoszewski
3:30 p.m. — Music 104 — Free
ERICK HAWKINS
>
u DANCE COMPANY
with the brilliant composer
LUCIA DLUGOSZEWSKI
COMING
Nov. 5 - 12:30 - Aud. - 50e
CHARLIE MINGUS QUARTET
• •      •
Nov. 9 - 8:30 - Aud. - $1.00
UNDER MILKWOOD
* •       •
Soonl
ELIJAH MOHAMMED Page 6
THE
UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 2,  1965
PM praises students:
'teach-ins, not towers'
FENCING CLUB
Please return last year's
equipment — urgently needed.
Meeting tomorrow at 7:30 in
Women's Gym.
PHYS. SOC.
Films: "Vector Kinematics"
and "Measurements with
Light" noon today in Hebb
Theatre.
By ROSEMARY HYMAN
Noisy hecklers and a partly
inaudible speech failed to
dampen a reception for Prime
Minister Lester Pearson at
UBC Friday.
Some 3,300 students overrode a persistent group of 20
sign-waving hecklers to give
Pearson frequent ovations
during his 30-minute speech
in War Memorial Gym.
Students also subjected the
hecklers to a barrage of
rolled-up lunch-bags and other
debris.
Pearson's speech was partly inaudible to many at the
back the packed gym. Several
students later blamed the public address system.
The prime minister praised
the growing student involvement in university affairs.
"The ivory towers of Toronto  and  Oxford  are  being
PEARSON
... for students
replaced   by   teach-ins   and
demonstrations.
"This is a healthy reaction
Food and finance
on IH bill tonight
Food and finance head the bill at International House
tonight.
The annual general meeting
of International House starts
at 6 p.m. with an international
buffet prepared by foreign students studying  at  UBC.
Following the buffet, Lewis
Perinbam, liaison officer for
the development services of
The World Bank, will speak.
• •      •
Liaison officer since 1964,
Perinbam is responsible for the
bank's relations with the United Nations and it's specialized
agencies.-
In I960 and 1961, he was
mainly responsible for the organization of Canadian University  Services  Overseas.
New members are welcome
to the meeting.
Two thousand oddities have
arrived on campus.
• •      •
Treasure Van, sponsored by
World University Services of
Canada, will be at International House until  Friday.
Sales totals for 13 universities visited before Oct. 22 were
up $1,264 over 1964 sales.
Profits from Treasure Van
are used to send Canadian students abroad, assist overseas
students in Canada and contribute to the growth of universities in developing countries.
UBC  moths  are
SOMM target
The first general meeting
of the newly-formed SOMM
society will be held Wednesday noon in Bu. 100.
SOMM — standing for
Stamp OUT Moths Methodically — was recently accredited by the Undergraduate Clubs Committee of the
AMS.
The group plans to stamp
out moths methodically, a
spokesman said.
from students who are more
aware of what is going on in
the world than they were in
days when I was a student,''
he said.
"Today students know they
are immediately affected by
events throughout the world."
Pearson acknowledged that
federal aid to education would
have to increase greatly. "But
we cannot achieve the ideal
overnight," he said.
"The best way to accomplish higher aid is to keep the
country expanding and to
raise the national income, to
bring in more taxes and give
more aid to education."
The prime minister touched
off renewed heckling when he
said one of Canada's main
roles was to attempt to maintain an international security
in the world.
"Go to the United Nations
and see what they say about
Canada," Pearson retorted to
the catcalls.
Following his speech, Pearson turned the sod for the
Student Union Building in the
stadium.
Shortly before his arrival
there, two students removed
a "Vote Lester Bird" sign
placed on top of the sod by
other students.
At the sod-turning, UBC
Chancellor Phyllis Ross paid
tribute to past student councils for their "foresight and
vision" in planning for the
building.
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THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
ABOUT   THOSE   LITTLE    PILLS
Birth control  laws are laughable
Reprinted from the
Dalhousie Review
By TONY BOND
When the teetotallers imposed Prohibition, America
just laughed and went on with
its drinking as before.
The laws regarding birth
control in Canada today are
likewise laughingly disregarded by the majority.
But Section 150 (2)(c) of the
Criminal Code names as offenders anyone who "offers to
sell, advertise, publishes an
advertisement of, or has for
sale or disposal any means,
instructions, medicines, drugs
or articles intended or represented as a method of preventing conception or causing
abortion or miscarriage."
* •     •
We all know what the manufacturers do to get round
that one. They simply call
condoms or French letters
"prophylactics" — disease
preventatives — and birth
control pills "hormone pills."
No doubt if parent planning organizations were to
change their name then they
too would be able to evade
the law along with the
wealthy pharmaceutical firms.
As it is, the law makes
them ineligible to receive provincial or municipal grants or
help from the United Appeal,
and their contributions can't
be income tax deductible.
The parent planning organizations run birth control clinics to help prevent poor
people from producing children they wouldn't be able to
bring up.
The law is broken so often
that it is regarded with contempt. From here it is only
a small step to adopting the
same attitude toward other
laws.
Finally, the law prevents
Canada from taking part in
TJN-sponsored health programs.
• •     •
Every time there's a" debate on birth control at the
UN, Canada sits there like a
Presbyterian prude, primly
puts its hands over its ears,
splutters its righteous indignation, and abstains — to the
dismay  and  surprise of  the
other member nations.
Talk to the people who are
in everyday contact with birth
control, and they act as
though there were no law
against it.
The doctors I spoke to at
a Toronto hospital readily
admitted that they prescribed
birth control pills to patients.
To them it isn't a question
of breaking a law, but rather
of serving a practical need.
• •      *
In Canada brand - name
birth control pills include
Enovid, Ortho-Novum, Nor-
inyl and Norlestrin.
The doctors prescribe them
because they are 100 per cent
effective. After five yars as
the most widely-used contraceptive in Canada, so far no
serious ill-effects have been
reported. Contrary to popular belief the menopause is
not delayed.
No other birth control
method is as trustworthy as
the pill. Rating a contraceptive's effectiveness on the
number of births per 100
couples, pills score zero to
three, whereas for diaphragms
used in conjunction with
foams or jellies, condoms,
and coitus interruptus —
withdrawal — the figure is
about seven per 1Q0.
And the famous "rhythm"
method — engaging in intercourse only during the
woman's so-called "infertile"
period, the Catholic Church's
compromise on contraception
— results in pregnancies an
unreliable 15 per cent of the
time.
• •     •
There is also ibirth control
by surgery, like vasectomy —
tying off the male's tubes. In
India, the state, in an attempt
to curb that country's population explosion, awards six dollars to each male who allows
this operation to be performed.
The woman may have her
womb or ovaries removed or
be fitted with an inter-uterine
device which irritates the
uterus into ejecting the pregnancy.
To undeveloped countries
which just don't have the food
U.B.C FILM SOCIETY
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and resources to look after a
huge, mushrooming population, the problem has reached
desperate proportions. Medicine has lowered the death
rate; it must now lower the
birth rate.
Despite the almost universal use of contraceptives, the
Catholic Church remains opposed to the use of "artificial"
birth control. At the moment,
the only form of contraception open to Catholic couples
is the "rhythm" method which
at best is an unsatisfactory
substitute for the real thing.
*      •      •
It's not for want of discussing the subject — last week
Pope Paul had to ask Catholics to stop talking about it
in public — that the Catholic
Church is so far behind the
times, but rather that celibate
priests can only theorize
about birth control.
They say contraception is
interfering with nature. Up
until a few years ago the
Church would only countenance sex as a means of procreation. Pope Pius' approval
of rhythm in 1951 was tacit
approval that marriage partners were entitled to pleasure
from sex also.
• •      •
Only last week, a Father
McMahon, a young English
priest wrote: "I have come to
believe that not only do many
Catholics use contraceptives—
I believe they have the right."
He was followed into print
by another British priest: "I
completely support what
Father McMahon said although I realize I must face
the consequences."
Both are now in compulsory retreat.
• •     •
A recent book on birth control is Contraception and Holiness a collection of arguments for reconsidering the
traditional  Catholic  position.
Father Gregory Baum, one
of three U. of T. contributors,
questions his Church's objections to the use of "artificial"
birth control methods by
quoting   another   theoligian's
analogy that although contraception devices provide a barrier of space, "rhythm" also
creates a barrier — that of
time.
Elsewhere in the book, Dr.
Rosemary Ruether, herself
married, condemns rhythm:
"It treats marital love as an
appetite which can be scheduled like eating and sleeping."
• • •
Furthermore, recent research has shown the woman's
"safe" period to be a fallacy,
and that it is even possible
for a woman to be fertile and
menstruating at the same
time, she says.
Father Baum reports that
wherever he has travelled in
North America he has met
priests who "seriously questioned the official position on
contraception."
• •      •
And he adds: "The awful
thought comes to mind that
we may be pushing millions
of people into conditions of
misery just because we don't
want to admit that we are
wrong!"
LONDON
THE NEW
SCENE
l.ft:
PIANO  by   Richard  Smith
NOVEMBER 3-28
Vancouver Art Gallery
Join the Football Team
For a Weekend
In San Francisco
CHARTER FLIGHT TO SAN FRANCISCO BEING PLANNED FOR THE NOV. 5th-7th
WEEKEND, LEAVING VANCOUVER FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 5th AT 5:30 P.M.,
ARRIVING IN VANCOUVER, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 7th, AT 9:30 P.M.
Return   Fore    -    Vancouver - San Franscisco
$60-00
(Regular Fare - $118.00)
Those interested should apply at Athletic Office in The Memorial Gym
not later than Wednesday, November 3rd.
$60.00 payable  at time of application.
Flight Limited to 50 Passengers   —    Sign Up Immediately
Less than 15 seats left — Don't miss this opportunity to travel
with the Thunderbirds and see San Francisco. Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 2,  1965
McGill and Marianapolis
join Quebec student union
QUEBEC <CUP) — McGill
and Sir George Williams Universities and Marianopolis
College have become members of the Union Generale
des Etudiants du Quebec.
The three English Quebec
schools were admitted at the
first session of the union's
congress at Laval University
last week.
McGill was the first to be
accepted with the understanding that the school drop its
membership in the Canadian
Union of Students at the next
CUS congress in ten months.
The UGEQ costitution does
not allow its members to belong to another national union of students.
The exception was made
by the UGEQ general assembly to allow McGill to fulfill
its legal obligations as a member of CUS during the current year.
PULL OUT OF CUS
Sharon Sholzberg, president of the McGill student
council, indicated to the assembly that her school did
not take part in the CUS
national student day so that
it could participate in Quebec
student adtivities.
IThe motion grants McGill
membership but makes its
continuation in CUS illegal
according to the UGEQ constitution.
Supporters of the amendment maintain that if McGill
does not leave CUS by next
year, it will be automatically
expelled from the Quebec
union.
But Miss Sholzberg sees the
effect of the motion somewhat
differently.
In an interview Oct. 29 she
said:
"In strict law, I would say
the resolution implies that
McGill is unconditionally in
UGEQ."     -
Asked whether she intended to ask her council to
honor the understanding that
McGill will leave CUS she
replied:
LINK TO  BE MAINTAINED
"It is obvious where our
energies will be concentrated, but we will always maintain some sort of link with
English Canada. I don't know
now what that link may be."
She continued: "If we don't
cease to be members of CUS
it is possible that UGEQ will
on longer consider us a member of UGEQ."
"My   personal   opinion   is
that feeling was overwhelmingly in favor of accepting
McGill as a member—period.
I think with the exception of
a few vociferous people, a
good many delegates would
have accepted us unconditionally."
EXPELLED?
Michael McAndrew of the
University of Montreal said
his understanding was that if
McGill did not leave CUS by
next year it would be automatically expelled.
The assembly accepted McGill by a 100 to 4 vote margin.
Sir George Williams and
Marionopolis were admitted
without debate following Mc-
Gill's entry. UGEQ also admitted to membership a recently founded association of
1,500 Quebec students at the
University of Ottawa.
PRESS
Continued from Page Five
the   nature   of   the   task   we
pays their salaries.
the   nature   of   the   astk  we
perform.
We are both committed to
freedom of expression, and
we are so committed because
freedom of expression is the
basis of the freedom of every
man in a free society.
You are constantly concerned with freedom of the
press and I with academic
freedom, the right and duty
of professors to express themselves freely, no matter who
pays their alaries.
• •     •
You and I have a sacred
trust to perform jf democratic
society is to flourish.
Our claims for these freedoms — freedom of the press
and academic freedom — are
often misunderstood.
What we must be certain
to make clear is that freedom
of the press is for the society,
not just for editors and reporters; that freedom of the medical profession, for example,
is freedom for patients, not
just for doctors; that academic freedom is for the people,
not just for professors.
• •      •
Moreover, because freedom
is indivisable, and the curtailment of one man's freedom is a threat to all men's
freedom, you are as concerned with academic freedom as
I am, and I with freedom of
the press, quite as much as
you.
Eighteen UBC students
finally head to India
Eighteen Canadian University Students Overseas
volunteers will leave Vancouver for India Nov. 12.
The volunteers' departure has been held up since
September because of the war between India and Pakistan.
Recruited from universities across Canada, the group
includes five UBC students. PThey are Sandra Carr, John
Titsworth, Katherine Herbison and Gary and Adele
Wic-kett.
Two hundred young men and women are serving two
year terms with CUSO in developing countries as nurses,
teachers, and agricultural advisors.
Class begins
in sign lingo
A sign language communications course begins at UBC
Nov. 10.
"The purpose of the classes
is to interest hearing people
in the problems of the deaf,"
said Bob Bowes, arts 4, one
the organizers of the course.
"One of our great problems
is the profound breakdown of
communication between the
deaf and the rest of society.
Deafness is not an obvious
handicap and many people
tend to minimize the difficulty the deaf have in communicating."
The class will be held at
12:30 p.m. Wednesdays in
Angus 214.
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GSA NEWS
GRADUATE STUDENT PARKING:
A new lot has parking facilities available for graduate students. This lot is the black-topped lot located
behind Brock Hall and entered from East Mall.
The Pay Booth has no significance to Graduate
Students.
CURLING:
There are still openings for players who wish to
curl with fellow Grad. Students. Come along to
the Winter Sports Centre, Tuesday evenings at 9:30
p.m.
SPECIAL NOTE:
Those Grad. Students who may be thinking of booking the facilities of the Grad. Student Centre for
private parties, such as departmental parties during
the Christmas season, should see Mrs. Chapman in
the centre office very soon to arrange a time during
the busy Christmas season.
so you're
an Engineer
who hates
fishing
(Life in British Columbia is still great)
Many people find British Columbia's natural attributes reason enough
for living here. The beauty of mountains and forests is unsurpassed
in all the world - and the outdoor activities, from fishing to skiing,
match the scenery. But even without these things, graduate engineers
would find life rewarding in British Columbia. For here, in the plants
and laboratories of Columbia Cellulose, exciting advances in pulp
and paper engineering and technology are achieved. We demand
inspired efforts from our entire engineering team - and in return
we offer the opportunity to engage in important, practical work right
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test the skill and ingenuity of the most gifted engineer, with full
scope for individual initiative. If you're keen to dig in on challenging
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THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
—norm   betts  photo
GETTING THEIR HEADS together at Friday's SUB sod-turning ceremony are UBC president
John  Macdonald   (left),  AMS president  Byron Hender and Prime Minister Lester Pearson.
GOOSE   COOKED
Socreds scorched
at Brock meeting
By SUE GRANSBY
Two Social Credit candidates speaking at UBC Monday
were subjected to intense heckling by their audience.
The candidates, Norman Howard of Vancouver South and
Donald Gosse* of Vancouver
Quadra were addressing 200
students in Brock.
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Positions available with Depts. of Finance, National
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For further  information
come to the Briefing Session
12 noon, Wednesday 3 November
Room 414, Henry Angus Bldg.
U.B.C.
Gosse said: "The reason for
the election is to take the public eye away from the inadequacies of the Liberal regime.
"The Liberals are bumbling
through from one election to
another."
Howard said if Socred candidates were elected they
would provide "a strong voice,
representative of the people,
not of the party."
He reminded the hecklers
they "are coming out someday
to run this cockeyed world."
The twp speakers gave various aspects of! the Socred platform and criticized Ottawa's
unfair treatment of B.Cl
They also criticized Canadian custom duties which they
say are scaled to benefit Ontario and Quebec, the federal
government's attempt to gain
control of B.C. mineral rights,
and financial control of Canada
being centered in Toronto and
Montreal.
During the question period
following the speeches, a few
listeners felt it necessary to
apologize to the candidates for
the heckling of the students.
But the hecklers were defended by one of the audience who
said: "Heckling is a tradition
at political discussions. It's
our democratic right."
The meeting was sponsored
by the UBC Socreds.
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'**»»»•*»•**•■»•••*»«»•»•»•»*■»»»**»*»»< Page 10
THE      UBYSSE
V
Tuesday, November 2,   1965
^    10% OFF CORSAGES
To All UBC Students
ORDER   EARLY
VOGUE   FLOWER   SHOP
2197 W Broadway   736-7344
RUSHANT
CAMERAS LTD.
4538 West 10th
The Store with the
Technical Photo Knowledge
* TRADES
<r RENTALS
•Ct TERMS
•a REPAIRS
Try us for the best in
CUSTOM PHOTOFINISHING
Black and White and Color
We are always ready to help
with all your
Photographic Problems
DARKROOM SPECIALISTS
Your B.C. ILFORD stockist
224-5858   224-9112
Free Parking at Rear
SPORTS
AT
UBC
INTRAMURALS
Cross country in stadium,
noon Thursday.
Managers' meeting Wednesday noon, room 211, gym.
Basketball begins November
10. Entries close tomorrow 10
p.m., room 309, gym.
CROSS  COUNTRY
UBC entry in the junior
men's section of the B.C.
Championships at Stanley Park
Saturday finished second to the
Vancouver Olympic Club.
UBC travels to Spokane this
weekend to compete in the Inland Empire Championships.
BIG BLOCK CLUB
Dance for members and all
campus athletes at Vancouver
Rowing Club November 13, 9
p.m., featuring The Accents.
Tickets $3, bar will be open.
—bert  mackinnon  photo
DADBURN SMOKE BOMB, says Joe Referee at Saturday's homecoming football game,
going through wary confrontation before deciding it was safe to remove the smoker
from the stadium field.
Loudmouths
called out
Are   you   a  natural  loudmouth?
Are you under 130 pounds?
It you are, men, the UBC
rowing crews needs you as a
coxswain.
For   details   contact   crew
captain Bruce Jacks at AM
Park to take on Columbus next
Saturday.
Plan
now
for
an
EXCITING CAREER
in
COMMUNICATIONS
wi
th
B.CJEL ®
BRITISH COLUMBIA TELEPHONE COMPANY
Nowhere on the continent are there greater rewards for
University graduates than in British Columbia. Register now
at your Student Placement Office for an interview with a
British Columbia Telephone Company representative and
discover the exciting and rewarding opportunities in the field
of communications.
Management training opportunities are available in:
ENGINEERING
MARKETING and SALES
DATA PROCESSING
GENERAL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Our interest is in graduates in Applied Science  (Electrical,
Mechanical and Engineering Physics); Commerce and Science
(Mathematics and Physics).
B.C. TEL ®
BRITISH COLUMBIA TELEPHONE COMPANY
Mosher leads Birds
to 2-1 soccer win
The rejuvenated UBC soccer Thunderbirds, who sat in
the basement last season, moved closer to the top Saturday.
Dick
Led by Dick Mosher's two
goals, UBC defeated North
Shore United 2-1 in Pacific
Coast Soccer League action at
Kinsmen Park.
The Birds have sole possession
of second place with three victories and a tie in four games,
one point behind league-leading Firefighters.
UBC, trailing 1-0, had a penalty kick opportunity in the
second half, and Mosher
promptly put the ball in the
lower left hand corner of the
net.
His winning goal came with
five minutes left in the game,
taking a pass from Harry Lend-
voy and blitzing the ball into
the open corner.
UBC    travels    to    Callister
1-8469,   or   manager  George
Horwood at AM 1-4906.
Hoffman  rink
sweeps 2nd win
The Don Hoffman rink
won the third annual homecoming curling bonspeil held
at the Thunderbird Winter
Sports Centre during the
weekend.
Hoffman beat Herb Mill-
ham 7-6 in the A events final
Sunday.
It was the second straight
homecoming victory for Hoffman in as many years.
Ron Adies took the B event
with a 9-8 victory over Ken
McCurdy while John Munro
won the C event defeating
Don McDonald 10-8 in the
finals played Sunday.
Fifteen rinks entered the
spiel.
Rugger Birds
bash Alberta
boys twice
UBC's rugger Thunderbirds
extended their win streak to
five with victories over both
the U of Alberta campuses this
weekend.
The Birds had their own way
against an inexperienced Edmonton team, winning 35 to 3
Saturday.
Gary Rowles scored three
tries from his position on the
wing; Bill Black scqred two
tries and dropped a goal to add
another nine points.
Brian Cornwall tallied another two tries from among the
pack.
The Calgary club fielded a
stronger team Sunday, but
were unable to cope with the
fast moving Bird backfield.
Led by Bruce Laffling's three
tries the Birds downed Calgary
24 to 3.
In city league play the other
three UBC teams went winless.
The Braves, after a very fine
half against the powerful Kats,
allowed 22 unanswered points
in the second half Saturday at
Wolfson.
Down only 8 to 3 at the half,
the backs were unable to link
up with the forwards and the
bigger Kats ran over them.
The final score was 30-3, and
the loss relagates the Braves to
third place.
The injury-weakened Totems
went down 11 to 3 to the strong
second division Kats.
Tomahawks were equally unsuccessful, losing to Pocomo
22-3.
Folk Singer
Jn. Yluisaker from Minneapolis
Coming to Totem
This Saturday
Did you know the joy of
CONTACT LENSES
Ask any satisfied wearer!
Have them expertly fitted at a reasonable price by:
MU 3-1816        LAWRENCE CALVERT      705 Blrk* BMfl. Tuesday, November 2,  1965
THE      UBYSSEY
Page  11
—denis  gone  photos
PIONEERS PUSH PAST BIRDS
UBC THUNDERBIRD'S DEFENSE - did most of the work at homecoming football game
which UBC lost 14-0 to Lewis and Clark College Pioneers. Above, Bird sandwich is given
Pioneer Ed Cheff (27) by Bill MacLachlan (right) and Sam Kravinchuk (66). Bob Linder-
mann (70) helps stricken teammate. Below, UBC's Charlie Pbtpps (73) pursues Pioneer's
quarterback Skip Swyers (10).
BIRDS PUNCHLESS
Pioneers spoil
homecoming 14-0
The  UBC  Thunderbirds  committed  the  unpardonable
Saturday — they lost their homecoming football game.
Spoiling    the    celebrations
with a 14-0 win were the
Lewis and Clark College Pioneers.
The Birds faltered offensively throughout the contest,
and UBC's pass defense suffered two costly lapses.
Lewis and Clark scored
twice in the second quarter on
passes from quarterback Skip
Swyers to end Jack Head.
•      •      •
The Pioneers went 64 yards
in 14 plays for their first
touchdown. Hard running Pioneer fullback Jerry Button
struggled for a first down on
fourth-and-one to give Lewis
and Clark a first down in UBC
territory.
Swyers threw to Head for
another first down on the UBC
30, and then found halfback
Tom Boyle at the Bird 11 yard
line.
An offside penalty against
UBC put the ball on the three,
and on third down Head broke
over the middle from his left
end position. UBC was using
an eight-man line, and Head
crossed the line of scrimmage
untouched.
Swyers straightened up with
the snap and fired to Head as
he crossed the goal line in
front of UBC's Chip Barrett.
Ken Byers kicked the extra
point, and the Pioneers had
seven of their points.
The Thunderbirds could do
nothing with the ball and John
Haar punted to the Pioneer 38.
The Pioneers electrified the
3,000 spectators with their second major score in three minutes.
Two plays got them a mere
three yards, but Head outdistanced Barry Callaghan,
snared Swyers' long bomb at
the Bird ten, and scored.
Byers converted the 59-yard
FRANK GNUP
...  no offense
pass   and   run   touchdown   to
end the scoring.
UBC's best opportunity to
score came before the half
time intermission. A fourth
down pass from center went
over the head of Lewis and
Clark punter Bill Bailey.
T-Bird defensive tackle Bill
MacLachlan almost kept
Bailey from getting the kick
away, and the ball was ruled
dead when it hit a Pioneer
player at the Lewis and Clark
43 for a net loss of five yards.
But a line plunge and a
pair of passes failed to gain
an inch, and the Birds punted
the ball away1 on fourth down.
•      •      •
From their own 16, the
Pioneers drove to the Thunderbird 8 in less than two minutes. In the end zone, Head
missed the only one of seven
passes thrown to him, and the
Pioneers tried a fourth down
fake field goal and run.
Swyers was stopped nine
yards short of paydirt, and the
Birds had time for their only
two first downs of the half.
8th ANNUAL
UBC ARMOURIES
International Fall Fair 65
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 5th
6:30 p.m. -
Armouries opens to the public.
7:30 p.m. -
Official opening by the Lieut.-'Governor of
British Columbia.
7:35 p.m. -
Floor show.
8:15 p.m.-
East meets West in a Fashion show.
9:30 p.m.-
Floor show.
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 6th
2:00 p.m.-
Displays open.
3:00 p.m.-
East meets West in a Fashion show.
Floor Shows at 4:00, 8:00, 9:00, 10:00 p.m.
10:30 p.m. -1:00 a.m. -
Dance to the Carribian Steel Band in
Modern and Spanish themes.
STUDENTS  ONLY  $1.00 Page 12
THE      UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 2, 1965
'TWEEN CLASSES
Brock politicos have say
UBC CIRCLE K
All party political forum in
Brock noon today. Free admission.
UCC
Fall   general   meeting   noon
tomorrow in Bu. 205. All clubs
must attend.
PRE-DENTAL SOC
Meeting noon today in Bu.
204. Dr. Ross Upton speaks on
"The Direction of Dentistry."
New members welcome.
PRE-MED
Pre-med  presents  "Cancer."
A lecture by Dr. J. Tull, Wed.
noon Wesbrook 201.
INSTITUTE OF FISHERIES
Illustrated lecture by Dr.
Murray Newman on "Capture,
Care and Behaviour of Killer
Whales" 8 p.m. tonight in Biological Sciences 2000.
WAA
Men and Women's track and
field   practice   today,   6:30   in
Field House.
WUS
Chile seminar. Slides and
talk noon tomorrow in Bu. 204.
SPECIAL EVENTS
Erick Hawkins lecture "The
Aesthetics of Contemporary
Dance" in Aud. at noon today.
Free admission.
Lucia Dlugosziwski gives lecture demonstration of her musical innovations in Mu. 104 at
3:30 today. Free admission.
Erick Hawkins' dance company performance, 8:30 tonight
in Aud.
WEDNESDAY NOON HOUR
CONCERTS
Tomorrow in Bu. 106, Arthur
Poison, violin, and Harold
Brown, piano, will play Sonata
by Weinzweig, Vista by Barbara Pentland, and Duo by
Leon Kirchner.
LUTHERAN STUDENT
MOVEMENT
"Cybernation — Computerized Living?" Dr. Luft speaks
Noon Wednesday in Ed. 204,
Noon tomorrow in Ed. 204,
Mr. Anderson (Department of
Religious Studies) speaks on
'Bible Study Courses in B.C.
High Schools."
BRIDGE  AND CHESS CLUB
Bridge and chess game session Wed. 7:30-11:30 in Brock
Hall stage room.
COMMUNITY AND
REGIONAL PLANNING
Free   film   "The    Changing
City" noon Wednesday in Laserre 102. Everyone welcome.
STUDENT COMMITTEE TO
END WAR IN VIET NAM
Film on Viet Nam made by
the Viet Cong, Wed. noon in
Bu. 102.
DEBATING  UNION
Resolved that majority gov-
&&€>#&
DIAMOND       RINGS
LYRIC FROM $100
FIRBANKS
599   Seymour  -   Brentwood
and Park Royal
Ask about your student
Discount
ernment is  a necessity. Wed.
noon in Bu. 217.
FULL GOSPEL STUDENTS
Rev. Ivan Gamble speaks on
"Is Speaking in Tongues Ex-
tatic" in Bu. 202, Wed. noon.
All welcome.
GAMMA DELTA
Pep meet noon today in Bu.
225.
UBC LIBERALS
Campaign meeting noon today in Bu. 214.
SCHOOL OF PHYSICAL
EDUCATION
B.C. inter-school swim meet.
Officials meeting in Rm. 213 of
Memorial Gym noon Wed.
COMMERCE
General meeting Thurs. in
Angus 104 at noon. Door prizes.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications  Office:  Brock   Hall,   Ext.   26.   224-3242
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
FOUND ADS inserted free. Publication* office. Brock Hall. Local 26,
224-3242.
WOULD navy officer majoring in
Geology '58, white Dodge? Who
gave hiteher ride to 8:30 Friday
from Highbury & 9th, please phone
CA 4-6093 concerning man's black
umbrella left in car.
LOST. A pair of black rimmed glasses at Homecoming. Reward 25.00.
Phone Ed at RE 8-8908.
FOUND. Black umbrella, left in
Volkswagon by rider let out at
Discovery on Friday. Phone 266-
4017.
FOUND. Lady's watch in back seat
of car after hitchhiker's departure.
Phone 228-2530.
LOST. One white button-down shirt
in pink 1955 Pontiac, Thursday,
October 28. Finder please leave at
Ubyssey office.	
FOUND. Physics 200 text, outside
Hennings 201. Phone Dave at 988-
7389.	
LOST. Lord Buxton wallet, between
Buchanan & Lower Mall, last wk.
Reward for return of papers. Call
Graham,   224-9049.
LOST. Wed. noon, Bi-Sc. 2000, girl's
glasses. DESPERATE, need for
weekend. Call Barb 224-6865, or
leave VOC clubhouse.
LOST and desperately needed. Girl's
black framed glasses. Phone CA
4-7445.      	
FOUND at Pep Rally. China — A
critical bibliography by Charles O.
Hucker. Apply Brian Salvador at
Hut 5, Room 37, Fort Camp. Phone
224-9833.
LOST HISTORY 304 NOTEBOOK.
In Lasarre Men's Washroom.
Monday at' 1:30 p.m. Very Important please phone Ken. BR 7-8154.
LADY'S ring found in washroom of
Education Bldg. Phone YU 7-0566
after 6 p.m.            .	
WOULD the person who found the
gold ring in the Henry Angus wash
room please contact Fred Madryga
at FA 1-3303. 	
LOST. Girl's pearl ring in vicinity
C-Lot to Biology Bldg. Of sentimental value, 10k gold. Contact
Jerry,   922-7578.
RIDERS for carpool wanted. 4th and
Blenheim, 8:30 to 5:30. Mon. to
Fri. Stay out 4 nights per week.
Call Bob,  733-3290, leave message.
WANTED. Ride in carpool from vie.
of 10th and Alma. Phone 224-3692.
RIDE wanted from Lynn Valley.
M. W. F. Call Maureeta at
922-5B07.
AUTOMOTIVE  ft MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
FOR SALE. a956 Pontiac, 4-dr. sed.,
6-cyl., std., real good condition.
Phone Ken  at  224-7230 after 5.00.
51 METEOR two-door, running condition, 265. Phone 261-0344.
1961 RENAULT Dauphine 4-door.
Perfect condition, fine running
order, Metallic blue, only 2395.00.
Phone John 581-1157.
1956 SUPER 88 Olds, p.s., p.b., radio,
heater,     in     excellent     condition.
$475.00, or best offer. Call Bernice
Gerard, 266-9275' or 325-2515, and
let it ring.
53 HILLMAN in good condition.
Ask for Bob at 224-1570 after 7.00.
p.m.
Motorcycles
27
1965 MONZA DUCATI 250CC, 2680,
or payments. 2455 W. Broadway.
Phone 738-4992.
BUSINESS  SERVICES
Typewriter* fe Repairs
42
GOOD CLEAN Tl HBW K1TJSRS, 222
up. Also Typewriter repairs St
SO percent savings. Poison Tras-
writere, 2140 W. 4th. Phone R2J
1-2322.
Typing
42
THESES, ESSAYS, BOOK RE-
views, Notes. ARDALE GRIFFITHS LIMITED, 70th and Granville.   Phone   263-4530.
FAST, ACCURATE typing of all
types, reasonable rates. Call 263-
4023 anytime.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
Tl
Special Notices
13
THE FABULOUS MR. BARRY,
hypnotist exceptional. One more
hilarious show. Fri., Nov. 5, Totem Park,  at 8:30 p.m.	
SCHWEITZER SKI TRIP ! ! MEET-
ing for ALL interested — noon,
Nov. 5, Buch. 100.	
GOT A CAMEL you want saddled?
A wife you want lead? Need a gift
for your dog or mom? Try Treasure Van — all week long in International House — 12  p.m.  on.
TWO SEATS available on charter
to Europe at Xmas. Phone Susan
224-5332 or Mrs. Smith 681-8581.
3 weeks; leaving Dec. 19, 2350.00
return.
'TWIRP DANCE (the lady is requested to pay), Nov. 6, Dance
Lounge, 8-12 p.m. 50c per person,
21.00  per  couple.	
TRAVEL 'Round the world at Fall
Fair '65', Nov. 5, 6. Armouries
Dance following Sat. show. Tickets
50C-21.50, AMS office or Inter'l.
House.
Transportation
14
PART-TIME WORK AVAILABLE
as taxi drivers. Black Top Cab»
Ltd..   701  Beach.
PIZZA PATIO IS CONTINUING
with Its policy of making employment available to students for part
time evening work—one or two
evenings a week. Students considering applying must have clean
driving record for use of Company
cars and be 21 years of age or
older. Contact Manager at the
Pizza Patio most convenient to
you after 5 p.m. Locations in Kerrisdale, South Van., Downtown
and West Van.
PS:   New   outlet   coming   close   to
U.B.C. 	
RELIABLE baby sitter for 14 mos.
old boy. Light housekeeping duties, live in or out. CA 4-6605
after 5 p.m. or 228-2227, ask for
Rada.
INSTRUCTION
Tutoring
64
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
NORTH VANCOUVER — RIDERS
wanted, one or both ways. Leave
7.30 a.m., return 3.30 p.m. Phone
988-4860 evenings. 	
RIDE WANTED FROM 18th AND
Renfrew for 8.30 classes. 433-2596
after six.
STAFF REQUIRES RIDES, 2nd and
Larch. "A" lot preferred. Call
Irene   after   5:30   p.m.   RE   6-9350.
RELIABLE on time drivers needed
for  carpool,   vicinity  between   Arbutus  and   41st.   Call  Allison   AM
I    6-4667.
Ben's Carpet Centre
UBC   STUDENTS   SPECIALS   9x12
rugs   $29.50   up.   Desks   and   bookcases, $9.95-$23.95. Open Fri. 'til 9.
Cor.  4th  & Burrard.  RE  1-8913.
BIRD CALLS—THE MOST USE-
ful book on the campus. Student
telephone directory. Now available. Limited number. Buy Your's
Today—Only  75c.
Furn. Homes & Aprs.
83
$75 PER MONTH, NORTH VAN-
couver. Can accommodate 3-4, will
also sell furniture and household
equipment.   Phone   987-6914.
NOW
ON SALE
: R S I T Y    OF
O L U M B I A
STUDENT TELEPHONE DIRECTORY
1965 - 1966
GET  YOURS  TODAY
Present Pre Sale Tickets To Publications
Office, Brock Hall
Cash Sales at Book Store
Publications Office, College Shop, etc.
V
Chevron Standard
Limited
CALGARY, ALBERTA
Offers Careers In
Petroleum Exploration
and will conduct
Campus Interviews On
November 8, 9 & 10
POST GRADUATES - GRADUATES
UNDERGRADUATES
in
ENGINEERING — Chemical, Mechanical, Civil
—Permanent and summer employment in engineering.
HONOURS GEOLOGY
—Permanent and summer employment in geology.
GEOLOGICAL ENGINEERING
(Options 1, 2, 3)
—Permanent and summer employment in geology
and/or geophysics.
GEOPHYSICS
—Permanent and summer employment in geophysics.
PHYSICS and GEOLOGY
—Permanent and summer employment in geology
and/or geophysics.
MATHEMATICS and PHYSICS
—Permanent and summer employment in geophysics.
HONOURS PHYSICS
—Permanent and summer employment in geophysics.
ENGINEERING PHYSICS
—■Permanent and summer employment in geophysics.
Arragenmenis for Personal Interview may be
Made Through the
UNIVERSITY'S PLACEMENT OFFICE.

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