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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Feb 7, 1980

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Array U.S. students turn artful dodgers
By PETER MENYASZ
"Hell no, we won't go!"
The defiant cry is still echoing in some
people's minds — minds that have not yet
recovered from the horrors of the Vietnam
war. But the call away from the flag might
sound again soon, signalling the start of
another round of draft evasion.
Since U.S. president Jimmy Carter's announcement of his intention to start up
registration for another draft, resistance
has begun to grow. And although the current cold war-like world situation is a
source of alarm, many students are as
unwilling to throw themselves into the fray
as they were in the 1960s.
"Hell no," says Dana Ackerson, a UBC
student who still retains her American
citizenship. "I wouldn't go. I'd support
anyone who doesn't go."
Ackerson, like many of the more than
300 U.S. citizens at UBC, is unsure of her
status if a draft should be announced. But
she is absolutely certain she won't get involved.
"I think I'm too old," says Frances Hill.
No one is certain what age limitations the
draft registration will have, although 18 to
26 is the range most people are predicting.
But Hill says she isn't worried about the age
restriction.
"If I were within the age, I would not
go," she says. "I think it's absurd."
Tim Ireland says he couldn't go if he
wanted to — a physical consideration
would keep him out of the U.S. armed
forces anyway. But he says even if they
would take him, he probably would refuse
to go.
"I can't see much sense in it," he says. "I
don't agree with army war in general."
Most of UBC's American citizens are
already landed immigrants, and many of
them might already have applied for Canadian citizenship. Some of them have been
here for more than 10 years; some almost
from birth. Ireland is a perfect example.
"I just haven't bothered to get my
papers," he says. "I consider myself a
Canadian."
But as determined as some students are to
keep out of the draft, some are equally
determined to charge headlong into the
fray.
UBC graduate student John Affinito says
if the maximum age for the draft is 26, then
he's still eligible. And he's certain what his
actions will be when the initial registration
begins.
"I'd register. If they drafted me, I'd go,"
he says.
Affinito says he was drafted to go to
Vietnam, but under the lottery call-up
system that the American government
adopted in 1970, he was never called.
Tim Ahern, also a graduate student, says
he thinks he's too old to be drafted but is
willing to stand behind the conscription.
"I would support it if I were of age,"
Ahern says. And he adds he thinks his feelings of patriotism are shared by many
Americans at home and abroad. "I think a
good number would register."
There are some who are still undecided.
See page 3: DRAFT
Board vetoes
Iranian influx
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXII. No. 49
Vancouver. B.C. Thursday, February?, 1980        *?~.y>4S        228-2301
By GEOF WHEELWRIGHT
UBC's board of governors is refusing to make any special provisions for Iranian students who want
to transfer to UBC from U.S. universities.
The board defeated a motion
Tuesday to refer a letter requesting
the special provisions to senate
(which sets admission standards).
Student board member John Pellizzon said he proposed the motion so
senate could be made aware of the
concerns expressed in a letter from
Simon Fraser University's student
society.
Only Pellizzon, fellow student
board member Anthony Dickinson
and faculty member Peter Pearse
voted in favor of the motion.
The SFU student society letter requested special provisions be made
so Iranian students suffering
harassment in the U.S. could study
in Canada and charged that UBC
had actively discouraged Iranians
from attending the university.
But UBC administration president Doug Kenny said that Iranian
students have been treated like any
other foreign students studying in
the U.S. He said UBC's policy is to
disallow foreign students to transfer
from the U.S. until they complete
their studies there.
"And Iranian students who are
bonafide students are not being
hassled in the U.S. I don't think
they (the authors of the letter) are
talking about students," he said.
Board chair Leslie Peterson called the letter misleading and expressed concern that senate members
might not question its credibility.
"My reservation in referring this
letter is that people would accept it
as fact."
He said to consider the letter
would be a waste of senate's time.
But Pellizzon said since senate is responsible for decisions on UBC admissions the letter should be referred.
"It is talking about something
that falls in senate. It should be referred to senate," he said.
And Pearse asked Kenny whether
the university has received any requests for special status for refugee
students. Kenny said he has received none and added there are no special provisions.
SFU student society president Bill
Goodacre said Wednesday UBC
board's response was not surprising
and repeated his charge that the
university has discouraged Iranian
students from registering at UBC.
"If that's not discouraging people
from applying, I don't know what
is," he said.
See page 2: BOARD
ADMINISTRATION VICE PRESIDENTS don disguises in desperate attempt to discover dark secrets of Ubyssey operation as part of covert
scheme to destroy myth of honesty and fair play that is rag's tradition. Trio
— glen sanford photo
cut hole in roof and caught sight of couple doing no-no in corner before
being riddled by semi-automatic weapon concealed in weathervane.
Davis, Will receive Crumb bowl dishonor
By KEVIN FINNEGAN
Housing director Mike Davis and
arts dean Robert Will will share the
Crumb bowl for 1980, the student
representative assembly decided
Wednesday night.
SRA members unanimously passed a motion saying they could not
decide between the merits of the
two nominees for the award, annually given to "recognize excell
ence in the field of amateur oppression."
The Crumb bowl, given to the
member of the administration or
faculty who best exemplifies the
anti-democratic tradition at UBC,
consists of a dirty toilet seat and a
plastic sword.
Will's nomination is a result of
his refusal of an arts undergraduate
society request for permission to
hold a concert in the Buchanan
quadrangle. Will said he "didn't
want to get any flak from
anybody," arts representative Bob
Staley told SRA.
Will was also cited for "violently
opposing" a senate motion allowing students to see their final exams.
No rationale was given for the
Davis nomination, but science representative Craig Brooks suggested
SRA members who didn't vote for
Davis "probably wanted to live in
Ontario students boycott classes
OTTAWA (CUP) — Hundreds
of University of Ottawa students
boycotted classes Wednesday in
their second major protest against
proposed tuition fee increases.
Student demonstrators set up
picket lines outside social sciences
classrooms and successfully persuaded students not to go to classes
as a protest against the Ontario government's plan to introduce a 7.5
per cent tuition hike. The hike will
be coupled with further 10 per cent
fee increases that can be imposed at
individual universities' discretion.
All political science classes were
cancelled and most sociology students boycotted their classes although professors showed up to
teach.
The protestors are also fighting
an attempt by the university administration to raise $500,000 from
students to help establish an $8 million development fund.
A referendum being held on campus asks students to contribute an
additional $10 per year in tuition
for five years to raise money.
Student organizer Jean-Pierre
Maisonneuve said protestors are
also calling on students to reject the
fund proposal. He said the fund,
which would be used for capital
projects, research, scholarships, library improvements and replacement
of lab equipment, "doesn't do
enough to help students."
The Ottawa action was the second in a series of protests planned
for Ontario colleges and universities
to demonstrate opposition to funding cutbacks and tuition increases.
the hotel." Davis has proposed the
Gage low-rise residence be converted into a hotel to finance renovations in other residences.
SRA also approved a motion to
send a letter of thanks to the university administration for financial
aid of more than $8,000 despite objections from some members that
the money should have gone to
other projects.
"I think it would be folly for us
to commend the administration
when they haven't carried through
on their promises to improve student aid," said Staley.
The assembly also approved rules
for awarding the interfaculty cup,
although some members complained the motion was a waste of time.
"Of all the silly things that have
come up at this assembly, this is one
of the silliest," said student senator
Anne Gardner.
Alma Mater Society president
Brian Short told the meeting the
cup has never been awarded although it has existed since 1955.
SRA postponed a motion to
adopt a new code of procedures because copies were not printed in
time for the meeting. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 7,1980
For VV5 program
Chinese rap CTV
Chinese university students were
"economic scapegoats" in CTV's
Campus Giveaway program but
should not feel intimidated by the
telecast, a Chinese Benevolent Association member said Wednesday.
Pat Chen, a member of the association's ad hoc committee against
media discrimination, said UBC's
Chinese community should not
think they are infringing on the education rights of others.
"Intentionally  or  not,  Chinese
Board of governors
not sympathetic
From page 1
Goodacre said UBC's insistence
on enforcing its regulations strictly
"is more than just a passing bureaucratic situation." The decision is
yet another form of harassing Iranian students, he said.
"It's a special circumstance, but
those types of bodies (UBC's
board) we don't expect much sympathy from."
Dickinson said the letter could
not be referred to the senate in its
current state as it is addressed to the
board of governors. "If the guy
wants to readdress the letter to the
senate, then the senate will consider
it."
But Goodacre said he will not
send a letter to the senate but added
that the SFU student society external relations officer will send a
further letter of protest to Kenny
later this month.
He said he did not send a letter to
the SFU administration because it
had not discouraged Iranian students from applying for transfer.
students are being used as scapegoats for economic failures," Chen
said. "Times are tough, and it's not
unusual for racist elements to appear in explanations of economic
problems."
And Chen said his committee is
pushing for a public apology from
CTV for W5's Sept. 30 telecast.
"We at least want equal air time for
rebuttal."
Chen said he supports the lawsuit
five University of Toronto students
who think they were libelled by the
program have filed against the television network. He added he thinks
the students have a valid case as the
program contained many inaccuracies.
"Alleged foreign students appearing in the program were later
proven to be Canadian citizens,"
said Chen. "And although they
(CTV) mentioned 'foreign students'
the program obviously focused on
Chinese students."
The Chinese Benevolent Association is currently circulating a petition condemning CTV for the racist
tone of the Campus Giveaway program, and is asking for financial
support from the public to support
their actions.
The association is also sponsoring
an all-candidates meeting Feb. 10 at
1 p.m. in the Marco Polo restaurant
for major party candidates from
Vancouver East, Kingsway, Centre
and South ridings. The candidates
will respond to questions on immigration, multiculturalism and the
W5 program.
ARTS
STUDENTS
Nominations are now open for
1. Arts President
2. Vice President
3. Treasurer
4. Secretary
5. 4 Student Council Representatives
6. Social Coordinator
7. Ombudsperson
NOMINATIONS CLOSE FEB.8
ELECTIONS ARE FEB.13
Advice, information and nomination forms available at the
Arts Office (Buch 107)
rd
>6e
hair studio inc.
UNISEX HAIRSTYLES
FOR APPOINTMENT
224-1922
224-9116
5784 University (next to Bank of Commerce)
master charge
Big or
Small Jobst
Reasonable
Rates
2060 W. lOtte
Vancouver
734-5535
Eve. and Holidays 732-9898
Also Garages, Basements, Yards
CLEANUPS
'-,- v-t '^
Women's Athletic Association
Executive Positions 1980/81
Nominations are open from:
February 4 to February 18,1980
Executive positions are:
President
Vice-President
Secretary
Member-at-Large
Nomination forms are available in Room 208, War Memorial
Gymnasium. Elections will take place at the W.A.A. Annual
Meeting on March 3, 1980 at 12:30 p.m., Room 211, War
Memorial Gymnasium.
fc-liltki:Li
Employment
Personnel from the Ministry
of Labour will be on
campus at: U.B.C, Room
214, Brock Hall on:
12-
FEBRUARY
14, 1980
(8:30 A.M. ■ 4:30 P.M.)
to accept applications for
summer employment with the
provincial government under
the Provincial Youth Employment Program.
Province of Ministry of
British Columbia Labour
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY PROGRAMS Thursday, February 7,1980
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
UBC faces big bill for beach cure
By GEOF WHEELWRIGHT
Some students and environmentalists are concerned UBC could be
stuck with an $800,000 bill to head
off erosion of the Wreck beach
cliffs.
UBC's board of governors approved a $153,000 expenditure
Tuesday to begin the first phase of
the erosion control plan, after the
Universities Council of B.C. refused funding last week.
UCBC executive director Gerry
Schwartz said the council liked the
plan, but could provide no provincial money to fund it.
Unemployed
occupy office
in Halifax
HALIFAX (CUP) — Protestors
occupied Canada Employment centre offices in Nova Scotia recently
in an attempt to settle a two-year
old dispute involving overpayment
of unemployment benefits.
Supporters of the protestors also
demonstrated outside Conservative
Party headquarters in Ottawa Jan.
31 to publicize the case.
The overpayments occurred two
years ago due to a computer error
and the government's attempts to
collect the erroneous benefits have
met with strong resistance from the
5,000 recipients affected.
Members of the Coalition for
Full Employment occupied employment offices in Sydney and Halifax
to gain support for their fight.
The unemployment insurance
recipients were unknowingly overpaid a total of $1.4 million but the
government has collected about
$900,000 of that amount. The coalition is demanding the government
give up its claims to the rest and
reimburse those who were forced to
pay back the money earlier. The
overpayments ranged from $70 to
$900 per person.
"The government institutes
policies which cause high
unemployment and then turns
around and expects people to pay
back an exorbitant amount of
money which they accepted in good
faith in the first place," said Dian
Pepall, spokeswoman for the
Halifax group.
The coalition was previously
fighting the government mistake
through the courts but decided not
to carry an appeal to the Supreme
Court, saying the action was extremely expensive and not an option
for the unemployed.
"The problem seemed acute
enough to get on with. But it's a
UBC matter," he said.
UBC student board member Anthony Dickinson said he thinks the
province should pay for at least part
of the erosion control. "I think the
provincial government should be
paying for most (of it)," he said.
Dickinson said UBC will reapply
to the council for funding but refused to speculate on the success of any
future applications.
A Society for Pollution and Environmental Control spokesman
said he thinks UCBC should "put
its money where its mouth is" and
chip in to fund the project. "If they
approve of it, they should pay for
it," John Vance said.
UBC administration spokesman
Brant Ducey said he is optimistic
the council will grant UBC some
funding after UBC's second application. "The university feels it is a
community problem, not just a university problem. We've had widespread public interest."
The university should pay for all
the work because the university
wants the work done, said Wreck
beach committee member Korky
Day.
"It's their building and they're
trying to save it. Maybe they (UBC)
should pay for it."
Both Day and Vance said they are
happy with the main thrust of the
erosion control plan. Ducey said the
plan will be implemented during the
next five years, with the first phase
starting this spring. (Pending approval by the Vancouver Parks
Board, which leases the land the
beach sits on.)
The first phase includes:
• removal of dangerously locat
ed and root-damaged trees from the
cliff edge;
• construction of protective
fences to prevent erosion from foot
travel;
• upgrading of access trails to
the beach to discourage climbing of
the cliff face;
• introduction of a five-year re-
vegetation program to improve
stability on the seriously eroded
areas of the cliff;
• and the redesign of a campus
storm drain said to be the cause of
erosion below the anthropology
museum.
"YOU SAY YOU GAVE at the registrar's office last month?" asks incredulous blood clinic worker of hardy students taking time Wednesday to
drain bodily fluids. Despite administration attempt to bleed students dry
—glMi sanford photo
with tuition payments attendance at clinic, which continues until Friday,
has been healthy.
Draft quandry hits Americans again
From page 1
"I don't know whether I'd go or
not," says fourth-year arts student
Jon Hobbs. And Hobbs is certain
of his eligibility for a draft.
"Oh, yeah. I'm right in the middle," he says. Although he was
turned down when he volunteered
for the U.S. air force two years ago,
Hobbs says he thinks the military
would take him now. But there are
factors that counterbalance his
patriotism, he says.
Already organizations are gearing
up to help draftees make their decisions. One such organization is
headed by Jrm Nielsen, director of
the Common Ministry, a non-sectarian church loosely connected to
Washington State University.
"Right now there's no real political action planned," says Niel
sen. "We're setting up a draft counselling service to assist some people
who are wrestling with the decision
of whether or not to register."
Nielsen says although no formal
announcement of the draft has been
made, it is almost inevitable. "Registration is one step closer to that."
And he says anti-draft sentiments
will intensify when the final announcement comes. "I would guess
Lab will become dump, residents fear
LAC DU BONNET, Man. (CUP) — Local
residents are worried Lac Du Bonnet might
become Canada's nuclear waste dump after a
proposal was announced for an underground
nuclear research laboratory in the area.
The Atomic Energy Company Ltd.'s proposal for a deep underground research facility is part of a 15-year program to develop
a waste storage plan, and takes advantage of
thick, hard underground mountains similar
to those under consideration as disposal
vaults in Ontario.
Company representatives assured residents
the research site would not become a nuclear
waste disposal site at a public information
meeting that attracted 100 people despite only three days' notice.
But those opposing the project say that
after the proposed $5 to $7 million investment has been made, the federal government
will be reluctant to simply place a lid on the
underground laboratory. Residents say they
are worried the next step might be to develop
the research station, or an adjoining site, into
a disposal area.
Local residents decided at a Feb. 2 meeting
I give up, dear. What has Spike found in our yard?"
to form a committee to investigate the
laboratory proposal.
"This project is just the tip of the
iceberg," said meeting organizer Ray
Ylonen. "This could lead to the eventual
establishment of a commercial scale
depository."
The decision to dump radioactive material
in Manitoba will be made by politicians, said
Hans Tammemagi, head of the Whiteshell
research station. And Tammemagi said he is
confident that a decision to dump in Lac Du
Bonnet will not be handed down.
"All I can say is that this particular facility
... is going to be totally designed by us and
it's going to be used for experiments. I would
find it very difficult to believe that any politician would ever accept taking the wastes," he
said.
The federal government and the province
of Ontario have agreed to have Ontario,
Canada's major producer of nuclear waste,
provide the site for a permanent disposal facility. But opponents to the Lac Du Bonnet
project are concerned that widespread opposition to a nuclear dump in Ontario might
cause the project to move to their area.
all hell will break loose if the draft is
reinstituted."
But Nielsen says he is concerned
over the level of blind patriotism
growing in the U.S. "There's a really weird nationalistic fervor happening right now," he says. "It's
scary. Over 50 per cent of the people on campus would be ready to
go."
And although Nielsen says his
son is under draft age, he wouldn't
hesitate to send him to Canada if he
were called up. "I'd ship him up
there real fast."
A spokesman for the U.S. consulate in Vancouver said Wednesday no official date has been set for
the start of draft registration. "The
legislation to register people has not
yet been submitted to congress by
the president," said consulate public affairs officer Tom Marquis.
"But I believe he (the president) has
the executive authority to require
the registration of people."
Marquis said no decisions have
been made on age restrictions or the
eligibility of women for the draft.
And he added there will be no attempt at this point to start classifying people on their fitness for duty.
Marquis said the registration, and
perhaps a draft, is necessary to replenish military reserve units and
the National Guard, depleted by
poor enlistment. "People are not
enlisting in the numbers we expected." But Marquis said current
world affairs are obviously involved
in the decision, or the president
would not have made the decision
in his Stare of the Union address. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 7,1980
THE UBYSSEY
February 7, 1980
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year by the Alma Mater
Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the AMS or
the university administration. Member, Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page
Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in room 241K of the
Student Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301; Advertising, 228-3977.
Co-Editors: Heather Conn and Tom Hawthorn
"Aaargghhh," the shrill pitch punctured the air, frightening Andrea Lazosky and Jay Vander Meulen into the woods for safety, tt continued. Kevin Finnegan
began to look pale and twisted his ears to heads to stop the awful screeching. "Oh God get me a beer, drugs, anything to drown it out," he said. Gary
Brookfietd was so shocked by the noise his head suddenly sprouted a new fuzzy growth. "It must be a radioactive sound wave," he said to himself. Peter
Menyasz, who knew much about hair loss and regeneration, agreed, "it's strange. When i> it going to stop?" Geof Wheelwright grabbed his sister in an attempt to shield her from the cries but Julie Wheelwright resented the move and bit deeply into his arm. His cries added to the cacophony. The staffers moved
swiftly towards the source of the noise, their ears stuffed with cotton as a minor protection. And there she was. Heather Conn, howling in frustration and
loneliness. She turned and stopped the screams. "Edit desk and news desk. It's hell at the top."
Board with Iran?
The old boy's club at UBC is alive and well.
Membership is, of course, exclusive. You have to have enough
money, the right social background and of course, no foreigners
please.
Once again the UBC board of governors has done its best to
keep nasty political matters that might mean taking an unpopular
stand out of its hands. You can almost hear the martini glasses
tinkling as they fill up for another one and sweep the problem of the
Iranian students under the rug.
The board decided Tuesday it would not allow a letter from the
Simon Fraser Student Society, condemning UBC's non-transfer
policy for visa students studying in the U.S., to pass onto senate.
Now the senate admissions committee will not reconsider the
policy and perhaps they won't even know about it.
UBC's administration president Doug Kenny denies the fact that
Iranian students are being "hassled in the U.S." and board chair
Leslie Peterson says the issue isn't even worth wasting time on.
Justice and charity are such dull issues. And the provincial
government appointees can always tell us what nuisance politics
are. After all, political issues don't really have a place in the administration of the university, do they?
And too bad it had to be the Simon Fraser University student
society to point out the outrageous stance of our administration
leaders.
Ah, if only those bleeding heart liberals would stop yelling
"racist."
Boycott is good news
For once, the news from Ottawa is good.
Oh, not the political news. The student news.
Students at the University of Ottawa successfully arranged a
boycott of classes Wednesday as part of a province-wide student
protest against continuing cutbacks and tuition hikes at Ontario
universities.
Ontario students are facing a 7.5 per cent tuition fee hike, with
further increases up to the discretion of individual institutions.
They have realized their boat is sinking fast and are starting to do
something about it.
UBC students would do well to pay heed. In the face of promised
fee increases and an accelerating shift in emphasis away from
teaching, at UBC we may find ourselves without any classes to
boycott.
Godiva ride is
no silly frolic
The following letter was sent to
UBC administration president
Doug Kenny:
J am writing on behalf of Women
Against Violence Against Women
and the Vancouver Women In
Focus society concerning the upcoming Lady Godiva ride. It is of
deepest concern to me and the
women I work with that women as a
class are still overtly humiliated in
the name of an 'engineers' frolic'
This display, organized annually by
the engineering students at UBC,
can only be viewed as degrading to
women. It presents an image of women which, in my mind has absolutely no place in society today,
least of all at an institution of
higher education.
May I make reference to a letter
that I wrote to Walter Gage in 1975
regarding this same event while I
was a graduate student at the university. I pointed out then that were
this so-called 'harmless fun' humiliating to any race, creed or group
other than women it would be viewed as hate propaganda and would
not be tolerated by any faction of
the university community.
The university administration has
the authority, and the responsibility, to bring this ride to an end. It
is ironic that your administration
has chosen to ignore repeated requests to take action on this matter,
while at the same time making public announcements concerning the
university's role as social leaders
and in particular its concern for women's issues.
Your comments on this matter
would be greatly appreciated.
Marion Barling
project leader
Women Against Violence
Against Women
president
Vancouver Women in Focus
Get on the ball!
'Fight with Flora' is
Canada's newest cry
In her speech Monday, the
Honorable Flora MacDonald spoke
often of the need to have an
understanding of political reality.
By cleverly combining the problems
of the Third World, the world
energy shortage and the aggressive
behavior of the U.S.S.R. in the
Mideast, she gave the impression,
and rightly so, that the present
political situation is extremely complex.
Some aspects of this complexity
however, may have escaped the
honorable minister. Obviously,
political reality, like any other is in
fact subjective.
We would believe it seems that
Canada's role in the coming
decade, and those of the other free
world nations, is to support the
United States in its fight against
Soviet imperialism. In fact, recent
events have convinced the people of
the U.S. that this indeed is the role
Canada will play. To what end?
History shows that Canada always
gets the shorter end of the stick.
There is no reason to expect this to
change overnight.
In the speech, MacDonald states
that Canada needs to be strong and
independent to help the Third
World nations. Does this translate
into helping only those nations
which have U.S. blessing?
Political reality is that the image
of the U.S. in the Third World is
still deteriorating as the result of involvements in southeast Asia, Iran
and Latin America. Canada which
was always respected as neutral will
appear increasingly as a pawn of
this faltering giant.
Equally real is the danger that the
U.S. in spite of its extensive efforts
will not be able to achieve energy
self-sufficiency due to its incredibly
consumptive growth pattern. To
solve the problem will require vast
expenditures in pure and applied
science. The U.S. is slowly losing
ground to western Europe in this
area.
Abram Davis
science 4
In response to Rob Smith's letter
printed in the Feb. 5 edition of The
Ubyssey, 1 must say that somehow,
somewhere, I feel that I've heard
that story about a million times
before.
Not always being the English 100
graduate that I am now, but after
writing the English composition exam for my third time (having failed
with flying colors the first two
times) I think I can see your problem.
First, if I may quote my
economics prof: "It may even be
blindingly obvious" but you can't
spell. Second, you sound an awful
lot like the average English 100
flunkee (you've probably never failed an exam in your life and now,
you're blaming your failure on the
system). That's exactly how I felt a
year ago — my heart bleeds for
you. Well stop blaming the system,
relax, get into your books (or the
Pit) and "suck it up"!
The only way to get around the
composition exam is to get some
past exams and practise them under
simulated exam conditions (two
hours of absolute quiet). Show your
past exams to your prof and ask
him to go over them with you.
Believe it or not, it is possible to
pass the stupid thing; but you have
to put out and motivate yourself in
order to succeed. I had Bs and C + s
on my essays last year and I thought
to myself, "Hey, even if I don't
pass the composition exam, my
essay marks will probably pull me
through the course." Well, that
kind of attitude got me nowhere. I
ended up taking English over again
last summer. If you want to spend
some time at UBC this summer,
then keep up your A - spelling and
D - complaining.
Get on the ball fella!
Kara Dhillon
commerce 1
The Kremlin press speaks
To point out the consistent
stupidity of your editorials would
require a team of critics working
seven days a week. However, I feel
that I must take the time to respond
to your latest demonstration of
logical bankruptcy concerning the
"draft" in the United States. (Tues.
Feb. 5).
To begin with, you should make
a habit of getting the facts straight,
as difficult as that obviously is for
The Ubyssey. Despite your claim
that ". . .a great number of young
Americans (are) facing military
draft and imminent death," this is
simply not the case. The U.S.
government is proposing only a
registration of names and addresses.
Furthermore,   your   comments
regarding the "industrial-military
complex" finding a way "to
stimulate the economy" were clearly borrowed from a Kremlin press
release. In the face of Soviet imperialism backed by a Russian standing army which is twice the size of
its American counterpart, I would
have expected a more responsible
attitude towards the idea of U.S.
military preparedness.
But alas, your pro-communist
bias forces you to miss the lessons
of history. In future, may I suggest
that The Ubyssey staff stick to subjects they understand.
I sincerely look forward to the
day when funding is cut off for this
outlet of leftist propaganda.
Brad Watson
arts 1 Thursday, February 7,1980
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Let 9s all clap and smile like the cultural VIPs
On Wed. Jan. 30, the musical
society of UBC (Mussoc), staged a
final dress rehearsal preview of its
1980 production Sweet Charity.
Our on campus publicity people
went to The Ubyssey office and invited them to come to the show on
that night so that something could
be put in Page Friday, as apparendy
Thursday, our opening night, was
too late for publication.
So anxious is the club for on-
campus support and publicity, and
being confident of the show itself,
that I thought it would be a good
idea to have something in the paper
this week rather than next, when we
would be closing. Little did I realize
that  the  outcome  would approach
Long, lacklustre
letters losing all
laughs lately
Whatever happened to laffs
anyway? This place is depressing
enough without the lack of humor
presented in The Ubyssey.
Back in the old' days we were
guaranteed at least two funny letters per week and now there's
nothing. Don't call that feeble effort on Tuesday's Jan. 22 edition
("Silly party . . .) funny. The Edward Kennedy as chauffeur joke
was straight from the National
Lampoon, followed by selections
from the Rhino party platform and
the remainder was drivel.
C'mon now, all the witty people
couldn't have graduated at once —
after all, I'm still here. So, unless
your idea of fun is driving around
the block (not so fun) without using
your turn signals (the fun part),
write us a funny letter and maybe
we'll laugh, ok?
Alexander Encephalopenia
(now if you know your
medical terms
THAT'S funny, sort of)
guffaw 4
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Why not give us a call and
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Vancouver, B.C. V6R 2J3
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call us toll free at
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the libel written by the poor man's
Wayne Edmonstone.
Aside from not mentioning that
what he saw was a preview, and not
opening night, the fact that he
basically did not even see the show,
and admitted as much, I find
deplorable. Although the critic has
no conception of musical theatre,
had he stayed around, his review
would have had at least a layman's
understanding.
Perhaps an engagement more
desirable than the one with his "fat
mate" was the reason why he left 10
minutes after the curtain went up.
To watch a production for that
length of time and then pretend to
write an objective review destroys
any credibility your entertainment
department might have. The
amount of work involved with a
production such as this is so great
that I cannot allow it to be written
off so easily.
Judging from the size of the audience and the reception we received on Thursday, our opening night,
the show is a hit and word of mouth
should more than make up for any
damage you might have done. In
the audience were several important
members of the university administration who took the time to
support a club that has been active
for 64 years. How wonderful it
would be if the rest of the campus
supported us equally as well, as I
am sure they would do if they were
kept properly informed of campus
activity.
Reviews of the ilk found in your
paper certainly do not help and are
indeed destructive. I am not content
to allow Mussoc to sit on its laurels
from the past and use that as the
only excuse to support us.
I appeal to the campus — come
out and make up your own mind
and see the results of a lot of hard
work and enthusiasm, almost all
volunteer. Support a club that has
you as its most important resource.
Come and talk to us, either in
our office or drop a line at Box 56
SUB. I invite you all to come and
see an excellent production and join
in the spirit of what we are doing.
Ian Forsyth
Mussoc preadent
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THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 7,1980
'Tween classes
TODAY
AWARDS AND FINANCIAL AID OFFICE
An swards office representative will be available
to discuss financial problems, noon to 2 p.m.,
SUB Speakeasy.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Lesbian drop-in, 1:X p.m., SUB 130.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
General meeting and organization for the pot
luck dinner, noon. International House board
room.
MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY
Display of 16th to 19th century paintings from India until Feb. 11, Museum of Anthropology.
LSA FILM COMMITTEE
Film entitled Men's Lives on male role stereotyping in today's society, noon. Law 101.
IVCF
Missionary Vivian Stacey speaks on Islam: A
Christian Perspective, noon, Chem. 250.
TOASTMASTERS
Meeting, new members welcome, 7:30 p.m. to
9:30 p.m., MacMillan 278.
AMS ART GALLERY
General meeting, noon, SUB 230.
LAW STUDENTS' LEGAL AOVICE PROGRAM
Free legal advice, SUB 111.
RED CROSS
Blood drive from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily until
Feb. 8, SUB 207.
YOUNG ALUMNI CLUB
New wave disco dance, open to all fourth-year
and graduate students, 8 p.m. to midnight, Cecil
Green Park.
EAST INDIAN STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
General meeting, noon, International House
main floor.
AMNESTY UBC
Letter writing workshop, noon, SUB 224.
UBC NDP CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 119.
GAY PEOPLE OF UBC
Bill Black speaks on Gays in the Labor Force,
noon, SUB^12.
IYS
Lecture by Dr. Hasham, noon, SUB 215.
FRIDAY
SRA EXTERNAL AFFAIRS
1980 federal election party profile, questions and
answers with Alan Bush, Ron Johnson, Pat
Carney, Art Phillips and Peter Pearse, noon to
2:30 p.m., SUB ballroom.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
General meeting, noon. International House
lounge.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Valentine's dance, music by The Act, 9p.m., International House.
GAY PEOPLE OF UBC
Planning meeting, noon, SUB 115
IYS
Last sign-up for ski trip, noon, SUB 224.
SATURDAY
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Oance featuring Contagious, 9 p.m., SUB party
room.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Romanian Festival with exhibition of Romanian
art, lectures, food and dancing, 4 p.m. to
whenever, International House.
MONDAY
PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVE CLUB
John Fraser, Tory environment minister and
postmaster general, speaks, noon, SUB 207.
INTRAMURALS
Final registration for Valentine's CoRec Tandem
Bike Race, 3 p.m.. War Memorial Gym Rm. 210.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Workshop on sexual harassment on the job with
a speaker from the Association of University and
College Employees, noon, SUB 211.
TUESDAY
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Women   Against   Violence   Against   Women
workshop on pornography, noon, SUB 212.
ARTS UNDERGRAD SOCIETY
AH-candidates meeting for AUS general elections, noon, Buchanan lounge.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Testimony meeting, noon, SUB 117.
WEDNESDAY
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Film entitled We Will Not Be Beaten, noon. Law
101.
DEBATING SOCIETY
All-candidates meeting for Vancouver-Quadra,
noon, SUB party room.
Hot flashes
Women's Week
start* Saturday
Women's Week is on its way,
and there are a lot of activities next
week for interested men and
women.
It all starts off with a dance
Saturday night, featuring Contagious in the SUB party room starting at 9 p.m.
Main event for the week will be a
speech by feminist Kate Millett on
violence against women in IRC lecture hall 2 on Feb. 15 at 8 p.m. The
speech is co-sponsored by the
women's committee and the UBC
gay club, and there will be a public
reception after the lecture in the
SUB party room.
Ellen Barrett, the first lesbian to
become an Anglican priest,  will
speak on Feb. 14 at noon, also co-
sponsored by the women's committee and the gay club. No room has
been announced for the event as
yet.
A speaker from the Association
of University and College
Employees will lead a workshop on
sexual harassment on Feb. 11 at
noon in SUB 207. Another
workshop on pornography will be
conducted by Women Against
Violence Against Women on Feb.
12 at noon in SUB 212.
Women's Week will also include
several films. We WW Not Be
Beaten will be offered on Feb. 13 at
noon in Law 101 and again at 8
p.m. in SUB 212 along with
speakers from Transition House.
Further information on Women's
Week or the women's committee
can be obtained in SUB 130 or by
calling 228-2163.
■*K>*Vy**y**y«*:<<*
INTRAMURALS
'FEBRUARY}
COREC TANDEM
BIKE RACE
Go double with your favourite girl or guy.
¥
M
H
W
\°l
Ky
M
SCIENCE STUDENTS
Nominations are now open for
1. Science President
2. Vice-President
3. Treasurer
4. Secretary
5. 3 Student Council Representatives
6. Public Relations Officer
7. Publications Officer
8. Athletic Co-ordinator
9. Social Co-ordinator
10. Academic Co-ordinator
NOMINATIONS CLOSE FEBRUARY 11, 1980
Nomination forms and information are available at
the Science Undergraduate Society Office (Room
1500, Biological Sciences).
THE S.U.S. NEEDS YOU
OPTIC
ZONE
Student Discounts
ARBUTUS VILLAGE
733-1722
TEACHER INTERVIEWS
SCHOOL DISTRICT 88 (TERRACE)
On campus interviews will be conducted, March 10 - 12, with graduating
teachers for positions in the Terrace District effective September 1, 1980. Attempts will be made to correlate the interviews scheduled with the number of
vacancies expected in particular subject field and/or Grade levels. To obtain
an appointment, please submit, before January 31, a completed B.C.T.F.
Application form, copies of PRACTICUM REPORTS and a completed
personal resume. References and further reports may be submitted in
January or at the interview.
Mr. M. Bergsma.
Director of Instruction,
Box 460.
Terrace, B.C. V8G4B5
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: Student - 3 lines, 1 day $1.50; additional lines 35c
Commercial - 3 lines, 1 day $3.00; additional Unas50c. Additional days tt.TB and 46c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in advance.
Deadline is 11:30 a. m, tha ttay before publication.
Publications Office, Room 241, S. U.B., UBC, Van., B.C V6T 1W5.
5 — Coming Events
40 — Messages
70 — Services
Fab. 8th 9:00 p.m.
International House
VALENTINES DANCE
featuring "THE ACT"
the band that plays rock, disco, new wave
and more
ADMISSION $2 members
$3 Non-members
YOU THINK THIS PLACE IS A ZOO? Come
see ANIMAL HOUSE this weekend in SUB
THEATRE. THURSDAY 7:00, FRIDAY
SATURDAY SUNDAY 7:00, 9:30. Thafs
right, EXTRA SHOW SUNDAY! Only
$1.00.
FRANCOIS, j'ai oublie votre numero de
telephone samedi 26. Telephoner 734-2656
or 873-7752 s'il vous plait. Ken Le Gaffeur.
PREGNANT? NEED HELP? Call Birthright
for free confidential help. 687-7223. We
care about you.
80 — Tutoring
BRIGHT STUDENT REQUIRES TUTOR(s)
main grade 9 subjects til June. Should be
accredited high school teacher(s). Phone
224-3074.
ROMANIAN FESTIVAL
at INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
FEB. 9th 4:00 p.m. - 1:00 a.m.
Art & Handicrafts and traditional costume
display, folk dancing performances, talk on
"The Vampire of Transylvania"
and Romanian traditional cusine. A dance
for everyone to join in
ADMISSION FREE
DINNER tt.00
DINNER AVAILABLE 5-7 p.m.
66 — Scandals
10 — For Sale — Commercial
LIMITED OFFER prints from slides. Regularly
4.59. Now only $.39. Offer expiree Feb. 29,
1980. Cx Photolab 4480 West 10th Ave.
224-4215.
LIMITED OFFER: 16" x 20" Custom Color
enlargement from negatives. Regular price
$15.50. Sale price $11.50. Offer expires
Feb. 16,1980. Cx Photolab, 4480 West 10th
Ave. 224-4215.
COMMUNITY SPORTS SPECIALS: Sherwood H12ROK Hockey sticks $4.95; grey
sweat pants $9.95; polyester hockey jerseys
$9.95; racquetball racquets $9.96; bicycle
panniers, $14.96; Wilson World Class tennis racquets $29.95 (strung); grey-colored
down jackets $34.95; Nike LDV Or Osaga
joggers $39.95; Waxless X-Country ski
package $79.50; and dozens of other well-
priced items at 3615 West Broadway,
733-1612.
11 — For Sale — Private
AKAI CS-705 D cassette tape deck. Very
good condition. $225 Phone David.
733-1897.
15 — Found
CHARMING GREY SWEATER in Buch. 232
Phone Alan 261-0580.
SUBFILMS PRESENTS
$1.00
SUB
AUD.
Thursday 7:00 p.m.
Fri. Sat. Sun 7:00 & 9:30
85 — Typing
MONDAY FEB. 11th Krivoy Rog and Lesterd
and tha Piles will be at the Fog Show in the
Pit.
20 — Housing
ROOMS FOR RENT 2280 Wesbrook. Phone
224-9679. Ask for Chris or Ted.
25 — Instruction
30 — Jobs
MENI WOMENI
JOBSI
Cruiseships/ Sailing Expeditions/ Sailing
Camps! No experience. Good pay. Summer. Career, nationwide, worldwide.
Send $4.95 for application/info/referrals
to: Cruiseworid 141, Box 80129,
Sacramento, CA.
TREE PLANTING SUPERVISOR and tree
planters. Must be of good character.
References please. Write to E.C.S. Ltd.,
Box 444 Abbotsford, B.C. V2S 5Z5
36 - Lost	
AGGIE WEEK IS OVER so please return 2
Aggie Sweaters missing from the Pit Mon.
Jan. 28. Phone Nancy 922-1837. Reward.
A.M.S.
JUNK SALE
(used items from
A.M.S. Building)
MORE ITEMS FROM
THE STOREROOM
• Shelving
• Counter tops
• Assorted pieces of
lumber
A veritible handyman's
haven
A SALE OF
RECYCLABLE
MATERIAL
SALE BY
SEALED BID
Thursday & Friday
Feb. 7&8
11:00 a.m. -2:30p.m.
SUB BASEMENT
PROFESSIONAL. EXPERIENCED, FAST
typing for manuscripts, term papers.
Reasonable (from $.80) rates. (Marpole
area) 321-4270 (Valerie)
TYPING 80c per page. Fast and accurate.
Experienced typist. Phone Gordon,
873-8032.
TYPING. Essays, theses, manuscripts,
including technical, equational, reports, letters, resumes. Fast accurate. Bilingual.
Oemy 266-6641.
YEAR ROUND expert essay and theses
typing from legible work. Phone 738-6829
from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.
EXPERT TYPIST. Essays, term papers $.75
per page. Theses $1.00 per page. Phone
Rose: 266-7710.
90 - Wanted
16K TRS-80 LEVEL 2. Phone Russ 732-6078
Leave a message.
ARE      YOU      HAVING      TROUBLE
keeping physically fit? If so, you are invited
to join a new program, in which we will attempt to match you with an exercise partner. Get involved, get fit, no cost. For further information call David Myles 733-9015
(early evenings).
99 — Miscellaneous
f
•V
w
*
9.
•SV**
 m^f
THIS
PAGE
RESERVED
for
VALENTINE'S
MESSAGES
Thursday, Feb.14
SPECIAL RATES •<£*
3 lines for $1.00 ^7?
Deadline ^Sf
11:00 a.m. Wednesday ^y
Feb. 13th W
'et
a
70 — Services
HOW TO STOP SMOKING. It works.
Money bag back guarantee. Send $5.00 to:
E.C.S. Ltd. Box 444 Abbotsford, B.C. V2S
5Z5.
USE
UBYSSEY
^
SP
X«V
SP Thursday, February 7,1980
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
('Bird droppings)
Putting a Valentine's message in
The Ubyssey — that's affection.
But riding five kilometres on a
tandem bicycle — now that's love.
And to prove it, UBC intramurals will present a special Valentine's Day co-rec tandem bike race
next Thursday. The race will start
and finish at the bookstore, and the
route goes out main mall past B lot
to Southwest Marine Drive, north
to the museum of anthropology and
back to the bookstore.
All entrants must pre-register in
room 210 of the Memorial gym by
Monday. Entry fee is $2.
Upcoming
TODAY
SATURDAY
Man's rugby
Intramural*
Volleyball
UBC at James Bay
Co-rec volleyball.
UBC Invitational tourney
Judo
7:30 p.m., mem gym
9 a.m., mem gym, A and B
UBC at Canada West
Men's soccer
Finals
championships, Edmonto
UBC vs. Whitecap reserves,
7 p.m., mem gym
SUNDAY
7 p.m., Empire stadium
Women's basketball
Women's soccer
Men's wrestling
UBC at Calgary
UBC vs. PoCo,
UBC vs. Washington State,
Man's basketball
10 a.m., Maclnnes field
1:30 p.m., gym E
UBC at Calgary
Women's ice hockey
FRIDAY
Volleyball
Swimming
UBC vs. Victoria
UBC vs. Newton,
4:45 p.m., winter
UBC Invitational tourney.
meet cancelled
6 p.m., mem gym, A and B ■
MONDAY
Men's ice hockey
Intramurals
Woman's basketball
UBC at Saskatoon
Last day of registration:
UBC at Calgary
Women's field hockey
co-rec tandem bike race
Men's basketball
UBC vs. Simon Fraser,
WEDNESDAY
UBC at Calgary
1 p.m., Trafalgar field
Intramurals
Woman's gymnastics
JVs vs Doves
Co-rec inner tube water
UBC at Spokane
11 a.m., McGregor field
polo, 7:30 p.m., aquatic
centre
Men's ice hockey
Totems vs. G.T.S.,
Last day of registration:
UBC at Saskatoon
1 p.m., McGregor field
men's 8-ball tournament
MUSIC/UBC
PRESENTS
SUNDAY SCHOLARSHIP RECITAL
Fab. 10 8:00 p.m. Recital Hall
Robert Silverman, Piano
music of: Brahms, Ravel, Chopin, and Rachmaninoff
A benefit recital in support of scholarship funds
for the U.B.C. Music Department
and The Vancouver Academy of Music.
TICKETS ON SALE AT THE UBC MUSIC DEPARTMENT
GENERAL ADMISSION    «00
STUDENTS & SENIORS   *3.00
^*1.49.
FEBRUARY
12Hi * 19tti
DRY CLEANING
• LADIES & MENS PANTS/SLACKS
• LIGHT SWEATERS
• LIGHT SKIRTS
IN THE VILLAGE
U.B.C. 1-HOUR MARTINIZING
2146 Western Parkway 228-9414
ALTERNA TION SERVICES A VAILABLE
* NO OTHER DISCOUNTS A VAILABLE ON THESE DA YS
Peace lovers must fight
In last Friday's freestyle, Ubyssey
reporter Steve McClure was venting
his frustrations over the consequences of nationalism and the
waste of war. I let this pass by
because everyone is entitled to his
or her own opinion, especially in a
column called "freestyle." But on
Tuesday, the staff of our only
campus-wide, student newspaper
The Ubyssey, voiced some similar
statements about war and the
American draft. Even if the majority of students on this campus agree
with the editors on this matter, I am
one who doesn't, and I don't like to
be represented in this way.
Contrary to what The Ubyssey
states,   Canada   has  never  in  its
history been a "neutral" country.
Thousands of Canadians for more
than 100 years have given their lives
for the establishment and defence
of our free and democratic society.
They tried to improve the world
they were living in, not only for
themselves, but for us and the
generations yet to come.
Unfortunately, today, we
(Ubyssey staff included) are so
preoccupied in an irresponsible pursuit of self-satisfaction that these
ideals of peace, freedom and
democracy are taken for granted
and naively thought to be invincible.
With the increasingly complex
political and economic ties between
Nightmare is real, draft is here
Last night, the nightmare I had I
wouldn't wish on anyone. The
right-thinking people were taking
over the world. They had found a
new imperialist conflict, it was none
of their business but they were willing to champion and were signing
up men. The draft we'd fought to
keep out of society for reason of
sanity and justice had reappeared.
Students on campus thought it was
okay. Apathy rotted, they scarcely
thought about the issue.
Campus leaders were more involved in more important issues like
their new constitution and how to
make it work. They sighed about
the issue and went on with their
work. But I knew it had to be the
seventies. 1 woke up and it was all
real.
B. Schwartzhelm
alchemy
countries in the world today, forces
which seek to erode the freedom of
a country or people are more subtle.
Even more subtle are the links between one people's freedom and our
own freedom.
It is tragic that an event such as
the Soviet Union's invasion of
Afghanistan is necessary to shock
us to our senses. It is even worse
that The Ubyssey staff, confronted
with the obvious, has still not come
to its senses.
We are, in fact, a "peace-loving
country" as the editors so rightly
emphasize. We must do our utmost
to preserve this peace, for war is a
horror and an evil that must be
avoided at all costs. But, as a last
possible resort, for the protection
of our freedom, we must be ready
and willing to defend our country.
Anyone who respects peace and
freedom, and who has a similar
hope for future generations, will
voluntarily defend his or her country. Why, then, does the American
government have a draft? Because
so many of us, as exemplified by the
staff of The Ubyssey, are either too
self-centred and irresponsible or are
too ignorant to realize when our
very existence is threatened.
Eugene Leduc
Invest in precious metal with an
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CK RXCH
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TheOpagoAL-300 is fully equipped
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cassette tapes on the market today. Particularly
the more recent high performing metal tapes.
The front panel 4?way selector permits the bias
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the most suitable levels for metal, chrome,
ferrichrome, and normal tapes.
3 heads, closed loop, dual
capstan, tape transport
The AL-300 Sets Amaziing New Standards in
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The new meial tape cassettes now on [lie market oiler you sneciacular. improved frequency response and
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But in order lo record on metal tape your tape deck musi ne able io provide much greater bias current
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THE    UBYSSEY
Thursday, February 7,1980
EARTHQUAKE LOOMS
Coming soon to a neighborhood near you
I
By JULIE WHEELWRIGHT
.N 1556 IT STRUCK AND KILLED
830,000 people.
In Canadian history it has killed 29 people.
It could strike Vancouver in the next 10 years
killing more.
Earthquakes occur at the rate of 2,000 per
year and they are all potentially damaging,
says UBC geophysics professor Robert Ellis.
Ellis says he readily forecasts a magnitude
seven earthquake that would seriously dam-
to the earth's surface and combines with sand
to soak up buildings like quicksand.)
"If we had a big earthquake the Richmond
area would have problems with liquifaction,
but it (the earthquake) would have to be fairly close and fairly big."
Finn adds that while a magnitude seven
earthquake is "certainly not unreasonable,"
predicting earthquakes in Canada is difficult
because the country's geology is not well-
known.
HE LAST MAJOR EARTH-
quake of magnitude seven in the Vancouver
Island area occurred in 1946 killing one and
"There's no doubt earthquakes have been
predicted under rather restricted circumstances in the U.S., the USSR and China,"
says Ellis.
In 1975 the Chinese accurately predicted an
earthquake for the city of Hai Cheng and only 300 of its one million inhabitants were killed, he says. But a false alarm was called a few
months before the actual quake and residents, in anticipation of the event, were evacuated and had to spend the night sleeping in
sub-zero temperatures, he added.
Despite the success of the evacuation procedure in Chinese culture, Vancouverites
would not be so willing to put up with false
alarms, says Ellis.
of quakes. "They're psychologically tuned to
the possibility of disaster."
There are also a flock of amateur
seismologists in the country carrying out an
intensive study of earthquakes, he adds.
While the Chinese have been able to make
predictions, like the Soviets and Americans,
Ellis says the accurate prediction of the time,
place and magnitude of quakes is still a
decade away. "We can predict certain earthquakes under special conditions. Before it's a
practice, it's 10 years away."
Quakes can be predicted by observing
areas with previous seismic activity and Ellis
says his Vancouver area prediction is based
on a historical cycle.
"You can take this seismic gap and see
foreshocks a long time ahead but there's no
nice, neat way right now to predict earthquakes."
The only protection citizens have from
quakes is through proper design and construction of buildings. Ellis says the national
building code of Canada has built in regulations to ensure this.
"Vancouver enforces certain provisions in
regard to earthquakes. The national building
code is really a suggestion and not a mandatory thing."
H,
age the Vancouver Island, Puget Sound and
Lower Mainland area.
"Seismologists are forecasting a large earthquake in the next 10 years. We have
enough energy to have a magnitude seven
earthquake in this area," he says.
The Courtenay, Campbell River area of
Vancouver Island would be the most severely
affected by a quake and is the most vulnerable area on the west coast of Canada, he
says.
An earthquake could turn Richmond into
a soupy bog where buildings float like ships
due to "liquifaction," says UBC civil engineering professor Liam Finn. (Liquifaction occurs when a high water table in an area rises
Apartments in Niigata, Japan toppled during a 1964 earthquake after their sandy foundations
achieved liquifaction. The buildings sustained no damage because of well-designed structure.
If an earthquake hit Richmond, B.C., buildings could suffer similar fate.
breaking the earth's surface. But if it occurred today the death rate would be much
higher, says Ellis. "If the 1946 earthquake
occurred today the consequences would be
more serious because the population density
has increased."
A quake of slightly less magnitude occurred in California in 1971 causing $500 million
damage and killing 65 people, says Ellis.
He adds that every year 20,000 people are
killed world-wide by earthquakes and the
Chinese, who are usually hard-hit, have become increasingly aware of the dangers of
quakes.
"If we asked the people of Vancouver to
sleep outside and we were wrong (about prediction), and then we asked them to do it
again a few months later, they wouldn't be
too happy."
M
.OST COMMUNES AND
schools in China have seismological instruments that can detect changes in the earth's
movement and this information allows the
community to be more aware of the danger
E ADDS EDUCATION CON-
cerning future earthquakes is also important
in minimizing damage that such events leave
in their wake.
"The more people know the better. Public
education is important but there's no need to
panic."
The safest place to be when an earthquake
occurs is outdoors in an open area, Ellis advises. But if you are caught indoors, dive
under the nearest bed, table or couch and
keep away from bookshelves and cupboards,
he adds.
"The type of precaution one takes is to
remember you're building in a high risk zone.
We're the highest risk zone area in Canada."
But Finn says that even buildings of adequate construction can be severly damaged
during an earthquake. "You can't depend on
the (building) code to prevent all damage."
Ellis agrees that buildings in Vancouver
would be damaged during a large quake.
They would become unusable and have to be
condemned.
"If we had a major earthquake in Vancouver few buildings would collapse but
many would be condemned later."
BLACK & LEE
TUX SHOP
NOW AT
1110 Seymour St.
688-2481
George & Berny's
VOLKSWAGEN
REPAIRS
COMPLETE SERVICE BY
TRAINED
MECHANICS
FULLY GUARANTEED
AT REASONABLE RATES
731-8644
2125 W. 10th at Arbutus
1980 FEDERAL ELECTION
PARTY PROFILE
ART PHILLIPS, LIBERAL PARTY CANDIDATE
PETER PEARSE, LIBERAL PARTY CANDIDATE
PAT CARNEY, PROG. CONSERVATIVE
PARTY CANDIDATE
RON JOHNSON, NDP PARTY CANDIDATE
ALLAN BUSH, NDP PARTY CANDIDATE
Friday, February 8, 1980 SUB Ballroom
12:30 - 2:30

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