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UBC Publications

The Ubyssey Nov 6, 1979

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Array r
Misleading facts slur foreign students
By MAUREEN McEVOY
for Canadian University Press
Life has been hell for John Helliwell.
The airing of a controversial W5 program
on foreign students has unleashed a flood
of criticism from student groups and government agencies, including the Canadian
bureau for international education.
And bureau executive director Helliwell
has spent a lot of time explaining the program's errors and trying to correct the
many false impressions it created.
He says there are problems with W5's
claim that international students are forcing
thousands of students out of post-secondary education programs and costing Canadians millions of dollars annually.
l   First, Helliwell says he is unsure of the
statistics the program used to validate its
claims.
When W5 interviewed Helliwell, he told
them there were 55,000 foreign students in
Foreign students have their own problems at UBC. See Thursday's Ubyssey
for this special report.
Canada in 1978. But W5 neglected to point
out that this figure includes foreign students at kindergarten, primary and secondary as well as college and university levels.
And assessing the exact number of international students in Canada is a dicey business that depends directly on the source used. For example, all foreign students coming to Canada must have a student authorization in addition to a visa. Immigration officials base their figures on the number of
students entering Canada on the number of
authorizations.
But students who leave and re-enter the
country are counted for each entry, making
the figures deceptive.
Statistics Canada uses data it collects
from schools on Dec. 1 of every year. But
universities have been notoriously sloppy in
recording that kind of information.
Only in 1977 did universities begin to
clean up their data as it became important
to differentiate between Canadian citizens,
landed immigrants and foreign students after the introduction of differential tuition
fees.
Helliwell also says W5 failed to make any
distinctidn between foreign students and
landed immigrants. W5 based their figure
of 100,000 foreign students on the 55,000
figure Helliwell provided them added to an
assumed equal number of landed immigrants.
But landed immigrants are not foreign
students. Under the new immigration act
people who have been accepted as landed
immigrants are assumed to be permanently
residing in Canada. And they have the same
right to state-supported education as any
other Canadian citizen.
Helliwell also says he finds it difficult to
believe these "hordes" of foreign students
are keeping Canadian students out of Canadian universities.
Universities are supported by taxpayers,
he says, making them political institutions
subject to public pressure.
See page 7: UNIVERSITY
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXII.No.24
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, November 6,1979
228-2301
New constitution
plan 'dangerous'
Some student politicians have
charged amendments to the Alma
Mater Society constitution currently under consideration are
dangerous.
And members of the AMS code
and bylaws committee allege the
committee's meetings are timed to
prevent the attendance of certain
members.
Arts representative Bob Staley alleged the last meeting was deliberately scheduled to coincide with an
arts beer garden. Staley added the
three arts representatives on the
committee who had to absent themselves from the meeting to attend
the beer garden were the more vocal
opponents of the constitutional
changes.
"When you've got three people
who are opposed to the constitution
changes (and they're absent) there's
something wrong with the person
calling the meeting," he said.
Committee member Dave Smith
said the results of the last meeting
were a "very unbalanced view."
Smith said a few things might
have been altered if all committee
members were present.
AMS external affairs officer Valgeet Johl said the committee's
recommendations might have been
defeated if all the members had attended.
Johl added the meetings are always called at "inopportune moments," such as Sunday afternoons.
And Smith said only three committee members attended the last
meeting and quorum was not met.
"To say they are going to put a
referendum forward is absurd when
they can't get quorum at a code and
bylaws committee meeting," he
said.
Smith added the current AMS
problems are not going to be solved
by the proposed constitution
changes.
Staley said the most dangerous
change in the constitution would be
the redefinition of the external affairs officer's mandate.
See page 3: PROBLEMS
Car pool benefits
-geof wheelwright photo
DOUG SLUGS it out for students in SUB ballroom Saturday. Doug and the Slugs slugged their way through
rock, blues, punk, soul, reggae, country and Martian music. But sluggish students were unimpressed with
musical display and responded with blank stares and frozen poses. Saturday performance was band's last before
crawling off to eastern Canada for tour. "It ain't me," lead singer Doug Bennett might have said, if he changed his
name to Dylan.
pushed by hacks
Students in car pools might soon
be rescued from a sea of parking
stickers.
Special parking areas and transferable stickers for pool users are
Brush carefully on curves
"S    I       »«t"i    I.
By PETER MENYASZ
Had a brush with sexism lately?
A few students who bought "Eva" novelty
toothbrushes from the Thunderbird Shop are
likely doing so, and the women's committee is
bristling.
SUB's Thunderbird Shop is selling toothbrushes with handles in the shape of naked
women. And the sign on the sales stand features a semi-nude woman saying ". . .for
men!"
Women's committee member Star Mahara
said she did not believe reports about the
toothbrushes when she first heard them.
"I'm surprised that people would consider
selling that at this university," she said.
And she said the sale of this kind of merchandise is a sign of a much larger problem.
"It represents a whole broader issue," she
said. "Stores downtown make money on naked ladies' bodies."
Thunderbird Shop employee Doris Birss said
not many of the toothbrushes have been sold.
And she added some students are offended by
the brushes.
"People come in and say 'Oh, that's disgusting,' " she said.
But Thunderbird Shop manager Carol Brill
said she does not find the Eva toothbrushes offensive. "I like these things," she said. "They
are cute."
Boue International Trading Ltd. supplies
the Thunderbird Shop with the toothbrushes,
and company president Paul Boue said Monday he is surprised anyone finds the brushes
objectionable.
"We think it's a humorous item," he said.
"We've had no complaints so far."
And he said he finds the toothbrushes attractive. "It's a piece, I wouldn't say of art,
but they're a nice design."
Boue said his company plans to market an
Adam toothbrush, a male version of the Eva,
early next year. "Most of the women say,
'When's the Adam coming?' " he said
Mahara said people had suggested the women's committee picket the Thunderbird Shop
to protest the toothbrushes, but added the
issue does not deserve that much attention. She
said if the women's committee picketed each
time such an incident occurred, they would
have no time for more important issues.
TOOTHBRUSHES . .  . wipe smiles away
being proposed by student members
of UBC's parking and traffic committee.
"Car pooling is one of the major
traffic problems on campus right
now," committee" member Craig
Brooks said. "But if we can eliminate even 100 cars on campus that
would be a major achievement."
Brooks said the administration
should allow car pool users to park
in preferential parking areas like
A-and C-lots. And he also called
for acceptance of a system of
floating parking stickers, where a
sticker can be transferred within a
single car pool.
Brooks said he and committee
member Bob Staley will hold a
meeting Friday in SUB to get student support for their proposals.
There are no incentives for students to form car pools, while those
that do face yearly parking fees for
four vehicles while only using one
space, he said.
Brooks said that until recently the
administration had not been interested in promoting car pools and reducing parking costs.
"The parking committee said
stickers don't cost that much, so
they might as well buy four," he
said.
Brooks said the administration is
"over-committing" the parking
space on campus by assuming that
all cars with permits will never be at
UBC at the same time. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 6,1979
Gays to show pride
The UBC gay club will sponsor a
gay pride week in February, 1980.
"Many people on this campus are
now becoming more open to the
concept of gay," said club president
Tim Stevenson. "Five years ago
you would have been stoned for
mentioning a gay awareness week."
Stevenson said some of the functions they would like to have are
speakers, lunches, films and a
dance. "The main idea involved in
this awareness week is to show the
student body that we are gay and
proud of it," Stevenson said. "And
we would like to help the campus in
becoming aware."
He said the club will contact author Malcolm Boyd to speak at
UBC. "We will attempt to get a lot
of attention," Stevenson said.
"And this man will be able to do
that. He is a highly respected priest
and author, having written about 20
books. When Boyd publicly announced he was gay it created quite
a stir.
"There are people in the working
world from all walks of life which
are gay and don't appear so, and
Boyd is a prime example," he said.
"It showed people that a man with
that respectability could be gay and
proud of it."
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An hilarious spoof of the 1330's
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Stevenson said one of the biggest
objectives of the club is to get to
people who have not publicly admitted their sexual orientation. "A
booth will be set up all week so that
people can come and see us and
talk. We're not begging for acceptance," he said.
Stevenson said the club wants to
show people that they take pride in
the fact they are gay. "It is a type of
pride where one is happy to be the
way they are, and not a type of 'I'm
better than you.' It's along the lines
of 'Hey, I'm OK.' "
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a work-study program for
Science I students planning
to enter the Faculties of Forestry
or Applied Science (Engineering).
For APPLICATIONS - Brock Hall 213
For INFORMATION - come to an INFO-SESSION on
CO-OP on THURS. Nov. 8 at 12:30 in Comp.Sci. 310.
Have You Considered a Career in
ENGINEERING or FORESTRY?
If you are a Science I student,
CO-OPERATIVE EDUCATION can help you decide.
For Information and Applications:
Brock Hall 213. Phone: 228-3449. 228-6271
or come to an Info. Session
Thurs.. Nov. 8, at 12:30 noon in Comp. Sci. 310.
Hillel Highlights
TUES., NOV. 6: Steering Committee
Meeting (Open)
a la Pizza
6:00 p.m. Hillel House
WED., NOV. 7: Vegetarian Lunch Bar
Menu: Vegetable Curry, Tabouli
12:30 Hillel House
COFFEE HOUSE: Relax to the sounds of
CATHY BEST
8:00 p.m. Hillel House
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A
THE ROYAL BANK will be on campus
November 28th and 29th, 1979 interviewing students for our Branch Administration Officer and Consumer
Loans Officer Training Programs.
Applications should be submitted to the
Canada Manpower Centre on Campus
when arrangements can be made to attend an interview.
Interested students are also invited to
attend   a   Career    Presentation
November 7th at 12:30 p.m.
on
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WATCH YOUR STUDENT
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.Peho-GanadCL Tuesday, November 6,1979
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
UBC indulges in land abuse policy
By GEOF WHEELWRIGHT
Although many students consider
UBC a dream campus, it's a univer^
sity planner's nightmare.
Some land use experts claim the
university is falling prey to a
runaway land development policy,
fueled by haphazard individual
building projects and heading full
speed into the Pacific.
The charges come only weeks after a UBC physical plant error
which ruined an entire season's
plant science experimental data by
allowing the provincial highways
department to place an immense
pile of dirt in front of delicate weather measurement equipment.
Land use committee member Jan
Devries says the dirt pile fiasco is
only the tip of a mountain of land
use bungling by the university.
"That mountain is only the tip of
an iceberg. We're using our land in
an irresponsible manner," he said.
Devries charged last week that
the campus suffers from:
• lack of coordination between
policies concerning land use, traffic
and parking, architecture, landscape, construction, senate and
non-academic space planning;
• lack of an effective master or
long-range plan;
• lack of attention to urban renewal in the university core;
• insufficient funding; and,
• lack of public discussion on
each space problem.
He said the administration has also ignored land use committee recommendations to establish policy
and has rejected guidelines concerning non-university agencies on campus.
Devries said although the committee made its policy recommendations more than a year ago, administration vice-president Chuck Connaghan has not yet acted on any of
them.
"This has been in Connaghan's
hands for about a year and he
hasn't acted on it. UBC doesn't
have a planning policy," he said.
Devries  charged  the  university
has been erecting buildings and using university land on a project-by-
project basis without regard to any
kind of overall plan or objective for
the construction.
"Ad hocism does not lead to a
beautiful university. It doesn't lead
to rational planning. You deal with
projects in a vacuum."
Plant sciences head Victor Runeckles, also a committee member,
agreed with Devries. "There's been
far too much ad hocism," he said.
Runeckles said the administration refers to the university's 1958
"master plan" when it is convenient to justify their actions and ignores it when the plan does not
agree with their decisions. He said
THE TWINE BULGED, the crowd roared and the goalie said "Ah, shit."
UBC men's ice hockey team got last laugh Saturday, edging Alberta 4-3
after dropping Friday game 5-3 in overtime. 'Birds should be in thick of
playoff race this year after graduating players brought Bears down to level
—jim duggan photo
of rest of league. Hockey action goes again on weekend with Calgary in
town, and knowing students will take advantage of free entertainment and
nearby refreshment outlet.
the plan was originally intended to
be a policy framework for university land use planning, but has since
been abused.
And Devries said even the land
use committee's general policy
guidelines were ignored by the administration in their planning of
UBC's proposed 58-acre research
park. "We were totally ignored,
and that makes me mad. This research park is very important in the
context of what kind of campus we
want."
In a policy statement entitled
Proposed UBC Policy Concerning
Non-University Agencies on cam-
See page 7: UBC
Problems arise
with proposal
for constitution
From page 1
"The most dangerous aspect of
the constitution would be the AMS
president would become the only
public affairs spokesperson," said
Staley.
Johl said the amendments would
render her executive position ineffective.
"It really does cut down on the
mandate of the external affairs officer," she said.
Education senator Frank Lee said
his faculty would be seriously affected by the new constituency level
formula, requiring 2,000 students
for each representative instead of
the current 1,500.
"That could be terrible. Next
year the enrolment (in education)
will go down below 2,000. We'll go
down to one representative," said
Lee.
The AMS code and bylaws committee makes recommendations to
the student representative assembly
on changes to the AMS constitution.
The proposed constitution
amendments would cut representation on SRA from 52 to 35, introduce at-large elections for SRA executive and reduce the number of
student senators on SRA.
Students slow to sign cutbacks letter protest
By VERNE McDONALD
It was not an impressive beginning for national students week.
Valgeet Johl, the Alma Mater
Society external affairs officer,
spent a quiet Monday distributing
pamphlets and asking students to
sign letters to education minister
Pat McGeer.
The pamphlets Johl distributed in
SUB and Gage residence contained
information on cutbacks,
unemployment, tuition fees, accessibility and student aid.
And the letters expressed similar
concerns.
But neither the pamphlets nor the
letters mentioned national students
week.
Johl said Monday the letter campaign had been planned before it
was known it would take place during national students week.
No other events or campaigns are
planned for national students week
at UBC, she said.
The letter campaign has so far
convinced more than 100 students
to sign the letter asking MLAs to
give budget cutbacks in education
their "utmost attention."
Johl said her goal for this week is
to get 6,000 signatures on the letters
which will either be sent to the
MLAs or dumped all at once on
McGeer's desk.
Though the campaign is being
held in conjunction with activities
at post-secondary institutions
across Canada, Johl said it had
been decided not to advertise this
fact in either the pamphlet or the
letter.
"We've mentioned it to students
who came to pick up the pamphlet,
but it didn't make any difference,"
said Johl.
She said the concept of national
students week came from the national   union   of   students   policy
though UBC is not a full member of
NUS.
"The material we used in the
pamphlet is NUS material and NUS
policies," she said. But neither
NUS nor national students week are
mentioned in the pamphlet.
Johl denied that the omission of
both national students week and
NUS from the pamphlets was connected with the current controversy
in    the   student    representative
assembly over UBC's relationship
with NUS.
Student senator Chris Niwinski
gave notice at Wednesday's SRA
meeting that he would propose a
motion for holding a referendum
on UBC joining NUS.
If the referendum fails to receive
a favorable majority vote from at
least 20 per cent of the students, the
AMS would instruct the external affairs officer to sever all connections
r
Other Press all wet
It's often hard to keep a student newspaper afloat.
But the Other Press is trying.
The Douglas College newspaper lost at least one
page to the Fraser River Thursday as the paper's bus*
iness manager rushed the pages to Abbotsford to be
printed.
The paper's publication was delayed by an accident on the Port Mann bridge. And business man-
anager Dave Hayer was the star of the accident.
"The paper went all over the place, all over the
bridge," said Keith Baldrey, B.C. bureau chief for
Canadian University Press. And he said at least one
page flew over the railing into the Fraser.
The newspaper's staff spent Wednesday night celebrating the early completion of this year's fifth issue.
But Thursday morning they had to rush to the accident, recover the pages of their paper and try to put
them back together. The staff typeset at least two
pages that were missing after the accident.
"They did salvage the paper. It did come put,"
Baldrey said. But the former Other Press co-editor
added tbe newspaper was distributed on Friday and
not on Thursday as planned.
And when tbe newspaper was finally distributed, it
was appropriately titled The Accident Issue.
Hayer was only slightly injured in the accident, but
his vehicle was totally destroyed as was the Other
Press' "flat box," the box used to transport the
newspaper's pages to the printing shop.
Baldrey said Hayer told him the accident was a hit-
and-run, and that a car struck Hayer's vehicle, sending it into oncoming rush hour traffic. The flow of
traffic was tied up in both directions for some time.
The Other Press is determined to avoid similar incidents in future, said Baldrey. "They're thinking of
hiring a Loomis courier to take the paper out to the
printing shop."
with the organization.
Johl, in a report to the SRA, said
she does not believe UBC should
hold the referendum.
Johl said the decision to exclude
mention of NUS in the pamphlet
was made before the controversy
surfaced.
"Not all institutions are organizing their campaigns on student concerns for this week," she said.
The student union at Simon
Fraser University, member of NUS,
is also having a letter campaign this
week.
Johl said there have been some
problems with the letter campaign
at UBC so far.
"In some ways it was a favorable
response, but there are always the
others," she said. A Gage student
said: 'No, I'm graduating this year,
what do I care?' when Johl explained the cutbacks campaign
She added lack of support from
the SRA has been a problem. "I
can't get the people at SRA to contribute their time."
Johl said she alloted about $700
from the $2,000 external affairs
budget toward national students
week.
Booths with pamphlets and letters will be in operation in SUB and
Sedgewick library today, she said.
Volunteers will also be visiting
Totem and Vanier residences with
letters for the campaign. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 6,1979
Write now
This is national students week.
We bet you hadn't noticed because national students week is the
brainchild of the National Union of Students, an organization the
Alma Mater Society would rather not talk about.
And that's a shame.
But AMS external affairs officer Valgeet Johl is doing her part.
She is organizing a campaign to have students send letters to their
MLAs asking for action on education cutbacks and the tuition fee
raises those cutbacks cause.
But the response has been lukewarm and it sure as hell could be
better.
When Johl went to Gage residence some students told her they
couldn't care less about cutbacks and tuition fee raises. "We're
graduating this year anyway," they said. Assholes.
If the student bodies of the late 1960s and early 1970s had
thought the same way there would be no student representation on
university governing bodies for those twits. Not that they deserve
it.
There would be no student senators fighting against academic
injustices. No representatives on the board of governors finding
out what's going on above our heads. No student union building or
other services for members of the AMS.
Tuition fees would likely be much higher. Classes would be
larger. And so on.
Johl wants 6,000 letters signed and sent out to the provincial
government. It would certainly get some notice from those who
make decisions about our lives as students. v
Grab a letter and sign it, even if you are graduating. You could
do worse things with your time.
THE UBYSSEY
November 6, 1979
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the
AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial offices is
in room 241K of the Student Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301; Advertising, 228-3977.
Co-Editors: Heather Conn and Tom Hawthorn
It was anarchy day at The Ubyssey. "In an anarchy, everyone must be a leader," Verne McDonald
scrawled in the rubble of the firebombed office. "Leadership is only needed by those who don't know
what the fuck they're doing," said Kevin Finnegan, trying to figure out what the fuck he was doing.
"That's right, share and Cheryl alike," said peter Menyasz, while Heather Conn got into the spirit of
things by buying a round of drinks. Tom Hawthorn countered with "Follow Tom," which was not only
contrary to the theme but a ripoff from an election two years before he was born. Jim Duggan asked if
he could be administration president in the new order of things, while Joan Marklund would settle for
editor. Yvette Stachowiak explained to them such positions would not be needed, whereupon Geof
Wheelwright breathed easier, knowing he would never be drafted. Dave Francis said the lawyers
would never allow it, but Julie Wheelwright said when she became dictator she would legislate them
out of existence.
41 am not a crook (honest!)'
After reading the article Student
Rep Cuts in Works and the editorial
Getting Sticky ... of Nov. 2, all I
can say is congratulations. Once
again The Ubyssey has demonstrated the finer points of factual distortion, seasoned with a liberal dose of
'creative' writing, hidden hysteria
and character attack. After all, if
you can't argue against the proposal, crucify the person proposing
it.
The first misconception I wish to
clear up is The Ubyssey's ridiculous
claim that I'm out to "eliminate
any form of proportional representation based on faculty size." The
fact is, constituency representation
by population will be maintained,
for example the arts faculty will
have one representative for approximately every 1,250 students (i.e.
four reps for 5,000 students). Indeed, all the constituencies with
more than 1,000 members would
have one representative for every
1,250 to 1,700 students. The formula was altered merely to bring
the larger constituencies into line
with each other.
Another point that should be
made here is that constituency representation will increase under the
proposed changes. Currently constituency reps constitute 62 per cent
of student representative assembly's
members; under the changes they
will constitute 75 per cent. Constituency representation is really being
destroyed, isn't it?
With reference to centralizing
power and condensing responsibilities to the same people who have it
now, the proposed changes will
eliminate dual responsibilities; a
person will only be able to fill one
position. At present, we have a
president who is also a senator, a
secretary-treasurer who is also a
board of governors rep, an external
affairs officer who is arts senator,
etc. etc. (Need I go on).
The changes will provide for
more people being elected to a position because they want that position, not because it's a stepping
stone to SRA, and an executive position, which brings me to senators.
One would assume that senators
are elected to represent student
views on senate. Unfortunately, this
is not always the case. Many sen
ators find themselves caught up in
the internal politics of the SRA, and
having to attend countless meetings
which have little or no relevance on
the academic questions facing them
in senate.
To alleviate this problem to some
extent, the student senators will be
organized into a separate committee
which will act in concert with SRA
and constituencies on issues dealing
with senate. The senators will continue to have a say on SRA through
two council senators.
As for The Ubyssey's ill-concealed disgust towards at-large elections, what can I say except that
The Ubyssey was telling us something different a year ago. In the
editorial on Sept. 28, 1978 you were
pointing out (quite rightly) that
"the current practice of electing officers in a parliamentary fashion
has not worked. The selection of executive officers from amongst
council members had led to compromise officers and weak* student
government. The election of the
AMS president, the person who
speaks for the society has become
an affair to be organized in back
rooms instead of the open platform
of campus-wide elections."
The Ubyssey went on to tell the
world how at-large elections would
make student politicians more
responsible to the needs of the
students. What happened? I guess
consistency was never one of The
Ubyssey's better attributes.
Now The Ubyssey talks about at-
large elections as being "kinda
scary." Well, I guess you should
know. The idea that there will be
some student politicians speaking
for the students must be scary to a
newspaper that expounds its own
biases across the campus like gospel
truth and the only real student viewpoint. You're probably right, it
might screw up our priorities; we
wouldn't want students electing executive officers they feel represent
their viewpoint.
Just one more point I should
make. This constitutional proposal
is not an entirely new constitution
as people keep claiming. More than
80 per cent of the proposal is an
amended version of what already
exists, with the only significant
changes being at-large elections for
an executive and the creation ot a
senate caucus. The rest of the
changes clean up the present document, making it easier to follow.
I think The Ubyssey should spend
less time telling the campus how it
should feel about the changes and
more time explaining what the
changes are. After all, we are all
adults out here, at least legally, and
are able to make up our own minds.
Bruce Armstrong
Rowers squeal
into race with
Bourgeois Pigs
Re: The West End Bourgeois
Pigs' letter of Oct. 30, 1979.
We quote: "We'll play your little
game. Next year we . . . will end the
contrived domination of the UBC
rowers." Oh, you silly little pigs.
It is reasonable for you to vent
your barnyard spleens by protesting
your disqualification from the Arts
20 race, an occurrence which you
find reeks of unfairness and unsportsmanlike conduct, but to
smear your pig waste over the good
name of the UBC rowing team by
suggesting that our victory was contrived? Oink, oink, oink.
Is there something unfair about
the crew's domination of the Arts
20 race for "umpteen years?" Maybe it's our intensive training that includes rowing, weight lifting and
some running that you find unfair.
Or perhaps the fact that we are a
bonafide club and not a herd of serious middle-distance runners is disturbing to you.
It remains a mystery to us why
you would sling hogwash at the
crew — almost as intriguing a mystery as why you seasoned runners
ever entered in the Arts 20 race. We
assume that you sensed easy victory, and when one's team does
"not consist of varsity track team
members" (why is that, may we
ask?), then running victories of any
sort must be a rare occurrence.
Anyway, Bourgeois Pigs, we'll see
you next year when we'll huff and
puff and blow your straw house
down.
UBC rowing crew
Send your friend a petition today
Just a short letter to let your
readers know what has happened to
an alleged petition seeking the removal of myself and Bob Staley
from the student representative assembly. The "petition," actually
authored by one of the signers of
the letter, was in a garbage can in
the computer science building before the letter/article appeared in
Friday's issue of The Ubyssey.
When one of the signers of the
letter was confronted Friday morning by myself, he wouldn't comment til after he had read the letter
that he had signed.
Who are these six people anyway? Most of them are fourth year
computer science — like myself —
and one person I don't even know.
Four of the six have never been to
• an SRA meeting with Bob and myself present, and don't know who
Bob Staley is — so much for their
credibility.
I must therefore assume that I
have been the unfortunate victim of
a poor joke, instigated by alleged
friends and classmates of mine. I
apologize to arts rep Bob Staley on
behalf of my classmates for any embarrassment or trouble caused him
over this matter.
While Bob and myself do have
our differences over such issues as
constitutional reform, we have
worked together on many successful Alma Mater Society housing
projects, such as the orientation
residence games night, and the upcoming inter-residence social night
in the SUB ballroom tomorrow.
However, something is very personally disturbing to me is that
some of my consistuents would not
even feel free to come and discuss
with me a matter of concern that
they may have with AMS policy. I
am always free to talk to, and
would like to hear from, more of
my cdtistituents.
Craig Brooks
science SRA rep
AMS housing commissioner
P.S.  Friday must  have been a
slow news day for The Ubyssey if
they start following up on joke petitions.
Bus boom bumps biker
The date was Tuesday, Oct. 9.
The time, 4:50 p.m. Cycling east-
bound along Cornwall, I was hit by
a bus that rounded the bend in the
road a bit too closely. Nothing serious, just a nasty thwack against my
pedal. As bus #3112 pulled away, I
was affronted by a big bold bumper
sticker: "WINNERS . . . DRIVE
CAREFULLY."
Naturally, I immediately
reported the incident to B.C.
Hydro, and I was told I would be
contacted shortly with regard to the
outcome. I have not yet heard from
them so I have decided to publicize
the issue in an attempt to solicit a
response.
Generally, Vancouver's bus drivers deserve high commendation for
their performance. But this one in
particular is worthy of note . . . because he almost won.
David Robertson
arts 2
The serpent lives
at Back to Eden
God created Adam and Eve. . .
not Adam and Steve. . .
Cheers for Back to Eden. . .
K. Matthews
physical education 4 Tuesday, November 6,1979
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters
Tony Bardach
Pointed Sticks
bass player
Punk is a messy business
I would like to thank Stanley
Westby for writing a full page article on the Vancouver Complication album (Page Friday Oct. 19).
Unfortunately, most of the information given in the article is totally
wrong.
The album began in November,
when Stephan Macklam contacted
Chris Cutress and me. He offered
to pay the pressing costs of an album featuring various Vancouver
punk/new wave bands in exchange
for free recording time at our
studio, Sabre Sound. In addition,
the album was to be on the Sabre
Sound label, Pinned Records.
Chris and I agreed to do the album and recording began on Nov.
25 with the Dishrags. All material
recorded at Sabre Sound was done
free of charge. At no time did the
bands or Complication album organizers pay Sabre Sound for recording of their material. The only
studio time costs incurred at Sabre
Sound was for rental of a digital delay system during mixdowns.
At one point, the album was stalled when the Pointed Sticks came to
Stephan, asking if some tracks recorded at Sculptures In Sound
could be used on the album. They
had recorded two tracks at Sabre in
December, as a four-piece band.
Shortly after those sessions the
group broke up and reformed as a
five-piece group. Since the original
idea was to record all the material at
Sabre there was some arguing between the groups and the album organizers as to the validity of the
Pointed Sticks request.
Ultimately, the Pointed Sticks
were allowed to put The Marching
Song on the album. The Pointed
Sticks were not happy with the recordings done at Sculptures In
Sound, but they were better than
the tracks recorded at Sabre.
Originally, the album was to be
finished in February and released in
KORRES
iw MOVING AND T
tO TRANSFER LTD
1    SI
MOVING AND r^
STORAGE
Big or
Small Jobs
Reasonable
Rates
2060 W. 10th
Vancouver
734-5535
Eve. and Holidays 732-9898
Also Garages. Basements, Yards
CLEAN-UPS
Playing this weak-8:30 p.m.
Tuesday
JAM NIGHT
Wednesday
MAINLAND JAZZBAND
Thursday
WESTSIDE FEETWARMERS
Friday
PHOENIX JAZZERS
Saturday
KANSAS CITY 5
Members $2.00 - Guests $3.00
TUES/WED/THURS - FREE for Mffmbert
LIVE—MEW ORLEANS JAZZ
36 E. Broadway — 873-4131
_   YEARLY MEMBERSHIPS — $3.00   _
OCCUPATIONAL
By Nora D. Randall
A New Canadian Play
Directed by
Moira Mulholland
NOVEMBER
12-17
8:00 p.m.
Tickets: $3.50
Students: $2.50
Tickets: Room 207
Frederic   Wood
Theatre
DOROTHY
SOMERSET STUDIO
March. However, Sabre Sound was
still recording bands in April so
some groups such as the K-Tels and
No Fun were allowed to submit material recorded at other studios.
Other groups, such as Wasted Lives
scrapped material recorded at Sabre
and submitted tracks recorded elsewhere. The recording costs of this
material was paid for by the bands
who used outside studios, not by
the Complication album organizers.
To pay for the pressing costs, one
benefit was held at O'Haras on
Thursday, May 10. The concert featured DOA, The Dishrags, The
Pointed Sticks, Private School, The
Subhumans, and U-J3RK5. Each
band played for free and, according
to Stephan, enough money was raised to pay the album pressing costs.
There were no police hassles at the
benefit concert.
The album was pressed at Imperial Records on Aug. 1 and the
rest is history. I never heard "accusations of deceit" from anybody
concerning the album.
If Mr. Westby could give me the
names of people who believe the album is a publicity scam, I would be
willing to talk to them about the album. Rabid was offered three different recording dates during January and February 1979. Stephan
told me the bass player of the group
was not interested in being on the
album so the group never showed
up on any of the three dates.
Finally, the last song on side one
is titled Pork You and was performed by the group BIZ, which consisted of Brad Kent, Ian Tiles and Zippy Pinhead.
I would have written earlier but 1
spent last week trying to contact
Mr. Westby at The Ubyssey. If Mr.
Westby (or any other journalist)
would like further information
about the album he can call me at
433-3418 or 437-8320 or contact
Nancy Smith at the Crane library
recording centre.
Jay Leslie
commerce 4
Employment
Personnel from the Ministry of Labour are on campus to accept
applications for summer employment with the Provincial Government
under the provincial YOUTH EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM.
Interested students should plan to attend on the following dates
between 8:30 and 4:30 p.m.
DATE
NOV. 5
NOV. 6
FACULTY
UBC
LOCATION: Room 214, Brock Hall
Fine Arts and Library Sciences
Art History Dance
Graphic Design
Applied Science
Community & Regional       Engineering
Planning
Theatre
Computer Science
NOV. 7
Faculty of Arts
Architecture
History
Communications
Recreation
Journalism
NOV. 7
Sciences
Zoology
Aquatics
Oceanography
Ecology
Fisheries
Biology
NOV. 8
Commerce and Business
Economics
Commerce
Public Administration
NOV. 9
Faculty of Education
NOV. 13
Forestry
NOV. 14
Agriculture
NOV. 15
Human and Social Therapy
Psychology
Child Care
Community
Social Work
Counselling
Development
NOV. 16
Law
Province of Ministry of
British Columbia Labour
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY PROGRAMS Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November 6,1979
'Tween classes
TODAY
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Cantonese class, noon, Buch. 220.
VOC
Slide show and lecture on climbing in India and
Greenland, slides on climbing in Scotland and
Yosemite, 7:30 p.m.. IRC 2.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CENTRE
Bible study and discussion led by Fr. Paul Ren-
nick, noon, St. Mark's College.
UBC SCIENCE FICTION SOCIETY
General meeting and discussion on alien project,
noon, SUB 113.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Testimony meeting, noon, SUB 224.
COALITION FOR A SAFE CAMPUS
Meeting, 1:30 p.m., SUB 130.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
General meeting, noon, SUB 130.
LAW STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
SPEAKERS COMMITTEE
Edward McWhinney lectures on constitutional
change in Canada, noon. Law 101.
PRE-MED SOCIETY
Lecture by Dr. Salit on infectious c
IRC room 1.
RUSSIAN CLUB
General meeting, noon, Buch. 1256.
Hot
flashes
f veryfking but
o stagecoach
The Liberals have- a sneak preview out. It's called How the West
was Won.
But somebody along the line forgot to tell them it's been done before. A rerun. Old hat.
Lloyd Axworthy, the new party
hopeful-hero sprouted from a Winnipeg wheatfield is reeling out for a
public viewing to revive tired, filmy
hacks. He'll unwind the role of Liberals in the west Friday at noon in
Buch. 100. Bring lots of popcorn.
MY JONG KUNG FU
Practice, noon, SUB 125.
CHARISMATIC CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Prayer and sharing, noon, SUB 213.
WEDNESDAY
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Mandarin class {intermediate), noon Buch. 2202.
VOC
General meeting and special talk on crosscountry and ski touring, noon, Chem. 250.
AMS STUDENT HOUSING
Inter-residence social night with full facilities, 8
p.m., SUB ballroom.
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CENTRE
Father Mike O'Hagan speaks on Cardinal Newman, noon, SUB 211.
JAPAN CLUB
Martial arts demonstration, noon, SUB 212.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Fat is a feminist issue discussion group, noon,
SUB 130.
SAILING CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 207.
WOMEN STUDENTS' OFFICE
Budgeting and money management session,
noon. Brock 223.
TM PROGRAM
Group meditation with videotape, noon, Buch.
217.
AQUASOC
General meeting with coffee and donuts, noon,
SUB 215.
LSM
Dr. Levy speaks on Production and use of scientific knowledge, noon, Lutheran campus centre.
THURSDAY
Musical program, noon, SUB 207.
HAIRSTYUNG    ^
FOR MEN b WOMEN ^
10% Discount for all students on
hairstyling by Noalle and Terry with
presentation of this ad. Offer expires Dec. 7, 1979.
ken hipped
hair company ltd.
5736 UNIVERSITY BLVD.
(next to the Lucky Dollar
in the Village)
.DROP IN OR CALL 228-1471.
MEDIEVAL SOCIETY
General meeting, noon, SUB 215.
STUDENT LIBERALS
General meeting, new members welcome, noon,
SUB 213.
NDP CLUB
Dennis Cocke, New Westminster MLA, speaks,
noon, SUB 119.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Questions and answers on Christian Science,
noon, SUB 224.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Lesbian drop-in, 1:30 p.m., SUB 130.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
General   meeting,   noon,   International   House
lounge.
YOUNG ALUMNI CLUB
Live music with full facilities, 8 p.m. to midnight,
Cecil Green Park.
WOMEN STUDENTS' OFFICE
Panel discussion entitled Women, are you considering law?, noon. Law 169.
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
Brazil Night, with I. Desai's slide presentation on
field work in Brazil, 8 p.m.. International House
upper lounge.
MY JONG KUNG FU
Practice, noon, SU8 125.
FRIDAY
CIVIL CLUB
Another wave social with music, dancing, conversation and economical browns, 4 to 8 p.m.,
SUB party room.
UBC LIBERALS
Lloyd Axworthy speaks on Liberals in the west,
noon, Buch. 100.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Subcommittee meetings, noon, SUB 130.
LE CLUB FRANCAIS
General meeting, noon. International House
lounge.
"[^   for the ultimate
in fine coffee
and pastries
come to
espresso bar
Daily 8-midnight
Weekends 11-midnight
2134 Western Parkway
"In the Village"
llinfs
Inight
irk way  I
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
1979 FALL LECTURES
BY VISITING PROFESSORS
Eugene Wigner
Winner of the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1963, Professor Wigner now teaches mathematical
physics at Princeton University. His work on quantum mechanics and group theory has led directly
to most of our modern descriptions of the fundamental nature of physical particles and the nature
of physical forces. He has also thought about, and published a number of papers on, the
philosophical and biological implications of modern physics, an area which should appeal to
general audiences as well as to scientists in the field.
THE FUTURE VOCATION OF SCIENCE
Thursday, November 8    In Room 106, Buchanan Building, at 12:30 p.m.
EINSTEIN - THE MAN AND HIS WORK
Saturday, November 10 In Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre,
at 8:15 p.m. (A Vancouver Institute Lecture.)
ALL LECTURES ARE FREE
sponsored by
mammmmWmWmWmWmW1l\\e Cecil H. and Ida Green Visiting Professorship Fund mammmmmmmmmmmammm
WHO IS
C.C.C.M.?
The Ministry of:
Anglican Church
United Church
Student Christian Movement
Who Belongs: Open to those of ail faiths, or of no faith, who
wish to explore meaning and action; students, faculty, friends.
Program
• Retreat Nov. 9-11 with Brian Teixeira, on Spiritual
Consciousness and Social Actions.
• Weekly Worship Mondays 12:30, Chapel Lutheran Centre
• Process Theology Monday 8:00 p.m.
• Bible Study Friday 12:30
• Science & Religion (Grad. & Faculty)
• Women & Religion
• Wednesday Night Suppers 5:30 p.m.
For more information contact:
UBC Lutheran Campus Centre
5885 University Blvd.
224-3722
Campus Minister:
GEORGE HERMANSON
THE DINER
Serving U.B.C. and West Point Gray
for the last 20 years.
We put our Sole in your
FISH & CHIPS
English Style Home Cooked Meals,
at Reasonable Prices.
WE ACCEPTCHARGEX
Open Mon. to Sat.
7:30 a.m. to 8:30 p.m.
Closed Sun. & Public Holidays
4556 W. 10th Ave.—224-1912
EDITING
SERVICES
Editing and rewriting for professors,
editing and tutoring for students, by
Ph.D. with extensive writing and
editing experience. Some typing services also available.
Affiliated with company which has a
word processor, which eliminates
much re-typing of manuscripts and
produces perfect copy with justified
margins.
call: DR. CARTER
733-5294 (mornings or evenings)
REGISTERED NURSES
Join us now and assure yourself of full-time summer
employment.
SHAUGHNESSY HOSPITAL
IS INTERESTED IN RECRUITING B.C. Registered
Nurses — regular full-time positions available, or join
our float pool.
Evening or weekend orientation can be arranged if there
are sufficient interested applicants.
If interested please contact
VIVIAN WALWYN 876-6767 loc. 491
or PAM McLAREN 876-6767 loc. 483
<M
THE CLASSIFIEDS
RATES: Cempu* —, 3 Hnw, 1 day $1.60; additional lines 3Be,
Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day ♦3.00; additional fines
50c. Additional days *2.75 and 46c.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone and are payable in advance. Oeadfme » 11:30 a.m., the day before publication.
PiMrcatbns Office, Room 241, S.U.3.. UBC, Van., B.C. VST 1WS
5 — Coming Events
65 — Scandals
READ YOURSELF A ZOOI There's penguins*, pelicans, peacocks, panthers,
bantam dolphins, and seals: all at
reduced prices during Mall Book
Bazaar's first annual Zoo Sale
November 11-18 at 860 Granville.
AL, Bruce, Cindy and Len. Congratulations
and good luck. Love Brian.
MIKE WELCOME HOMEI ~
FIONA.
"Finding A Path Through
The Chaos Of Cults"
Speaker: LORT McGREGOR
Ex Cult Leeder
7:30 p.m. Thursday, November 8
LUTHERAN CAMPUS CENTRE
Sponsored by UBC Christian Fellowship
70 — Services
10 — For Sale — Commercial
COMMUNITY SPORTS. Excellent prices for
ice skates, hockey, soccer, jogging and racquet sports equipment. 733-1612. 3615
West Broadway, Vancouver, B.C.
POSTERS, reproductions, photo blowups,
largest selection. The Grin Bin. 3209 West
Broadway, Van. 738-2311. Opposite Super
Valu.
11 — For Sale — Private
1969 VOLVO, two door, one owner, regularly
maintained, reliable transportation.
263-3006, Friday Eves. Only.
READING SKILLS. Reading, Comprehension, Retention and Speed. Plus Note Taking/Study Techniques. One Day Course.
Ideal for Students. 266-6119.
CHILDREN'S Corner Daycare. Suzuki Piano
Program by Susan Wong, B. Mus., UBC:
, A.R.C.T. Daycare by experienced personnel. Enrolling 3-4 year olds. 327-4736 evenings.
80 — Tutoring
GERMAN LESSONS by German Student.
All levels. Translations. 682-2437.
86 — Typing
TYPING 80c per page. Fast and accurate.
Experienced typist. Phone Gordon,
873-8032.
TYPING. Essays, theses, manuscripts,
including technical, equational, reports, letters, resumes. Fast accurate. Bilingual.
Clemy 324-9414.
FAST, efficient typing. Reasonable rates.
266-5053.
90 - Wanted
25 — Instruction
30 — Jobs
BRIGHT CHEERFUL PEOPLE needed for
Viva! A new restaurant opening in
December. No experience necessary.
Please apply to LEANNA SCHULTZ for an
interview appointment. 685-2301. Part time
welcome.
40 — Messages
DO YOU enjoy 'CREAM PIES', SPLURGG
GUNS', and 'FUNNY HATS'. "BUGSY
MALONE" is playing in "SUB THEATRE"
on "THURSDAY", Nov. 8 at 12:30 and
"SATURDAY", Nov. 10 at 2:00. Only
$1.00.
ATTENTION SHORT PEOPLE. U.B.C.
Rowing Crew needs coxswains, male or
female under 120 lb. If interested phone
John, 733-4161.
99 — Miscellaneous
INSTANT
PASSPORT
PHOTOS
^^ 4638 W. 10th
224-9112 or 224-5868
CHECK OUT
OUR SKI
PACKAGES
ALPINE and X-COUNTRY
EQUIPMENT
Now in Stock
Fashions from "DITRANI" and
"David (S) Reid" have arrived.
>rnrarao99 228-0414
| LOWER MALL
STUDENT UNION BUILDING
"Across from the Pit"
SPORT
Let Us Be
"Your"
Ski Shop Tuesday, November 6, 1979
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
UBC master plan-less
From page 3
pus, the land use committee recommended that:
e university lands be made available for use by non-university activities, but only where it can be demonstrated that such a use would bring substantial educational values in
teaching, scholarly activities, public
education, demonstration or research to the university,
e and all non-university activities on campus lands should be required to contribute as substantially
as possible to the education purposes of the university.
But  Devries said the proposed
discovery park does not meet those
criteria. He said the buildings in the
research park will not be used primarily for education and charged
most students will derive little benefit from the park.
"What benefits are undergraduates going to derive from the research park — marginal," he said.
But administration services vice-
president Connaghan said the university did use the committee's
recommendations in laying the
groundwork for the research park.
"The research park meets those
recommendations very clearly."
And  Connaghan  said  planning
University president
rejects W5 report
From page 1
And Helliwell says many universities have instituted quotas in
faculties where there is great demand.
UBC, for example, will not accept students who wish to enrol in
courses that are offered in their
home country.
Helliwell says there are three
reasons why Canada and other
countries admit foreign students into their institutions. One reason is
the money. The second is that international students provide a degree
of cultural diversity to the learning
experience of Canadian students.
And the third is that educating
another country's students forges
economic, political and diplomatic
ties.
Helping underdeveloped countries is not a consideration.
The W5 report, titled The Campus Giveaway, has caused a flurry
of attacks from students and
educators. The Oct. 20 edition of
the Toronto Star included two letters condemning the program.
U of T administration president
James Ham's letter is an indication
of the pressure brought to bear on
university administrators to protect
their institutions' reputations on
foreign student acceptance.
Ham cites statistics from his own
university and compares them
favorably with other universities.
And he emphasizes the contribution
that foreign students make to the
quality of academic life.
"The life of major universities
throughout the world is enriched by
the presence of numbers of
student citizens from other lands."
for the park was not and should not
be the responsibility of the land use
committee, although the park will
be built on university land. "It was
important to the province and it
was something the board of governors moved through. It wasn't in
their (the committee's) jurisdiction."
But Devries said the committee
should have been consulted and
asked for recommendations on the
location of the park, as they are for
most other university building projects.
"The 58 acres at that site were
not discussed with the land use
committee. It was a major decision
on land use in which the committee
was not involved."
And Runeckles said the university should take more immediate action in improving or replacing substandard buildings such as the former army huts on the south end of
campus. But he said the problem
cannot be entirely solved until the
Universities Council of B.C. recognizes not only the need for adequate
amounts of teaching space but also
the necessity of quality teaching
facilities.
"There is no provision in any of
the (funding) formulae to provide
for those substandard buildings.
And some of those buildings probably don't meet the latest building
standards," he said.
Runeckles said until more funding is received from the council it
will be difficult to conduct any urban renewal of the university core.
But he said he expects there will
soon be a total review of the university's land use policy following the
recent appointment of Graham Ar-
gyle as UBC's facilities planning
director.
IIIIIII1IIIIII1IIIIH
Careers
IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII1IIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIH
PLEASE TAKE TIME OUT TO SUPPORT THE
EXTERNAL AFFAIRS COMMITTEE
In its efforts to inform the Government about our concerns regarding the quality
of your education. Sign your name to this letter and drop it in
SUB,  SEDGEWICK,  BUCHANAN,  SCARFE,  MACMILLAN,  TOTEM,
VANIER, GAGE, GRAD CENTRE, or MAIN LIBRARIES.
November, 1979
To:
M.L.A. for the riding of:
I
I
As a student at the University of British Columbia, and a resident in
your constituency, I would like to bring a matter of concern to your attention.
I am concerned about the erosion of the quality of education at this institution. Each year, U.B.C. is denied the money it needs to operate, and
we have yet to receive an operating grant which is sufficient to meet the
budgetary needs of this University. As a consequence, tuition fees are rising once again this May, and I am forced to pay more money for an education that is worth less than it was last year. Many of the students on this
campus are working with poor or non-existent lab equipment, or are attempting to learn in classes with up to 200-300 other students.
Unless measures are taken to reverse this trend of instituting tuition
fee increases to cover budgetary shortfalls, and cutting back on the quality
of education due to underfunding, the future of students and institutions
look bleak in this province. I trust you will take this matter up with your
fellow members of legislature, and give it your utmost attention.
Yours sincerely,
WOMEN
are you considering
LAW
Come and hear all about . . .
getting into law school,
what it's like once you're there,
articling and the legal profession.
PLACE: Room 169, Law Building
DATE: Thursday, November 8th
TIME:        12:30 p.m.
Sponsored by the Women Students' Office
OFFICE OF THE AUDITOR GENERAL
PROVINCE OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
CHALLENGING
AUDIT CAREERS
VICTORIA
The Office of the Auditor General of British Columbia has been established with broad authority
to carry out an independent examination of
management controls, expenditures and
revenues, and the accounts of the Government
and various Crown Corporations and public
bodies. A comprehensive report on the results
of these examinations will be made annually to
the Legislative Assembly.
Creation of this new organization presents career
opportunities in Victoria with unique respon-
sibiities and potential for advancement in a
growth environment.
We require students with B.Comm. (Accounting
major), or a licentiate in accounting, wishing to
register as C.A. students with the Institute of
Chartered Accountants of British Columbia, to
join the Office as Audit Assistants. Interested
students majoring in other subjects are also invited to apply.
We offer a comprehensive and attractive compensation package to successful candidates.
Interested students should contact the Manager
at the Canada Employment Centre on Campus,
telephone 228-4011, for further information Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, November b,
Contenders
split games
By DAVE FRANCIS
The hex has been lifted. The UBC
men's ice hockey team has removed
any doubt they will be first place
contenders this year.
In weekend action at the winter
sports centre the 'Birds split a two-
game series with the defending national champion University of Alberta Golden Bears, dropping a 5-3
overtime decision Friday but rebounding for a 4-3 win on Saturday.
UBC centre Bill Holowaty opened the assault Friday with an unassisted goal at the 13-minute mark.
Early end
for 'Birds
The UBC Thunderbird football
team failed to repeat as Western Intercollegiate Football League champions after losing to the University
of Alberta Golden Bears 28-17 in
Edmonton Saturday. UBC finished
the season with a 6-4 win-loss
record.
The 'Birds, minus starting
quarterback Greg Clarkson, led
11-10 at the half and were tied 17-17
at three-quarters in the hard-fought
game.
Dave Thistle, replacing the injured Clarkson, completed 15 of 33
passes for 238 yards and ran for one
touchdown. Chris Davies was top
receiver with four catches for 122
yards, including a 43-yard touchdown.
UBC had 95 yards in penalties,
including a holding call which
wiped out a 70-yard touchdown
pass to Davies. Ken Munro contributed to UBC's scoring with a field
goal, a convert and a single.
Key player for the Bears was running back Sean Kehoe who racked"
up 155 yards on 13 carries, including two touchdowns of 26 and 77
yards.
The 'Birds broke a 20-year tradition earlier in the season by defeating the Bears 17-16 in the Alberta
capital.
Danny Arndt then answered for the
Bears with 12 seconds to go in the
period.
Alberta picked up the second period's lone goal at 9:27, but UBC
revived their attack in the third with
a Rob Jones connection at 1:14 and
a goal by Hugh Cameron at the six-
minute mark.
Alberta then complicated matters
with a tying goal at 10:59 to end the
period 3-3.
In overtime play the 'Birds failed
to score but Alberta's Chris Helland netted the tie-breaker at 3:28
followed by Garnet Brimacombe's
insurance goal at 9:16 into an empty
net. The Bears outshot the 'Birds
49-36.
In a hard-hitting match on Saturday, UBC dominated a penalty-filled first period with two goals by
winger Marty Matthews. The first
came just 2:36 after the opening
faceoff with an assist from Holowaty. The second was scored with
three minutes remaining with assists
to Hugh Cameron and Dino Sita.
Alberta scored midway through
the second period with the first of
two goals by Jim Lomas. UBC rallied two minutes later as Jay Rumley
connected for the 'Birds only goal
of the period.
With UBC leading 2-1 at the start
of the third, Alberta defenceman
Dan Peacocke scored unassisted at
2:33 with Jones replying for UBC
one minute later on an assist from
Rumley and Jim McLaughlin. McLaughlin earned three assists in the
double header.
Lomas netted his second goal at
the five-minute mark to end the
scoring. Alberta once again outshot
the 'Birds 36-30.
UBC raised their injury list to six
players Saturday when Bill Trena-
man was sidelined with a dislocated
shoulder. 'Birds coach Bert Halliwell said the injuries have put increased pressure on the entire team.
He added this is a rebuilding year
for most of the teams so it is still
anyone's game.
The 'Birds will play league-leading University of Calgary Friday
and Saturday on the winter sports
centre main rink. Game time is 8
p.m.
— kevin finnegan photo
HAVING A GOOD TIME at Darryl's expense, despite what it says on his shirt, is UBC centre Bob Forsyth in
game Saturday against Good Time Chalies. 'Birds won squeaker 74^73 after getting bombed by University of Victoria 111-71 Friday. Thunderbirds play other dagwood teams on weekend while women's team travels to
Lethbridge for first league action.
UBC teams leagues apart
Three UBC rugby teams won and
and a fourth tied in weekend action
in the Vancouver Rugby Union.
The Thunderbirds dropped the Kats
17-0 on tries by Dave Eburne, Brian
Daniels and Roy Hoolihan, while
Graham   Taylor  added  a   penalty
goal and a convert.
The seconds tied the Kats 6-6
while the Thirds defeated the Kats
thirds 19-0. The frosh dropped the
Red Lions 14-7.
EMBRACED IN BIRDHUG are two UBC ice hockey players after goal in
Saturday action at winter sports centre. Dejected visiting Bears, who invented art form, attempt to ignore passionate moment while referee gives
—jim duggan photo
each player two minutes for holding. 'Birds split pair of weekend games
with defending national champion Alberta, now face league-leading Calgary on Friday and Saturday.
The Thunderbirds start their
defence of the McKechnie Cup on
Sunday at Thunderbird stadium
when they meet the Fraser Valley
reps at 1 p.m. The McKechnie Cup,
one of the oldest trophies in B.C., is
awarded to the top rugby union in
the province.
* *        *
The men's basketball team got a
taste of what their league will be
like this year Friday night when
they lost 111-71 to the University of
Victoria. The match was a non-
conference game but was indicative
of where the strength lies.
On Saturday the 'Birds edged the
local senior dagwood team Good
Time Charlies 74-73.
UBC will play two more
dagwood teams on the weekend.
Game time is 8:30 p.m. Friday and
Saturday night at War Memorial
Gym-
The women's basketball team
opens its Canada West away season
on the weekend against the only
team it managed to beat last year —
Lethbridge.
The Thunderettes lost two exhibition games on the weekend, dropping a 59-57 decision to Seattle on
Saturday and getting bombed 66-40
by Kirby's on Sunday.
UBC's next home game is Nov.
16 against Saskatchewan.
* *        *
Don't you wish your name was in
this paper? Come to the Ubyssey
office in room 24IK of the student
union building and say you would
like to write sports. Aside from an
occasional byline we promise
copious amounts of fermented
hops, lots of telephone book fights
and an amazing number of overdue
essays.

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