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The Ubyssey Jan 14, 1966

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Array THt U8YSSEY
rule
the  waves?
Vol. XLVIII, No. 36
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, JANUARY 14, 1966
CA 4-3916
—norm   betts  photo
SCIENCEMEN STAGE sick stunt Thursday, dunking 'crippled engineer' in Buchanan quad
pool. Co-eds extended sympathy to the 'cripple' — really a healthy scienceman — as he
emerged walking, sputtering and commenting "Poor taste".
NDP, unions 'useless'
in social change—editor
The New Democratic Party
is useless for changing society,
a leading socialist editor said
Thursday.
John Riddell, editor of The
Young Socialist Forum told a
panel discussion on student
radicalism, "The NDP is completely useless as far as social
change is concerned."
However, he said he supports
NDP because it is a political
alternative to the status quo.
He went on to criticize labor
unions.
Union leaders are "corrupt
in the sense that they are putting their personal privileges
before the interests of the
worker."
But unions are one of the
most promising organizations
for social progress, he said.
Peter Cameron, co-editor of
the arts paper Concensus said,
"Students are economically
freer than other sections of
society."
"The potential for change is
greater    among   students   be-
— dermis gans photo
HIKING HER HEM, a nurse
joins in spirit of nurses' day
leg auction Thursday. Some
girls offered more than
limbs. (See Story p. 3.)
cause they are not completely
enmeshed in the system."
Cameron pointed out that
even students from families observing the status quo sometimes become radicals.
Bill  Johnston,   president  of
the Young Socialists which
sponsored the panel said students often become involved
over major issues.
"The establishment must be
removed," he said. "The question is how."
Campus clubs need
more SUB space
By STUART GRAY
Len Brown, vice-president of the University Clubs
Committee said Thursday it is absolutely necessary for
campus clubs to have more space in the new Student Union
Building.
Present   club  facilities   will   TTTTT^        .^ ^	
HAMS HOOKED
AMS thaws
$3 500 for
'66 grads
By ANNE BALF
Half of last year's grad class gift — frozen by the AMS
has been returned to this year's class to use as it decides.
The   1966   graduating   class
will probably follow the wishes
of last year's grads and donate
the $3,500 to the Three Universities Fund.
A tentative decision to make
the donation was made at a
grad council meeting Thursday.
ALL FOR BURSARIES
Last year's grad council
wanted the entire $7000 gift
used for bursaries.
But a general meeting of the
grad class voted to give half
the gift to the fund.
When tuition fees were raised
last year, the AMS froze the
$3500, hoping the grad class
would reconsider its decision.
"We thought they might
want to put the whole gift into
bursaries for needy students
because of the fee raise," said
AMS president Byron Hender
Thursday.
DIRTY AMS
"Then the grad class had a
meeting and voted to uphold
the grad class decision and
down with the dirty AMS,"
said Hender.
"The funds were unfrozen in
October or November and
given to this year's council,"
said Hender.
"They can do what they like
with it," he said. "They can
drink it if they like."
The final decision on how to
use the money will be voted
on at a meeting of the entire
grad class Jan. 27.
The grad council approved
in principle an amendment to
the AMS constitution giving
the grad council complete financial independence, so that
a similar freezing of funds will
be impossible in future.
Exact wording of the amendment will be drawn up and
presented to the AMS.
Hender approved the proposed change.
A petition signed toy 100
graduating engineers was presented at the meeting, calling
for a general meeting of the
grad class on Jan. 27.
According to the constitution, the meeting must be held.
TEN PER CENT QUORUM
Ten per cent of the grad
class, 300 students must ibe present.
The meeting will choose a
grad gift for this year, and
decide who gets last year's
$3500.
Grad council president Keith
Brimacombe, Engineering IV,
said he hoped members of
other faculties would out-number the 170 well-organized engineers at the meeting.
"We don't want them railroading anything through," he
said, "especially if it involves
money."
be discontinued when SUB is
completed.
"Even with our current facilities, there are many clubs on
campus who are screaming for
space," said Brown.
"Wfflhout sufficient club
space in SUB, the clubs will
gradually deteriorate."
Eighty-two clubs, with an
average membership of 60, are
registered with UCC, he said.
And he added, there are several large clubs with memberships in the hundreds who
will very much need club
space in SUB.
These include the Dance
club with 400 members, Varsity Outdor Club with 600
members, The Varsity Christian Fellowship with 350 members, and various political
clubs with a total membership of 600.
SUB chairman Roger McAfee
said Thursday club rooms are
not needed in the new building.
"Most of the clubs on campus don't have clubrooms and
they are flourishing and growing," he said.
ON BIG  TIME
Radsoc wants FM band
By COROL SMITH
Radsoc wants $20,000 from
the AMS next year.
This   year   radsoc   got   $215
from the AMS.
"The difference in budget
would go to equip Radsoc as
an FM band station broadcasting from UBC," said Radsoc president Paul Thiele
Thursday.
Radsoc augments the $215
from council with an approximate $4,000 in advertising
revenue.
The $20,000 would be in
the nature of a loan from
council which would be paid
back from the increased advertising available to a station broadcasting to the general public,  said Thiele.
"We could pay it back in
two  years."
"A radio licence is one of
the most difficult things to
obtain in Canada," said Thiele.
If everything went smoothly, the radio station could be
in operation next fall.
This would require that
council act immediately so
Radsoc's application for an
FM licence could be before
the Board of Broadcast Governors at their scheduled
meeting this spring.
The interest in producing
public radio at UBC coincides
with changes in the Canadian
Radio Act.
The old FM act required
that the university administration be responsible for
the actions of the student radio
station.
"That would mean Radsoc
would have no club status,
and the AMS would have no
control over it." said Thiele.
Under the new requirements the AMS may take responsibility for radio production and sublet the responsibility  to  Radsoc.
A reserve of three year's
operating expenses was re-
required by the old ruling,
but it is now adequate that
some solvent body such as the
AMS sponsor the station.
"An AM band is technically
impossible at UBC, said
Thiele.
AM broadcasting regulations require eight hours per
day, seven days every week.
"I think we can be justly
proud of Radsoc," he said.
"All of Vancouver will be
open to us when we start
broadcasting."
He estimated 100,000 audi-
ience to be a reasonable maximum as only 37 per cent of
radios are FM equipped.
Radsoc intends to cut many
of the costs of the new station by purchasing • only the
basic equipment needed and
setting it all up themselves.
FREE  TUITION
NOT ENOUGH'
SEE PAGE 13 Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 14, 1966
Emergency ward
best for interns'
Medical students get their best education when they
leave UBC's Wesbrook hospital, says a Vancouver intern.
"The emergency ward is the
Students
challenged
socially
By   JOAN   FOGARTY
Don't just stand there — do
something.
That's the challenge to UBC
students from the Student Volunteer Service.
SVS has a two-fold aim in
making students aware of social problems in the community
and in getting them involved
in the community activities, of
Greater Vancouver.
It is a committee of UBC
students interested in participating in the volunteer work
of Red Feather Agencies.
Asked by the AMS in fall
1965 to prepare a program of
social action, social work student, William Young Soon, conceived the idea of working
through the Volunteer Bureau
of Greater Vancouver.
He found an interest in his
idea of setting up such a committee and found students to
help him.
SVS plans to include all students interested in participating in the program.
A meeting is set for Thursday in Brock Hall to tell students who are interested the
aims of the SVS.
The program is based on the
two-fold nature of the aims of
the committee, providing people to fill volunteer needs in
the community agencies, and
providing a learning experience in the area of social problems and community activities with a focus on the student's self-development.
The students who volunteer
through the SVS will be working through the Greater Vancouver Volunteer Bureau.
best teacher — especially in
Vancouver," Dr. John Lockie
told 150 pre-med students in
Wesbrook Wednesday.
"You treat drunks, addicts—
every type of person.''
Lockie and fellow-interns
Jim Duke and Andy Davis
agreed "interning gives one
an outlook on people as a
whole population."
Internship, said Lockie, is
designed to increase interns-'
knowledge, experience and
understanding of people and
to train them in the field of
general practice.
The intern has a lot of work
to do, Lockie said, and must
study every specialty, every
area of the hospital.
DICK MOSHER will lead his
Thunderbird soccer teammates from his centre forward position Saturday at 2
when they meet a lower
mainland first division club
in an exihibition game at
Mclnnes field behind Brock.
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
CUSO Applications Forms
Application forms for a position next September
through the Canadian University Service Overseas
are available at International House for anyone who
plans to graduate or receive some other degree or
diploma this year.
It is recommended that these should be filled out at
the earliest convenience.
Acodemic Activities Committee:
POSITIONS OPEN:
Chairman of Summer Symposium; A symposium tra-
ditionaly concerned with international political
affairs.
Chairman of Science Symposium; Symposium concerned with the role of science in the world today,
briefly the science of man.
Applications should be addressed to
Chairman of Academic Activities, Ray larsen.
Box 1. Alma Mater Society Office,
The University of British Columbia,
Campus.
Homecoming Chairman:
Applications are now being received for the position
of Homecoming Chairman for 1966-67. Appplications
should be addressed to the Secretary AMS (Box 54)
stating qualifications. Applications close Thursday,
January 20th.
Student tour of Viet Nam
hits second-thought snags
OTTAWA (CUP) — The Canadian Union of Students
is considering cancelling its program to send a Canadian
student journalist to   Viet Nam.
The project was designed to send a Canadian student
journalist to South-East Asia to make contact with student
groups there and to send weekly news reports to Canada.
The current CUS memorandum lists financial problems, the lack of good contacts in Viet Nam, the difficulty
of obtaining travel permits, and various health and security
problems as reasons for reconsidering the scheme.
AMS ELECTION
INFORMATION
Nominations Open Wed., Jan. 19,1966
for the following positions:
Slate I
President
Second Vice-President
Secretary
Slate H
First Vice-President
Treasurer
Coordinator
Nominations must be received by the A.M.S. Secretary
before:
Slate 1—4:00 p.m. Thursday, January 27, 1966
Slate 11—4:00 p.m. Thursday, February 3, 1966
Nominations will be posted only by the A.M.S. Secretary and will not be posted until such time as an eligibility form has been received by the Secretary.
The open candidates meeting will be held on Monday,
January 31, 1966, in Brock Lounge for the first slate,
and on Monday, February 7, 1966, in Brock Lounge.
ELECTION DATES ARE:
1st Slate-Wednesday, February 2, 1966
2nd Slate-Wednesday, February 9,1966
Nominations forms, elegibility forms and election rules
may be obtained either in the A.M.S. Office or from
the A.M.S. Secretary.
Tuition Fully Paid
Book Allowance
Living Allowance
$78 MONTHLY SALARY
12 months per year while attending
university
MONTH  PAID HOLIDAY
every year
FREE MEDICAL and
DENTAL CARE
ALL THESE BENEFITS
FOR UP TO 5 YEARS
WITH THE REGULAR OFFICER
TRAINING PLAN.
STUDENTS ATTENDING UBC CAN
STILL QUALIFY FOR 65-66
SPONSORSHIP
Can you afford to miss this opportunity?
JHerit
Young men attending the Canadian Services College and Canadian Universities
under the Regular Officer Training Plan
(ROTP) train for challenging and rewarding careers as commissioned officers in
the Canadian Forces. University students
can qualify for entrance on a competitive
basis. These young men are selected and
will advance on one basis alone — On
Their Merit.
For particulars see your Canadian Forces Career Counsellor
on the
UBC CAMPUS
Jan. 25, 26 & 27
Arrange   interview   appointments with the UBC placement
officer. Friday, January 14, 1966
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
BUFFETEERS CRUISE AND BENTON
. . . Ubyssey the greatest, again
—norm   betts  photo
Pubster plucks win
in pillow-fighting
The Ubyssey feathered out still another area of great
ness Thursday.
Prices upped
with skirts
at leg sale
By  VICKI  SMITH
The biding went higher and
so did the skirts.
Thursday was nurses day in
the engineering building and
the featured event was a leg
auction.
Legs were donated by the
nurses. Engineers contributed
the money and lusty approval.
The bidding began when a
pair of legs appeared below
the screen.
The room rained nickels
and dimes and when the buzzer
sounded, the last bidder walked off with the legs.
Most girls offered more than
legs — like cakes or cookies
or backrubs.
"Take it off," asked the bidders.
Legs were stripped of stockings and shoes.
Bare toes wiggled seductively.  Bids rose.
Red sweaters came off as
their owners prepared for back-
rubs.
Proceeds will be used by the
nurses to construct a ball model
for the engineer's ball.
The legs pulled in an estimated $60.
Slocks Narrowed
Suits Altered
and Repaired
Fast Service — Expert
Tailoring
UNITED TAILORS
549 Granville St.
Not only is the thrice-weekly
wonder Canada's best college
newspaper, The Ubyssey now
holds .UBC's version of the
world's championship in
pillow-fighting.
Six-foot-seven-inch reporter
Bruce Benton vanquished all
comers at the aggie-sponsored
contest.
He clobbered education and
science faculty reps in the
opening round and finished off
AMS first vice-president Bob
Cruise in the semi-finals.
The hulking Pubster then
met agriculture's Ed Curylo on
the log in front of Brock Hall
for the grand slam finale.
The strong looping right
clipped the aggie for the first
round, but Curylo came back to
unseat Benton in the second
round.
The third fall went to Benton after a hearty exchange of
blows with the feather-filled
burlap ibags.
Lakes, slides
storm UBC
UBC may have lost ground
Wednesday night but it gained
a lake.
Heavy rainfall kept the
RCMP hopping  all night.
The water came first, when
a lake about fourteen feet long
and up to ten inches deep formed at the base of a hill in
front of St. Anselm's Church
on University Boulevard.
At 11:00 p.m. the banks opened and deposited several tons
of mud, rocks and trees on
Marine  Drive.
The slide occured one mile
west of Spanish Banks, putting
30 feet of road under three feet
of debris.
RCMP said that the road
was clear toy 2:30 a.m. — there
was no serious traffic tie-up.
Cards not missed
There are at least forty students at UBC who haven't
found any use for AMS cards.
The AMS office has 40 cards
that have been found since the
beginning of the year and never
claimed.
A NEW START
CUS has home
for city Indians
The UBC branch of the Canadian Union of Students is
founding a home for Vancouver Indian girls to give them
a new start in life.
CUS regional president Ed
Lavalle said Indian girls come
to Vancouver ill-equipped to
cope with city life and often
meet with racial discrimination.
Unable to get the jobs they
come to find, their lives become a vicious circle between
the miseries of skid road and
Oakalla Prison, he said.
CUS is taking over a house
in the Kitsilano district. It will
toe paid off at $150 a month.
CUS must also pay $400 a
month, as their share of operating costs of the home.
"This is a pilot project — an
experiment in co-operation,"
says Lavalle.
The home will be run on the
co-operative system. The girls
will help with budgeting, furnishing, cooking and houseclean-
ing. Half the operating costs
will be paid by the girls.
"We're not running a welfare agency," said Lavalle.
The home will be run by
house mother Mrs. Margaret
White, a Cree Indian from Hob-
berna reserve near Edmonton.
Mrs. White is now assistant
director at the Vancouver Indian Centre.
Next week, CUS will begin
a fund raising campaign for
the   project.
Their objective  is  $6,000.
WUS offering
travel seminars
Canadians and overseas
students have a chance to
travel and learn on government money.
World University Service,
the Canadian Centennial
Commission and the federal
External Aid Office are planing three travel and educational seminars.
Students can obtain further information and applications from the WUS office,
Brock Extension 257.
U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
SKATING SCHEDULE - 1965-66
Effective September 24th 1965 to April 15th 1966
TUESDAYS
WEDNESDAYS
FRIDAYS
SATURDAYS
SUNDAYS
12:45—2:45 p.m.*
2:00—3:30 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m.
3:00—5:00 p.m.
7:30— 9.30 p.m.**
3:00—5:00 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m.**
12:45—2:45 p.m.
7:30—9:30 p.m.
(Beginners & Preschool Children)
*    Special student admission:   15 cents.
** Except when hockey games scheduled — Nov.  19 & 20,
Jan. 28 & 29, Feb. 11 & 12 and two more dates not scheduled.
ADMISSION: Afternoons    —    Students .35*    Adults .60*
Evenings — Students .50* Adults .75*
Skate Rental .35* per pair — Skate Sharpening .35* per pair
NOTE:  The  Centre  will  be  closed  all  day  Christmas  Day
and Good Friday.
For further  information:   Call  224-3205  or  228-3197
STUDENTS IN ALL FACULTIES:
There's a rewarding future for you
as a CHARTERED ACCOUNTANT
Learn how and why, February 7 to 18
During this period, members of The Institute of
Chartered Accountants of B.C. will be at UBC to
interview students who expect to graduate in 1966.
Arrangements for interviews may be made
through Mr. J. C. Craik at the University Placement Office. Earlier interviews may be arranged
by telephoning the Secretary at MUtual 1-3264.
Your opportunity to join a challenging
and fast-growing profession
Chartered   Accountants   play   a   decisive role   in
Canadian business, industry and government. Many
have attained executive positions of considerable
stature and influence; their training and experience enables them, as one writer has put it, "to
disentangle the threads of profitability that hold a
company together."
CA. training offers interesting employment with
practising chartered accountants. Your work "on
location" will introduce you to a wide range of industrial, financial, commercial, service and governmental operations.
The Institute of Chartered Accountants
530 Burrard St., Vancouver 1
MU 1-3264 mmsssr
Published Tuesday, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA 4-3242,
Loc. 26. Member Canadian University Press. Founding member. Pacific
Student Press. Authorized as second-class mall by Post Office Department,
Ottawa, and for payment of postage in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
FRIDAY, JANUARY 14, 1966
"It is not the contexture ot words, but the
effects ot Action, that gives glory to the times"
—Samuel Daniel, 1603
^"v. "'V?
.» osx&zjtrjs.
Illusion
We received a letter yesterday from the Acadia
Camp students council.
The letter remined us of one of the intangibles we
only touched on in our discussion of the job which lies
ahead for the new director of residences, Dr. Malcolm
McGregor.
The intangible which the representatives of Acadia
Camp's energetic council remined us of was spirit —
the kind of spirit which makes life in the camps not
only possible but at times enjoyable.
The roof may leak, but if your roommate can bash
out a few blues on his electric guitar, well . . .
Now the point about bringing up the intangible
spirit which turns even the camps into habitable areas
(though hardly academic ones) is to make a suggestion
publicity to our new director of residences which we
have already tossed out to him in private conversation.
We invite — and implore — him to take a week
and live in the heart of his new empire. We can think
of no way to truly assess the current state of camp and
dorm life except to live there himself for a time.
Of course, a week is a long time. But that is probably the best time for an accurate look at what exists
—since his presence would undoubtedly add a special
tone to the hut or hall he lived in for a few days.
But a week in Fort — or Acadia — and a week in
Lower Mall — or Totem — would give him a better
glimpse at his residences than any reports, or interviews,
or bull sessions.
A week in residences — about the length of time
for a trip to a scholarly conference somewhere—would
provide him with an insight into his empire which no
predecessor in his position ever had.
Since Dr. McGregor is a sporting man, let us say we
challenge him — for the good of his office — to live in
the residences he is to administer.
The alternative, as we see it, is for him to administer
by illusion.
EDITOR:  Tom  Wayman
News        ..   Ron   Riter
Associate   George Reamsbottom
City        ....   Al   Donald
Photo         Norm   Betts
Sports      Ed  Clark
Ass't News      Dan  Mullen
Richard   Blair,   Robbi  West
Ass't City     Danny  Stoffman
°age   Friday       John   Kelsey
Managing          Ian   Cameron
Features     Mike    Bolton
CUP    _    Don   Hull
In for laughs Thursday were
Joan Fogarty, Anne Balf.fl Stu
Gray, Vicki (hie) Smith, Bruce
(thump) Benton, Bert Hill, Marilyn Hill, Ann Josephine Lou foe
Bishop, Andrew Horvat, Dick Taylor, Dour Bruce, Batman, Vivfan
Gieun, Jim Good, Kris Emmo'tt,
Chris Brockhurst and Carol (welcome   back)   Smith.
So camp it couldn't
waftfar spring!
ffyou flipped over Superman ,were
knocked onthvBatman,switchont©.,.
the greatest sfo
sincg the Great .
Election Parody!
toe most fantastic    ,,
figure since tutienRivard!
IN THE EAR
BY IAN CAMERON
SUBhuman, meet lanman!
Originally, this column was
going to be about Batman,
who is camp this week.
However, after reading the
article in yesterday's paper
explaining why lite SUB is
not doing as well as might be
the Aefazniures
4flfflAIMAliT:g'w*^
,$A£A3r«S',4*** si
sJHANKS To  A
VALIANT, SMOUrPLOU&H, OUR HEKp.lSNJOk; UN-BURIED.
5) ^WWWTf^^S^^f^^^^'VOoWE VoT.'VbO MEttLYT
. »ii ■ —— w——-i—~r~tl   inWf      si    W^ Tri nil I———.—^——J—m3Xl*-yj
Quotation of THE OEE K: fUHEN   IM   DouBT, DESTROY1.1 w- 'Ross TLeedale ,iw
$«T tJEEK.-CAS.rVkTS.ANDKEJlDEWCES-'iw CREDO.
CAMERON
expected (it wasn't expected
by me, but everyone else had
hopes), I decided to write one
about that instead.
The scene is
an office in
Brock Hall.
Sitting in it
is    the    man ^™^      _
known to his HMMlm   **
friend   (s)   as
The     Artful
Bodger.     A s
the    scene
opens,     The
Bodger is talking to his ward,
Sick Greyman.
Bodger: "And no one seems
to realize that this university
NEEDS this kind of building.
They don't seem to appreciate the vital force that this
can be to the community, the
service that this can play in
building our spirit, and mostly
they don't realize that if this
building is scrapped I'll have
to find a new summer job!!"
Sick: "Yeah, Bod, I know
how you feel. If^ . ."
Sick is interrupted by a
light that starts flashing on
the wall. The light silhouettes
a German U-boat being attacked by a destroyer.
The Bodger leaps to his feet.
, Bodger: "This is a job for
SUBhuman!!"
He and Sick rush to their
changing room and appear
minutes  later as  SUBhuman
and his sidekick Rubby.
They walk to the lounge,
where groups of students are
gathered talking excitedly
about a story ii The Ubyssey,
Canada's Greatest Student
Newspaper.
They read the story, helping each other with the longer
words.
SUB: "My God, Rubby!
this story is about the increased cost of the new building. We'd better straighten
this out."
SUB: "Look, Wayman. This
is ridiculous. The reason the
building cost has increased
$7 million over the original
$3.8 million is because the cost
of living has gone up.
"The construction wil cost
more."
Ian Cameron: '*The cost of
living hasn't gone up that
much, SUB-human. That's almost 20 per cent in one year."
SUB: "That's not the basic
point. The basic point is that
you people are wrong, and
that's that. Let's go, Rubby."
Rubby: "Right, SUB."
(Forcefully).
They go upstairs and change
back to their normal dress.
SUB: I'Well, we made it
again. But if those guys ever
find out that this extra cost
is going to pay for the SUB-
cave, I don't know what we're
going to do, Rubby." page   friday
Hungarian Mate sounds off on India—pf 6
Profiteering on  napalm, Boylan charges—pf 2
Ralph [May I Correct] Daly is back! — pf 2 pi
ON THE COVER: art by Bob
Masse. Possible title: north shore
commuters' nightmare. More art
by Masse en PF 2 and 4 and by
Al Wiggan on PF 7.
Editor: John Kelsey
Current affairs-
Steve Brown
Science, the arts—
Al  Francis
Assistant-
Claudia Gwinn
Two autumns ago at
UBC, Canadian movie
making history was bent
a bit by renegade camera
cranker Larry Kent.
Kent did what you
weren't supposed to — he
made a home movie into
a full-length feature —
Bitter Ash.
The sound didn't match
the movement, the plot
was lousy, the camerawork had good spots and
bad ones and it cost about
$5,000.
Kent got it all hack in
admissions, and since has
made two less significant
films.
The momentous part of
Bitter Ash was its fornication scene as the heroine
tries yet another escape
from reality.
Now, Larry isn't a
pornographer, But he's
still known mostly as the
man who made the dirty
movie and got away with
it. Even though the scene
wasn't dirty, just factual.
Let history record Kent
as such, then, and let us
remember him as such.—
the man who made dirty
movies and got away with
it.
He's still getting away
with it, and Bitter Ash
returns in the auditorium
Monday and Wednesday
noon next week.
A little napalm
— a rich nation
By CHARLIE BOYLAN
Marxists have always contended wars are seldom
fought for ideals and catchy
patriotic slogans  alone.
There is ample documentation proving World War
One, as well as being a war
for democracy and a war to
end all wars helped enrich
a   few   armament   manufac-
Information for this article
has been plagarized from
Victor Perlo's column in
the Dec. 18/65 edition of
People's World. San Francisco.
turers on both sides of the
Rhine. The same is true for
the Second World War and
all the "little wars" (usually
against the "colored") since
1945.
The difficulty is to pin a
name or face to the profit
tag.
Johnson's global Christian
Anti-Communist Crusade
especially in Viet Nam, also
has its share of profiteers.
Everyone knows the U.S.
uses napalm (jellied gasoline) to convince natives of
the benefits of democracy.
Few people know the
main manufacturer of napalm is the Tennessee Gas
Transmission Co. (Tennessee
Building, Houston, Texas), a
ocmpany with assets of 2Vk
billion. Its subsidiary, Ten-
neco, handles the chemicals
in what has become a booming business. In 1963 Ten-
neco bought out the Newport Hayden Chemical Co.,
whose subsidiary Nuodex
Products, actually m a k e s
the napalm. In 1965 Tenneco
took over California Ink
another manufacturer o f
napalm.
Tenneco is mainly owned
by Texas millionaires, with
a number of directors who
are New York and Boston
financiers, specifically Stone
& Webster; White, Weld &
Co.; and the Chase Manhattan Bank.
In the first six months of
1965 Tenneco increased its
sales 23% and its profits
70%. Hot damn, Uncle Sam!
But Tenneco is not the
only company cashing in on
the napalm gravy train.
Chemetron Corp. (840 N.
Michigan Ave., Chicago),
Martin Marietta Corp. (350
Park Ave., N.Y.), Nopco
Chemical Co. (60 Broad
St., Newark), Witco Chemical Co. (122 E. 42nd St.,
N.Y.) and Leffingwell Chemical Co. (Whittier, Calif.),
all have plants throughout
the U.S. manufacturing napalm (at a price) for Johnson's holy war.
The boards of directors of
these assorted corporations
are a democratic amalgamation of the U.S. melting pot
—there are good wholesome
Anglo-Saxons like ex-admiral Arthur Radford (Whitco
Chemical) and Rudolf G.
Sonneborn, a noted Zionist
leader who also pinch-hits
as a director of the New
York Post.
As far as I know, however, there are no Negroes
on any of the boards of directors, probably because
they are too busy causing
trouble in Watts and Selma.
So if you're thinking of
making a quick buck on
penny mining stock, I suggest you re-invest in napalm
—particularly Chemetron—
the "we scorch earth better"
people.
But if you are one of those
who were sickened by the
sight of napalmed children
on the Seven Days documentary, The Mills of the
Gods, then you might just
drop a line to the happy six
and let them know.
Hot damn, Uncle Sam.
inside
argument    pf 2
books     j - pf 4
mate the great pf 7
music pf 6
opinion    pf 8
poetry    pf 2
theatre    pf 8
two columns    pf 3
whimsy   pf 3
HELLO? ■WISISTHEHSSIPEW
SrWNG.„.0rm UNITED
STATES!..,^,., NOW LOOK,
IWOTY0UT08UXV0RHE
10,000 SHARES 0t TENNESSEE
GAS....IO0OOSHARES OF-
CHEMETRON..,^000 SHARES
OP NOPCO CHEMlCr\L...,lJ000
SHARES OP LMN6WEU.
CHEMICAL,... AND SELL ALL
W LlEE 1HSURAWCE^0CK„„
Greydon s attractive book
has good line or two or...
By CLAIRE WEINTRAUB
In his usual self-conscious
ly poetic and impeccably
precise manner of writing,
Greydon Moore manages —
somehow — to apply a few
Themes From The Morning
Mist, by UBC's Greydon
Moore; a book of 24
poems;  hoi  off  the  press.
basic truths to the whirling
world of words.
One almost suspects that
the fellow knows what it is
he's talking about, when he
says:
"As an adult he/ Still preferred to paint wildflowers/
Alone/ for this way he
could enjoy life/ Un viola ted
by petty jealousies and conceits of men passionately
carving their way into society."
pf 2wo
Well, yes, but condifen-
tially — too many words.
Philosophers have been saying it, everybody in the
world has been saying it —
for years.
A new way of saying it
. . . PRECISELY? CLEARLY? DARKLY? through a
glass, perhaps?
A line like "How poorly
the withdrawn self touches
man" could go far—despite
that which follows.
A quick turn of the times
—Greydon's book has ah upside down and backwards
section—entitled The Homecoming of Manu—and like
the man is really onto something . . . power, and fury,
and words used well. Precise, cool, chipped like stone
from a hewn piece. Well, at
least the first one goes:
"Time and the lake nibbled
quietly . . ." and the second
one ain't half so bad either:
"A heavy blow".
Greydon goes on dribbling
his music, but occasionally he
comes out with a good line
—or two, or three, or even
several all at once.
If    you're    interested    in
keeping up with it, it's probably worth the six bits payable    to     the    University
Bookstore.
Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
. Friday, January 14* ;1966 Uncalled for, unwanted and mostly
unfair, the fallowing
two columm contain
a whimsical review
of the past iev«n
days at UK.
this
week
has
COLUMNS
IN CROWD:—Notables
among the red horde at
Tuesday's annual engineering smoker were two
AMS executives, an AMS
committee chairman, one
paid AMS employee and
a Ubyssey editor.
Although invited, AMS
pres Byron Blunder kept
hisv image pure by not
showing up at the amny-
mous East End ball.
Cleaner entertainers at
the smoker — billed as
a "Revival Meeting" —
were circa 193Q dirty movies and a stripper.
• •      •
IN RESIDENCE: — Before the new housing regime turns residents into
culture vultures it should
consider re-feathering the
nest.
The corridor joining Noot-
ka and Dene Houses in
never-never Totem land
is now replete with modish buckets to catch water from the stylish year-
old leaking roof.
• o •
INTOLERABLE:—A new
part of Acadia Camp's
burgeoning social scene is
chartered buses to outlying pubs for thank-god-
it's-Priday celebrations.
More than 60 campers
— most of them over 21,
surprisingly enough —
descended noisly on a
North Shore pub last Friday, taking flash pictures
with their Brownies and
playing "this is table
number  one"  games.
Several older UBC students who had thought to
escape Joe College-ism in
the out-of-the-way pub
were noticed quietly leaving as the campers clattered in.
INSENSITIVE:—The Val
Warren Memorial Award
for poor taste in journalism goes this week to
the Vancouver Province
(alias the Daily Wonder)
Beside Wednesday's page
one picture and yarn on
rites at a local Sikh temple for Indian PM Lai
Bahadur Shaslri was a
headline reading "Indian
giver scalps carrier's
Christmas  tip".
•     •     •
IN  CONFERENCE:  —
Latest rumor in the AMS
demolition derby for student prexy foresees the
imminent collapse of seven-year power planner
Ed Lavalle.
But he can be replaced.
Other potential candidates Peter (nouveau blah)
Braund and Chuck (red
document) Campbell are
alive   and   politicking.
But Hardial Bains
hasn't left Brock Hall yet
and don't forget the upstart Ubyssey editor.
• o o
IMMORAL: — A U.S..
Navy directive declares
the Warner Bros, technicolor, super cinerama, ul-
tra-panavision turkey
Battle of the Bulge to be
strictly  off limits.
The historical fact that
the battle was fought in
fog whereas the bomb
was shot in sunshine
doesn't   bother   the  tars.
It's those damaging admissions about possible
democratic mistakes made
by American h.q. for all
those G. I. Joes.
• •     •
INVESTMENT: — Last
term's Action Day fester
group, the Ad Hoc committee, which reformed
at the Broadway and
Alma Advance Mattress
headquarters and subsequently decided to form
a free-thought coffee
house, is now selling
shares — as many as they
can sell — in the establishment at $5 a throw.
• o     •
IN SOCIETY:—Yesterday's meeting of the Law
Students Association entertained the notion from
the grade three group for
a joint medicine-law mixer with the pan-hell
crowd. The title is professional malpractice naturally the only hangup
is from married students
>who ostensibly object to
spending $50 for fun and
games.
pf 3hree
tfalph halif cwtecU...
Here he is again, folks,
UBC's irrepressible Director
of Information Ralph Daly
with the latest Ubyssey correction.
This one's about last Tuesday's editorials. See page
four of Thursday's paper for
Mr. Daly's first reaction lo
.♦he  editorials  that  day.
whimsy
Editor, The   Ubyssey:
Your editorial claim that
the University administration follows a "usual practice of bringing in as deans
outsiders or relative newcomers" is almost completely
at variance with easily available facts.
The practice actually is to
appoint a dean only after a
broadly representative President's Committee of UBC
faculty members has examined exhaustively the qualifications of all visible candidates, on campus and off
campus, and made a recommendation. Some searches
range over several continents.
In this light, it is a tribute
to the quality of UBC faculty that a majority of present
deans were appointed from
on campus. At present, seven
out of 13 deans were appointed on campus. These
are   the   Deans   of   Applied
Science, Arts, Graduate
Studies. Medicine, Science,
Students Affairs and Women. None accurately could
be described as a "relative
newcomer" at the time of
appointment.
The Dean of Forestry
when appointed had been on
campus physically for 15
years, heading the federal
Forest Research Laboratory,
and was well known to UBC
faculty  members.
Three other deans, (Dentistry, Education and Law)
were appointed to head entirely new faculties, where
obviously there would be a
few if any candidates on
campus.
Only the Dean of Pharmacy and the new Associate
Dean of Medicine were appointed from off campus to
existing faculties. There is
at present an acting Dean
of Commerce and Business
Administration.
Sincerely  yours,
RALPH   DALY
UNIVERSITY    TEXT    BOOKS
Non-Fiction   Paper   Backs
New and Used
BETTER BUY BOOKS
*393 W. 10th Ave. - 224-4144
THE JEFFERSON
AIRPLANE
LIVES YOU
Whistler Mountain Ski Schedule
Leave 1148 West Georgia
Every Saturday and Sunday at 7 a.m.
and return at 4 p.m.
For Information Phone 6834565 or 684-0522
SQUAMISH COACH LINES
A number of Scholarships
Each of $6,000 per annum are available
to suitable graduates in
Any Branch of Engineering or The
Applied Sciences who are interested in
Graduate Studies in Mining Engineering
at McGill University
Representatives of sponsoring companies will visit the
Campus on JANUARY 21st, 1966, to provide further
information. Appointments may be arranged through
your Placement Office.
'I
CUISINE AT ITS BEST!
MODERN CAFE
1946:
HOW LUCKY SHE IS.
SHE HAS CURLY HAIR!
1966:
HOW LUCKY SHE IS.
SHE HAS STRAIGHT HAIR!
If you're the girl who's bemoaning
her curly hair, while your mother,
lost in a world of rollers, gazes at
you in utter astonishment, do at
least, take her advice on other
matters.
Your mother was probably a
teenager when lady riveters were
doing their bit in war work. And as
women pitched in to help win, their
clothes changed, their activities
changed, their ideas changed. For
one thing, Tampax tampons for
internal sanitary protection became
an accepted way of life. It gave
women total freedom.
Today countless mothers are
helping their daughters learn about
Tampax tampons. If you have
questions about them, go to your
mother.
She not only knows best—she
knows a lot.
Tampax tampons are available in
three absorbency sizes (Regular,
Super and Junior) wherever such
products are sold.
Developed by a doctor—
now used by millions of women
TAMPAX  INTERNAL SANITARY PROTECTION   IS
MADE  ONLY BY CANADIAN  TAMPAX  CORPORATION   LIMITED, BARRIE. ONT.
Bavarian Room
3005 W. Broadway   -:-   RE 6 9012
SHAKEY'S
Pizza Parlour
1026 Granville
presenting
Moriko
and
Hank Pickett
Also Sounds of the
South    Seas
Friday, January 14, 1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7 ENGINEERS'
SPECIAL
(lc More)
RED SPLIT
COWHIDE
JACKETS
Fleece lined . . .
(only 10 in existence).
Bad Boy Exclusive Design
Bad Boys Ragge Shop
315 SEYMOUR
JUST ARRIVED
The New
Suzuki Mustier
250 cc. 6 Speeds
SEE IT AT
Varsity  Cycles
4357 W. 10th      CA 4-1034
CUSO
2 Year's 'Peace Corps' Work
agriculturists, engineers,
foresters,
lab technicians, nurses,
social workers,
teachers . . . etc.
Application forms — International House.
Selection interviews — 24th Januaory
JACQUES
de TONNANCOUR
RETROSPECTIVE • through Jan. 30
THE VANCOUVER ART GALLERY
oooocooooooooooeoooooag
GALA  PREMIERE
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 19th
8:30 p.m.
PARK THEATRE
From the age
of magnificence
comes a new
magnificence in
motion pictures
20(h Coimry Fox
pfncno
mm      REX
Directed by CAROL REED
Musk by ALEX NORTH
Screen story and screenplay by PHILIP DUNNE
■m* o« • ihxiI by ItVING STONE
RESERVED SEATS
NOW AT BOX OFflCE
ODEON,   881    Granville
PARK THEATRE, 3440 CAMBIE ST.
Mail   self-addressed   (tamped   en- Cambie   St.,   Van.     Out-of-Town
velope with cheque or money or- orders    must    include    bank    ex-
der payable to Park Theatre, 3440 change charge.
Evenings
8:30 p.m.
$2.50
Matinees
2 p.m.
(Wed.) $1.50
(Sat.  &  Sun.)
$1.75
Holidays
$1.75
Name
Street
City
.               _                 Zone
Please
send  me tickets for  (date)	
at $ _
 each.    1st alternate date	
2nd—
.—□Mat nEve	
CTJC3
CZ3
EVIDENCE FORGED
Re-open Rosenberg spy case
By DONALD MINTZ
"Not only were Julius and
Ethel Rosenberg — and Morton Sobell — unjustly convicted," write Walter and
Miriam Schneir, "they were
punished for a crime that
never occurred."
That firm statement is not
an idle claim nor is it made
emotionally or without full
appreciation   of   its   signifi-
INVITATION TO AN INQUEST, by Walter and
Miriam Schneir; 479 pages,
$5.95.
cance. Schneir and his wife
have devoted five years to
investigating the Rosenberg-
Sobell case.
They seem to have followed every lead they could.
They have gone over as
many of the voluminous
records of the case as were
open to them—and a good
many unfortunately were
not. Moreover they have had
access to previously closed
files and recordings concerning the case belonging
to Harry Gold's lawyer.
Gold, who granted the
Schneirs permission to use
the material, was one of the
key prosecution witnesses.
The Schneirs have gone still
further. They have examined
several prosecution exhibits
in detail and, where necessary, with expert assistance.
They conclude that one of
these exhibits was misrepresented and that it is a "near
certainty** that another, a
hotel registration card, is a
forgery.
Despite  the fact  that in
1953 when the Rosenbergs
were executed for having
transmitted secrets about
the atomic bomb to the Soviet Union, there were grave
doubts about the case in
some non-left wing circles in
the United States, and even
graver doubts abroad, the
Schneirs' conclusions seem
fantastic.
For it is difficult to read
the book without coming to
the conclusion that it is unlikely the Rosenbergs and
Sobell were guilty and that
if by chance they were, the
information they transmitted
was relatively unimportant
and trivial.
The difficulty arises with
the statement that the "crime
. . . never occured" and that
an important document is almost certainly a fake. For
if that is true, not only were
the principal prosecution
"witnesses heavy-weight
champion liars tout somebody
close to the prosecution
made the forgery. The implication is unavoidable.
The Schneirs show that in
the tense climate caused by
the Korean War, the arrest
of Klaus Fuchs and the Soviet Union's explosion of its
first atomic bomb, it was
widely believed bomb secrets must have been stolen.
They contend this assumption misled the justice department and the courts into
acepting and developing
some highly doubtful "evidence" which in calmer
times would have been subject to more skeptical scrutiny, a scrutiny It could not
have survived.
There is no doubt the
Schneirs make an impressive
case. There is also no doubt
their rase is subject to re-
butal, for it should be the
beginning of a dialogue, and
not the last word.
Even if one discards all
but their mildest — and
most likely — contentions,
they have assembled sufficient evidence to warrant a reopening of the case.
Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 14, 1966 What is the value
of A
CDA?
You don't have to be able
to solve this problem to build
a rewarding career with IBM
Not everyone at IBM is a mathematical
wizard.
Not that we don't have a lot of bright
people . . . people who are generating significant advances which help man cope with
today's information explosion.
For some, theirs is a world of algorithms,
microelectronic circuits and automatic programming techniques for multiprocessing
systems.
To others—in the Office Products Division
—the challenge is to discover and implement
ways of improving the flow of vital communications through an office. They call it "word
processing"—the use of modern equipment
to increase word output, making more productive time available to time-conscious
business and professional men.
And thanks to IBM's talented development engineers, product planners and industrial designers, Office Products people
have some fascinating devices to work with.
These are some of the latest:
Selectric typewriter—15 years of engineering research resulted in the development of
this revolutionary, unique typewriter which
has no type bars and no moving carriage.
Magnetic Tape Selectric typewriter —
stores typing work on magnetic tape and can
later retype the desired material on command, at a speed of 180 words per minute,
"proofreading" its work as it goes.
Dictation Equipment—a full line, rang
ing from the 224, small enough to fit in your
coat pocket, to full-scale dictating systems
which can channel dictation from any
number of executives to a central typing pool.
The growing market for these and other
IBM office products creates rewarding career
opportunities for imaginative individuals
who wish to sell a dynamic product line.
A comprehensive training program is provided. Upon its completion, you, as an IBM
Sales Representative, would be assigned your
own exclusive territory. There you maintain
direct executive-level contact with IBM's
present and prospective customers, analysing their typing and dictation requirements
and making recommendations on what equipment should be installed.
Naturally, salary prospects—immediate
and future—are important to everyone. You
receive an attractive salary throughout the
training program, and upon taking charge of
a territory, your earnings potential is extended through a salary and commission plan.
Bigger jobs await those ready to take on
bigger responsibilities. Promotion to positions like industry specialization representative, field manager, branch office manager
and others of sales or general management
responsibility can be attained.
IBM is noted for its progressive employee
benefit plans. Life insurance, family hospitalization, retirement benefits and many others
are provided—all paid for by the company.
Now that you know a few facts about the
work, the company and its future—measure
them against your own criteria for a future
career.
If you seek a satisfying and rewarding
future in a dynamic, thriving, rapidly-expanding industry, we'd very much like to talk
with you. Make it a point to discuss what
IBM's "room for achievement" could mean
to you with the representative who will be
visiting the campus on Friday, January 21.
Your placement officer can make an appointment with our interviewer. If you cannot attend the interviews, please write or
visit the IBM office in Vancouver at 1445
West Georgia Street.
Just in case you're still puzzling over the size
of /} CDA,don't feelbadly.lt took an IBM
computer nearly three minutes to solve. Here's
the solution: Draw a line from A to intersect BD
(point E) so that angle EAB is 20°: Connect
points C and E. Now it's just a matter of discovering equalities and adding and subtracting
angles.''
IBM
International Business Machines Company Limited
Friday, January 14, 1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 9 RALPH S. PLANT LIMITED
will be on Campus January 24 and 25
to interview Commerce and Forestry Graduates.
If you are interested in the Marketing of Lumber
and allied Forest Products and wish to join an
aggressive Vancouver based wholesale lumber firm,
please contact the Placement Office.
FRATERNITY
SPRING
RUSH
Sign up at A.M.S. Office
Jan. 17th through Jan. 28th
AUSTMNSCttI/1*   I
Direct from the Matrix in San Francisco.
TODAY, 12:30 NOON BROCK, 50c
DALE BARTLETT — pianist — TUESDAY, JANUARY 18th
Playing Ravel, Chopin, Lizst and John Lennon
AUDITORIUM 12:30 NOON, 35c
music
Symphony fails
the shivers test
By DOUG MUIR
Last weekend's concert
by the Vancouver Symphony
Orchestra really felt the absence of Meredith Davies, as
guest conductor Dr. Boyd
Neel stepped onto the podium to produce a program
of varied and somewhat disjunctive  music.
Haydn's Symphony No.
97 is not, in my opinion, an
ideal program opener. However, after the inevitable
late-comers had finished
clambering over knees and
umbrellas after the first
movement,- the orchestra
managed to tune and warm
up in time to make a very
decent job of the last two
movements.
Pianist John Browning
played well, but then there
are a lot of people around
who play Beethoven's Fourth
Piano   Concerto  well.   Rela
tively few are able to pass
the shivers - up - and - down -
the - spine test, however. It
could have been a combination of inbalance between
soloist and orchestra and uneventful playing on both
sides, but the only shivers I
felt were from a cold draft
down the back of my neck.
Britten's Variations on a
Theme by Frank Bridge
were the high point of the
evening. I was so capitvated
by the music and the electrifying new sounds produced
by a stringed orchestra that
I forgot to notice how well
it was played. But isn't that
how it should be?
The orchestra's rendition
of Handel's Water Music was
equally as anti-climactic as
the Britten was climactic.
Even the insertion of an ad
lib trumpet solo didn't improve the overall passive,
phlegmatic manner in which
Dr. Neel brought the program to a close.
Dr. Neel's metronomic precision made the players
really work to create those
few exciting moments -which
occurred spasmodically
throughout the program.
pf 6ix
GSH NEWS
GSA ELECTIONS: Elections for the 1966-67 GSA Executive are to be held near the end of February or first
week of March. This year, many new people will
be required to fill positions left vacant by members
who are leaving the executive due to the fact that
they expect to complete their degrees in the near future. In all, eleven positions are open for nominations on this executive. The Graduate student centre
will not function effectively without an active executive nor will the number of social, athletic and cultural activities be possible without the efforts of new
executive members. Service on the GSA executive
does not require an enormous amount of time, but
can provide a most satisfying opportunity to contribute to Graduate Student Activities and to make possible a better Graduate Studies total program on this
campus. If you are interested, drop in to the GSC
Office any noon hour and talk to any of the present
executive about the Executives' responsibilities and
activities. In future columns details will be given
about nomination procedures and about an open executive meeting at which prospective candidates will
be welcome.
THIRSTY? By popular demand, starting January 21,
1966, the GSA has arranged for a regular Friday
Afternoon "Beer Garden" to be established in the
GSC Lower Lounge. Beer and wine will be available
from approximately 3:00 p.m. for members and their
guests. NOTE: All members will be required to
produce their membership cards on these days before
entering the building. If you don't have one, pick
it up in the office and save yourself some embarrassment. Since we expect these events to be popular,
limit your number of guests to a sensible number, i.e.,
about two per member. Remember, your guests must
be of age.
COMMUNITY PLANNING
FREE ILLUSTRATED LECTURE
Dr. M. C. BRANCH
UCLA DEPT. OF ENGINEERING, LOS ANGELES PLANNING COMMISSION
"EMERGING TRANSPORTATION
TECHNOLOGY:   THE CITY'S
CHALLENGE AND RESPONSE"
MONDAY, 17th JANUARY at noon
LASERRE 102
Page TO
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, January 14, 1966 By GABOR MATE
The unexpected death of
Lai Bahadur Shastri occurs
at a time fraught with uncertainty and crisis for India.
Despite the armistice
agreed on by Shastri and
Ayub Khan in Tashkent, the
Kashmir controversy with
Pakistan remains essentially
unresolved.
An acute food shortage
threatens millions of Indians
with starvation. Shastri also
bequeaths to his successors
numerous social and economic problems that have
traditionally plagued the subcontinent.
In the realm of international relations, India finds
her influence greatly diminished, and her former stature as a world leader all
but nonexistent.
It would be a spurious accusation, however, to claim
that the diminutive Shastri
was responsible for the Indian predicament. In truth,
the country's domestic difficulties are inherent in her
existing s o c i a 1, economic,
and political system. Her
international problems are,
toa  large extent, the result
of Jawaharlal Nehru's policies.
The basic political problem is one of unity. India is
a somewhat artificial union
of what had been, even
under British rule, many
smaller states and principalities, of separate ethnic
groups, many with their
own particular languages.
There were widespread riots
last, year when the central
government attempted to
make the dominant Hindi
the official language instead
of English.
The peoples that comprise
the Indian Republic have not
yet developed that sense of
nationhood which could
unite them behind the government, except perhaps in
times of grave military danger. Yet it is clear that some
irpose is||i|festfry if tl
mntry is»|olipapl progrei
|^j^peace«|^e^^bment.
in the international
sphere, India has descended
far from her high position
as one of the leaders of the
non-aligned block. This position was due initially to the
immense moral stature of
Mahatma Ghandi, and then
to the often astute interna-
t i o n a 1 statesmanship of
Nehru.
However, it was Under
Nehru that India began her
decline. Having preached interminably and sanctimoniously of the evils of military force as an instrument
of national policy, Nehru
appeared as somewhat of a
hypocrite when his armies
invaded the tiny Portuguese
colonial enclave of Goa.
He suffered a further setback when India was decisively defeated by China
in war which Nehru had
done much to provoke by a
two year policy of attrition
along the disputed northwest frontier.
The confrontation with
China brought into focus the
question facing many underdeveloped countries: which
is better for the development of the country: socialism on the Chinese model, or
a Western-styled democracy
with free-enterprise.
It has been charged that
one of the reasons India
provoked the war with
China was to create anti-
Chinese feeling, and thus
ictivene
ample.
Ihat the^
social
lution and* rapid economic'
progress might become desirable to the Indian masses.
While India is constrained
to beg for American handouts to avoid mass starvation, famine has been wiped
out in China.
While India's economy
stagnates, China's industry
continues to grow.
While India is fought to
a stalemate by such a relatively small power as Pakistan, China has become the
greatest land power in Asia.
To the average Indian,
who consumes less food than
is  considered   necessary  for
Tf^e bogs oMcsl toe
***** *pr aWc
~fhe uooudter asked
M X xoas Jookin*
fa* vny foilr\®r
good health by all medical
authorities, and who has a
life expectancy of forty
years—forty years of squalor and privation—the words
democracy and free enterprise can have little significance. In the words of Albert Einstein, "An empty
stomach is a poor political
advisor."
When your children are
dying of hunger, you are
not concerned to know that
Western ideals of democracy
are the avowed principles of
your leaders.
There are indications that
many Indians are deciding
that communism is the answer to their problems, that
only communism can provide the needed social and
economic reform. In the
state with the highest level
of education, Kerala, the
Communists are the largest
party.
It is necessary therefore
that Indian leaders abandon
their timorous approach to
reform and adopt more vigorous measures. It is also
necessary that India's Western friends realize the desperate need for reform in
India, and assist freely and
generously in the process.
It is time, for example,
that we Canadians emerge
from the somnambulistic atmosphere of such projects
as the Cup of Milk Fund
which bestow no long range
benefits and merely help
to maintain the status quo.
No nation can exist on charity forever, and still retain
her sense of national dignity.
Such assistance as we do
give must be designed to
help the Indians help themselves, and must be predicated upon the Indian government applying the needed reforms. It is safe to predict that unless such reforms
are carried out, India will
follow the Chinese example.
In view of existing donations, that would be a greatly desired improvement.
I /even
THE JEFFERSON
AIRPLANE LOVES YOU
1       BAY     1
STARTS TOMORROW
SYLIA
Carroll Baker, G. Maharis
plus
THE L SHAPED ROOM
Leslie Caron, Tom Bell
(Restricted)
STUDENTS  75c
I DELTA "
STARTS TOMORROW
T-BIRD GANG
Ed Nelson
plus
THE FLY
H. Marshall, V.  Price
plus
EVIL EYE
A Challenging
Career
Opportunity
Representatives of
THE BRITISH COLUMBIA
PROBATION SERVICE
will   interview   male
candidates
for
PROBATION
OFFICER
POSITIONS
Enquire now at the University Office of Student
Placements for an appointment January 19, 20, 21,
1966.
LARRY KENT'S
'Uncensored
a
BITTER ASH
Two Days Only
Monday, January 17th
Wednesday, January 19th
1ASC ^diioMunt -1230 (won.)
Admission
$1.00
THOSE ATTENDING MUST
PRESENT THEIR AMS CARDS
Friday,- January. 1.4« JS66
THE _.  .UBJSSJ.Y;
Page 11 :s s*  j ■■*>   "i
Dumbshow
satirizes
real man
By CLAIRE WEINTRAUB
All your life you do the
theatre thing, and you think
about what it means to live
a life where theatre is important. You educate yourself to believe that theatre
has a place in society, and
you troup about wondering
what on earth it could come
to mean to you. I have seen
Marcel Marceau, the French
pantomimist, on several occasions. He has always impressed me, for an act without words — a dumbshow —
a silence which explains itself in motion, is among the
basic and fundamental ideas
of human behaviour.
Always before when I have
seen him perform, I have
laughed on cue, and felt in
accord with the audience
about what was important
and what was laughable.
But somehow, I began to
watch the performance in
sequence, and saw that mime
was to be taken as seriously
as theatre itself. The art is
expressing oneself without
words — with no other med-
iumistic device than one's-
self and perhaps the burble
of music or background noise
— the minimum properties
the maximum of body flexibility.
The incredible agility of a
man climbing an invisible
ladder and walking an invisible tightrope across the bare
stage — the audience laughs.
When Marceau finds himself trapped inside an invisible cage — the audience is
quite still, waiting to see if
there's a chink in the vitreous walls — and the mime
escapes in his dumbshow,
and finds himself in the beginning of another cage, the
dimensions of which are as
yet unexplored. The lights
dim down into a single spotlight, the solitary figure is
left standing there, until his
partner appears again.
Bip fights a bull. Bip is
Marceau's character, who
acts in place of the real man
— l'homme juste —that is,
he assumes the role of the
actor in order for Marceau to
satirize himself.
Bip goes to a society party,
and everything Marceau himself would not ordinarily do,
one suspects . . . and yet he
does it so Marceau can explain his own reasoning, his
own responses to the world
— the real, actual world in
which he finds himself, his
friends, life, work.
If there is any doubt about
the necessity  and the  effi-
V ■*?%"*
cacy of the medium, perhaps
it is answered by San Francisco pantomimist R. G. Davis, who speaks on mime in
terms of accents.
Human events, like human
speech, take their dialect
from variety of factors. The
mysteries of the actual event
of human communication are
explained best by the backlog of unspoken words —
messages—delivered through
the essential medium of the
voice, the body.
tr -i^^mmk;
.-*»*•■
Methinks he
would protest
A dramatic critic has put
an ingenious justification of
the curious dress worn by
Hamlet in the Stratford production. Shakespeare's Hamlet was a prince, he explains,
"and that was appropriate
for the social conditions of
the Elizabethan Age. But the
contemporary equivalent of
a prince is a "young intellectual", and'a young intellectual must naturally be
dressed in a fairly scruffy
way.
This explanation is hardly
supported by the text. If
Hamlet were really the
equivalent of a young intellectual, he wouldn't have
gone sulking and skulking
about, plotting revenge for
his father's murder.
He would have formed a
Who Killed King Hamlet?
Committee, casting suspicion
on Ophelia, Polonius, the
gravediggers, anybody, in
fact, except Claudius. Far
from feeling rebuked by the
resolution of Fortinbras, he
would have organized a
teach-in against that warmongering colonialist adventurer.
And, of course, his soliloquies would have been one
long moan about the shameful inadequacy of his postgraduate grant.
(From  The Times of
London, Dec.  29/65.)
DARK
ROOM
OPEN the DOOR
On   Your   Hobby
Taking the picture is only half
the  fun.
Let us show you
the  rest.
We have a
complete
assortment
of all types of
Darkroom
Equipment
and
Supplies
Enlargers
from $30 and up
Your Darkroom Specialists
The Store with the Technical
Photo Knowledge
RUSHANT CAMERAS
4538 West 10th, Van.
224-5858
224-9112
NEWMAN      CLUB
PRESENTS THE ANNUAL
NEWMAN BALI
Friday, January 21, 1966
in the
REGAL BALLROOM
of
THE GEORGIA HOTEL
RECEPTION 8:30 DANCING 9:30 TO 1:30
FORMAL DRESS $5.00 per Couple
TICKETS AT A.M.S. or NEWMAN CENTER
The Player's Jacket fashioned by BANIAMAC in Terylcne*, a Cel-Cil libre.
Come on over to smoothness
with no letdown in taste
Come on over to
'Regd.Lan.TM.
New!
Player's
Kings
DEPARTMENT OF THEATRE
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
HAPPY DAYS
by Samuel  Beckett
Student Performance - Mon.r Jan, 17 - 7:30 p.m.
TICKETS 75c
THE AUTHOR OF "WAITING FOR GODOT" WRITES A WHIMSICAL COMEDY OF
THE ABSURD, WITH JOY COGHILL, DIRECTED BY KLAUS STRASSMANN.
Note: Some tickets at 75c will be available for all the other performances,
January 14-22.
SUPPORT CAMPUS THEATRE
Page  12
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, January 14, 1966 Friday, January 14, 1966
THE    UBYSSEY
Page  13
FORECROUND
Free education?	
o bourgeois benefit
For anybody out there who
thought tuition-free education
was a radical suggestion, the
following article by an alumnus of a free-tuition university (City College of New
York) explains why he considers tuitionless education
not nearly equivalent to universal accessibility, the other
Canadian Union of Students
watchword.
Excerpted from New Politics, Vol.. IV, No. 3, the article
is written by Michael Parenti,
on the faculty of New York's
Sarah Lawrence College.
Last year, just before its
inauspicious demise, one last
snarl emanated from the Republican-controlled state legislature in Albany.
• •      •
True to their upstate small
town heritage, the legislators,
with a helpful thrust from the
Governor's office, issued yet
another warning that the days
of the free-tuition college in
New York City were numbered. Such threats, as in the
past, were answered with a
barrage of protestations from
the Mayor's office, City Univer'
sity alumni, administrators
and students.
At the CCNY campus on
Convent Avenue, President
Buell Gallagher, happy to be
on the side of the masses on
this occasion, whole-heartedly
joined in a mammoth student
demonstration.
Speaking over an amplifier
he told the crowd that he
wanted them to pay for their
education—not now, but in
taxes on their future salaries,
a proposal which met with a
roar of approval.
• •     •
Learn now, pay later.
In a final gesture of determination  and  solidarity,  the
thousands    of    demonstators
joined  in a chorus of  "We
Shall Overcome."
Yet while we castigate state
legislators for their selfishness, conservatism, shortsightedness and insensitivity, one
cannot help but wonder
whether some of the same
epithets might not be applied
to the students, faculty and
administration who ostensibly
support the principle that
everyone is entitled to an education "regardless of ability
to pay."
For whom, is this free education?
• •      •
Free education, like everything else in this society, is
for those who can afford it —
in this case, the middle and
lower-midle class of New
York City.
Those who cannot pay tuition, either (because it is beyond their family means or
because they choose not be
beholden to their parents for
such sums of money, still
must possess the financial resources for four years of food,
clothing, shelter, carfare,
books, fees, and other living
expenses.
Going to college, even a
publicity supported one, is a
costly affair. The poor simply
cannot afford it.
But, as always, the poor
pay their full measure for services inaccessible to them.
The poor have no capital
gains, deferred compensation,
profit-sharing plans, stock options, professional expense deduction, etc., they compose the
one stratum which pays its
share on the federal tax scale.
At the federal state, and local
levels they pay something
more than their share (by any
progressive scaling) in sales
and excise taxes.
The free municipal colleges
are institutions subsidized in
part by the poor for the benefit of the middle and lower
classes.
The poor are as far from
Convent Avenue as they are
from the Great Society.
It becomes evident, even
though the opposite impression is often left, that "rescuing our free-tuition colleges"
does little in the way of rescuing the poor.
A massive program of stipends is desperately needed
before "free higher education"
becomes a meaningful dictum
for thousands of youths.
•      •      •
But stipends awarded solely on the basis of secondary
school scholastic accomplishment often merely further
subsidize many who already
enjoy cultural and financial
advantages unknown to the
poor.
Money must be allocated on
the basis of financial need,
with special consideration and
special funds accorded the student who comes from a family
that ordinarily relies on him
for support.
Thousands of high school
graduates who do not go to
college in New York and
throughout the nation are
from the top quarter of their
class.
.Their performance ability
is proven and their primary
problem is usually a financial
one.
• •      •
But more often, as implied
above, the economically deprived are also the culturally
deprived.
Lowering the entrance requirements in the municipal
colleges from an 85 high
school average to an 82 or
80 as has been suggested, will
not rectify the social inequities, it will only bring in more
white middle class offspring,
many of whom are attending
less exacting private institutions.
• •      •
As a first step toward more
equitable educational opportunity, the municipal colleges
and public and private institutions throughout the nation
will
ing:
need   programs   provid-
(a)    free-tuition
stipend  support,
plus   full
(b) a waiving of certain academic requirements and some
modification o f admission
standards for students from
severely deprived backgrounds, and,
<c) intensive pre-entrance,
summer courses to repair the
deficiences of an inferior secondary school education.
Unless educators and students, including those who defend the sanctity of "free education" mount concerted political pressure upon state and
federal governments, unless
they broaden their frame of
reference and free themselves
from the illusion that middle-
class claims are the voice of
Everyman, the efforts made
on behalf of higher education
for the poor will remain little
more than  window-dressing.
Lionel Conacher (Honors Bus. Admin. '60) is a successful London Life sales representative.
Lionel K. Conacher* counsels '66 grads:
a
Why I chose a marketing career with London Life"
"In my field of work, there is unlimited scope for
graduates who seek freedom to decide their own
future along with an opportunity to develop their
own potential.
"London Life gives you three major assists in
establishing your career in marketing:
"First, a solid three months of specialized training
at the head office, with emphasis on marketing
among executives and professional men, in business
insurance, estate planning, taxation and group insurance. And this is only the beginning of your training.
"Second, an attractive starting salary that helps
you become established. Also, there are plenty
of opportunities for graduates to move into key
marketing management areas.
"Finally, you are backed by the company with more
insurance in force on the lives of Canadians than
any other. A company whose annual sales are
unexcelled in the Canadian market."
Graduate Opportunities
London Life requires graduates with bachelors or
masters degrees in commerce, arts, and business
administration, to develop the fast-growing market
of life insurance throughout Canada.
Successful candidates will enter the marketing
branch for specialized training in group sales and
ordinary life sales to professional people and businessmen. Beginning with three months of initial
training at its head office in London, Ontario, the
company's 18-month training and development
program for university graduates continues under
expert supervision in your home area (or another
location of your choice), with continued short
courses in London.
An attractive salary is provided during the training
period and can be supplemented by sales commission. In addition, you enjoy individual freedom to
develop your own skills, knowledge and income at
the pace you choose to set. There are no limitations
to opportunities in life insurance marketing.
A London Life representative will be interviewing
at your college placement office on the date below.
If you are interested in learning more about a marketing career with London Life, arrange for an
appointment through your placement officer.
*At the University of Western Ontario, Lionel
Conacher was well known as a fullback on the
champion University Mustangs of 1957 and 1959.
He was graduated in 1960, joined London Life,
and became a group insurance supervisor in
Montreal. In 1963 he transferred to the company's Ordinary Branch in Toronto, where he has
successfully established a business clientele.
A REPRESENTATIVE WILL BE INTERVIEWING AT THIS CAMPUS ON JANUARY 19 AND 20
London Life Insurance Company
Head Office: London, Canada Page  14
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, January 14, 1966
UNWANTED
By KRIS EMMOTT
REGINA (UNS) — An instructional assistant at the University of Saskatchewan in
Regina has been told he will
not be rehired next fall.
James Harding, federal
council chairman of the Student Union for Peace Action,
says he has been dismissed by
the university for reasons
other than his psychology
teaching.
"We don't know for sure
who is responsible for the dismissal," said a staff member
of the student newspaper, The
Carillon, Thursday.
"There has been no concerted action from the student
council as yet," said the staffer.
"Until they find out from the
Board of Governors who is responsible for the decision, they
can make no move."
Harding, now in his second
Eye-opening
$1,000 aids
research task
A UBC opthalmologist has
been awarded $1,000 to continue his research into eye
diseases.
Dr. Andrew McCormick, a
native of Vancouver Island,
will use the money from the
E. A. Baker Foundation for the
Prevention of Blindness for a
year's study at the Institute of
Opthalmology, London, England.
McCormick,. who recently
finished a three-year residency
in opthalmology at UBC, graduated from McGill Medical
School and completed his internship at Montreal General
Hospital.
PRESCRIPTION
EYEGLASSES
All Doctor's Eyeglass Prescriptions filled. Only first
quality materials used. All
work performed by qualified
Opticians.
GRANVILLE  OPTICAL
861 Granville MU 3.-8W1
■» Money Back Guarantee M
NEW YORK
COSTUME SALON
WHITE   DINNER  JACKETS
TAILS, TUXEDOS
MASQUERADE      COSTUMES
Special Student
Rates
4397 W.  10th AVE.
CA   4-0034
K
Come Sunday to
University Hill
United Church
on University Boulevard
11:00  a.m.—Morning Worship
Sermon:  "Loneliness"
Rev. Harold L. MacKay
7:00 p.m.—University
Young People's Fellowship
The Church on the Campus
Welcomes You
teaching year at Regina, is also
a graduate active in campus
events.
He said the university has
informed him it has no legal
obligation toward him because
he does not have tenure.
Harding feels his position as
both student and staff member
is seen as a threat by the administration.
Harding feels his position as
both student and staff member is seen as a threat by the
administration.
"People in Regina, as in
other campuses are extremely
sensitive about the happenings
at Berkeley, California, last
year," he said at a SUPA federal council meeting recently.
in cold
ARMSTRONG & REA
OPTOMETRISTS
EYES EXAMINED        2 Convenient Offices.
nnMTAnT i r-Mcrc      -BROADWAY at GRANVILLE
LUNTAU LENbbb      .KERRISDALE   41s.tatYEW
The   Ubyssey   is  still   looking for aspiring writers.
_____ 	
McMASTER UNIVERSITY
GRADUATE TEACHING FELLOWSHIPS
The University offers Graduate Teaching Fellowships to support graduate
students working towards a Master's Dgeree in Biochemistry, Biophysics, Civil
Engineering, Classics, Economics, German, Greek, Latin, Mechanical Engineering, Metallurgical Engineering, Philosophy, Politics, Romance Languages,  Russian. Sociology and Social Anthropology; and for a Master's or Doctor of Philosophy Degree  in Biology, Chemical Engineering, Chemical  Physics,  Chemistry,
Mathematics, Metallurgy, Molecular Biology, Physics, Psychology and the Religious Sciences.
The Fellowships vary in value but in all cases the stipends provide adequate support for a full year's study.    Most awards are renewable for subsequent years.   Holders of Fellowships will devote approximately one-fifth of their
time to instructional duties.
Travel advances are available to assist students who are coming to the
University from distant points.
Further information and application forms maybe obtained from:
The Dean of Graduate Studies, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
RICHARDS & FARISH are having a
WHALE OF
A SALE
FROM JAN. 13TH TO JAN. 23RD
Many items reduced lower than
half price! Fill your wardrobe
now at a WHALE of a SAVING!
Don't be disappointed
ACT FAST!
LIMITED
QUANTITIES
OF
S^ME ITEMS
Sweaters
$8 88
v\
Reg. $17.95
for
T0P-C0ATS!
$14'M
Reg.
up to
$39.95
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for
Sweaters
$lO*95
59.95 |   jf
-Y
^^^^^^^^^^■■■■i^^iS^n,
tm
During this
WHALE OF A SALE!
Extra pair - pants
|"|\EC    w'Tn every made-to-measure suit purchased!
Richards and Farish Ltd.
786 GRANVILLE ST.
The College Shop Ltd.
(Division of Richards and Farish Ltd.)
802 GRANVILLE ST. Friday, January 14, 1966
THE     UBYSSEY
Page  15
ALPINE COMPETITION
Skiers schuss south
By LEIGH BROUSSON
The Thunderbird ski team's
season will officially get under
way this weekend with the
Swaggler Cup at White Pass,
Wash.
This alpine competition —
with -Slalom, and giant slalom
events — is one the best American Northwest competitions,
and teams from Nevada and
Washington are expected.
The strongest competition
UBC will encounter this year
is from the University of Washington, Seattle.
Their jumping and crosscountry runners are mostly
Scandinavians competing on
athletic scholarships, while
their alpine team includes Jay
Jalbert from Idaho, a 20-year-
old American National team
member.
Our nordic and alpine skiers
appear to be the most seasoned
team ever at UBC.
Dave Turner, Tom Jenkins,
Eugene Ruelle, Gary Taylor
and Leigh Brousson will all
be skiing hi their fourth season for the alpine team. Bill
Shaak brings one year's experience and Elwood Peskitt
is starting his first year.
In the nordic, Brian Hume,
Bernie Kahlert, Tom Ramsey,
and Dave Gibson are all fourth-
year runners. Chris Elms and
Jan Uigdat (just recently from
Norway) are in their freshman
year.
Eric Peterson, a member
from last year's national B
team, will also be jumping.
Both teams spent one week
training at Rossland during the
Christmas holidays, although
snow conditions (that deep
powder skiing that was promised by the team as part of
our Rossland ski week) were
such that much of the time was
spent packing the slopes.
This Sunday, the crosscoun-
try skiers begin their season
with a competition on Mount
Seymour.
This is the traditional four-
way meet — downhill, slalom,
cross-country,    and    jumping.
The following week, at Banff,
the international intercollegiate will be held Jan. 27 to 30.
Skiing conditions appear to
be only fair on the local mountains for this weekend. Mount
Baker    conditions   should    be
good.
Whistler Mountain is probably the best bet. Apparently
the lifts and the Poma lift at
the top will all be operating.
Well-rested Thunderbirds
repel southern Vikings
A layoff of almost two month hasn't hurt the UBC
Thunderbird rugby team.
At least, Brian Wightman's first XV showed nary a
rust stain in a 8-0 victory over Western Washington College's Vikings Thursday at Wolfson Field.
UBC had not played or practiced since Nov. 20.
The Birds scored all their points in the second half.
Gary Rowles carried the slippery ball for UBC's first
try.  Dean  MacKinnon converted.
All four UBC rugby teams will be in action this Saturday at Wolfson beginning at 1:15.
CLEARANCE
r .Means SAVE NOW
Need a SUIT?
University Store,
Values from $89.50 to $125.00
Broadway Store.
Values from $59.50 to $75.00 -
$79.50
$49.50
SPORT SHIRTS
ARE YOU A . .  .
For Class-U.S. Imports and Lancers 5WEAT6K MAN?
—mostly button downs. Wide   range   of   Cardigans,   Bulky
Reg. $7.95 2 for $10.50 Wools and Flat
$8.95                                   or "-"-   "-'■— *~
$5.95 each
2 for $7.50
Reg. $5.95  „
$6.95
Knits. Values to $15.95	
Others as low as
or
$3.95 each
1/2 Price
EXTRA SPECIALr-Corduroy pants and jeans in high £   for
styles and conservatives cuts
Reg. $8.95-$10.45  _ _.      $12.00
0*
DISTINCTIVE MEN'S STORES
4445 West 10th       East of Sasamat
2906 West Broadway at Mackenzie
There's Still Time Brother!
To Hear The Jefferson Airplane
TODAY        BROCK - 50c - 12:30        a special event
SCUBA DIVING COURSE
For UBC Students
Commences January 18th
Room 211, UBC Memorial Gymnasium, 7:30 p.m.
NOTE:   This course is available only lo those
who have passed the skin diving course.
PROVINCE OF ALBERTA
EMPLOYMENT
INTERVIEWS
For 1966  Graduates in te following fields:
Highway Engineers District  Home  Economists
Sanitary Engineers Agriculturists
Social Workers Public Land Appraisers
Probation Officers Economists or Commerce Graduates
Architects
Instructional Positions (Technology Schools)
High School Teachers (Correspondence School   Branch)
INTERVIEW DATES: January 20 to 27, 1966.    Please consult your university recruiting office for specific rimes.
EATON'S
SKI STOP!
for all your Ski Equipment
Ski Chalet
Downtown MU 5-7112 Park Royal 922-3325
Brentwood  CY  9-5511   __     New  Westminster  526-6766 Page  16
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, January 14, 1966
'TWEEN CLASSES
Mayday in Brock Hall
SPECIAL EVENTS
The Jefferson Airplane lands
today noon in Brock. Will
Brock survive? Only for those
who are out of their heads. 50
cents.
SUS
Science women vs nurses
hockey game. Thunderbird
Winter Sports Centre, Monday
noon. Free.
AMS
Bitter Ash returns to Aud.
Monday and Wednesday noon.
LUTHERAN STUDENTS
B.B.  will  give  Vespers Friday   10:00   p.m.   Luthern   Student Centre, 4608 W. 10th.
PRE-SOCIAL WORK
Dave Barrett, M.L.A. speaks
Monday noon Bu. 202 on Social
Work in B.C.
FINE ARTS
Dr. H. P. Oberlander speaks
on Rome. Noon, Fine Arts Gallery.
UN CLUB
Current    affairs    discussion
noon Monday at IH.
ALPHA OMEGA SOC
General    meeting     Monday
noon, Bu. 223.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
Meeting  noon  at  IH   .Film
and discussion.
IH
Record   hop   8:30   p.m.    25
cents, all welcome.
ARTS ANTI-CAL
Senior  English  course spies
noon today, Bu. 2205.
EUS
Two speakers on alcoholism
Monday noon, Eng. 201.
ANGLICAN   CHAPLAINCY
| Eucharist 9:15 Sunday St.
Anselm's Church, University
Blvd. All welcome.
GERMAN CLUB
Two color films, Special interest to Fine Arts students.
Bu. 205.
PHRATERES
All-Phi election speeches
meeting, noon, Bu. 104. Vote
Monday.
Alberta paper
mil try it
every day
The Gateway will go into
daily production the week of
Jan. -17, the paper's editors announced today .
A four-page newspaper will
be distributed on campus Monday through Friday of that
week.
The Gateway will be Canada's third daily student newspaper, joining the McGill Daily
and the Ryersonian.
The experiment is part of a
study now underway to determine whether the U of A campus is large enough to support
a daily newspaper.
"The Gateway's expansion
plans will now make it necessary for us to recruit several
new staff members," says the
paper's editor-in-chief Don
Sellar.
RAINCOATS
by
CROYDON
$19.95
Reaularly   to   $29.95
UNITED TAILORS
BRITISH    .VOOILENS
549 Granville       MU   1-4649
COMMUNITY PLANNINNG
Dr. M. C. Branch UCLA
Dept .of Planning .speaks Monday noon, Lasserre 102.
ITALIAN CLUB
II Caffe and Cinema 16 present Fellini's 8V2. Monday,
Aud., 8 p.m.
UBC NDP
NDP Campaign Comittee for
Model Parliament. Monday
noon, Bu. 2250.
Academic Symposium
"Cybernetics and Education"
ONLY 18 YEARS UNTIL 1984!    HOW WILL
AUTOMATION AFFECT YOU ?
Join with faculty and alumni in discussion and debate on
the   impact of automation  on  our society
FEBRUARY  4th-6th-Parksville,   Vancouver   Island
Applications available at AMS Office
Bad Boys
Exclusive!
Genuine
U.S. Navy
"P" jackets
Bad Boys Ragge Shop
315 SEYMOUR
CHAPLAINCY
SERVICE
ELDORADO
MINING AND REFINING LIMITED
Permanent employment opportunities for:
Mining   Engineers,   Metallurgical   Engineers,   Chemical
Engineers, Geological Engineers, Geologists.
Summer employment opportunities for:
Mining   Engineers,   Metallurgical   Engineers,   Chemical
Engineers, Geological Engineers,  Geologists, Mechani-
■    cal Engineers, Electrical Engineers, Civil Engineers.
Interviews Wednesday, January 19th
PLACEMENT SERVICE
AT U.B.C.
CHAPLAINS APPOINTED FOR WORK IN THE
UNIVERSITY
The Chaplains appointed by their respective religious bodies for a U.B.C. ministry often act in a consultative capacity to student clubs, but are always available
for personal counselling and assistance. They will also be
able to help you find the worship service of your choice.
Rev. David Bauer (Romon Catholic) .—    —    224-3311
Rev. S. Fox (Lutheran Church-Canada) CA 8-8166
Rev. Bernice Gerard (Pentecostal Assemblies of
Canada)         _-   - -    AM  6-9275
Rev. J. A. Jackson (Anglican) __ 228-8900 or 228-3144
Rev. C. R. Pearson (Can. Lutheran Council) ....    224-3328
Rev. I. Richardson (Baptist)     RE 3-2126 or CA 4-6939
Rev. A. Ross (Presbyterian) CA 4-7720 or CA 4-5742
Rev. M. V. Shaver (United Church of Canada)        224-6825
or 228-3144
Rabbi W. Solomon (Jewish)   874-8049 or RE 1-4161
RYERSON  UNITED CHURCH
CHORAL SCHOLARSHIPS
are available for
TENORS and BASSES
Monies applied directly to UBC or to approved private
music tuition in return for light duties in the Senior
Choir. Further details may be had from the Organist,
Hugh McLean, 731-7360.
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines. 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Publications Office: Brock Hall, Ext. 26. 224-3242
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
FOUND ADS inserted free. Publications office. Brock Hall. Local 26,
224-3242.
WILL, THE PERSON WHO TOOK
my raincoat in mistake from the
College of Education phone to arrange an exchange. N. Brearley,
Local   .807.
LOST ON TUES., JAN. 11, ONE
dark blue medium-length winter
coat on main floor of Chem. undergrad wing. Finder please phpne
224-9888 and ask for room  6.
PLEASE TURN IN THE BLACK
purse I lost Tuesday. It is a Christmas   present.
The identification is useless to
you but expensive and inconvenient to replace. You may keep the
ten dollars though that is my
weekly food and carpool allowance.   I  call   on   your  humanity.
GLASSES — probably last Thursday.. Dark frames. Reward of five
dollars.   Phone   Diana,   278-0950.
WILL THE PERSON WHO PICK-
ed up a new brown Aquascutum
raincoat from the Ponderosa at
noon, Jan. 12 please return it to
the Ponedrosa or call Doug Shejep-
wash at 224-3121. My number is
on  the  inside of  the  coat.
LOST—LAST FRIDAY NITE NEAR
Totem —  One  black   wallet,   reward
for   reutrn    of   documents   phDne
987-6639   after   6   p.m.
ONE GREY STRIPED SCARF CALL
FA 7-3334.
LOST, TUESDAY IN LIBRARY,
Flight bag and gym strip. Please
return to lost and found, or Commissionaire  in  Ed.  Building.
LOST A STERLING, PARKER PKN.
Last Friday at Totem dance. Finder  please   phone  AM   1-3089.
Special Notices
13
WANTED — APPLICATIONS FOR
counsellors, diabetic summer
camp last two weeks In August.
Phone Kerry,  AM. 1-5944.
INTERESTED IN WEEKEND
work in Vancouver's newest j.nd
swingingest nite club opening
soon? We are looking for "attractive "go-go" dancers, waitresses, cigarette and check room
girls, 18 and over. Phone 682-
9144.
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSIJR-
ance   rates?   If   you   are   over   20
and have a good driving history you
qualify for our good driving raxes.
Phone   Ted   Elliott,   224-6707.
FARMERS FROLIC HARD TIMES
Dance with Hank the Hobo, Jan.
15, 9-1, UBC Armouries. $-.75
couple. Tickets from AMS or from
Aggie   Building.
ICE HOCKEY A-GO-GO — Science
women vs Nurses, Monday January 17, 12:30 at Winter Sports
Centre.   FREE.
SKI WEEK-END — JOIN THE
Varsity Christian Fellowship Club
for a fabulous weekend on Baker
at The Firs Chalet. Its the week-
nd of the 21st of Jan. And'the
cost is a mere $17. Avoid "the
rush and get your registration
form at AMS now. Deadline for
registrations  —  Mon.,   Jan.   17.
DANCE TO "THE CHESSMEN"
at the lower mall ballroom tonight.
9:00 - 12:00. Admission $1.00 —_75c
for residents.
Transportation
14
CARPOOL NEEDED VICINITY OF
33rd and Arbutus. Call Diaiine,
261-3753.
DRIVERS     WANTED    FOR    NEW
Westminster carpool   (Sapperton
area)   Phone  LA  1-2765  or   LA"  2-
1366.
RIDE WANTED FROM 41st AND
Main. 8:30 a.m. Phone 327-8654"af-
ter 6  ask for Bev.
TWO    NEED    RIDES    FOR    8:30's
from' West End, Ph.  681-7761.
RIDE   WANTED   FROM   41st   AJJD
Granville.   Phone   2ti::-3320.
WANTED — RIDE F.ROM HIGH'
land Delbrook area. North Vancouver.   Phone  Nancy   YI"  7-8079.
RIDE WANTED HOUR: 5:30. CALL
Jacquie, 261-0797. Vicinitv 52nd and
Oak.
URGENT! RTDIC TO AND FROM
UBC for 2, M-F: S:30 lectures.
Phone Don,  327-5719.
ENGUISH SPEAKING STUDENT
requires ride, rider? or carpool
from Lynn Valley area. 8:30-5:30.
987-7918.  '
RIDE WANTED MON. -FRI. sTJo
1626 S.W.  Marine Dr.  Ph.  261-0125.
Wanted
15
CAN ANYONE GIVE FIRST-HAND
information on travel in South
America? Write N. Janosy, 1246
Pendrell.
AUTOMOTIVE & MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
'57 CONSUL IN GOOD HEALTH
needs a new home. Call grieving
owner   at  AM   6-4974  after   6.
52 NASH. GOOD RUNNING ORDER.
Pulmanized, Radio, a rare bargain
at  $75.   Call  CA   4-7401. .
1957    VW.     JUST    PAINTED.     EX-
cel.   mech.   cond.   $435.   224-6857.
Scandals
39
EXTRAVAGANZA: SCIENCE PEP
Meet! Tom Northcott, famous
actors, beautiful girls, noted poet:
E. Koster. All for 25c. 12:30 Thursday,   January   20.   Hebb   Theatre.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Typewriters & Repairs
42
GOOD CLEAN TYPEWRITERS, »20
up. Also Typewriter repairs at
50 percent savings. Poison Typewriters, 2140 W. 4th. Phone RE
1-8322.
Typing
43
PROFESSIONAL TYPING, ARDALE
GRIFFITHS LIMITED. 70th and
Granville, Phone 263-4530.	
STUDENTS. TYPING DONE, .MY
home, essays, reports, etc. low
rates,   Phone   261-2996.	
TYPING OF TERM PAPERS, ES-
says, Thesis and Letters. Reasonable   rates.   CR   8-9480.
Help Wanted
51
PIZZA PATIO IS CONTINUING
with its policy of making employment available to students for part
time evening work—one or two
evenings a week. Students considering applying must have clean
driving record for use of Company
cars and be 21 years of age" or
older. Contact Manager at .the
Pizza Patio most convenient to
you after 5 p.m. Locations in Kerrisdale, South Van., Downtown
and  West  Van.
PS:    New   outlet   now   open   close
to  U.B.C.
$400 PER MONTH WHILE BEING
trained to sell Business Life insurance. Career position with unlimited possibilities; age 21-30.
Good education and background.
Character subject to scrutiny.
MU   5-7234.	
BREAKFAST DISHES AND TIDY-
ing for Wheelchair House wi?-!. 2
hours daily or 3 days a week between, 9:00 a.m. and 2 p.m. 5 minutes walk from (JBC gates. $1.00
an  hour.   CA 4-7574.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
SKI BOOTS, SIZE 10, GIRL'S ICE
skates, size 6; men's skates, size
9. ' All in good condition. Good
bargains.    AM  1-7448.
WELCH ALLYN OPHTHALMO-
scope, Tyeos Aneroid Manomejer,
Hellige Sahll Hemometer and
Hemocytometer Head Mirror; -telex Hammer. 733-3769 after 6
p.m.
"GOOD   AS    NEW"    INFANTS   TO
adults   clothing.     Discount   prices—
new  cribs,  playpens,  buggies,   etc.
Rentals      "Good   as   New."      2846
West   Burnaby.     RE   1-3310.
KLASSEN'S
... USED FURNITURE MART ....
Where You Shop at Auction Prices
3207 West  Broadway RE 6-6712
(Beer Bottle Depot at Rear of Store'
Rooms
81
LARGE, BRIGHT BED-SITTING
room with desk. Carpool available.
$35 per month. AM 1-7448.
Room & Board
82
ROOM AND BOARD. AVAILABLE
Prefer male student. Private" entrance, Vicinity of 10th and Alma.
Phone   224-3390.
Furn. Homes & Apts.
83
DESIRE FEMALE STUDENT .TO
share furnished suite in Sojith
Granville area. Please call 7.33-
2869   evenings.

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