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The Ubyssey Mar 11, 1966

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Array LAWMEN,   JAWING,   HALT   RED   S-FORAY
By NORM BETTS
Ubyssey Stunt Editor
Three hundred UBC engineers Thursday held their
first stunt at Simon Fraser Academy and were met
with the full force of Burnaby RCMP and SFA campus
police.
Led by EUS president Art Stevenson, five busloads
of engineers were stopped toy SFA campus police aided
by RCMP halfway up Burnaby Mountain.
The supervisor of SFA's traffic patrol, Marty
Kilcoyne, refused to say who had ordered the buses
stopped.
Three carloads of RCMP, plus two cars watching
the roads at the foot of the mountain, aided Kilcoyne's
cops.
After negotiating with SFA president Patrick Mc-
Taggert-Cowan over permission to hold the stunt,
Stevenson returned to the buses blockaded by police
and the stunt carried on.
MARTY KILCOYNE
. red baron be damned
The 300 engineers burned Gordon Shrum, SFA's-
chancellor, in effigy, labelling him a traitor. Shrum
was formerly head of the physics department at UBC
and has been a member of UBC's board of governors.
Three SFA-ites were tanked in the EUS portable
tank until it sprang an untimely leak.
Later engineers remarked that the SFA students'
reaction to the stunt had been rather childish.
Rocks, mud and vulgar epithets were hurled at
the UBC engineers.
"It's just like an over-grown high school," Stevenson said, "what a bunch of low-grade primates they've
got out there."
He said members of the Simon Fraser faculty and
campus patrol he had talked to apologized about the
childish behavior of the undergraduates at "high
school on the hill".
"That was enough to turn me right off athletic
scholarships forever," one of the engineers said.
READY BY FALL OF '67
New housing complex set
Vol. XLVIII, No. 59     VANCOUVER,  B.C.,  FRIDAY, MARCH  11,   1966
CA 4-3916
— norm betts photo
TRIUMPHANT UBC ENGINEERS hold court at Simon Fraser Academy after stunt
demonstrating their mastery of strategy, tactics. Redjackets report rhetoric was lost on
Simple Simons who inhabit Burnaby Mountain-top institution.
Faculty and grads
will live together
By CAROL WILSON
First plans have been laid  for a  125-unit complex  to
house graduate students and faculty members.
The   plans   resulted   from
briefs submitted to the married studetns' housing committee and the faculty residences
for married students on campus.
The project will toe made up
of 100 units for graduate students and 25 units for new faculty members.
The plan for the complex
was approved by the board
of governors March  i.
COMMITTEE'S  PLAN
A client's committee to discuss the units with the architect and to submit suggestions
has been organized.
The committee includes student representative Jim Slater, faculty representative
Fritz Bowers, a buildings and
grounds representative, and the
dean of women.
The chairman of the committee is housing'head Malcolm
McGregor.
Calendar
sales slow
Time is running out on the
student union building committee's plan to plug SUB.
The SUB committee published 2O00 1966 calendars last fall
at a cost of $721.50.
The calendars were distributed to the bookstore and the
college shop, and sold to alumni, as part of a publicity campaign for SUB.
So far approximately 200
have been sold, grossing about
$50.
This represents a loss of
$671.50 — $450 more than the
planned loss.
None of the distributors interviewed said the fact the
calendars, printed at the nonunion Mitchell Press, recorded
31 days in September had anything to do with the low sales.
TORONTO   HOLDS POET
Birney flies UBC coop
UBC has lost its greatest
poet to the University of
Toronto.
Earle Birney, the man who
originated creative writing
courses at UBC, sent in his
resignation in January, Robert Harlow, head of the
creative writing department,
said Thursday.
Birney, a UBC faculty
member since 1946, will take
up the post of poet in residence at Toronto.
He has been on a leave of
absence from UBC since
July 1, 1965.
"Without him there would
have been no creative writ--
ing here," Harlow said.
"He was the creative writ-
EARLE BIRNEY
. . . resigns
ing department since 1946."
Harlow  said  Birney's   resignation   was   an   "irreparable loss."
Birney, a specialist in
medieval literature, has published six volumes of poetry
and two novels.
His novels are Turvey and
Down the Long Table.
His collected poems are
scheduled to be published'
soon.
He won the Governor-
General's award for his
poetry. This is the Canadian
equivalent of the Pulitzer
Prize.
He graduated from UBC
with a B.A. in 1926 and took
his M.A. and Ph.D. at U. of T.
President John Macdonald
announced Thursday the appointment of Vladimir Plavsic
as architect for the project.
MAKING PLANS
Plavsic will submit a proposal for the complex of the
one, two, and three room
suites to the university administration.
He said they were now in
the process of programming
the details of the building.
"The construction should
start by September, and toe
finished in September of 1967,"
he predicted Thursday.
The complex will be managed by the university administration and will be part of
the residences system.
It will be built on the UBC
campus in the Acadia Camp
area.
ACADIA OUT
"Acadia will eventually be
torn down and the new project
will probably be expanded,"
Bowers said Thursday.
"I would guess that ultimately the complex will be three
times the proposed size."
"The faculty association has
offered to look after the financing," he said.
SUBSIDIZED
"The students may be subsidized to some extent. There
is no reason why faculty
should not pay higher rent
than students, and I think this
will be so."
Bowers felt the mixing of
students and faculty in the
project has two advantages —
easier financing and the intellectual stimulation of the
mixture.
McGregor refused comment
on the plan.
BRAUND
BLASTS  OFF
SEE PAGE 11 Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March   11,   1966
VIOLATE RIGHTS'
Compulsory tests axed
A proposed B.C. law compelling suspected drunk drivers
to take breathalyzer tests
would violate the Canadian
Bill of Rights, a Vancouver
lawyer told a UBC panel debate  Wednesday.
Sidney Simon told 150 law
students compulsory tests
would possibly require a driver to incriminate himself, and
to prove his own innocence.
"The Bill of Rights says no
one can be required to prove
his innocence," he said.
"About 80 per cent of impaired drivers do consent to
take the tests — and usually
convict themselves," Simons
said.
He said he didn't think tests
would   necessarily   lower   the
number of accidents.
"I'm a better, safer driver
for having had a few drinks
during the day to relax myself,
and for having waited for rush-
hour traffic to thin out," he
said.
Vancouver lumber executive
Robert Malkin said he drank
six ounces of liquor in five seconds in an experiment involving the breathalyzer test
at city police station last week,
and got only a .03  rating.
"I would have had to drink
five times that much—30 ozs.
straight to have the .15 impaired level," he said.
"But this might not be the
same for everyone. My metabolism is different from many
other people's," he said.
PAPERBACK
NEW ARRIVALS
List No. 79 - March 7,  1966
Africa.   Nielsen.   (Atheneum.)   _    ....  1.95
After   Robespierre:   the   thermidorian   reaction.   Mathiez.   (Grosset's
Universal Lib.) _ ._.....      2.95
Africa and the Communist World. Brzezinski. (Stanford U.P.)        2.85
Anarchists. Horowitz. (Dell.) _    _.  .95
Atlantic Frontier. Wright.  (Cornell  U.P.)   2.25
Balcony: a play by Jean Genet. Frechtman. (Grove.)   .        2.10
Berkeley: the new student revolt. Draper. (Grove.) .     _     _     _     — 1.00
Bernini. Hibbard. (Pelican.)  .            .     __   _           _      .. . 2.95
Blue Nile. Moorehead. (Four Sq.)   ......                _       1.25
Breaking  the  Silence:  the  Negro   struggle  in  the  U.S.A.  WTeatherby.
(Penguin.)    _     ..   _     _     _.  _   . .      _        _       1.25
California  Progressives.^ Mowry.  (Quadrangel   Bks.)   _.   _       2.35
Chinese & Indian Architecture. Wu. (G. Braziller.) .    .    _    _    ___ 3.55
Classical French Drama. Fowlie. (Bantam.)  .            .60
Coleridge: poetry and prose. Baker. (Bantam.) _                   1.45
Common Muse: popular British ballad poetry. De Sola Pinto. (Pinton.) 1.85
Data Processing. Janda. (Northwestern U.P.)   3.70
Don  Segundo Sombra.  Guiraldes.  (Signet.)   ._  _      . —  .75
ESP for the Millions. Smith. (Sherbourne.)  .     -      _  2.10
Existentialism & Indian Thought. Dutt. (Wisdom Lib.) .     .       1.25
Falange: a history of Spanish fascism. Payne. (Stanford U.P.)   3.20
First Russian Revolution, 1825.  Mazour. (Stanford U.P.)  3.20
Flame of Power. Newman. (McClelland & Stewart.) ..    .95
Forgotten Lanuage. Fromm. (Grove.)        _           ._.._.    1.90
Four Famous Tudor & Stuart Plays. Wright. (Washington Sq.) _     _ .60
Great Purge Trial. Tucker. (Grosset's Universal Lib.)  3.75
Herzog.  Bellow.   (Fawcett Crest.)                       ...       .95
History of Canadian External Relations: Vol. t. Glazebrook.
(Carleton   Lib.)   -     _     ..     _       2.95
History of India. Spear. (Pelican.)     .   ...   — 1.25
Hitler Moves East.  1941-1943.  Carell.  (Bantam.)   1.25
Hitler's Secret Book. Taylor. (Grove.)                     -    _       2.65
Indians of the North Pacific Coast. McFeat. (Carleton Lib.) __  3.65
Introduction to Fiction. Stanton. (Holt, Rinehart.)  _    _..  1.40
Language & Myth. Cassirer. (Dover.)         _..__.     _     _     _     _..-... 1.35
Language, Truth & Logic. Ayer. (Dover.)       _..  1.35
Latin America. Szulc. (Atheneum.)                .     _                           _   1.75
Life & Times of Sir A. T. Gait. Skelton. (Carleton Lib.)        ___.-. 2.95
Logic of Democracy. Thorson. (Holt, Rinehart.) _ — 3.00
Methods  of Collecting  &  Preserving  Vertebrate. Animals.  Anderson.
(National Museum of Canada.)               _                 _    _.._.. 2.00
Military & Society in Latin America. Johnson. (Stanford U.P.)       . 3.20
Modern Democracy. Becker. (Yale.)         _    _.  1.25
Mollusks. Morton.  (Hutchinson  U.  Lib.)         _               3.25
Moscow & Chinese Communists. North. (Stanford U.P.)  3.20
New Bancroft World Atlas and Gazetteer. (Bancroft & Co.) 2.25
New Math, for Teachers & Parents of Elementary School Children.
Baker. (Signet.)               .    _.     .60
Painting  in  England  1500-1880.   Piper (Pelican.)   _.  1.65
Paris Commune of 1871. Jellinek. (Crosset's Lib.)         .    .           _    _ 3.25
Patterns of Sexual Behavior.  Ford.  (Ace Star.)                _     _           .   . .75
Penguin Private Eye. (Penguin.)                                                                  1.25
Petrogenesis of  Metamorphic  Rocks. Winkler.  (Springer-Verlag.) 5.35
Political Science: a philosophical analysis. Van Dyke. (Stanford U.P.) 2.85
Pre-Columbian Architecture. Robertson. (Braziller.) 3.55
Psycho-biology  of  Language:  an   Intro,  to  dynamic philology. Zipf.
(MIT Press)                                                   _______ 3.25
Quest for Being. Hook.  (Delta.)                                          ...___     .. 1.80
Restless Church.  Kilbourn.   (McClelland 8. Stewart.)                _ 2.50
Revolution in Teaching. De Grazia. (Bantam.)                             _     _     _ .95
Roger Casement. MacColl. (Four Sq.)               _                               . 1.25
Russian at War,  1941-1945. Werth. (Avon.)                      _            .   -_■  _ 1.80
Shakespeare's Festive Comedy. Barber. (Meridian.) 2.00
South  Africa's   Hostages:   Bcsutoland,   Bechuanaland,  &   Swaziland.
Halpern.   (Penguin.)                               .     _                         _            2.50
Southeast Asia. Durdin. (Atheneum.)          ..._     _     _     _     _     _...__ 1.95
Star Called the Sun. Gamow. (Bantam.)                _         _      __ .75
Ten Early Plays by Chekov. Szogyi. (Bantam.)   .                  .     _       .95
Thirty Years War.  Wedgewood.  (D.ubleday.)                .__... 1.55
Three Faces of Fascism.  Nolte.  (Holt, Rinehart.)                _     _     _     ... 4.70
Totalitarianism. Friedrich.   (Grosset's Universal Lib.)                       .... 2.95
Two Cheers for Democracy. Forster. (Penguin.)          ..._._. 1.35
Vietnam. Gettleman. (Fawcett Crest.)                         .    _         _.    . .95
Western  Islamic Architecture.  Hoag. (Braziller.)           _ 3.55
Wild Company. Duthie. (Penguin.)                                                    _ 1.35
With Napoleon in Russia. Hanoteau. (Grosset's Universal Lib.)        ... 2.50
UBC BOOKSTORE
Malkin's son was killed in
California when a drunk driver hit his car. Since then, he
has been campaigning for stric-
tor laws against drunken drivers.
Without a breathalyzer test,
Malkin said, conviction becomes a game of wits between
the prosecutor and the defence council.
"There should be compulsory
tests or none at all," he said.
UBC law professor Anthony
Hooper said the present way
of examining, drunken drivers
— physically — is the worst
of all because many illnesses
make a person look drunk.
"There should be chemical
tests, but not compulsory
ones," he said.
LAST WEEK!
BIG MILLER
"COUNTRY - WESTERN BLUE GRASS"
Richard and Jim
March  14-26
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What's the
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It's the Austin-Healey Sprite. And it's got everything that makes it a true sports car. Twin-carb,
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And here's the best part. You just can't pay
less, and still get a true sports car. So get the
new Austin-Healey Sprite, and you'll agree . . .
nobody puts more into car-making than BMC.
The British Motor Corporation of Canada Ltd.
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RE 8-2171 Friday, March   11,   1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
— dermis gans  photo
ACTION-FILLED DAY for Ubyssey assistant news editor Rick Blair (horizontal) got off to a
roaring start when he was pooled on his 21st birthday. Left to right staffers Stu
Gray, Bruce Benton, Blair, Pat Hrushowy, Kurt Hilger, and the Peak's Lome Mallin.
Viet Nam critic will speak
if he can pass port bars
Outspoken critic of U.S.
Viet Nam policy Staughton
Lynd will speak at UBC
March 18 — if customs officials have no objections.
Lynd recently visited Hanoi
on a peace mission.
He said the purpose of the
trip was to seek common
ground for negotiations to
end the Viet Nam conflict.
When he returned1 his passport was withdrawn by the
U.S. State Department because the trip was unauthorized.
In addition to his noon hour
talk at UBC auditorium Lynd
will speak at Simon Fraser
and at a public meeting at
John Oliver High School.
Folksingers   invade   Brock
for concert Monday night
Folksinging is coming to Brock.
The UBC Folk Song Society will present a folk concert
Monday noon in Brock lounge.
Headline entertainers at the concert will be Mariko
and Don and Eileen.
Mariko, a Hawaiian singer popular in Vancouver entertainment circles, is a student at UBC. She is accompanied
by guitarist Hank Piket.
Don and Eileen, winners of the 1965 PNE Folk Festival have appeared at coffee houses throughout the province.
Admission is 25c.
$20,000 to 3-U fund
from Courtenay drive
Courtenay has contributed
sities Capital Fund. L
Courtenay campaign chairman M. S. Wharram turned
over $16,000 from individual
canvasses and $4,000 from 'business firms and professional
people.
Courtenay city council also
recommended a minimum of
$3,485 in grants to the 3-U
Fund over the next five years.
Allan McGavin, fund co-
chairman said1," Courtenay has
become a shining example for
contributions."
Sex!  Sex!
This filler has nothing to do
with sex, but is merely to fill
in a blank space. Now, don't
you feel silly, eh?
$20,00 to the Three Univet-
"A U.S. citizen can travel
outside the country without a
passport, but if he needs the
privileges provided toy a passport, he won't get them," U.S.
consul-general R. F. Courtney
told The Ubyssey.
J. D. Cook of Canadian Immigration said lack of a passport would not keep Lynd out
of Canada.
"But if the U.S. government
has removed the passport to
Lynd in that country and by
dong so placed him in a prohibited class, he would not be
able to enter Canada.
"We would not toe able to
find out until he applies at
Canadian c u s t oms," said
Cook.
Lynd's speech is sponsored
by the Viet Nam Day Committee in support of a march and
rally March 26 to protest
American intervention in
Viet Nam.
Lynd is a 36-year old history professor who was a conscientious objector in the Korean War.
He was inducted in a non-
combat role. A dishonourable
discharge on political grounds
was reversed by the U.S. Supreme Court and he was given
a honorable discharge.
Treasures from
The Art Gallery of
Toronto
Through March 27
31 important paintings by
Rembrandt, Van Dyck, Hals,
Reynolds .Canaletto, Monet,
Renoir, Degas, Picasso and
others.
at
The Vancouver Art
Gallery
open Tue.-Sat. 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Fri. 7 p.m.-lO p.m.. 2 p.m.-
5 p.m.
NO STUDENT ROLE
Bissell backs
faculty ferment
TORONTO (CUP) — A
ment has been recommended
versity of Toronto.
In his annual report, President Claude Bissell called for
a "new theory and practice of
academic government" but denied that students had the right
to take part in it.
"Students tend to see themselves as a power group that
must assert its position and resist sternly any attempt at assimilation, no matter how benevolent.
" .... A university is not
a society of political equals in
the government of which
everyone has a right to participate," he said.
He noted the growth of university staff and its youth
made it less willing to accept
the status quo, and advocated
the creation of staff committees
to help govern the university.
The president said this idea
was behind the creation of the
President's Council, which includes faculty members, administrators and two members of
the Board of- Governors.
He suggested programs involving student-.faculty co-oper-
ation.such as last fall's international teach-in, could be an
essential means of bridging the
gap between the university and
the community.
A magazine of "opinion and
creativity" could be developed under student and staff
auspices, he continued, which
would have more effect on the
community than the scholarly
periodical.
new form of academic govern-
by the president of the Uni-
UBC  bowlers
pin  down  west
UBC pinned 'em all down
in  Edmonton  last weekend.
UBC bowlers won the
Western Canadian Intercollegiate Athletic Association championships with
13,648 points. University of
Alberta (Edmonton) followed with 13,187. University
of Alberta from Calgary was
third. '
Easter weekend
Sedgewick library will remain open till 2 a.m. on Friday, April 8, and till midnight
on Sunday, April 10, the librarian's office announced Thursday.
raacRimoM
EYEGLASSES
All Doctors Eyeglass Prescriptions filled. Only first
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work performed by qualified
Opticians.
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Published Tuesday, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university
year by the Alma Mater Society, University of B.C. Editorial opinions
expressed are those of the editor and not necessarily those of the AMS
or the University. Editorial office, CA 4-3916. Advertising office, CA _-32«.
Loc. 26. Member Canadian University Press. Founding member. Pacific
Student PreBS. Authorized as second-class mail by Post Office Department,
Ottawa,  and  for payment of postage in cash.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies for general
excellence and editorial writing.
FRIDAY,  MARCH   11,   1966
"The responsibility ot the press
is to report the Truth."
—Batman, Feb. 3,   1966
Res rep—1966
Perusing the constitution revisions scheduled to be
debated at the Ma_rch 24 AMS general meeting, we came
upon non-controversial number 5, which affects bylaw 3,
sub-section 5.
The by-law provides for the seating of a non-voting
representative from the university residences on AMS
council.
This provision has been present for a number of
years now, and we'd like to see next year the year when
the residence associations for the first time took up this
opportunity to draw on the AMS resources for the benefit of their members.
Up to the present, the problem seems to have been
the selection of the residence reps. With the collapse
of the Inter-Residence Council, there has been no single
residence student government.
But the case for the residence rep seems to us to be
of such importance — especially now with the planning
of student co-op Tesidences about to begin — that it
would be well worth while for the residences to find
some way of choosing their representative.
If electing one is impractical, the four residence area
presidents might meet to select one of their number to
attend council meetings.
But let's make 1966-67 the year Bylaw 3 (5) becomes
relevant.
Sprong I
i
"A good book, a good crock,
And you beside me in the Brock . . ."
Ah, spring! When a young man's epithet slowly
turns to fancy.
We see in Tuesday's Ubyssey a pastoral scene indeed.
A cheerful threesome consuming food on the library
lawn, a la picnic.
But what's in an epithet. The first of our bit here
is surely impossible, for "no alcoholic beverages are to
be consumed on university property" as the rules go.
What's in an epithet ? Book, rock and Brock are
great, but if we may be excused, they're rot! It's just a
euphemism for unreality.
Or, verse to drug the mind, settle the stomach,
soothe the posterior. Gad! It may even tickle the souls of
the feet.
For if you were picnicing in peace on the library
lawn, what would bother you epithet-wise but cold wind,
wet rocks, passers-by, photographers and reporters, not to
mention building-and-groundsmen.
Yeech! Spring.
A. and T.W.
LETTERS  TO  THE   EDITOR
Jerry or Yank—whattheheck'
Editor,   The   Ubyssey,  Sir:
I am greatly offended at the
letter of March 3 written by
R. Thomas, ed. Ill, concerning
my recognition abilities concerning various aircraft.
I will have you know, sir,
that my squadron won consistently high marks in aircraft
recognition and the class that
I instructed personally won
the P.O. Snoopy Memorial
Flying Doghouse three times
in a row. This trophy was
awarded for highest marks in
aircraft recognition.
I state again, with P.O.
Snoopy's full backing, that
the aircraft in question was
an ME-109  E Messerschmitt.
I have one question to ask
the uncle of the picture sup-
lier. Since a gun camera operates only when the machine
guns are firing, the picture
must have been made while
you were firing at your own
wing man. Why were you
firing at your own Wing man,
Sir?
The answer is obvious. No
self -respect ing RAF pilot
trained  in   the   tradition   of
Pilot Officer Snoopy and his
Flying Doghouse would dare
shoot at his wing man (not
cricket, you know).
He must have been shooting
at a Jerry or a Yank — it
doesn't make much difference.
As for you, Manuel de Cor-
rupta of the Tristan de Cuna
Air Arm: Sir, I challenge you
to a duel, Spitfires at 5,000
feet over VGH this Saturday
at 12 noon. Loser pays.
Ex-Sqdn. ldr. Nigel Feather-
stone-Smilh,
692 Sqdn., RAF.
IN THE EAR
BY IAN CAMERON
Squire Ian meets the math retards
Yesterday, while looking
for lunch, I wandered into the
Brock lounge.
There I found all sorts of
people sitting |
at little tables
playing with
colored sticks.
I saw at once
that whatever
they were doing was im-.
portant, because Bill
Cunningham of the Province
was there.
At any rate, I asked what
was happening, and was told
that this was the first annual
CAMERON
Squires tournament. I asked
what Squires is.
"It's a game that you play
with colored sticks," I was
told.
I wandered over to the
tables, and was immediately
informed that we should all
get away from the tables. I
did so.
As I did so, I noticed that
there seemed to be all sorts
of moves that you could make
at once, and other moves that
you could only make later.
Later, it occured that the
moves you could only make
later were being made now,
since now was later, so I looked to see if these moves were
different from the moves that
you could only make earlier.
The only difference that I
could see was that the earlier
moves had already been made.
Later, I noticed that the
later moves had also been
made, and that now the players were on the moves that
they were only thinking of
making earlier. I even watched them make a couple.
Then, suddenly, I saw a
member of one of the teams,
who was either winning or
losing, muttering under his
breath. I drew nearer.
The head official rushed up
and told me to stop drawing.
I did. I heard him muttering
again. "Again? What kind of
mutter is that?" But then it
came through more clearly.
"4, 5, 6, 7, uh, uh." "Eight," I
whispered. "Eight," he said
thankfully.
I had it. I knew what it was
all about. This was actually
a remedial class in arithmetic,
using Cuisenairre Rods.
Checking, I noticed that
most of the players were arts
students, so I knew I was
right.
Being right, I left.
EDITOR: Tom Wayman
News   Ron Riter
Associate - George Reamsbottom
City Al Donald
Photo          Norm Betts
Sports Ed Clark
Ass't News .. Dan Mullen
Richard Blair, Robbi West
Ass't City      Danny Stoftman
Page Friday John Kelsey
Managing Ian Cameron
Features Mike Bolton
CUP Don Hull
Halverson didn't burn glue.
Hroooshowie edited and was generally unconscionable. Much occurred newswise as it were. Writers were Ann Bishop, Val Zuker,
Bill Graf, Judy Bing who was Nay
Tay in the sky, Carol Wilson, "A
Flabby Guest, Bruise Benton,
Guido Botto, Irving Fetish, Bert
Hill, Derick Blackie, Earle Birney who resigned, Ann Balf, Rosemary Hyman, and Sue Gransby
who wrote about her buddy God
and drugs which will go in Monday. Photogs were chief Betts,
Kurt Hilger, Dennis Gans, Joe
Varesi,   and   Hargrave. Artaud s mad books - pf 2
Play essay footnotes - pf 3
Prism's ed lashes out - pf 6
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INCARNATE: Ex-seven-
year-power-planner Edu-
ard Lavalle is getting a bit
of static from Sigma Tau
Chi. UBC's honorary fraternity.
STX, a co-option bunch
of biggies, is asking questions about 15 STX pins
(at $6.75 apiece) that ex-
prexy Lavalle ordered.
He's got one week to
cough up the pins — or
cash — plus his own un-
paid-for Siggie pin, or he
gets the nix from STX.
INSOMNIA: — Insiders
have it that Roger (SUBhuman) McAfee is cracking up.
His paid ad in Tuesday's
Ubyssey was — by count
— one-fifth SUB propaganda and four-fifths diatribe against those evil
people who operate your
friendly local campus
newspaper.
A pair of AMS wheels
are upset about what they
claim is McAfee's misuse
oft student money. Their
idea is that council ordered Roger to buy the ads
to boost SUB, not to display paranoid tendencies.
Hiey cite the non-appearance of today's promised SUB ad as proof that
the boy is getting further
and further out of his tree.
IN ABSENTIA: — Outgoing AMS treasurer Mike
(Money) Sommers pulled a
walk-out at Monday's council meeting.
Pulling the stunt in the
style of co-ordinator Graeme (Twitchy) Vance. Sommers left council in a big
snit after fledgling second
v-p Ian MacDougall offended him with some cracks
about council's forthright
indecision on athletics this
year.
He returned after president Byron (Baby) Hender
ordered MacDougall to pursue him, kiss, and make
up.
INCENSED: — Overheard at the pinko party:
Wife of sometimes consensus editor Pete Cameron
berating a Ubyssey staffer
for an opinion column
which didn't take the
standard leftist bleeding-
heart line about Viet Nam:
"Why, why, man —
you're just not WITH it!"
To which the bemused
staffer rejoined:
"I'd just as soon not be,
thank you." End of conversation.
INEXPLICABLE: — Ex-
ad-hoccers held a rent
party at their Tenth Avenue Advance Mattress coffee house location. ■
The rent is $120 a
month. The party netted
them  $40.
The word is the pinkos
will again delve into the
depths of capitalism and
hustle another share issue {at $5 per) on the public.
• •      •
INCONSISTENT: —UBC
senate candidate Donovan
Miller lauded our Rhodes
Scholars in a very nice
speech to the student-alumni banquet Wednesday
night. Too bad last year's
Rhodes boy Ian Clarke
wasn't there to hear it. He
wasn't allowed to come because he RSVP'd his invitation a day late.
• •      •
' IN DEPTH: — UBC senate candidate and ex-Uby-
ssey editor Mike (Vroom)
Hunter, law II, didn't know
he was a candidate until
he read it in the paper.
He's standing, anyway.
• •      •
IN THE FOURTH ESTATE: — The Vancouver
Sun has a new education
reporter to keep a jaundiced eye on the handouts
spread around by UBC-PR
poobah Ralph ("He didn't
say that") Daly.
He's Clive Cocking, an
ex-education student dredged from the depths of
the Sun's finance department and church pages.
Former education man,
J. Lionel Arnett, goes over
to Lovick's ad agency for
great heaps  of moolah.
• •       •
UNPOPULAR: — Engineer P. J. Meehan replaces
Don Wise as perennial loser of the year. He contested his seventeenth EUS
position this week — and
chalked up his seventeenth
straight loss.
• •      •
IN THE OUT DOOR: —
Local racists are fervently
trying to find out if chancellor candidate John
(Fishy) Buchanan has ever
had the nickname "Tuck".
Ijf he did, they could
say his race against Randy
Enomoto is nip and . . . oh,
forget it.
• •       •
IN SPLINTERS: — AMS
prexy-elect Mrs. Braund's
little boy Pete stomped into Blunder's luxurious
quarters in a towering
(joke) rage.
Emphasizing his outrage,
he pounded on Blunder's
glass-topped  desk.
The glass broke. The bill
was $20. Nobody knows
who paid for it. pf
Friday
March  11   1966
editor:  JOHN  KELSEY
current affairs: STEVE BROWN
science,  the  arts:  AL  FRANCIS
associate: CLAUDIA GWINN
ON THE COVER: Photographer
Powell Hargrove's art. Pentax
S-3 with 200 mm Tamron f.3.5 at
f-8, 1-250 sec. on Tri-X.
umph
While shopping for the
weekly essentials, American kratze, cheesies, peppermint tea, baby food,
etc., we rounded the corner from the detergents
into dogfoods and cereals.
Wonder if they are intentionally grouped that
way by the SPCA? Any
way the similarity, coincidental or other wise of
the sudsy and snappy products is remarkable.
From the brightness of
kitchen's Joy, Gay and
Cheer we were Whisked
into the jet age of cut-out
rockets and box top
iboomerrangs. It's Kix,
Cheerios, Crispy Critters
and Zoom stacked neatly
into rows on the shelves
just waiting to be launched into the shopping cart
and later ripped open for
their free surprise inside.
Someday we'd like to
create one of those zany
catch-the-eye names and
print it in vibrant fuchsia
and heliotrope on any and
every product from peanut butter to canned soup.
Our zany catch-the-eye
name would be Umph.
Umph will be energy
building, polyunsaturated, fruit flavored, vitaminized, non-fat, crunchy
and the kiddies will love
it. There's be no tears
with the easy to swallow
purple pill.
People will be able to
gulp, chew, spit or snuff
Umph with no side effects. It will cause no
nausea ,head ache or soreness of muscles. And it
will be safe enough for
children to use.
So why don't you try—
Umph.
By the way what ever
happened to snap, crackle
and pop?
PROPHET-MADMAN
BOOKS
Down on flaming wings —Artaud
By   IAN  WALLACE
With the publication of the Artaud
Anthology by City Lights Books we
at last have a comprehensive English
collection of the writings of the French
madman/prophet Antonin  Artaud.
A victim of psychic disorders since
his youth, Artaud was active in Paris
in the 20's as a stage and film actor,
playwright, director and poet. During
the early 30's he developed his theories of theatre of cruelty, which is the
substructure of today's theatre of the
absurd.
Upon his return to Paris in 1936
from participation in the peycote rites
of the Tarahumara Indians of Mexico,
Artaud decided to commit suicide.
He was saved from this fate by the
authorities and spent his next nine
years in insane asylums. He finally
died in 1948, a year after his release.
The Artaud Anthology is an accumulation of scribblings, poems, manifestos, letters, drawings — sometimes
lucid, sometimes indecipherable — of
a man. whose attitude to life, society
and culture was so completely uncompromising that he ended up by destroying himself. In an attempt to be consumed by the sun he plunged back to
earth  with flaming  wings.
Artaud's writing, bitter, messianic,
confessional, is a tirade against the
cruel burden that life and matter
places upon the spirit. Correction: it
is a frenetic gesture — it is the pain
of the flesh demanding release from
the autocracy of spirit and mind.
Until recently Artaud has been ignored by critics and academics because of his contradictions and irrationality. He does not play the game
of literature — to him every word is
total commitment. Thus he is an uncomfortable person to fit into any literary scene. To quote Artaud: "All writing is pigshit."
Anglo-Saxon reaction against Artaud
goes even further than literary incom-
patability.
His emotional effusiveness and catholic spirit run counter to WASP emotional self-consciousness and progressive pragmatism but Artaud-the-mad-
man now gets attention from the
neo-barbarian, hung-up generation of
1966.
Artaud is not a comfortable man to
read or discuss; he demands commitment yet denies any escapes.
Unlike compatriot Jean Genet, who
turns farts into perfume, Artaud turns
gold into excretion. Artaud feeds upon
this excretion in the form of opium,
a toxic life-force which at the same
time leads him to an inevitable and
desirable death.
"And if there is one hellish, truly
accursed thing in our time, it is our
artistic dallying with forms instead of
being like victims burnt at the stake,
gesturing through the flames."
A reading of the Artaud Anthology
makes us witnesses to this ecstatic unforgettable   self-crucifixion.
Sacrificial ritual perpetuates bondage
By   AL   FRANCIS
It is a constant surprise
to me that two contradictory
ideas such as feminine equality and weddings can be
found compatible by today's
supposedly enlightened university student.
Not to rehash those recently warmed-over issues of the
dubious possibility of feminine equality or the tenous
validity of matrimony, weddings are the repository of
the very sentiments and beliefs which pronounce women inferior.
Al Francis was married in
a civil ceremony last December.
In our society, a girl is
taught, by her mother of
course, to look forward to
her wedding as the greatest
day of her life, equated in
importance with birth and
death.
There can be no denying
it is a significant transitional
point in the life of both
bride and groom, a rite of
passage. In this capacity, the
wedding can be viewed as
a ritual.
It is a ritual of sacrifice,
similar to virgin sacrifices
of more exotic cultures.
•       •       •
It is however, a ritual of
social sacrifice, the sacrifice
of identity, as symbolised by
the changing name, and of
authority — from father to
husband.
There is, implicit in the
ceremony, the archaic social
attitude that a woman is not
an individual and is in a
position of lifelong subservience to a man.
This attitude is illustrated
by more than the traditions
of the biblical blurb and the
etiquette shrouded ceremony
of where everyone stands
and the part they each must
act out. It goes beyond the
symbolic acts of the father
giving away the bride and
the   groom   taking   over  by
placing a durable ring on her
pinkie.
This attitude is demonstrated by the current social conventions attached to the great
day, paricularly that it is the
bride's day.
•      •       •
On every newspaper social
page there are long, drooling descriptions of such trivialities as the bride's dress,
the color of flowers, in short
the amount of money spent.
The groom is merely identified.
The bride spends months
of breathless preparation for
this day. She is bombarded
with suggestions from relatives, friends, and stores on
the important marital decisions of bridal dress, bridesmaids and entourage, floral
display, photographs to preserve her one day for poster
ity, the reception, church
and minister. Sometimes the
groom is consulted, but usually he is just swept along
by the tidal wave of activity.
The groom's tasks are to
rent the usual tuxedo and get
drunk enough to go through
with the whole grisly business.
But this is right and just,
for when the day is over,
he is still an individual as
he was before, with the addition of a cook and baby
machine, sometimes companion.
She has disappeared, completely assimilated into the
accessory role of wife, a
sacrifice compensated for by
the one great day, preserved
by the ubiquitous yellowing
photo on her dresser.
Or so the wedding suggests.
Marriage need not be like
this description today. Two
reasonably intel&gent people can obviously conduct
their relationship on a basis
of equality and compromise,
not subjection.
The wedding, however, is
a vestigial ritual which re-
the elements of the doctrine of
presents and embodies all
feminine inferiority which
today's equality seeking women are still lamenting half
a century after suffrage.
•       •       •
If women can spare a moment from criticising the attitudes of men, they should
cast an eye on this institution, one peculiar to their
sex, preserved and promoted
by  generations   of  moms.
What'U it be girls, white
>   brocade  or  sackcloth?
"These addicts . . . you can spot 'em a mile away."
Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March 11, 1966 WARM  WINTER
CINEMA
First of everything for misfit
By JUDY  BING
If winter kept David Secter and his crew warm in
the past,, critical acclaim
should do so in future.
The all-student feature
Winter Kept Us Warm, is the
story of Peter, (Henry Tar-
vainen) an awkward freshman <j.rom a Northern mining town, as he progresses
along a road which brings
him closer to maturity and
takes him further and furth
er from his best friend, the
swinger Doug (John Labow),
a commerce senior.
In Doug's possessive jealousy there is a suggestion of
homosexuality, which Sector treats with rare understanding.
The parallel theme, loss
of innocence, is handled
much less subtly. In the
course of the plot Peter has
his first drink, his first hangover, and his first sexual
experience.   That   these   in
SURE WAS A WARM WINTER at old University of Toronto,
which plays in the auditorium today at noon, 3:30, 6 and
8 p.m.; Saturday at 6 and 8:30 p.m.
themselves constitute loss of
innocence is an oversimplification.
The film would have received another dimension if
Peter's rather ordinary and
stirctly physical experiences
were supplemented by a loss
of political, religious, and
general intellectual naivety.
Secter's scenario is weakest in portraying his female characters. Sandra
(Janet Amos) and Bev (Joy
Tepperman) are a pair of
shallow predatory coquettes
difficult to accept as university students.
Nevertheless the film has
much to recommend it. The
montage at the beginning,
Paul Hoffert's musical score,
consistently competent camera work, and the clever if
not always clearly audible
dialogue all work to capture
an authentic university atmosphere. The romp through
the snow, Sandra and Peter
skipping across the campus
in spring, and the shower
scene are particularly eloquent statements of love and
friendship.
Through his central characters, Sector makes yet
another kind of statement
— that the extroverted big-
man-around-campus is often
insecure and seldom finds
the happiness and fulfillment the quiet misfit
achieves.
Play or perish, dammit
By STEVE BROWN
Know how we're always
been urged to push aside
notebooks left on study desks
in the library and sit down?
Don't do it.
It's distracting. And disturbing.
I was in the throes of reading for an essay on de Gaulle
and the Recovery of France
since the War and I didn't
have time to search out an
empty desk.
But I had time enough to
get curious about an essay
lying on top of the notebooks
left on the desk.
It was titled, "The Importance of Play in the Primary
Grades. Education 405.
Second term essay."
Can you blame me for
being curious? A term essay
on play? I had to look inside . . .
It began: "Before I begin a
discussion of the importance
of play, it is necessary to define the word 'play'." Honest.
Then there was a quote
from some book: "Play is a
necessary part of the lives
(sic) of the young child." Profound.
I should have stopped
right there. I was starting to
feel ill. Was this what education   students   were   getting
away with while I poured
over discourses on contemporary history?
Like a fool I glanced to
the last page. After about
1,500 words the essay ended,
"Indeed, there is no activity
more valuable to mankind
than play."
I sense the teachers of tomorrow are going to be a
dogmatic lot. I can hear them
now, terrorizing the kids:
"Play, damn you! Play or
perish!"
I ignored the content of
the essay long enough to
notice that it was quite well
written. That made me feel
even more nauseous — the
author obviously spent days
working on it, polishing trivia.
But worse than the essay
were the marker's comments.
"I am glad that you realize  the importance   of   play
as a learning tool, Cathy.
"In our new program," the
marker confided, "the element of play has been
neglected.
"Please include a bibliography at the end of your
study." Please?!
"Please," he concluded
folksily, "look up the correct
procedure for presenting
footnotes, Cathy."
A sample footnote: "5.
Play is Education". Nothing
more. No author—an anonymous book? No page number,
even. Maybe they read one-
page books in education . . .
Right now, I could believe
it.
There May Be A Lot Of Dances
This Weekend
BUT
SATURDAY NITE
Will  Be The Best.
THE
Shanteil
with
KENTISH  STEELE GO-GO GIRLS
Roy  Hennessy
Bring Your Key Club Card — It May Be Valuable.
9:00-1:00, March  12 In Brock
BRING YOUR A.M.S.  CARD
HONEYMOON AT THE HARRISON
Spend lazy days golfing, riding, strolling by the lake, swimming in the hot pools and the sparkling outdoor pool. Cp
Enjoy fun-filled evenings in the gay Copper Room with dancing
and entertainment nightly. ^P Memorable food, a relaxing
resort atmosphere, and The Harrison's magnificent mountain
scenery. ^O For that most special holiday, plan to stay at
The Harrison. *%g Just 2 hours drive from Vancouver, B.C.;
3/i from Seattle.
June honeymooners receive a special wedding present - 50% off room rates
THE HARRISON Hotel
a distinguished resort at
Harrison Hot Springs, British Columbia
In Vancouver:
Call    toll free    521-8888,
see your travel agent
PRINCE GEORGE
SCHOOL DISTRICT
TEACHERS
Teachers interested in this dynamic and rapidly growing
centre of Central British Columbia may obtain full details concerning available positions, working conditions,
salary and fringe benefits by arranging for an appointment at our "Trustee Day" booth in the Armouries on
Tuesday, March 15th, 1966. Follow-up interviews will be
held in the Personnel Building on Wednesday, Thursday,
and Friday, March 16, 17th, and 18th.
Appointments for off campus interviews on Monday,
March 14th, may be arranged by phoning the Prince
George delegation at the Ramada Inn.
School District #57 (Prince George) Offers
* 50 additional teachers
each year.
* Opportunity for administrative experience.
* Resident professor plan.
* Summer School bonus for
1966 summer credits.
* Low rental teacherages in
rural areas.
* Supervisory staff assistance.
* Fare and boarding allowance for practice teaching.
* May and June internship
for selected1 students.
* Central school for special
classes and occupational
students.
Friday,  March   11,   1966
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7 SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 33
CHILLIWACK
Invites well-qualified teachers to visit its booth on Trustee
Day and to consult with its interviewing team in Hut M-4
on Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, March 16th, 17th
and 18th. Appointment lists are posted in the Personnel
Office.
Secondary Vacancies:
A specialist needed in each of the following fields:
Commerce, Library, French, Home Economics, Occupational, English, Social Studies, Mathematics, and
Science.
Elementary Vacancies:
A few teachers required in the following categories:
Primary, Intermediate, Slow Learners, Relieving.
Direct application may be made to:
Dr. J. I. Macdougall,
District Superintendent of Schools,
235 Yale Road East,
Chilliwack,  B.C.
Phone: 792-1321.
Love That Suit
In Your Fun Shade!
Gaze into the bright and shiny
world beyond through op-decorated Fun Shades! They're the
greatest things under the sun!
Made from durable celanese acetate, decorated in mad, uninhibited op art! Be the first in your
crowd to wear Fun Shades!
Young Flair Shop —
All Four Stores
EATON'S
cold war
We, the generation who have grown up
during the Cold "War, often find it difficult
to reject or even examine objectively the
myths that have grown up with us.
Our concepts of international politics, our
ideas about the forces engaged in the battle
for world supremacy, indeed the very conviction that such a struggle exists, have all
matured in the tense atmosphere of East-
West confrontation since the second World
War. Our opinions and reactions were forged
in the furnace of conflicts which often threatened to flame into nuclear war.
Whether the particular crisis occured1 in
Korea or Venezuela, Suez or Hungary, Berlin
or Cuba, Taiwan or the Congo, the lines of
battle always seemed clearly drawn, the
enemy clearly identified. In the heat of the
Cold War we have had little opportunity for
a temperate appraisal of the very assumptions
that the struggle is based on.
We have largely accepted the view that
each particular crisis is the direct result of
the general concept of global confrontation is
of East and West, the USSR and the U.S. are
waging against each other. Perhaps China is
now replacing Russia as the arch-enemy, but
the general concept of global confrontation is
not essentially altered.
But to accept the idea of the Cold War is
to leave two extremely important and highly
pertinent questions unanswered. Are there not
individual situations which simply do not fit
into the generalized scheme ? And is this
generalized scheme of world-wide confrontation essential or valid in explaining the post
W.W. II course of international politics ? In
other words, are the assumptions and interpretations from which our actions and reactions proceed in fact based on reality ?
To answer the first question in the affirmative is to deny that local and regional problems can have local and regional causes, and
thus local and regional solutions. It is to view
an impoverished, desperate and therefore revolutionary South American peasant as an
agent of international communism, and the
dictatorial junta general who opposes him as
the staunch defender of democracy.
DISSENT ...
For if everywhere the struggle is between
communism and democracy, then the peasant
and the general must somehow be adversaries in that struggle.
Thus local conditions and local history
must be declared irrelevant. It is this view
which compels Us to see Viet Nam, for example, as another battleground in the global war.
And we forget that Vietnamese history did not
begin with the first American bomb to fall
in North Viet Nam, nor with the first Viet
Cong attack on a Saigon army outpost.
Secondly, is it valid to speak of a global
conflict ? It is, if it can be shown that there
exists an adversary bent everywhere on conquest and agression, and on posing a threat to
our security. But to say that such an adversary
exists, namely communism; is to simplify
innumerable local and international problems
into the black and white picture of an ideological struggle.
For example, Russia's actions after the
Second World War are seen as blatant agression by subscribers to the "global conflict"
theory, agression designed to spread the doctrine of communism throughout the world.
Thus the early history of the Soviet Union is
forgotten — forgotten the devastation and
unparalleled disasters of the first World War,
forgotten the Allied invasions of Russia during
the revolutionary civil war, forgotten the long
isolation and ostracism of the hew state, and
forgotten the horrors of the Nazi occupation.
In light of these it is not surprising that
Russia might desire to set up a buffer zone in
Eastern Europe but history must be disregarded1 to make possible the validation of our
theories.
Russia may not possess the right to subjugate foreign nations to her authority — a
right, apropos, which no great power has ever
voluntarily abdicated — nevertheless, our reactions must be based on an understanding of
history and of international politics, not on an
abstract and spurious theory of global ideological struggle.
This is but one example of our failure to
apply understanding and reason to a particular
situation, a failure that reoccured often
throughout the past two decades.
And the failure reoccurs because we have
seized upon myths which we are unable to
cast away — so much that each new event
merely reinforces the myths.
If progress is to ibe made towards peace and
international co-operation, these myths, particularly that of inevitable global conflict,
must be rejected.
We must possess the patience and the tolerance to study each particular problem in the
light of its own local long range causes, and
see in it only such international implications
as actually exist. To do otherwise is to condemn ourselves to the continuation of the Cold
War, with no end in sight.
...ON JAZZ
Down with good guys
By ANGUS RICKER
The jazz scene for Special
Events — color it red with
a black future.
Saturday night's financial
debacle with the Paul Winter
ensemble is not an album
title and has extended the
Special Events budget past
the reach of any subsidy lifeline.
The boxscore for the year
records some solid musical
successes: Freddie Redd,
Charlie Mingus, Byron Pope,
Jon Hendricks and Winter.
But on Hendricks and Winter Special Events bled red
to the tune of $2,000. The
immediate result will be future jazz attractions at UBC
only if they can be sub-let
from other Vancouver promoters.
And the obvious corollary
will be the revolting masses'
return to the smelly gymnasium for some pop culture
clinically dispensed by The
Four Preps, the Chad Mitchell Trio and their antispe-
tic ilk.
Courtesy of Special Events,
of course.
At the risk of showing my
value judgments I will enter
a dissent. When Special
Events presents Paul Winter
or Jon Hendricks they are
providing the university and
the community with a culturally valid musical experience.
The Four Preps are neither
special or an event. Pop
music groups by definition
solicit mass appeal and while
I do not begrudge UBC students the Four Preps, the
good guys and the top cats
are not the best medium for
their presenation.
As an event the Preps offer
highly contrived and artlessly disguised lack of talent at
ridiculous prices.
Of course Special Events
count on our present enlight-
In summary, if it's the
Four Preps at $1,300 loss or
Paul Winter at $1,000 Spec
ial Events subsidies are best
spent on the latter.
Of course Special Events'
has yet to curb losses and
under present circumstances
it's highly doubtful if they
can. It would be unreasonable to give Special Events
carte blanche funds but an
AMS council endorsement of
their policy would give next
year's chairmen confidence
in planning future programs.
A mandate from council
would enable Special Events
to develop a specific jazz
program which could be sold
to the public on a subscrin-
tion basis. Such plans have
proven successful at American universities like Stanford and Hunter College.
UBC tie-ins with such
schools would no doubt reduce concert costs and provide a coherent artistic program. Now, if we could just
count our present enlightend
council for an endorsement,
ened council for an endorsement.
Page 8
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday, March 11, 1966 MARIKO, Hawaiian folksing-
er and UBC student, sings
Monday noon in Brock, with
guitarist Hank Piket.
Try candles
to get lit
By CLAIRE WEINTRAUB
Everywhere I go these
days I keep running into
candles.
Like at Doug Hawthorn's
Blind Owl Sandal Shop.
Well Doug, says I, how
are things?
Not too bad, he says. Sandal sale's over, people gonna have to pay spring and
summer prices now (by God,
spring is here). Nice bags,
starting to make leather
clothes, a few pots in sight
some fairly interesting jewelry.
But how about those candles?
You mean those, and he
points to a collection of
bright colored sand-cast candles on a shelf.
Yeah.
Well, they're tempting, but
people around here don't
seem to know what to do
with candles these days.
Could try burning 'em.
Yep.
Might get people to looking at the flame. Nice thing
to watch, a burning candle
flame. Sure is.
Might save a lot of wear
and tear on the old match-
ables. Kind of romantic too.
That's OK. Makes a cheap
meal look good.
Could be. Might even
make a good meal look better.
Candles. Well, now . . .
Maybe so, maybe so. . . .
Our Man in ANTRON
is poised for the action
UTEX: mastermind behind this suave rain-
chaser. The "Continental". A blue-ribbon blend
of ANTRON nylon and cotton. Protected by
ZEPEL* fabric fluoridizer by Du Pont. Spots
and stains don't stand a chance. Neither does
the lady. This coat's as smooth as its name.
  ANTRON
*ZE PEL is the registered T.M. of
E. I. du Pont de Nemours & Co. Inc.
CANADA
the name you can trust in fibres
University Hill
United Church
on University Boulevard
Invites You to Worship
Sunday, March 13, 11 a.m.
Church Parade of Cubs,
Scouts, Guides & Brownies.
Address:  "BE PREPARED"
Rev. Harold L. MacKay
7:00 p.m. — University
Young People's
WE  WELCOME   YOU
CASH
FOR YOUR
Text Books
PAPERBACKS
AND MAGAZINES
BETTER BUY BOOKS
4393 W. 10th Ave.
DRIVING IN UK
OR EUROPE?
• RENTALS
• LEASIN6S
• PURCHASE
COUNTRY
MaR This CwpM Or Mmm f*
FREE   BOOKLET
EUROPEAN CARS SERVICE
•2 RICHMOND SIKH, W.
SWTE1002.T0MNIT01.0NT.UIUM
PHONE 386-2413
SAVE
NIKKORMAT
THE   SLIDE   PROJECTOR   WITH
4-WAY OPERATION
Automatic   Timer,   Pushbutton,
Remote,  or  Manual  Controls.
5-WAY PROJECTION
Rototrays,   Universal   Trays,   Easy-
Edit Trays, Stackloader and Single
Slide Projection.
with NIKKOR Optics
now at
RUSHANT
CAMERAS LTD.
4538 West 10th, Vancouver
224-5858        -        224-9112
BAY
Women of the
World
(Restricted)
Plus
THE PUMPKIN EATER
(Restricted)
Anne Bancroft,
Peter Finch - J. Mason
STUDENTS 75c
DELTA
BLACK SPURS
plus
WEEKEND WITH LULU
Leslie Phillips and
Robert Monkhouse
SPECIAL
EVENTS
PRESENTS
The Foerstrova Trio
TODAY
F
r
i
d
a
y
M
a
r
c
h
11
F
r
e
d
e
r
W
o
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50c
Direct from behind the Iron Curtain. Czechoslovakia's
most accomplished instrumentalists. Selections will include   Brahms,   Beethoven,   Shostakovitch   and   Haydn.
OPTICAL DEPT.
Bring your optical prescription
to us and save!
Glasses   Single vision from _,_.   9.95
Bifocals from 12.95
Contact Lenses  49.50
ONE LOCATION ONLY
677 Granville, opp. the Bay, 681-6174
1 Hour Free Parking at Rite  Park
Alma Mater Society
OFFICIAL NOTICES
Assistant Co-ordinator:
Applications are now being accepted for the position
of Ass't. Co-ordinator. Applicants should apply in
writing to the Co-ordinator-Elect, A.M.S. Office, Brock
Hall. All applications must be accompanied by an
elegibility form. Applications will close on March 24,
1966.
Brock Management Committee:
Applications are now being accepted for positions on
the Brock Management Committee. They should be
sent to the Co-ordinator-Elect, A.M.S. Office, Brock
Hall. Applications must be submitted by March 24,
1966.
Chairmen  Needed:
Applications are now being received lor chairmanship
of the following committees:
Student Union Building Chairman
Open House Chairman
Ubyssey Editor
Totem Editor
Leadership Conference Chairman
High School Conference Committee
Intramural Committee
Academic Activities Committee
All  applications   shall   be   in   writing:  and shall   be
addressed   to  the   Secretary  (Box 54).  Eligibiltiy  forms
must be submitted with applications. Eligibility forms are
available in the Secretary's office (S. Brock).
Applications must be submitted by 4:00 p.m.
Friday, March 11, 1966.
Friday, March   11,   1966
THE
UBYSSEY
Page 9 PROF WRITES PRIMER FOR PF
By JACOB ZILBER
Having once attacked the
Vancouver Sun for irresponsible criticism of The Ubyssey, I would be wrong to let
pass the irresponsibility in
your recent editorial and
Miss Walsh's review of Prism
International.
Here then is a Primer for
Page Friday critics.
Get the facts straight.
Contrary to the editorial,
Earle Birney was not Prism's
founder, and had no connection with it until four years
after its first issue.
No collectors' items were
sold at ten cents each. The
only collectors' items were
complete volumes which
have been sold at the prices
listed in our announcement.
amples — wrong ones, unfortunately, and in support
of a trite and true thesis:
there is a gap between literary magazines and most
"consumers." But is this What
caused the Simon Fraser
group to start a new quarterly? The reader is asked to
Jacob Zilber is a UBC
creative writing professor
and editor of Prism International.
The copies you apparently
refer to were from certain
back issues.
Prism pirated no one's plot
to go international. From its
beginnings (several years before Limbo appeared), it published foreign as well as Canadian authors.
Contrary to Miss Walsh's
review, the early Prism appeared quarterly. Its contents were gathered from
various countries, and did
not consist of "scraps of literary verbage (sic) from very
minor Vancouver writers."
Among the local authors presented were Earle Birney,
George Woodcock, Dorothy
Livesay, and Margaret Laurence.
Know what you mean and
say it clearly.
The editor should consult
his dictionary for the meaning of horde — not eight —
and literally — no publishing venture ever croaked
belly-up literally. Issues of a
magazine cannot line up on
bookshelves and then threaten to "overflow and engulf
the corridors."
If these are meant to be
instances of poetic license,
then to borrow Dwight MacDonald's phrase, the editor's
license Should be revoked
for two weeks.
Miss Walsh needs an interpreter. In thought one she
says that Prism was awful,
and that Prism International
isn't much better. In thought
two she comments, "The
quality of the issue (the current one), which is understandably high, is not due entirely to the contributions of
the international poets, but,
except for a few ugly exceptions in the poetry, is generally good in the Canadian
writers". Thought three
states that the issue would
"lose nothing" but volume
with the omission of their
(the foreign authors') work."
The mystery appears to be
solved, finally, at the end of
the article .with some assistance from the caption-writer.
"Despite the garbage, there
are some jewels in Prism—
if you look for them." But
no examples of garbage are
presented for inspection.
Present examples to support your criticism and know
your subject.
The   column   gives   ex-
Page  10
accept the editor's assumption on faith.
In seeking to inform and
to correct the public taste in
letters, do not mimic the
worst aspects of the local
press. Otherwise, you will
prove only that you are too
much in the Sun.
Students dodge 1 /350 puddles
Sidewalks at the University come mud puddles during Van-
of British Columbia, near Van- couver's   eleven   month   rainy
couver, B.C., contain more than season
1,350   depressions   which   be-
C
A
N
A
D
I
A
N
CUISINE AT ITS BEST!
MODERN CAFE
Bavarian Room   -:-   3005 W. Broadway   -:-   RE 6-9012
EDUCATION
STUDENTS
are  invited to attend
ARMSTRONG & REA
OPTOMETRISTS
EYES EXAMINED
CONTACT LENSES
2 Convenient Offices
■ BROADWAY at GRANVILLE
■ KERRISDALE   41st at YEW
TRUSTEE DAY
at University of B.C.
on March 15, 1966
to  meet representatives of
School  Boards of  British Columbia
Students from other Faculties are
welcome to attend to discuss career
opportunities in  Education.
Watch your bulletin  boards for times
and  places of meetings.
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday, March 11, 1966 Friday,  March   11,   1966
THE        UBYSSEY
Page  11
FOREGROUND
'Only allegiance I have is to
student council'—Pres. Braund
Ubyssey reporter Pat Hrushowy last week managed to
steal a Radsoc laperecorder
and corner AMS presidentelect Peter Braund over dinner. Here's the result, which
should give a preview of the
direction of next year's AMS
council.
Ubyssey: What do you think
of Randy Enomoto running
for Chancellor?
PB: I'd like to separate the
question into two parts. What
do I think of Randy and what
do I think of a student running for chancellor.
I've known Randy for the
last year and he is a very intelligent chap and has done
a lot, I think, for the student
body.
If a more experienced student was running, I think
council would have seriously
backed him for chancellor but
I don't think Randy has the
experience a lot of other
councillors would like to see
him have.
Ubyssey: Then you would
like to see a student as chancellor?
PB: Not a student as chancellor but a student running
as chancellor.
Ubyssey: Do you think there
should be students on the senate?
PB: Yes I do and I actually think this is a better
idea than running a student
for chancellor because right
now, a student running for
chancellor looks like a joke
to most people.
I think we will get a student on the Senate. There is
a very good chance that one
of the four, particularly Ben
Trevino, <the AMS lawyer),
will get on.
Ubyssey: Are you in favor
of the student union building
as it is now planned?
PB: I certainly am. I think
the original concept is a good
one.
This campus has nothing
now and probably won't in
five years, unless this project
is completed. The building
will be within two or three
minutes walking distance for
14,000 students when it is
completed.
The building will not only
expand the facilities available in Brock but will provide new facilities that are
needed by groups on this
campus.
The pressure has been on
the students' council for six
or seven years to provide
these facilities but it is a long
and slow process.
Ubyssey: In your opinion,
would Co-op housing, be a
good alternative to SUB?
PB: I don't look on Co-op-
housing as an alternative at
all. I think as a program it
can run concurrently with the
student  union  building.
Those people who are professing to start co-op housing
don't realize that you don't
need to stop a $5 million project to get a $5 million residence started. All you need
is about $200,000 to get a coop residence started.
You   start   co-op  housing;
PETER BRAUND
... he comments
from then on it's self-financing; this is the whole principle of co-op housing.
Ubyssey: Do you think students should actively protest
conditions in residences?
PB: It all depends. The residence survey that I looked
over, most of the conditions
that the students disagreed
with were minor conditions
such as inadequate lighting,
for instance, which is a very
sore point because students
have to take their own lamps
into the dining room to study.
In my talks with Dr. Malcolm McGregor, (residence director), I find that he is planning to aleviate these minor
grievances.
The present difficulties in
residences are, in my opinion
minor, they can be worked
out if done quickly and with
as much pressure as possible
from the residence students.
Actively protest? I think
they are going about it the
right way now.
Ubyssey: You have stated
that withholding fees isn't the
form of protest.
PB: I think personally that
rather than go after the board,
now we've got to pay atten-
SCHOOL DISTRICT No. 86
Creston - Kaslo
B.C.'s newest amalgamated school district, in the heart
of the Kootenays, invites applications from teachers for
1966-1967 terms.
SECONDARY. SCHOOLS at Creston, Kaslo, Riondel:
—Home Economics
—Social  Studies and Geography
—Mathematics
—Science
—Girls' Physical  Education
—English
—Commercial
—French
—Counselling and/or Library qualifications desirable at Riondel and Kaslo.
PRIMARY and INTERMEDIATE positions in graded and
semi-graded schools.
For application forms write C. C. Wright, District Superintendent of Schools, Box 149, Creston, B.C.,
On March 16, 17, 18, Mr. Wright, Mr. F. Martello, Supervising Principal of Prince Charles Secondary School, and
Mr. A. Robertson, Elementary Supervisor, will interview
applicants at the Personnel Office, U.B.C, betwean 9:00
a.m. and 4:00 p.m. Appointments may be made at the
Student Personnel Office.
tion to the provincial government and the public in a. dramatic responsible way.
To tell the public why the
fees are going up, how students are suffering and what
students propose to do about
it.
Now is the time to protest
against the government and
ask them for more funds with
good reason to do so. I think
any fight with our own administration, although it
brings the problem to air in
the university, does not bring
it outside where it should be
put.
Ubyssey: Do you think UBC
should have athletic scholarships?
PB: I think it is a good
idea. We haven't thought of
this on this campus for a long
time until Simon Fraser started it.
There has never been a
great demand at UBC for
good scholars and good athletes all wound up in one because we haven't had the
spirit.
UBC must first get th'e
spirit then the administration
and alumni will take a greater
pride in extra-mural athletics
and will then say "let's try to
get some top men, let's offer
athletic  scholarships."
Ubyssey: What do you think
of student and administrative
officials that say' "no comment" in answer to the student press?
PB: If I say no comment it
will be because I don't know
the facts or am unsure of the
ifacts.
Often it is a good idea in
the sense that, especially after
a heated debate where you
might have somebody ranting
and raving and saying something that he didn't mean, a
no comment reply would be
good.
Ubyssey: being a Liberal
politically, would this affect
any decision that you would
make, let's say if the idea
were put forth by the NDP
and was contrary to Liberal
policy ?
PB: As far as I'm concerned, the only allegiance
that I have is that, to the student council.
The student president must
act in the best interests of the
students and to tie his policy
or the policy of council to any
political party is not the right
thing to do.
.^ ^vi:-„^iv  **>\LLx
Wherever you're heading after graduation, you'll find one of Royal's more than 1,100
branches there to look after you. Meanwhile, anything
we can do for you, here and now ? Drop in any time.
ROYAL BANK
A
TOMORROW NIGHT
FRIDAY, MARCH   11
IN THE ARMOURIES
Come and hear the BANDITS Irani
Seattle sing their recent hit
"LITTLE SALLY WALKER"
DANCE!
I Page 12
THE
UBYSSEY
Friday, March 11, 1966
TWfEN CLASSES
Czechs mate classicists
SPECIAL   EVENTS
Forostravo Trio — direct
from behind the iron curtain !
Czechoslovakia's foremost trio
of instrumentalists playing
Shostakovitch, Beethoven,
Brahms, and Hadyn noon Freddy Wood, 50 cents.
Special two tickets for price
of one; vouchers are available
for tonight's symphony concert in the Queen Elizabeth —
see Special Events, Rm. 255,
Brock. Last minute tickets
available for Romeo and Juliet
from AMS ($1 and' $1.75 card).
LUTHERAN STUDENT
MOVEMENT
The Gospel of Playboy —
Wm. Nicholls Monday noon in
Bu. 104.
PRE-SOCIAL WORK CLUB
Speaker    psychiatric    social
worker, Mrs. Kenyon, Monday
noon, in Bu. 202.
EUS
GIRLS t GIRILS ! GIRLS !
Come tonight to the fabulous
Engineer-F r e s h e tte Mixer,
Totem Park. Girls 25 cents.
Engineers 75 cents.
ED. US
Sock Hop Mixer, noon in the
Ed. Lounge.
CHINESE VARIETY CLUB
General    meeting    Monday,
Bup.   206.   Election   for next
year's executive.
ENGLISH DEPT.
Dr. Boyd Alexander author
and lecturer: Eccentric author
and collector: William Bedford
of Fonthill (1759-1844) noon
Lass. 104.
AAC
Students, drugs, addiction —
a talk and open forum with
panel members Wm. Deverell,
Lawyer; Dr. Sanders, Dept. of
Pharmacology, and Miss I.
Paulus, Sociologist from Narcotics Foundation noon in
Brock.
EUS
Let's have a huge turnout
for elections today. Secretary,
Social, Pro.
UNIVERSITY QUAKER
GROUP
Meeting for worship on Sunday at  11   a.m.   in  Bu.  Penthouse.
HELLENIC  CULTURAL   SOC
Byzantine    Art'   The   Icon.
Speaker: Dr. S. G. Angelomatis
Monday,     7:30     p.m.     Upper
Lounge IH. All welcome.
EL  CIRCULO
Miss Joyce Turner presents
a program of Chilean and Argentine music noon in Bu. 204.
SCM AND VIET NAM
DAY   COMMITTEE
Rev. Philip Hewitt — Viet
Nam — A Confrontation for
Western Morality noon in Bu.
106.
UN
Prof.    Bartole    speaks    on
Franco's Spain Monday noon Ii
Upper Lounge IH.
ALLIANCE FRANCAISE
French Day at IH. Film and
"offee at noon.
DEBATING UNION
Canada should join OAS —
Royal Roads vs UBC, Bu. 217
and Bu. 104 noon. All welcome.
PRE-LIBRARIANSHIP SOC
Miss Dwyer of the Fine Arts
Division will speak nopn, Bu.
225.
VOC
Annual Reunion banquet
Saturday, March 19. Last day
to buy tickets is Tuesday,
March 15, in the Clubroom.
U. S. S. R.
We are  official  agents  in  B.C. for the  Government
Tourist   Offices   of   the   U.S.S.R.,   Poland,   Hungary,
Rumania,  Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, Yugoslavia and
MAUV*     East  Germany.  Although  travel   to   these   countries
♦*?£_=&> :_
& is  easier than  it was,  it still  needs  careful  prepar-
•-.:'.?<!& ation, and we've been doing this for several years
''mi
Open 9-5 p.m., incl. Saturday
Hagen's Travel Service Ltd.
HAGEN'S
736-5651
2996 W.  Broadway
Type of Car
Acadian
Chevy II
Valiant
Comet
Parisienne
Galaxy
Impala
Mustang
MAKE YOUR
WEEKEND
RESERVATION
EARLY
24 Hour Day
$5.00 & 5c
$6.00 & 5c
$8.00 & 5c
Weekends
$12.00 & 5c
$14.00 & 5c
$18.00 & 5c
Save up to 40% on Special overnight rate. Any car in
our fleet — $5 & 5c per mile.
You Pay Only For The Gas You Use
BUDGET RENT-A-CAR
New Location 1058 Alberni
Phone 685-0536
NO ADMITTANCE TO
PERSONS UNDER II
Student. $1.25
Showtime:
7.30 . 9:30
^xkMmt^_
224-3710
4375 W. JOth
_?.*>
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00. Larger Ads on request
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Please bring or send to Publications Office, Brock Hall.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost 8c Found
11
FOUND ADS inaerted free. Publications office, Brock Hall. Local 26,
224-3242.
YOU WERE SEEN TAKING MY
briefcase from the Ponderosa
March 4. Deposit them at the
Lost and Pound. No questions
asked. Otherwise authorities will
be notified  concerning this event.
FOUND.   SLIDERULE   ON   MARCH
4.   in  M.   100.   Phone  736-7069.    '
LOST. ALL SECOND TERM NOTES
Taken from Gym Locker. Please
return; Urgent need. Phone RE" 6-
6281.
LOST—SOLID SILVER RING BE-
tween Education Building and C-
Lot.    Reward.    Call Sue, 278-0489.
Special Notices
13
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20 and
have a good driving history you
qualify for our good driving rates.
Motorbike & Scooter Insurance,
also from $17.00 up. Ted Elliott,
224-6707.
MENNONITEI STUDENTS: INVIT-
ed to meet with Howard Snider,
U. of A. First session Fri., 12:30,
Ed. 200. Second session Fri., 8:00,
Ed 200. For further particulars,
phone   224-1729.
SEE AND DANCE to the SEATTLE
"Bandits", of "Little Sally Walker" fame, and the "Chessmen"
on Friday, March, 11, in the Armouries, 9-1. Make it a completely
great weekend. Only $1.00	
EDUCATION GRADUATION
banquet will be held March 17 at
the Blue Boy. Dean Perry—guest
speaker. Tickets $1.75. On sale in
the  Education Building.	
GIRLS! COME TO THE GREAT
Engineer-Freshette Mixer Friday,
March 11. Totem Park 8-12. AMS
cards. Engineers 75c, Girls 25c."
DON'T MISS THE "BANDITS" Tonight in  the  armouries 9-11.  Also
the     Chessmen     only     $1.00    And
please arrive  early  to  get in   .
Great!!!!
FENDER JAZZMASTER. WHAT
offers? Phone Paul. CA 4-9910"
Leave   message.
WANT TO LEARN TO RIDE
horseback? Then come out to Willows Stables, 7226 Balaclava "(S.
of Marine Dr.) or Phone 266-4219
for information.
D. C. IS COMING!
Watch for D. C.
What  is  D. C.
Transportation
14
CARPOOL OR RIDERS, W. VAN.,
near Ambleside. Arrive by 8:30,
leave 5,   M-F.    926-2293 after 6."
RIDE WANTED FROM 41ST AND
Knight for 8:30 Mon.-Fri. Phpne
325-9650   after   6   p.m.
RIDE WANTED FOR 8:30 CLAS-
ses from 22nd and Cambie. Phone
TR 6-5361.
Travel Opportunities 16
AMS CHARTER FLIGHT ONE
way from London to Vancouver
only $200. August 13, C.P.A. Phone
Pat   261-1490.
JOINT THE JET SET TO MEXICO
Post Exam Tour all inclusive.
$295.  Meet in BU 205, 12:30 today.
Automobiles For Sale
21
'58  VOLKSWAGEN,   GOOD  CONDI-
tion.     Phone  Mike,  FA 7-4026.
'51 M.G.T.D., fully restored, collector's item, best offer. 922-7878,
after   5.
•57 FORD A-l MECH. GOOD TIRES,
radio & heater. Ph. FA 7-5763.
FOR SALE — 19501 PLYMOUTH.
Running order. Very satisfactory.
$110. 224-6355. Leigh Brouss'on.
After 6.
57 STUDEBAKER VERY GOOD
condition. Please leave name and
phone  number  at  22S-8343.
1959   M.G.",'   —   MECH.   A-l   TIRES,
body  good,   263-7433.
Motorcycles
27
VESPA 90 1400 MI. EXCELLENT
condition all accessories best offer
over   $275   263-6202.      	
'65   HONDA   SO   VERY'   REASON-
able.  RE  8-8100.
Scandals
39A
ATTENTION FOUR GIRLS ETC.
We were there, where were you?
No.   322.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Sewing—Alterations
40
REMODELLING AND DRESSMAK-
ing special atention to graduation
& wedding gowns. Call CA 4-6471
anytime.
Typing
49
FAST, ACCURATE TYPING
thesis, essays, etc., on new IBM
Executive typewriter, phone 263-
4023. 	
DEEP COVE STUDENTS—TYPING
done, my home, experienced. Reasonable rates.    Call 929-3181.
FAST, ACCURATE TYPING IN M.Y
home.  Reasonable  rates.   224-9174.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
51
SUMMER TRAINEE DIRECTOR OF
Recreations — Applicant must be
in the Faculty of Physical Education & Recreation. To organize
and direct the summer recreation
program of swimming, playgrounds
and activity centre, commencing
May 1, 1966. Starting salary $400
month plus car allowance.
Send applications to Director of
Recreations, Municipal Hall, 610
Duncan   St.,   Powell   River,   B.C.
HEAD LIFE GUARD to supervise,
direct and train a staff of five life
guards and assist with the summer aquatic program. Qualifications expected. Instructor's award
in swimming & life saving. Salary $400 month, plus car allowance
and extra instructional Income
opportunity. Send applications' to
Director of Recreations, Municipal
Hall. 610 Duncan St., Powell RtTer
B.C.
RELIABLE BABY SITTER WANT-
ed, Friday 4-10, Saturday, 4-7, 50
cents  hr.     263-4328.
RENTALS   &   REAL ESTATE
Furn. Houses and Apts.
83
GIRL (22) TO SHARE PART
furn. 2 BR apt. with same, c/o" 58
Kits. Close to everything. "RE
8-8707.
Unfurn. Houses & Apts.        84
6026 ELM ST. A 7-ROOM FAMILY'
house in excellent condition. 4
bedrms., 2 bath. Ext. stucco. Lot
50 by 125. 15 min. to campus, Poss.
approx. July 1. $22,000 by owner,
no agents. 266-6185 for appointment.
Houses and Apts.—Other
Cities 87
ROSEDALE .ONTARIO — FAMILY
of 4 with furnished coach house
(3 air cond. BR's, 2% baths, LR,
DR, garage), wishes to trade for
similar accommodation July-Aug.
with responsible individual in Van.
For further information call Van.
682-6331.
ARTS U.S.
GENERAL MEETING
Noon — Friday,  March 18th
Buch. 106

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