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The Ubyssey Sep 18, 1984

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Array THE UBYSSEY
Vol. LXVII, No. 3
Vancouver, B.C. Tuesday, September 18,1984
228-2301
Work study budget cut 79 per cent
By ROBERT BEYNON
The provincial education
ministry's decision to cut 79 per
cent of the work study budget was
just part of restraint, a ministry
spokesperson said Monday.
Rick McCandless, education
ministry support services director,
said "our total budget ran about
two and a half million last year.
This year it was cut back to a
million."
He said the ministry was forced
to put only $194,800 into work
study this year compared to
$940,500 last year because of
budget constraints. Work study is a
program that creates campus jobs
for students who qualify for
assistance above their student loan
allotment.
He said he did not know how
many students were affected by the
cut.
McCandless said his department
chose to cut work study rather than
stop funding for the Lester B. Pearson world college on Vancouver
Island because the college is a
priority.
McCandless added the reason
some colleges' work study funding
was cut more than others is to even
out the percentage of funding each
received. Douglas College was cut
back from 15 positions to one while
Kwantlen College's program was increased, he said.
"When the program started some
institutions started the program and
many others didn't. We're just
evening out the system now," he
said.
Texts sell out
By CHARLIE FIDELMAN
UBC students are without essential text books because of this year's
drastic over enrolment that has
doubled attendance in some
courses.
Carolin Henderson, a second
year political science student, is one
of 150 students in her class who
were unable to buy required texts.
"Enough students in the class are
out of books to merit the bookstore
air freighting the texts in bulk," she
said.
Another political science student,
Kevin Mullen, said enrolment in his
Poli 409 class has quadrupled from
last year's figure of 30. "Courses
have been deleted and the remaining ones have added sections," said
Mullen. He said most book shortages were in the upper level classes
where enrolment increased the
most.
Political.science head Kal Holsti
said enrolment in his department increased by seven per cent this year
and 24 per cent last year.
"Enrolments in several courses
were way higher than we predicted.
We can't predict from year to year
where the fluctuations are going to
hit," he said, adding he did not
know why it increased so much.
"The bookstore orders texts based on the figures submitted by the
professors," said Kathie McCrun,
manager of the UBC bookstore's
book ordering division.
"Under ideal conditions, a reorder can be in within two weeks,"
she said. The original delivery takes
six weeks under normal conditions,
said McCrun.
Professors are not encouraged to
order extra books, said bookstore
clerk Gary McGregor.
Political science professor Paul
Marantz said he agrees the book
shortage is due to over-enrolment.
He said the department "didn't
want to say no to anyone," adding
figures are preliminary and
understate the actual enrolment
numbers.
"My 408 course is supposed to be
a seminar and has increased from 14
students to 45. The 409 seminar on
Soviet foreign policy is now a lecture course. Instead of 30 students
enrolled it has 140," said Marantz.
He said he anticipated three times
as many students and only ordered
100 texts.
Students in Fine Arts 340 are also
without four required texts because
professor Serge Guilbaut placed an
order form at the bookstore on
August 21. Guilbaut could not be
reached for comment.
A science 1 student said first year
physics texts sold out and commerce students said many of their
texts were gone.
"One of the reasons there aren't
any books is that some students
came in too late," said a male
bookstore clerk who refused to be
named.
Canadian Federation of Students
spokesperson Donna Morgan said
the work study cut did not make
sense. "It seems to be a program
they (the Social Credit) would argue
for," Morgan said.
She said the government appears
to have no student aid plan because
it cut the program haphazardly and
had no apparent plan for
distributing money to universities
and colleges.
She added this program should
not be cut and added to at whim.
"We've got to get the government
to realize how important it is," she
said.
She said many students rely on
the program to make it through
school and to help pay off their
loans and many institutions rely on
the extra work students hired by the
programs do.
Students should write the education ministry and key cabinet
ministers to voice their disapproval,
Morgan said.
— kevin hall photo
THIS IS THE new aeronautics course offered at UBC on alternate week days. The book store is out of this text
too. Sorry. Try again next year.
Enrolment drops as cosfs rise
— kevin hall photo
THE BUSES ARRIVE in droves and the city is understandibly seething
because its citizens are disappearing from one location and appearing at
others as if transported by mysterious time machines.
First year enrolment declined 17
per cent this year, the UBC registrar
said Monday.
Ken Young said 700 fewer
students than last year, or 3,360
students, enrolled for first year at
UBC.
Total UBC enrolment declined
two per cent, or by 517 students
Young added. He said the "no
show" rate for people who were accepted to register at UBC but did
not register increased from 20 per
cent last year to 33 per cent this
year.
The registrar's office earlier
predicted UBC would receive a one
per cent enrolment increase this
year.
Alma Mater Society president
Margaret Copping said the rising
costs of post secondary education
were likely responsible for the
decline in attendance and tuition increases are not the only factor.
"If there was a suitable student
aid program then tuition fees
wouldn't matter," Copping said.
"In the absence of a better student
aid program, tuition fees are an increasing problem.
"In a society, if someone is
academically qualified to attend
university then money shouldn't be
an obstacle," she said.
In last summer's July budget the
Social Credit government made
B.C. loans the toughest to qualify
for in Canada and this February the
government eliminated the grant
program.
Copping added student politicians have been warning about the
future effects of Social Credit
policy for years "and the wolf has
finally arrived."
This summer Simon Fraser
University had its first decrease in
enrolment since 1979. A report by
SFU's analytical studies department
attributed the decrease to the end of
the provincial grant program this
February.
At the university of Victoria
enrolment decreased 2.4 per cent
this year and first year enrolment
decreased 18 per cent.
UVIC president Howard Petch
said staff and programs may be cut
due to the decrease in first year
enrolment. He added interior
students particularly could not afford to attend university anymore.
"I think it's been caused primarily by the (provincial government)
elimination of the grant program,"
Petch said.
Unions help students
By ROBERT BEYNON
University of Victoria unions pitched $27,000 into UVic's work-
study program to help make up provincial cuts.
The members of CUPE locals 917
and 951 voted to donate a percentage of a two per cent 1984-85 wage
increase towards the work study
program.
Local 951 vice president Shelly
Young said it was a worthwhile
cause to support students in these
troubled times. "As workers at the
university, we need the students. If
it wasn't for the students we
wouldn't have jobs."
Young said the larger local 951
with 457 members would provide
approximately $18,000 and the
smaller local 917 with 225 members
will provide approximately $9,500.
Mike Peterson, UVic Alma
Mater Society vice president for
programs, said the society was overjoyed the unions contributed funds.
"It was quite an unexpected move
for them to give up the wages like
that,"Peterson said.
He said they had not expected
contributions from any group and
did not expect more contributions
from others.
He added the provincial government should be supplying more
money to the program. "All I know
is that the student aid system
deteriorated quite badly these last
few years," he said.
The provincial government cut
the UVic program from $220,000
last year to $38,000. Due to the
union's contribution and a
$100,000 contribution from UVIC's
board of governors the university
will be able to have quite a large
program, financial awards officer
Nels Granewall said.
She said the program would offer
fewer positions, less pay and fewer
hours per term, but the program
would survive as a viable help for
students.
She said students should protest
to regain the lost funds. "Billions
of dollars are put into work-study
in the States but it is practically
unheard of in Canada," she added.
UBC's board of governors voted
to add $100,000 to UBC work-study
budget after the provincial government cut it back. Page 2
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 18,1984
Protestors jailed
This box Is apparently grey. However, it is not. It vou know why we want you at SUS 241K. 8e
there, in on the socialjustice action.':
(Jfaeiq >uao J9d OJ s,l| :1U!H>
MONTREAL (CUP) — Montreal police have detained 37 people
in the city during the Pope's visit
here.
And while police overruled a city
of Montreal ordinance banning
demonstrations during the Pope's
visit, and granted one such permit,
they broke up the march before it
ended.
Three hundred and fifty marchers, carrying banners and chanting that sexuality and abortion
were personal choices, were forced
to disband before they reached the
first church along the route.
REGISTRATION:
SEPTEMBER 22, 1984
10 a.m. — 12 noon
Thunderbird Winter
Sports Centre
or call
274-5982
"The police expressed a concern
that passing the church would provoke the protestors," said Serge
Morisoneau, one of the organizers.
" We were not interested in any
sort of violence," Morissoneau added.
Along the papal route in
downtown Montreal, city workers
patrolled regularly, ripping down
anti-papal posters and covering all
graffiti, anti-papal or otherwise,
with white paint or fresh cement.
Graffiti on Saint-Laurent
Boulevard,   a major  street,   read
RINGETTE
U.B.C. Ice - Sat.
8:15-9:15
UBC Student Teams vs.
other   lower   mainland
recreational   or   competitive teams.
"We must burn the church as they
burned witches." City workers
smeared cement over the words, but
they reappeared in the same spot
the next day, said McGill student
Scott Proudfoot.
Jacques Delisle, press secretary at
Montreal city hall, said the city
regularly cleans graffiti and posters
off the walls. He did not know of
any special clean-up effort for the
Pope's visit.
"It's as good an occasion as any
to clean off the graffiti," Delisle
said.
The Keg
The Keg Boathouse and Keg Prime Rib Restaurant
are looking for energetic, hardworking, caring people who would enjoy working with the public. All
jobs are part-time — two-three evenings per week.
Please apply in person at the Canada Employment
Centre (Brock Hall on campus) this Thursday, September 20, 12:30-2:00 p.m. or at the Keg Boat-
house Restaurant on Wednesday, September 19,
2:00-3:00 p.m.
BOX OFFICE
University of British Columbia
FREDERICK WOOD THEATRE
presents
LOOK BACK IN ANGER
by John Osborne
SEPTEMBER 21—29
(Previews Sept. 19&20)
Curtain: 8 pm
STUDENT SEASON TICKETS
4 Plays for $13
September 19-29
LOOK BACK IN ANGER (Osborne)
November 7-17
TWELFTH NIGHT (Shakespeare)
January 16-26
THE IMAGINARY INVALID (Moliere)
March 6-16
HAPPY END (Weill)
a musical
FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE
Support Your Campus Theatre
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BOOKSTORE Tuesday, September 18,1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 3
DTUC grants
still coming
— rory a. photo
AIR FREIGHTING YOURSELF to warmer climes is the fastest way to tan in Vancouver during winter months.
Fee
collects few cheques
By MARTIN WEST
The Fee Hike Strike Committee
collected only 800 petition
signatures and 30 tuition cheques to
date to protest this years huge tuition fee increase.
Committe organizer Barb
Waldern said student involvement
was less than she expected. "Out of
a university population of
30,000,800 signatures isn't a lot,"
she said.
Waldern said students are more
apprehensive about signing over
their cheques than simply signing
[heir names on ihe petition because
Alma Mater Society president,
Margaret Copping, said she is concerned that the committee is asking
people to do something that may
cost them.
"A late tuition payment will not
only result in an extra fee being
levied, but a student that pays fees
late runs the risk of being completely deregistrered," she said.
Copping added a deregistrered
student will have problems protesting campus conditions.
Copping said the education
ministry and the provincial government are more suitable targets for
the committee and added tuition
alone constitutes a small part of a
student's yearly expenses.
Copping added that despite
claims by the committee that it is
autonymous their flyers are printed
on the Communist Party of Canada
(Marxist-Leninist)'s press in standard CPC-ML format. The
literature stresses the fee hike and a
broader political ideology, she said.
(CUP) Vancouver — Only 26 relocation grants have been issued for
former David Thompson University
Centre students.
When the ministry of education
shut down the centre last January,
DTUC students were promised relocation grants if they continued
their studies in similar programs at
other institutions. Before the closure DTUC served about 500 students.
Jake Van Hemert, a financial aid
officer at Selkirk college who is
handling the grants, said the ministry budgeted for a 150 students.
He said applicants must present a
tuition receipt indicating their tuition is fully paid, along with their
grant form. Hemert added most
students have not yet applied.
Athena George is a former DTUC
student who is applying for the relocation program.
"I certainly hope to get a grant,
otherwise I'm in big trouble," said
George. A 23-year-old creative writing student, George transferred to
UBC after DTUC closed.
If she qualifies, George will get
$800 in relocation funds. Students
with dependents get $2,500.
"It's nowhere near enough
money," George said. She said living costs and rent are much higher
in Vancouver and she must take the
bus to and from class. In Nelson she
walked.
And George said she faces more
than just financial adjustments at
UBC. "It's nothing like David
Thompson here. I'm starting to
understand what we lost up there (in
Nelson)," she said.
She said she finds UBC's size intimidating. "UBC is so large I don't
know how I'm going to meet people."
Gays incorporated
i»
liltMi
Student council has voted to
transform the Gays and Lesbians
club into a service organization.
Club president Ken Anderlini
said the decision pleased him. He
added "We're basically a service
organization anyways. This change
basically gives us status for the role
we fulfilled before."
Alma Mater Society service
organizations differ from clubs in
that they provide services for the
university community as a whole,
rather than to a select audience. The
AMS also gives them a larger
budget. CITR, The Ubyssey, and
the women's centre are examples of
service organizations.
Anderlini said the club had had
problems because "people saw us as
a social club or a political organization."
He said the Gays and Lesbians
club is like the women's centre
because they perform similar functions. "We're offering counselling
services to people on campus who
are having problems being gay.
We're going to be counselling people by referral, by phone and in person," he said.
Anderlini said that the decision
will help increase the group's
visibility at UBC because more people will say they're gay. "University
is the first chance a lot of people
have to come out," he said.
AMS president Margaret Copping said the club was performing a
service to students by educating
them about the gay community and
its problems.
Copping said the move merely involved a change in the group's
operating code. She added that
council had been nearly unanimous
in its decision./'Only a two-thirds
majority vote is required to pass a
motion,"   she  said,   "and   it  was
tney tear they wi
fine for late pavr
be icviec
ifi#liiPilfPfil€l W*M0mpww^i, mm^mmmfBmm mwMSLtffom
XX   (CliP;   -•  Siiaien;
nearly unanimous. Only one person
voted against the motion."
The new service organization has
not yet collected its subsidy. "I expect the group will be applying for
it soon," Copping said.
Hitching stops
Bus drivers aren't the only ones
who found the three month bus
stoppage expensive.
UBC's Alma Mater Society spent
$1,000 for its hitching zone program to help students get to UBC,
but Monday AMS president
Margaret Copping said, "I was
astonished so few students used it."
Copping said the money was used
to print 10,000 "UBC" signs, adding only $600 was AMS money
and $450 was donated by the president's office. Copping said she used
a 1982 UBC-based study which said
7,000 to 8,000 students travel by
bus.
"About 5,000 signs were taken,
but I don't know how many were
used," she said. "The situation was
not as critical as I thought."
Even though buses are now running and the program was
underutilized, Copping said she has
no regrets. "It was less of a crisis
than expected, but under the same
circumstances I'd do it again," she
said.
The hitching zone plan asked
rideless students to pick up signs
and meet at central bus stops and to
meet at the UBC bus loop for rides
home.
Courses ended
REGINA (CUP) — The financially strapped University of Regina
has cancelled more than 60 courses
it planned to offer off-campus this
year, leaving hundreds of students
si:rambling for credits.
crease oy v.
i:hr;
?:Ci:;il
'!se e.ccj
a es.
Sharon   "
.'ay!
-> r,   a
sU'.aen;
tl 11:_:
pare:::, sai^
sne
is pe
sirnisn.: a
" 0 uf
the committee'
abil
;v to acl
,ie\c
its purpose
but she
gave her
cne-
que. "Ther
e is
a risk
involved
with
this, but if
ycu
don'
t have a
con-
frontation,
the
administration
will
take advantage
of you every time,"
she said.
•ji.-iCt'iiriiruiiiori pascc
physical appearance.
Knight says residence officials
could choose to match one person
with another simply because the
color of their skin is the same.
He said the student union would
i). a
aunt
* pel
s'    Oi
SOil's
photo   rcqulr.
are    useful
' o r
ihe
; X   f
(resi
assistants) to
■ C't.it'i
the
luiilu
faces of the st idents."
Dean of men Pat Donahue says
he did not think the policy could
result in racial discrimination.
"You can tell a lot about a person
a  qualify
'students'
ing
than
interest  rather
tiiei: appearance should determine
with whom they share a room.
Neither St. Mary's University nor
Mount St. Vincent University, both
in Halifax, ask for a photo with a
residence application.
■■'■•iin  e>as
co.leces
.lion dear., acknowledged the move
came less than a month before
classes were scheduled to begin. He
said the university knew in April it
would have to cancel some courses
but failed to notify the parties involved. Page 4
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 18,1984
Mic Macs gain status
ST. JOHN'S (CUP) — In spite
of active opposition from the Newfoundland government, the Conne
River Mic Macs have attained status
as Canadian Indians.
"It's been a long wait," said
chief Michael Joe about the 35 year
lobbying effort, which included
hunger strikes and court cases.
Joe expressed relief that the provincial government will no longer
have jurisdiction over the native
band.
"Now they can't hold up our
funding as they did last year," he
said.
The   Mic   Macs   will   now   be
registered with the federal department of Indian affairs.
The provincial government's
reaction was not favourable.
Newfoundland rural development
minister Joe Goudie called the decision "hasty" and "unexpected."
Adrian Tanner, president of the
Indian and Inuit support group,
said the province's reaction is
nonsense.
"The provincial government has
been actively opposing the (registration) and has succeeded in holding
it up for years. Their attitude has
been stupid and ignorant."
Tanner   also   dismissed   former
President evicted
BRANDON, Man. (CUP) —
Brandon University has finally gotten rid of an unwanted guest from
its mansion — former administration president Harold Perkins.
Perkins was evicted in July from
the fashionable university-owned
house because he would not leave,
10 months after he was forced to
resign as president.
The university normally provides
its president with free room and
board.
BU's board of governors
demanded Perkins' resignation last
fall, accusing him of "gross professional misconduct."
Perkins is suing the university for
unjust dismissal, but suffered setbacks in June when many of the
charges in his suit were found inad-
missable in court.
The case goes to trial in October.
OFFICE FOR
WOMEN
STUDENTS
THE UNIVERSITY PROVIDES AN OFFICE
IFOR ALL WOMEN STUDENTS TO:
|«answer questions about education, vocational]
and financial concerns
I* provide personal counselling
|«act in liaison capacity between students and]
faculty
|« offer programs relevant to the needs of women |
students.
THE OFFICE FOR WOMEN STUDENTS
IS LOCATED IN BROCK HALL,
ROOM 203, AND IS OPEN
MONDAY-FRIDAY 8:30 a.m.-4:30p.m.
DROP IN OR MAKE AN APPOINTMENT
BY CALLING
228-2415
Newfoundland premier Joey
Smallwood's approval of the decision as hypocritical because
Smallwood axed a provision for the
Mic Macs under the original terms
of the province's union with
Canada.
The current federal-provincial
agreement, which costs Newfoundland $12 million a year, expires in March 1986.
THIS WEEK AT HILLEL
Tues. Sept. 18
Wed. Sept. 19  -
Thurs. Sept. 20 —
"Over  Coffee"   -     12:30  p.m.
Meet Dr. Shmuel Sandler, Political
Science   Professor   (Canada-Israel
Academic Exchange)
Hillel Snackbar open (sandwiches,
coffee, tea)
"Lasagna  Lunch"   —   12:30  p.m.
Snack    bar   open    12:30    p.m.
See our Club Days booth at SUB
THE BACK
CHAIR
A new concept in sitting
Enjoy the Chiropracticall>
recommended BACKCHAIR
for better rare o( your back
Perfect for students, computer
programmers, musicians, writers.
WESTCOAST BACKCHAIR STORE
2170 West -Jlh Avenue • 7M-762.S
Where it costs so little to look so great!
• ••'' -;*   ••   •   •
*   LovE -
*,    ®    . .•
*.* QuicheS *
'' //-k at *
V    -->i ■■■■       \
'"'   A SOUP / SALAD ■*■
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Y;/      $5.95        0
f*. Everyday •'"    x
tt //'' from „ 'm
/a      5:30-7:30      ■£/
y/'-JL      < at the back ot the Village )        l(k.-
%/ /+/ xV </+/^/%
DANCE HORIZONS - formerly DANCEWORKS - UBC
is recruiting
• dancers
• stage manager
• stage hands
• lighting designers
• production coordinators
• publicity directors
• organizers and fundraisers
• costume designers
for the 1984/85 season
Come see us during Clubs Days at the Ballet-UBC-Jazz Table, September 20 and 21
— A BALLET-UBC-JAZZ PROJECT — Tuesday, September 18,1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 5
Secret research claimed
OTTAWA (CUP) — University
administrators and department of
national defence officials deny that
the Canadian military is pouring
millions of dollars into classified
research on campuses across the
country.
But according to a computer
printout obtained by two Ontario
graduate students under the Access
to Information Act, about five-
sixths of DND research funding to
universities has not been publicly
declared.
John Bacher and Ahab Abdel-
Aziz, two researchers for Ontario's
Federation of Students say the
"gross discrepancies" in reported
and actual amounts of defence
research on campuses means the
federal government and the universities have ignored their stated
policies forbidding funding of
classified research to publicly supported institutions.
The two researchers say they uncovered the secret contracts while
they examined the records of the
federal department of supply and
services, which is responsible for
awarding them.
In their report, Military Research
and Development in Canadian Universities, the researchers include
university lists of DND contracts,
lists published in the Supply and
Services Research Bulletin (a public
document), and the lists of contracts obtained through an Access
to Information request. The latter
fails to mention the nature of the research and the professor to whom
the grant was awarded.
Reginald Evans, a supply and services official who processed the request, says the department did not
supply more details because some
of the contracts are confidential.
"Let's assume that the release of
that description of the research is
considered contrary to the interests
of the Canadian people, government or national security."
Evans said not all defence grants
are handled by supply and services.
But Captain Kevin Carlie, a DND
information officer, denied that
classified research is being undertaken by universities for the department.
"We don't conduct nor do we
fund classified research on
campus," he said.
Protestors
fined $200
CALGARY (CUP) — A
precedent-setting verdict has left 13
Calgary peace demonstrators $200
poorer and with criminal records.
Judge Gordon Rennie slapped
fines and criminal records on
all members of the Calgarians for
Non-Violent Action who occupied
a Canadian Forces recruitment centre last summer.
Defendant Eric Bellows said the
case is significant because the protestors were charged with criminal
mischief instead of the usual
trespassing charge.
Bellows said the verdict is "too
bad" for civil liberties in Canada.
"Without regard to the legal
issue, there's the political issue,"
said defense attorney Aaron Rynd.
"There will be less inclination to
demonstrate (as a result of the verdict)."
Judge Rennie did not believe the
defendants had the right to assemble or demonstrate unless they had
the permission of the recruitment
centre owner or manager, in this
case the federal government.
"The criminal record won't stop
me," said defendant Kevin Coleman, referring to future protests.
Rynd said the group may appeal
the decision, but added any
challenge to the Charter of Rights
-would take a "back seat" to appeals about the specific charges.
The report says some universities
have been engaging in five to six
times as much classified defence research as non-classified since 1977,
and a total of 57 institutions are involved.
The Universities of Toronto and
British Columbia are the two
schools doing the most defence research. Others that have been near
the top of the list in the last six years
include Carleton University, McGill
University, Queen's University and
the Universities of Ottawa and Saskatchewan.
Tony Peterson, University of
Toronto accounting manager, denied the university is involved in
classified defence research. He says
the institution does not have a policy of refusing contracts for classified research, but has not been offered any.
Peter Larkin, UBC associate vice-
president of research, says the university has never done any classified
research for the DND. According to
UBC's stated policy, it must publish
the results of all research done on
campus.
Larkin said there are only two exceptions to this rule. One occurs
when the university wants to patent
an invention, and the other, when it
does "politically sensitive" research
for the government and must release the results only after the government has perused them.
Larkin says the university would
refuse to take secret defence contracts. "Our policy is well known to
the defence department. I think
somebody is confused as to what
classified research means."
The student federation which
sponsored the report is now demanding a public inquiry into the
issue. In a letter to Charles La-
pointe, former Liberal supply and
services minister, on behalf of the
two researchers, the Federation
says: "As a result of the conflicting
claims as to the nature and extent of
DND research in Canadian universities ... a full explanation by the
minister or a public inquiry is warranted."
 UBC DANCE CLUB	
FREE
INTRODUCTORY
JIVE LESSONS
Tues., Sept. 25 SUB Party Room
Thurs., Sept. 28 12:30-1:30
Contact: UBC Dance Club, SUB 220 (228-3248) or
see us during Clubs Days!
-^
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DROP IN VOLLEYBALL
Begins Sept. 20
Thursdays 7:30 pm - 9:30 pm
Sundays 8:0Q pm - 10:00 pm
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Tuesdays 6:30 pm - 8:30 pm
Sundays 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm
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INTERESTED IN CA EMPLOYMENT?
ARTHUR ANDERSEN & CO. is seeking 1985
graduates for Vancouver and all other offices of the
Firm. Submit your resume to the Canada Employment
Centre on Campus (forms are available from the Centre)
by October 3, 1984.
All resumes will be acknowledged. You will be contacted on or about October 12th regarding campus interviews which take place during the week of October
22nd. Additional information is available at the UBC
Canada Employment Centre and the Accounting Club.
WINDSURFING
B
^>V   CLUB
jT ^^. SUB 208
MEMBERSHIPS AVAILABLE
* Good until Sept. 1985
* Free use of club windsurfers
* Lessons in fall and spring
* Staff/ non-student memberships available
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Wool Melton, Leather & Nylon
Jackets with Cresting
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See us at the Thunderbird Shop
Lower Level Hours: Mon.-Fri.      Telephone: 224-1911
Student Union      8:00 a.m.-7:00 p.m.   Visa & Mastercharge
Building, U.B.C.  Sat. 10 a.m.-5:00 p.m. Accepted
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Good to October 31,1984
Present your student card for this special offer. Page 6
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 18,1984
Tradrttoru fs tWe   sptn'tualla   correct
ideolcgu, i-tls Also iHe Yviosi vev^i^vclmg.
We require
So you thought once you safely gained entrance into the slightly
crumbling, but still hallowed halls of UBC that pitfalls would not get
in the way of your education. Think again.
Yes, you made the short list (that's getting shorter) of students
who qualify for entrance to the university, but were you told when
you applied for admission that you would need to register in lightning fast speed to get in to a required course?
Students hoping to fill their degree requirements with first year
chemistry courses were probably not. That is, about 200 of them
were most likely unaware that their degrees could be delayed a year
because of the university's limited resources.
The plight of the chemistry students illustrates a disturbing trend
in many university departments: teaching staff have been cut to
the bare minimum, resulting in fewer sections being offered.
And the sections still being offered are reaching staggering
enrolment numbers are making seminar's obsolete at UBC.
The bottom line is UBC students are again suffering from under-
funding of education. If you don't believe it now, you will when
your graduation is jeopardized because you are unable to gain entrance to a required course.
The university administration should take measures to ensure
that students can get in to at least required courses to complete
their degrees. And they should look more closely at who their
enrolment limitations in individual departments affect.
Students who failed to get in to the chemistry sections were
mainly from dental hygiene, rehab medicine and home economics
— departments composed largely of women. Where are the
university's priorities?
Sold out
The textbook sellout is one more student's sellout. What's new.
Many students in political science, commerce, French and numerous
other courses are left hanging as to whether their required texts will be
available. Students can not know when, and if, the books they need will arrive. Nor do they know if these texts will be available in the library because
so many others in their classes face the same dilemma.
This is not the students' fault. One bookstore clerk who chose to remain
anonymous said students got what they deserved because they bought
books "late," in the first week of class.
This despicable weasel should squirm through the UBC bureaucracy
during registration week, stand in inane bookstore lineups and process
course changes before making such comments.
He should explain why lineups have not decreased after the new, $7
million bookstore's coronation.
Professors are also not to blame, for being reluctant to turn students
away from too few classes, as course selections decline and retiring professors are not replaced.
Unfortunately, provincial government education cutbacks mean there
are not enough educational resources for students to scramble for, unless
they are lucky, or pushy.
But isn't that what Social Credit philosophy is all about?
Letters
Board needs student input on tuition fees
By now all of you have noticed
that your fees are up 33 per cent,
putting UBC fees at the top of the
heap in Canada. Reactions we have
encountered have ranged from
'about time' to passive resignation
to the proposed fee hike strike. As
your representatives on the board
of governors (which sets fees) we
cannot simultaneously represent
these different philosophies!
Therefore, we will give you some of
our thoughts on the tuition fee
situation so you can either educate
us or rip us to shreds.
First, the idea that students just
don't pay the fees — the fee hike
strike. We respect the frustration of
people feeling they have little influence over tuition (and we've experienced more of this than most
people!), but we do not feel that the
strike is the way to go. We cannot
support something that will harm
students. The university has no
sympathy for late payments and will
impose a $40 late fee for fees unpaid by September 21st period.
Strikes are successful only if they
hurt the source of the problem. This
time the university is not to blame,
the provincial government is.
Government funding to UBC has
been^lashed over 20 per cent in real
dollars in just two years. This has
resulted in a salary freeze over this
THE UBYSSEY
VOL. LXVII NO. 3      September 18, 1984
228-2301
The Ubyssey is published Tuesday and Fridays throughout the
academic year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of British
Columbia. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and are not
necessarily those of the university administration or the AMS.
Member Canadian University Press. The Ubyssey's editorial office is
SUB 241k. Editorial department, 228-2301/2305. Advertising
228-3977/3978.
Yaku's birdie never flies it flashes said Pattie Flather confidentially to Erin Mullen who was busy passing dtuc messages to Robert Beynon via a mysterious black instrument (a thing which has magically
disappeared from Wongski's life). Chris Wong has the Barfy Bunch to console him said Charlie
Fidelman and at any rate, (25 cents exactly) he can always reach Sarah Millin and Kevin Hall via a street
corner contraption. Monte Stewart and Robby Robertson tackled Rory Alen during a forced exit from
the spewing Wongski. He was serenading Victor Wong and Donna Turko with yet another refrain of
the Barfy Bunch. Dave Stoddart lost his din-dins when Martin West asked for another encore.
period, a reduction of around 200
faculty and staff positions, unprecedented enrolment restric-
tionss, and the loss of several programs.
Even after these cuts were made,
tuition fees still had to increase by
one third. This has decreased accessibility and our ability to attract
top students.
To students who feel our fees are
justified we hope you reconsider.
First year enrolment is down 17 per
cent which leaves us $850,000.
short.
The elimination of the provincial
grant means that many students will
graduate more than $20,000 in
debt. Many top students, especially
those    from    outside   the   lower
mainland, are leaving B.C. to study
at more competitive institutions.
Universities are a keystone investment in our provinces' economic
future. Our fees are for the first
time at a level that severely comprises this investment.
Finally, to students who passively
accept. This is a university. Reflect
some of that 'idealism' and ask for
The Ubyssey invites all letters
from the university community and
students in particular. Letters
should be tripled space on a 70
space line. They must be typewritten or we cannot promise they will
be printed. All typewritten letters
The Ubyssey does receive will be
edited for sexism, racism and style.
change. Complain to your M.L.A.
Let us know where there is waste or
abuse in the system.
Unless each existing policy and
program is re-evaluated, and unjustified ones phased out, we will
not escape a crippling fee increase
next year. If you are not a part of
this questioning process now, you
may be a future victim of it.
So please display your concern
for UBC's future at every chance
you get. At the very least, let us
know how you feel (228-6106). We
cannot represent you unless you
make your views known.
Don Holubitsky and Dave Frank
Student board of governors
representatives
Student retreat went splashingly
Hey, you missed it! This year's
New Student's Retreat, Sept. 7-9,
was a great success. Organized by
the First Year Students Council, the
retreat was — and will be next year
— a place where students new to
UBC could learn more about our
wonderfully mind-boggling campus
and have a last vacation before
classes.
Speakers from administration
and many student services provided
their knowledge: they talked of the
AMS, SHS, SAC, counselling, the
ombudsperson, Speakeasy,
faculties,   clubs,   constituencies,
registration, (if you don't know
about these, you should) student
council, financial aid, women's centre, UBC politics (believe it or not
the UBC board of governors is not
part of the landscape), and
answered all the questions we had
to pose.
It was a lot of fun too!
The main entertainment was
Jonathan Mercer, the president of
F.Y.S.C. and organizer of the
retreat, who was thrown into Lake
Evans, accompanied by loud
screams — his, twice successfully.
His voice still echoes: "Oh, NO!",
"Oh Shit," "That's Expensive!",
"Where's my comb!" "Oh God,
my shoes!"
Most of those who attended
found it very informative and best
of all a lot of friends were made.
There will be a retreat next year,
and you don't have to be a first year
student to attend, you only need a
desire to find out more. Also coming up will be elections for the
various positions on the F.Y.S.C.
(look out for the ad in Tween
Classes) for which any frosh can be
elected.
Peter MacDougall Tuesday, September 18,1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 7
Vote, you Canadian Yankees, vote
If you are from the U.S. and have
landed immigrant status or hold a
temporary visa in Canada, and are
at all interested in who will be the
next president of the United States,
you will be happy to know that you
can easily vote in the U.S. federal
election.
Basically, all U.S. citizens 18
years or older, who are residing outside the U.S. during federal elections can vote with an absentee
ballot. The one major exception to
this is that most states do not allow
persons who have convicted a
felony to vote (Draft evasion is not a
felony). Specific details on registration and voting vary slightly from
state to state, but generally they are
as described below. More specific
information on each state and on
voting in general can be obtained
from the Voting Assistance Guide,
which can be obtained at each U.S.
embassy or consulate (1199 W.
Hastings   in   Vancouver),   or   by
Union goals
corrected
As a bus-dependent UBC student
I would like to thank The Ubyssey
for covering the recent forum on
the current ICTU-MTOC dispute
(which led to the bus lockout) and
thereby recognizing its significance
for the students, the community
and the bus drivers themselves.
I am pleased to see the student
newspaper and the Students for a
Democratic University showing
their concern for outside issues
which affect students and the university community.
I would however point out that
The Ubyssey incorrectly stated that
one major issue in the dispute is the
possible loss of union veto power
over changes to Metro working conditions. The union does not, and
never has had, veto power over such
changes.
The possible loss of the working
practices clause giving the union the
right to consultation, however, is a
major point of contention between
Metro and the union. The union
has had the right to prior knowledge of proposed working condition changes since its inception and
is bargaining to maintain this right.
Laurel Lawson
arts 3
writing and requesting to be sent a
guide.
Registering and obtaining an
absentee ballot is very easy. A very
short form, called the Federal
Postcard Application (FPCA) is used for both. Some states only require a single card to both register
and be sent an absentee ballot.
Other states require two separate
forms. FPCA's can be obtained
from the local U.S. embassy or consulate or from the town clerk in the
state you wish to register. Addresses
to   send   completed   FPCA's   are
found in the guide.
The state in which you register
should be where you last lived immediately before leaving the U.S.
You do not need to have property
or other ties in the state, and you do
not have to be sure you will return
to that state. Don't worry, voting in
a federal election cannot be used to
determine residency for the purpose
of imposing state or locahtaxes.
All you need to do is apply for
your FPCA at least 30 days before
election day (get your guide at the
same time). Since the mail system
can be a bit slow to and from the
U.S., applying by mid September
should give you plenty of time.
If you're applying to a state that
requires separate FPCA's for
regisi ation and voting, apply a little earlier. The guide will give you
information on deadlines for each
state. Your ballot will then be mailed out to you twenty to thirty days
before election day.
Even if you get your ballot late,
complete it and mail it out, it may
be important if the race is close.
It's easy as residents of Canada
to believe that what happens in the
States no longer affects us. But, as
we have seen in the past four years,
a sad but true fact is that Jhe
policies put forth by the U.S. president affects everyone in the global
community. Do your bit, it takes so
little effort and it can make a world
of difference.
Isobel McDonald
nursing 3
.i.,
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7_^k
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*_■_
I        '■
^J___L_
■__WL^_*9_Stt^_l m«
P¥
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'^___.            Lrn^ AT            Mfri
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*
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*  Sam.
17-9-01
Statement false
I read Patti Fiather's Alma Mater
Society council brief, entitled
"Budget Rejected," in the Tuesday, September 11, 1984 edition
with interest. I noticed that she
reported on council's deliberations
on the motion concerning the administration's contract breaking
take over of the Graduate Student
Centre.
Fiather's article reports that
AMS president Margaret Copping
stated that the AMS ad hoc committee on the GSC never approached Neil Risebrough,
associate vice president for student
services, to get the administration's view of this affair. As
one of the two Graduate Student
Society representatives on the AMS
committee, I know that this statement of Copping's is untrue.
Dr. Neil Risebrough was approached by a committee member.
This member reported back to us
that Risebrough not only refused to
discuss the matter with our committee, but that he did so in an angry
and slightly profane manner.
1 do feel that Flather should have
asked a committee member for confirmation of Copping's comments
before writing her story. However,
Copping should not be making
comments that she knows are untrue. This fabrication of Copping's
only appears to undermine the
credibility of this particular AMS
committee and its members.
Copping really appears to be acting on behalf of the administration
in this matter and not on behalf of
the students at UBC. Students do
have a right to manage their own affairs.
Graham Payne
member of the AMS ad hoc committee
on the Graduate Student Centre
Ubyssey launched unfair
attack on fee protestors
While we agree with your view
that a fee hike strike will not be successful in fighting fee increases at
this point in time, we take issue with
the way it has been expressed in a
September 13 editorial of The
Ubyssey.
We are well informed of the activities of the Fee Hike Strike Committee and are unaware of its "intimate connections" with the Communist Party of Canada (Marxist-
Leninist). This is a shoddy piece of
journalism, and we are opposed to
your apparent attempt at red-baiting
Not only is it not in keeping with
the  ideals of a university,  where
discussion must be frank and open,
and free from McCarthyite attacks
and harassment, but it also shows
absolutely no understanding of the
principles underlying a united
front.
This is especially the case in relation to some of the few people on
this campus who are willing to take
action against fee increases. It can
also have the effect of increasing
the possibilities of successful victimization by the administration, it
and when the Fee Hike Strike Committee decides to go ahead and call
on students to withhold fees.
We must also take issue with your
view that the administration of
UBC has nothing to do with the fee
increases that hit us this year, and
may hit us again the next. Has it
escaped your notice that the majority of members of the UBC board of
governors are Socred appointees
whose responsibility it is to implement government policies, if not, as
well, to make suggestions about the
kinds of policies to be pursued?
Has it also escaped your notice
that the board has done nothing to
fight against government policies,
and is more inclined to oppose
those of us who fight back?
We see no reason to make
political friends with the board of
governors, or the people it appoints
to run this university on a day to
day basis.
BUI Coller (Law 2) and
Graham Payne (Engineering 4)
for Students for a Democratic
University
STUDENTS   . . .
parking where they can. Page 8
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 18,1984
fH^j.-i-jti_j.l
® ^s 53
& ______ QfflQ **m
■r
as Bl_\
STUDENT REPRESENTATIVES
Faculty Of Arts
NOMINATIONS ARE INVITED FOR
STUDENT REPRESENTATIVES TO THE
FACULTY OF ARTS:
a) One representative from the combined major, honours, graduate, and diploma students
in each of the departments and schools of the
Faculty of Arts.
b) Two representatives from each of First and
Second Year Arts.
Student representatives are full voting members in the
meetings of the Faculty of Arts, and are appointed to committees of the Faculty.
Nomination forms are available from School and Department
Offices, the Dean of Arts' Office, the Arts Faculty Adviser's
Office, and the Arts Undergraduate Society Office.
Completed nomination forms must be in the hands of the
Registrar of the University not later than 4:00 p.m., FRIDAY,
SEPTEMBER 21, 1984.
C   .
CfifTIBIE OPTICPLI
TheTcore centre    IID.
3302 Cambie at 17th, Vancouver
879-9494
ALL PRESCRIPTION GLASSES 30% OFF
CORRECTION NOTICE
The Video Alley advertisement that appeared in the
September 11th issue of the
Ubyssey showed an incorrect
phone number. The correct
number is 266-6276. We
apolize for any inconvenience this error may have
caused.
UBC CURLING CLUB
2 Draws Available
WEDNESDAY, 5:00-7:00
THURSDAY, 9:30-11:30
Starting Date: Wed., Oct. 3
Thurs., Oct. 4
Box No. 27, AMS office or at our booth on
Cubs Davs Sept. 20, 21 in SUB.
Intramural Sports' Actionart Posters
. . . BECAUSE
INTERIOR DECORATING
IS A DIRTY JOB!
ON SALE SEPT. 17-19
11:30- 1:30
SUB CONCOURSE
or
WAR MEMORIAL GYM
Rm 203 (Always)
Graham Accepts
Soviet Invitation
Having been in the U.S.S.R. only two years ago, Dr. Billy Graham is
again speaking in many Soviet cities including Moscow, Leningrad,
Tallinn and Novosibirsk.
He acknowledges that his decision to go back was a tough one,
especially since many had advised him that the strained relations
between the Soviet Union and the United States might make this
visit more difficult for him.
What helped persuade Dr. Graham to go again was the fact that
during his brief visit in 1982, he sensed a "deep, spiritual hunger on
the part of many people of all ages." Graham also went with the
hope that his visit will help improve relations between the two
superpowers. He did not go, however, intending to make any
political statements which could leave him vulnerable to criticism.
Dr. Graham does not hesitate, however, to speak out against
nuclear armaments; last week in the Soviet Union, he called on the
superpowers to eliminate all weapons of mass destruction.
You have an opportunity to hear Dr. Graham for yourself. He will
lecture on "Peace in a Nuclear Age" in the UBC War Memorial
Gym on Oct. 12 at 12:30 p.m. Admission is free. Tuesday, September 18, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 9
Coaches caught bribing players
MONTREAL (CUP) — Concordia University's athletics department has been found guilty of making indirect payments to its varsity
athletes, a confidential report has
revealed.
The report is from an internal investigation launched last December
following stories in the university's
student newspaper, The Link,
which showed varsity athletes were
paid under the table to play for
Concordia.
The Canadian Inter-University
Athletics Union, the league in
which Concordia teams play, strictly forbids its members from paying
its athletes, said John McCon-
nachie, CIAU public relations
director.
The report says the athletics
department paid for some athletes'
books, tuition and living expenses,
helped them find high-paying stu-
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dent jobs, lent them money and
promised potential recruits "pocket
money."
Concordia faces stiff penalties
from the CIAU over the issue.
This summer the CIAU found
Brandon University in Manitoba
guilty of paying its athletes. The
university was put on one year's
probation. None of the university's
teams can appear in televised matches and if the institution violates
any more rules, the CIAU plans to
throw the teams out of university
athletics.
"Some of the top CIAU officials
are ex-employees of the Concordia
athletics department, so don't
count on them to take any action,"
said a Concordia coach who asked
not to be identified.
When The Link originally
published the allegations last year,
the CIAU said it would wait for the
investigator's report before taking
any action.
The investigation committee,
headed by recently elected Progressive Conservative MP Marcel
Danis, said men's basketball
players were given work through
the university's student work programme.
"The university is led to believe
THE
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TOURNAMENT
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SEPT. 29-30
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Rm 203
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that the student work programme is
available to all students," the
report states, "when in fact, it
clearly serves the ends of the
athletics department in general and
varsity athletes in particular."
The report also said since
1981, recipients of student work
jobs have been overpaid and often
did not work at all.
The report says money from the
summer sports leagues and camps
run by staff in the summer is unac
counted for by the university.
Since the report's release, the
Concordian summer basketball
league, run by a Concordia coach
for Montreal area teams, was
cancelled without explanation.
Basketball coach Doug Daigneault
refused to comment.
The committee blames no one
person for the department's wrongdoings but it recommends a series
of financial safeguards be adopted
to halt further abuse.
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$5.00
All style services complete with shampoo,
conditioning rinse, precision cut and
professional finishing.
3410 W. BROADWAY
(3 Blocks East of Alma)
736-5641
"hath Salon Independently Owned and Operated"
cTatitastic 1
The original famih haircuttcrs.
'
OPEN
7
DAYS
COUPON
*2.50
OPEN
7
DAYS
OFF ANY PERM OR BODYWAVE
puns
Nominations are now open
for seven positions on
STUDENT COURT
Nominations close 4 pm
Tuesday, Sept. 18, 1984
Forms available from SUB 238
Theatre Department
AUDITIONS
GET INTO THE ACT
AUDITIONS
for
TWELFTH NIGHT
by William Shakespeare
Directed by Pamela Hawthorn
(To be presented Nov. 7—17/84)
TIMES:    V/EDNESDAY, September 19
THURSDAY, September 10
FRIDAY, September 21
PLACE:   Frederic Wood Theatre, Room 206
}*
00 - 8:30 pm
(OPEN TO ALL U.B.C. STUDENTS, FACULTY & STAFF)
Arrange audition appointments in Room 207,
Frederic Wood Theatre or Phone 228-2678
Be prepared to read from Twelfth Night
AUDITIONS
GET INTO THE ACT
AUDITIONS Page 10
"^
<W0#?i
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 18,1984
TUESDAY
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Film, No Longer Alone, 7:30 p.m., Buch A104.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
Weekly testimony meeting, noon, SUB 213.
FIRST YEAR STUDENTS' COMMITTEE
Important general meeting, noon. Conversation
Pit.
SCIENCE FICTION SOCIETY
Office warming party for all people interested in
joining the science fiction society, all week, 9:00
a.m. to 3:00 p.m., SUB Room 228.
DANCEWORKS UBC
Early   registration   for   UBC's   unique   dance
ensemble, noon to 1:30 p.m., SUB 216E.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Early registration for fall classes,  noon to 1:30
p.m., SUB 216E.
JEWISH STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
AND HILLEL
"Over coffee" — meet Dr. Shmuel Sandler, Poli
Any Ubyssey staff
members wanting to attend the Oct. 5-7 regional
CUP conference should
write their name on the
blackboard by Wednesday
noon. Five and possibly
six staff will be voted on to
attend. Screening will be at
the Wed. staff meeting.
And don't forget the
retreat at Saturna this
Saturday and Sunday.
sci prof. (Canada-Israel academic exchange),
noon, Hillel house.
WEDNESDAY
AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL UBC
Get together meeting, noon, SUB 211.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Noon meeting. Christian fun, noon, SUB 213.
Film: Ben Hur, 7:30 p.m., Buch. A104.
JEWISH STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
AND HILLEL
Lasagna lunch, noon, Hillel house.
UBC SOCIAL CREDIT CLUB
Meeting for all members and interested people,
noon, room 230F.
WOMEN PLANNERS AND DESIGNERS
Film — "No Life for a Woman", about life in northern Canadian resources communities, noon,
Laserre 104.
THURSDAY
COMPUTING CENTRE
Open   house,   noon  to  3:30  p.m.,   Comp  Sci
building, room 100.
MARANATHA CHRISTIAN CLUB
Film: Greater than Gold, 7:30 p.m., Buch A104.
STAMMT1SCH
Social evening for people interested in German
language and culture, 7:30 p.m.,  International
house, upstairs lounge.
DANCE HORIZONS
Registration,   formerly   Danceworks   UBC,   10
a.m. to 3:00 p.m., at the club's day table and the
party room in SUB.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for fall classes, 10:30 a.m. to 3:00
p.m., at the clubs day table and the party room,
SUB.
JEWISH STUDENTS ASSOCIATION
AND HILLEL
Snackbar open, see our booth at SUB. Snackbar
at Hillel, booth in SUB.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Clubs' day demonstration and registration, 10:30
a.m. to 4:30 p.m., party room, SUB.
FRIDAY
DANCE HORIZONS
(FORMERLY DANCEWORKS UBC)
Registration,   10:00 a.m.  to 3:00 p.m.,  at the
clubs day table and the partyroom in SUB.
BALLET UBC JAZZ
Registration for fall classes, 10:30 a.m. to 3:00
p.m., table at clubs days and the party room
SUB.
UBC DANCE CLUB
Demonstration and registration,  10:X a.m.  to
4:30 p.m., party room SUB.
THINK KINKO'S
Quality Copies
Fast Service
kinko's copies
5706 University Blvd.
Vancouver, B.C.
V6T 1K6
(604) 222-1688
XIX-
X 'K<iX
IN SUB
Lower Level
A tiny place but famous for
their SANDWICHES. Also
homemade Samosas,
Chicken Pies & Cornish
Pastries.
Open daily 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
CA
The career with a future
,, <; *# f~f
^%'} >X*
*■>*.*   , -
People with the expertise and skills to meet today's
business challenges are a step ahead in the competitive world of
the Eighties. A Chartered Accountant is one of those people.
CAs are at the centre of the financial decision-making
process and a Chartered Accountant's training and judgment are
always in demand. The Graduate Admission Program could be
your first step toward a career with a future.
GA P prepares you for entry into the School of Chartered
Accountancy leading to membership in the profession. In the
Graduate Admission Program you will obtain a sound grounding
in business finance, economics, taxation, computers, commercial
law, financial and management accounting and organizational
behaviour   - the skills employers and clients need in todav's
complex economy.
Chartered Accountants come from a wide variety of
backgrounds. I'hev ha\c universit\ degrees in arts, science, law.
education, commerce and other disciplines  They've made she!1
degiees work tor ihem.  Ihe excellence ol iheir professional
training is recognized internationally.
t-iim.s .-.i ("ii.;:eereij Accountants \\\ British XX:i-h;.i »:!!
*      *
LIVE SENSATIONAL
SUPER SATURDAY
(Saturday, Sept. 22)
Stupendous Softball
Satisfyingly Sweaty Roadrun
Seemingly Surrealistic Cycle Criterium
REGISTRATION & INFORMATION
War Memorial Gym
Rm203
¥    *
¥   *
THE
RATES: AMS Card Holders - 3 lines. 1 day $2.50; additional
lines, 60c. Commercial — 3 lines, 1 day $4.50 additional lines, .70c. Additional days, $4.00 and .65c.
Classified ads are payable in advance. Deadline is 10:30 a.m. the
day before publication.
Publications Room 266, S.U.B., UBC, Van., B.C. V6T2A5
Charge Phone Orders over $10.00. Call 228-3977.
COMING EVENTS
TOUR TIME
at Main & Sedgewick
LIBRARIES
Every Day This Week
10:30 a.m., 12:30 p.m. & 3:30 p.m.
Meet in Main Library Entrance
WANTED!
Women To Play Rugby
- no experience necessary
- everyone welcome
- social team sport
PRACTICES: THURSDAYS 6:00 pm
at BALACLAVA FIELD (W.  30th
Ave. at Balaclava)
tOMK OUT AM) TRY:
More info:
Joanna 733-3877
The first weekly Co-operative
Christian Campus Ministry
Eucharist will be held Tuesday-
Sept. 18 at 12:33 p.m. at the
Luthern Campus Centre Chapel
(across from A nistration
Bldg.)
Our first potluck supper, followed by a study program, will be
held Thursday Sept. 20 at 6:00
p.m. at Luthern Campus Centre.
WANTED!
JUVENILE HOCKEY PLAYERS
KPG Hockey Assoc, fielding a competitive juvenile team (B.D. '66 or
'67). Home games and practices at
U.B.C. rink. Anyone interested in a
tryout, contact: Dr. Mark Longhurst
228-0798.
11 - FOR SALE - Private
1970 COUGAR well maintained car $750 obo
266-2872.
RELIABLE    TRANSPORTATION.    AMC
Gremlin   1975,   new   clutch   AM/Cassette
$895 obo Walter 261-4555.
1369 VW VAN POP TOP. gas Heater. quart?
hi   v.   sn<,v.s.  viiacii:   017'<) ■■■-co Lt¥'7«
ROOM and BOARD AT
ST. ANDREW'S HALL
6040 lona Drive (Near Gage Towers)
Single and double vacancies available.
Single — $369 per month
Double - $343.50 per month
Phone:
Mrs. Maxwell at 224-7720-days
Rev. Ian Morrison at 266-8673 —evenings
25 - INSTRUCTION
PIANO LESSONS by Judith Alexander
graduate of Juilliard School of Music. Near
Cambie & 38th 731-8323.
CLASSICAL
GUITAR
Instruction at all levels
NEAR CAMPUS
Ph: 263-2038
30 - JOBS
WANTED   RELIABLE   BABYSITTER.   My
home 2 evenings alternate wks, 3-7:30 p.m.
266-6402
LOST - 35
LOST SEPT. 11 near SUB - ladies gold
coloured Seiko watch. 5 yr. attachment. If
found please call 879-8157.
40 - MESSAGES
WOULD CYCLIST that witnessed car accident on S.W. Marine on Tues. Sept. 11 at
5:30 p.m. please call 261-6763.
70 - SERVICES
CLIP AND SAVE. Special rate clothing alterations for students. Anytime call
224-3596.
80 - TUTORING
NEED TO REVIEW high school math or
English? Phone 733-3135 for tutoring by experienced, certified teacher.
85 - TYPING
TYPING — Fast, accurate, reasonable rates.
734-8451
WORD PROCESSING $1.507PG (DS)
CRWR major - Winona Kent 438-6449
located in south Burnaby.
TYPING. Essays _ Resumes. Also Transcription from cassette. Spelling corrected.
Layout on resumes optional. 263-4739.
tXPERT   TYPING.    Essays,    term   papers,
kk turns,    u-rors,    manuscripts,    resumes.
SSI
11? &■ \
%   >nstiiute of Chairtes'sd AcccardariU
_<_.'     ib* 1   of British CoJumbsa
1 13.! Melville Street
Vancouver. B.C. V6E 4E5 Tel: 681-3264
Canada s leading accounting professionals
office
FURNISHED RMS availahlt- ;:■ ,-..,mp.j.;
Rent inc. meals. Contact Davin Ko.ly
224-9930 or drop by the Deke House, 5765
Agronomy Rd., just across Wesbrook Mail.
"SIGMA CHI has room & board (single
& doublesl available. Good foodl! Phone
224-3381."
■ !>'
TYPING ft WORD PROCESSING service
resumes, theses, etc Reasonable rates.
Colleen 590-1894.
PROFESSIONAL (HOME) TYPING. Essays
theses. Reasonable rates. Call 876-2895
and/or 872-3703. Tuesday, September 18, 1984
THE    UBYSSEY
Page 11
UBC Thunderbirds find end zone
By MONTE STEWART
At last, the drought has ended.
After two games of touchdown-
less football, the T-Birds finally
found the end zone last Friday,
defeating the Manitoba Bisons
43-11 at Thunderbird stadium.
UBC quarterback and receiver
coach Eric Guthrie put the game into perspective. "Our offence
started to execute the plays," said
Guthrie, pointing out one of the
reasons why the 'Birds were winless
in their first two Western Intercollegiate Football League starts.
"That's a pretty good bunch we
played against," said Guthrie, "but
we got off to a good start, did some
good things, and, of course things
are easy once you're ahead."
With second year quarterback
Frank Cusati started his first game,
the 'Birds surprised the Bisons by
passing deep on the first series from
scrimmage. Running back Terry
Cochrane finally broke the
touchdown jinx, scoring on a short
pass out of the backfield at 4:08 of
the first quarter. Glenn Steele and
Bruce Barnett provided the other
majors, scoring two touchdowns
each.
Tom Dixon supplied the other
UBC points. The former Richmond
Raider booted his first two field
goals of the season from 29 and 17
SPORTS
yards respectivelyl. Dixon also added four converts (one was missed as
a result of a poor snap from centre)
and three singles.
Cusati said he was pleased with
his performance. "It felt pretty
good out there," said Cusati, one
of several Notre Dame high school
graduates on the T-Birds' roster. "I
just went out there, relaxed and did
the job."
Despite the lopsided score, the
Bisons never gave up. But, they did
make a few obvious errors such as
the one that resulted in Barnett's
first touchdown.
The fourth year defensive back
was rather surprised with his own
good fortune. "I think it was K. C.
Steele, the outside linebacker who
made the tackle and, for some
reason the quarterback (Mike
O'Donnell) held out the ball," said
Barnett. "I just saw it there; so I
took it and I ran clean. Half the
people stopped (because) they
didn't know what was going on."
That touchdown — officially
recorded as a fumble recovery —
gave the 'Birds a 16-3 first quarter
lead. Steele's two touchdowns, the
first on a two yard run which was
set up by a fake field goal, and the
second on a 40 yard jaunt off a
screen pass, enabled UBC to enjoy
a 34-3 lead at half-time.
Barnett's second touchdown of
the game at 2:55 of the fourth
quarter was an extra sword in the
already felled Bisons. He returned
Brookes' punt for a 70 yard
touchdown as a result of some very
effective blocking.
"I saw the hole and there was
great blocking to the right so I cut
to the right and all I had to beat was
the kicker," said Barnett.
The offensive line with starters
Leo Groenewegen, George Piva,
Casey Smith, Don Adamic and
Peter Jeffries, played well as did the
defensive line of Carey Lapa,
Dwayne Derban and Kevin Burt.
Jack Beetstra, who recorded an interception and K. C. Steele participated in several key tackles as
they moved up from their lineback-
ing posts.
Cusat completed 14 or 26 pass attempts for the winners. Jordan
Gagner, who replaced Cusati in the
fourth quarter, completed two of
five attempts for 37 yards. Jordan
Leith, who started the first two
games at quarterback, managed one
completion. The second year Ottawa native threw a 22 yard pass to
Barnett on the fake field goal that
set up Steele's first major.
Terry Fach scored the Bisons' only touchdown at 14:04 of the third
quarter. O'Donnell then hit Fach
for the two point conversion.
The roster juggling that saw
Cusati start at quarterback and Rob
Ros move to wide receiver has not
ended yet.
Both Bob Skemp and Bruce
Rainier suffered serious knee injuries. The two, ironically both
tight ends, have probably ended
their football playing for 1984.
"They're both gone for the year,
I'm sure," said coach Guthrie.
The 'Birds face the Alberta
Golden Bears in Edmonton Friday.
Soccer Birds start Friday
UBC
END Ross Gatensbury eludes Manitoba tackier.
The men's soccer team swings into action this weekend with two
games against Canada West
Athletic union opponents, hoping a
single loss will not destroy their
play-off chances.
Last season UBC recorded a 9-1
record but the 'Birds failed to
qualify for post season play. The
University of Victoria qualified as
the only play-off participant in the
Western division where only the
first place finisher can advance.
The T-Birds open the 1984
regular season Friday against the
Calgary Dinosaurs at 2 p.m. at O.
J. Todd (formerly Wolf son) Field.
The 'Birds then host Lethbridge
Pronghorns at 2 p.m. Saturday.
"The league appears to be even
stronger this season," said UBC
coach Joe Johnson. "I feel from
what I have heard about the other
teams that we'll face an uphill battle
for the Canada West title."
The 'Birds seem unified with such
veterans as Mike Malaha, Frank
Iuele (a Canada West all-star in
1983), Ed Ladha (another Canada
West all-star), Murray Mollard, and
Frank Burkholdter returning.
The T-Birds have lost one key
player, however. Louis Miljanovic,
who led the team in scoring last
year, has not returned to UBC
because of an insufficient academic
standing.
The Canada West schedule com-
New head rugby coach hired
By MONTE STEWART
For the first time in 23 years,
UBC has hired a new head coach
for the men's rugby program.
Barry Legh (pronounced Lee)
was appointed the new mentor of
one of the finest rugby teams on the
lower mainland. He replaces Don
Spence, the man who held the post
for 23 years before passing away
earlier this year.
Legh comes to UBC with extensive playing and coaching experience. A native of Vancouver,
Legh attended St. George's High
School before coming to UBC.
While playing for the 'Birds from
1970-1974 he was a member of the
Canadian national team. He was
also a member of the World XV Invitational team that played Ireland
in 1974..
He coached three years at Point
Grey Secondary before moving to
Eric Hamber where he served as the
physical education department head
from 1981 until this year.
Legh also served as head coach of
the UBC Old Boys, the team he led
to Miller Cup victories in 1980,
1981, and 1982. The Old Boys also
won the Roungfell Cup in 1981.
The university also hired Legh as
an instructor in the faculty of
physical education, a position held
by  Spence  and  all  other  varsity
coaches.
"Barry has an excellent reputation in the educational
community," said UBC athletic
director Bob Hindmarch. "We feel
that his qualifications make him a
great choice to fill Don's position
We're happy to have him aboard."
Legh earned a masters degree in
physical education from the University of Washington, where he also
served as rugby coach. He has attended several Northwest sports
medicine seminars. And serving as a
teacher for the past nine years,
Legh helped to implement a special
modified physical education class
for students with either permanent
or injury-related disability.
Spence, who took a special interest in the off-field activities of his
players, died of hepatitis last spring.
The varsity rugby team cancelled an
Australian tour as a result of his
death.
Legh will supervise the entire
UBC rugby program which comprises seven divisions.
Champs return
The two-time Canadian champion UBC women's field hockey
team begin their quest for an unprecedented third consecutive national title in the first of three
Canada West tournaments this
weekend in Edmonton.
Several veterans have returned to
the squad which has won four national crowns in the past six years.
National team members Heather
Benson, Jody Blaxland, and Carrie
Lockwood provide experience to a
talented team.
Benson was an All-Canadian last
season while Blaxland led the entire
Canada West league in scoring.
"We should be competitive for
this year as we have nine starters
back," said coach Gail Wilson.
"We have lost Terry Drain and
Anne Crofts and goalkeeper Kelly
Thicke (to graduation) but we
should be able to beat them," said
Wilson, now in her eight season.
Following this weekend's tournament, the 'Birds will have a two
week hiatus from Canada West
play. The second tournament of the
fourth tournament schedule takes
place Oct. 6-7 in Calgary.
The final two tournaments of the
season will be held at UBC Oct.
20-21 and Nov. 1-4.
prises 10 games. If the T-Birds
finish first, they will play the
regional winner from the Quebec
Universities Athletic Union.
Right now, the team is looking
only within its own league. "Victoria and Calgary appear to be the
teams to beat," said Johnson.
THEY SAY ONE PICTURE IS WORTH
A THOUSAND WORDS . . .
. . .ENOUGH SAID.
$2.50 per Poster
or Set of 5 for $10
On Sale Sept. 17-19
11:30-1:30
SUB CONCOURSE
or
WAR MEMORIAL GYM
RM 203 (For Ever) Page 12
THE    UBYSSEY
Tuesday, September 18,1984
INTRAMURAL SPORTS
MARKET SURVEY
Fill out this survey and you may win a Sony Walkman, running Shoes, T-shirts, Gym Bags or Posters.
This survey is being used so that we at Intramurals can be of greater service
to the campus community. Please fill out one copy of the survey and place in
one of the blue ballot boxes in the SUB concourse. Winners will be made on
October 1.
GENERAL
1. I have taken part in UBC Intramural Sports in the past:
 YES    NO	
If "YES," answer Question 2.
If "NO," answer Question 3.
2. I take part in UBC Intramural Sports Programs because:
— My friends do
— I have a strong interest in the sport/event
— I base my fitness program around it
— I meet new people here
— I want to be involved
— I like the competitive environment
— Other (please specify)	
I do not take part in UBC Intramural Sports Programs because:
— I keep fit in other ways
— I feel I am not skilled enough/in good
enough physical condition
— I don't know anyone else who takes part
— I am too busy
— I don't like sports
— I know nothing about the program
— I can't afford the registration costs
— I don't know how to register
— I feel Intramurals is a luxury—not important
to a university education
— Other (please specify	
4.
To me
□
1
not a part of my
university life
UBC Intramural Sports is:
□ □
2 3
□ □
4 5
a very important part
of my university life
I have heard about the following UBC Intramural
"Special Events":
  Logan Cycle "200"
  Buchanan Frisbee Football League
  Grouse Mountain Ski Challenge
  Arts '20 Relay Race
  Inaugural Road Run
  7-A-Side Soccer Bowl
  Sedgewick Water Polo
  Centipede Run
  Triathlon
  Storm the Wall
Circle the UBC Intramural logo:
>^44
'7r&
7.      I usually find out about up-coming Intramural
events through:
— posters
— SUB banners
— brochure in registration package
— friends
— Ubyssey ads
— Thunderbird Review
— UBC Reports
— Intramural Sports Report
— My residence/club/fraternity/
sorority social coordinator
— Other (please specify)	
8
UBC Intramural Sports are:
□ □
1 2
Not at all
competitive
□
3
□
4
□
5
much too
competitive
9.      I know where the Intramural Sports Office is:
YES  NO	
NOTSURE_
SPORTSWEAR
1.       I am aware that UBC Intramural Sports sells sportswear:
□ □
YES    NO
If "YES," answer Questions 2 & 3.
If "NO," go on to Question 4.
2. I feel, based on the selection offered at THE BOOKSTORE,
UBC Intramural Sportswear offers:
□ □ □ □ G
12                       3                       4 5
extremely limited extremely large
style selection style selection
3. UBC Intramural Sportswear is:
□ □ □ □ □
12                        3                        4 5
very inexpensive
much too expensive
4.
I purchase the following garments sold by my faculty/
fraternity/ sorority team:
T-shirt	
sweatshirt.
track suit	
jacket	
polo shirt.
baseball cap.
tote bag.
other (please specify).
5.       My favourite sportswear colour(s) is:
 (please specify)
6.     I   buy  (check  the appropriate  box)
garments annually:
0 1
T. shirts                     □ □
sweat shirts             □ □
shorts                       □ □
track suits                 □ □
jackets                      □ □
other (please specify) 	
number  of  the  following
2
□
□
□
□
3 +
spend the following amount annually on sportswear
(excluding footwear):
$ 00.00     $ 51 - $100	
$    1 -$ 20         $101 - $150	
$ 21 - $ 50       $151 - $200	
8.
The percentage of my total garment purchases are made for
the following reason(s):
personal use 	
gifts 	
other (please specify) 	
_%
100%
9.      My favourite brand of running shoe is (please specify)
SKI ADVENTURES
1.       I ski:        YES     NO	
2.       I have taken part in a UBC Intramural Sports ski adventure
package:
never	
no      	
more than once	
I am interested in ski packages during the school year:
YES     NO	
During the winter season, I go skiing:
never	
1 -3 times	
4-6 times	
7 - 9 times.
10+ times.
Normally, I prefer to go skiing
never	
myself	
with an off-campus group_
with a group from UBC: residence_
faculty.
fraternity.
sorority.
other (please specify).
PERSONAL DATA
1.     I get to university by:
my own vehicle:_
bus	
bicycle	
walk	
via: Chancellor.
10th Ave.	
Marine Dr	
16th Ave.	
I live on campus	
other (please specify).
NAME:
ADDRESS:
Phone:	
AGE:	
Postal Code.
MALE.
Female.
FACULTY.
YEAR	

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