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The Ubyssey Mar 7, 1968

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Array Wingless, furry
esnilia bugs
THE UBYSSEY
should never
be circumcised.
Vol. XLIX, No. 54
VANCOUVER, B.C., THURSDAY, MARCH 7, 1968
224-3916
— lawrence weedd photo
DISTURBED AND PERTURBED, coed about to get a foot in the mouth doesn't especially like
being bothered when boning up on the latest scandal. "Fie and rot off, you vile foot."
SFU vote considers McFog
BURNABY (Staff) — A general meeting of
Simon Fraser University students Wednesday
decided to put to a campus-wide vote a motion
calling for university president Pat McTaggart-
Cowan's resignation.
The two-hour meeting on the mall attracted
Loyola   students
condemn   premier
MONTREAL (CUP) — One thousand angry
Loyola College students cried down with
(Daniel) Johnson Tuesday and carried placards
to protest of the possible future ruin of their
school.
They were marching on the Quebec legislature to demand the government recognize the
college as a university and give them grants
accordingly.
Otherwise, the college's 7.5 million debt will
force them to raise their fees to $800 next year.
Fees are now $590, second only to McGill's $60*0
fees, the highest in Canada.
All other universities in Quebec get an operational grant based on $1,500 per student.
Loyola, now classed as a classical college, gets
a grant based on $550 per student.
Student council president Graham Nevins
calls it discrimination.
He told students not to pay their fees next
year, unless the government came across with
higher grants. The government has promised to
make a decision on Loyola's status before the
budget is presented some time this month.
more than 1,000 students -who at one time forcibly ejected a student protesting the motion.
Vince Stone, a middle-aged man admitted to
SFU under their mature student program, had
a microphone jerked away from him when he
accused students of being immature.
"It's none of your business," he said. Stone
said the matter should be left to faculty.
Then chairman Rob Walsh called for order
and told students to take the microphone away
from him. Several did and Stone ran up to the
main speaker's microphone where he shouted
at students until the microphone was disconnected.
Political science, sociology and anthropology
teaching assistant Jim Harding first proposed
the motion which was debated for almost two
hours. Harding charged that McTaggart-Cowan
did not fully represent faculty to the board of
governors. Walsh decided to put the question to
a special vote today.
A recent Canadian Association of University
Teachers report assailed the concentration of
authority among department heads and. the university president.
Wednesday's meeting was originally called
to discuss SFU board of governors action Friday
to delay ending its policy of secret meetings.
Students Wednesday never got around to discussing secrecy.
Friday, 150 students held a -mill-in outside
the board's chamber as a student delegation
asked for open meetings.
After three hours the governors decided to
set up a three-man committee to meet with the
incoming student council when it is elected in
six weeks.
Prez f
%
ope
appla
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UbI
senat
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SITY Of
By DAVID SALMON
UBC's senate may soon follow the lead of Simon Fraser
University's open senate, says Alma Mater Society president
Shaun Sullivan.
Sullivan made the prediction Wednesday following the decision to open SFU's senate this week and a coinciding announcement of a 10-man committee to explore the jwssibility of opening
UBC's senate.
The opening of SFU's senate came after a five-man committee, including the dean of education, three profs and student
senator Stan Wong, made a unanimous recommendation that
meetings be opened to the public.
Wong said the committee will recommend to the senate's
April meeting guidelines for the mechanics of open senate —
how many observers will be allowed and rules on discussion.
The SFU move was applauded by Sullivan.
"It should be an incentive to the UBC academic body to
do the same," he said. "We have been campaigning for open
senate and this strengthens our case."
The committee's appointment followed an open meeting between senators and students January 31 at which economics prof.
Dr. Robert Clark advocated its formation. The open meeting
followed a decision by 600 students Jan. 9 to stage a sit-in
at the next senate meeting held Feb. 14 to protest senate secrecy.
"The issue of open senate was originally brought up by
the UBC students, and I hope UBC's senate will follow the lead
of SFU by opening its meetings," said student senator Gabor
Mate.
AMS first vice-president Don Mutton noted that SiFU's student senators have been elected for over a year now while
UBC's have held the seats for only a few months.
"It is only a matter of time before UBC's senate follows SFU
on open meeting, too."
However, acting UBC president, Walter' Gage, who named
the 10-man open-senate committee, said Wednesday that SFU's
decision will not influence the committee in any way.
"The senate has already heard the views of students and
will seek those of others, and will make its decision solely In
the light of UBC's own special circumstances and traditions,'' said
Gage.
Committee chairman Dr. Douglas Kenny, said: "The decision
to strike a committee antedated the action of SFU. There is no
possible co-relation."
"If the committee agrees, we will obtain the transcript of
SFU's debate on the subject and take into account their considerations," said Kenny.
"There is definitely a possibility of change,'' said committee
member Finlay Morrison, assistant dean and professor of pharmacology.
"This; time we intend to have a hard look at the subject,"
he said.
Three hats in  ring
for presidential bout
Three students are now in the running for the Alma
Mater Society presidential by-election March 13.
Nominated are Dave Zirnhelt, arts 4, j\ndy McConkey,
law 3, and Jack Christopher, arts 4.
Zirnhelt is chairman of World University Service at
UBC, McConkey is vice-president of the men's athletic
association, and Christopher is a defensive guard for the
UBC Thunderbirds football team.
The by-election was called when the Feb. 7 election
between Stan Persky and Brian Abraham was declared
void by student council. The action was taken after student court found Persky ineligible to run.
Nominations for the March 13 election close today at
noon. Page 2
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday, March  7,  1968
FREEDOM  THREATENED
Gov't attacks press
REGINA (CUP) — The board of governors
at the University of Saskatchewan is out to
squelch the Regina campus paper the Carillon.
The paper printed a front page story Feb.
16 showing how a Liberal MLA, who took three
graduate history courses in 1966-67, received a
$1,000 university-approved loan under the Canada student loan plan.
Allan Guy earned over $7,500 that year as
MLA and from other government posts he held.
He is now Saskatchewan's minister of public
works.
Canada student loans are reserved for full-
time students who can prove need.
The March 1 issue of the Carillon reported
that Regina campus principal W. A. Riddell
tried to stop or delay publication of the article.
Editor Don Kossick resisted their attempts.
Student union president Ralph Smith and
other student leaders were summoned to a
meeting Feb. 27 with two board members and
the principal. They were asked to show why the
university should continue to collect student
union fees, to allow them to use the name of
the university, and why the university should
continue to provide space on campus for the
Carillon.
Editor Kossick said the meeting clearly implied if the Carillon's editorial policy does not
change the university will no longer collect
student fees.
The Guy loan story has been discussed several times in the legislature and in the downtown press. The Carillon itself has stepped on
toes all over the province since Kossick became
editor last September.
He has hammered away at the government
and the university alike, coming up with stories
on a precedent-sstting Indian civil rights case,
student council misuse of funds and library
staff resignations. Premier Ross Thatcher's announcement to assume direct control of the
University budget touched off another editorial
attack.
The paper has been particularly unkind to
Thatcher, who has been caricatured extensively since mid-November. A famous photograph of several years ago showing Thatcher
kicking at the door to the legislative chambers
has had extensive front-page use.
Kossick said the principal's and the board's
threat to cut off finances of the Carillon by refusing to collect the fees at registration will be
studied by a faculty committee on academic
freedom.
Administration officials have said the Carillon's attacks on the government at the same
time the university is trying to lose the government's proposed control of the university budget
may make things difficult.
The university is also reported to be disturbed at the paper's effect on the public image.
Campus  filthy/   says   prof
By FRED CAWSEY
Our   campus   is   filthy,   says   UBC   Classics
lecturer Dr.  Geoffrey Riddehough.
"I've   seen   many   campuses   in   the   United
al life
outlined in
By MIKE FITZGERALD
Want to know how toi dunk a student?
It's all there in the engineering handbook,
a collection of rules and regulations designed
to bring out the best in any potential redcoat.
Consisting of 40-odd pages with an appendix
listing the phone numbers of the various women's residences and local hospitals, the handbook is issued by the engineering undergraduate
society.
On page 13, there is a section called tanking
with four rules:
(1) Jump the victim and disable him.
(2) Remove all valuables and articles of clothing (e.g. furry underthings for artsmen).
(3) Carry the guy face down to the pond and
then turn him through pi radians and
have a count-down.
(4) Make sure that he is not holding on to
anybody. Get a good arc for distance.
Social aspects of the engineering life are
also included.
One part reads: "All members of the EUS
have no doubt felt the stringent withdrawal
pains due to lack of beer and women. Now is
the time to release those frustrations which have
been building up for an entire summer. Come
to the mixers and meet the campus lovelies (e.g.
the innocent freshettes).
According to the handbook, the engineer's
attendance at social functions plays an important part in determining the success of the
engineer.
The development of the art of meeting people
is extremely important in his overall standing.
That section can be found on page 11.
"First, these knowing lovelies must be lured
out of their fortified residences. To do this we
sponsor terrific mixers off campus. Our mixers
are always a success and you never know what
fun you may find yourself in, so plan on attending as many as you can take."
A section on smokers says: "For those lucky
enough to be of age, we have the Engineer's
Smoker—in late (Ha!). Since there is always a
possibility of the magic man in the blue suit
appearing, (he is magic because when he appears, everyone else disappears) we don't advertise it. To make sure that you don't miss this
delightful evening of masculine entertainment,
let your council reps know early ..."
States and Europe, but UBC is by far messier
than any of them," he said Wednesday.
Indelible painting on sidewalks and buildings
announcing campus activities are examples, he
said.
"Students proclaiming their ability to remodel the world and run it properly might at
least keep their own  grounds  clean.
Riddehough thinks dirty grounds might be
a sort of tradition at UBC.
"I was at Fairview (old UBC campus) before
we moved out here to Point Grey," he said. "In
our efforts to show the government how squalid
Fairview conditions were, we always made sure
there was plenty of garbage lying around when
visiting dignitaries arrived.
"So UBC seems to have started off with no
pride in its campus, and unfortunately the
tradition seems to have continued."
Riddehough termed immature a recent engineering stunt in which toilet paper was strewn
through campus trees.
In Riddehough's opinion, undergraduates are
the cause of most of the mess. He thinks it is
bad for UBC's image.
"We need public support and money, and
when people who are already critical of the
university see our unkempt conditions they criticize even more."
Vancouver is a messy town anyway, he said.
It seems to suggest a lack of intellectual
maturity when people refuse to keep their
environment clean.
"Most people will agree that a neat campus
is something to be proud of and a messy campus
is one to be ashamed of."
He said it is about time UBC students were
aware of the problem, and did something
about it.
Quiz   return   poor
Only one fifth of the 9,500 arts anti-calendar
questionnaires distributed so far have been
returned.
They were handed out to arts students over
the last two weeks.
"I guess most of them are just lying in
lockers or in briefcases," said arts undergraduate society vice-president Ralph Stanton.
"People just aren't taking them seriously."
The questionnaire, two sides of a foolscap
sheet, asks students to evaluate their professors.
Results are tabulated as the arts anti-calendar,
available in the summer.
Anyone who wants to help compile the results should apply at the desk in Buchanan
lounge between 10:30 and 4:30, Stanton said.
LEARN GREEK
FOLK DANCES
at the social evening
Fri., Mar. 8, 9 p.m.
MUSIC BY THE  GIANNIS
ELECTRIC   COMBO
Refreshments Admission   $1
Everyone Welcome
Presented   by
The Hellenic Cultural Society
and International House
Albert' Ofusu Asiedu
(A Ph.d. candidate from  Ghana)
Presents
"An Analysis of Institutional
Changes in Africa"
Thursday, Noon
in the Upper Lounge at
International House
Everyone  Welcome
OVERSEAS AUTO PARTS
12th and Alma
736-9804
#y%
CLEARANCE
SALE
NOW IN PROGRESS
up to 50% off
Sorry, no student discount during sale
MRS. LOLA M. LANGE OF THE
"ROYAL COMMISSION ON THE
STATUS OF WOMEN"
THURSDAY, NOON
Room 400 at International House
BRING YOUR LUNCH AND HAVE OUR COFFEE
EVERYONE WELCOME
Alma  Mater  Society
OFFICIAL  NOTICES
STUDENT COURT
AND DISCIPLINE COMMITTEE
Applications will be received up to March 7 for
positions on the Students Court and the A.M.S. Discipline Committee.   Submit applications to:
President,
Law  Students  Association
Box  No.  65
A.M.S., Brock Hall
Committee Members
Applications are now being received for Committee
members for the following Joint AMS—Administrative
Committees:
Academic Symposium Committee
Brock Art Committee
Student Union Building Clients Committee
Winter Sports Centre Management Committee
Food Services Committee
Library Committee
Parking and Traffic Committee
Book Store Committee
Residence Committee
Housing Committee
Applications for the above positions must include a
letter outlining qualifications, reason for applying, and,
where applicable, a proposed program. Eligibility forms
are available from the AMIS Office and must be completed by the Registrar's Office before making application.
Letters of application and eligibility forms must be
submitted to the secretary, Box 54, Brock Hall by Noon,
March  11.
Committee Chairmen
Applications will be received up to Noon March 11
for the positions of Cairman of the following AMS
Standing  Committees:
Academic  Activities
Canadian University Services Overseas
Frosh Orientation
High  School  Conference Committee
Intramurals Committee
Performing Arts' Speakers Symposium
World University Service
Applications for the above positions must include
a letter outlining qualifications, reasons for applying,
and a proposed program. Eligibility forms are available
from the AMS Office and must be completed by the
Registrar's Office before making application.
Letters of application and eligibility forms must be
submitted to the secretary, Box 54, Brock Hall.
Presidential By-Election
Nominations for the Presidential By-Election will
open Wednesday, February 28, and will close at 12 noon
Thursday, March 7. Nomination and eligibility forms
and copies of the Election Rules and Procedures are
available from the AMS Office. All nomination and
eligibility forms should be submitted to Penny Cairns,
Secretary, Box 54, Brock Hall. Thursday,  March  7,   1968
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
— bob brown photo
IT'S SPRING   and   young   men's   thoughts  turn   foolish   like   these   two   young   rogues   who
spent  Wednesday  afternoon   touring   the   library,  by bicycle.
Drug kicks step down
for meditation, says dean
Hallucinogenic drugs are on the way out,
says UBC's dean of pharmacy Dr. Bernard
Riedel.
Riedel made the statement in an address on
psychedelic drugs.
LSD's possible ability to damage chromosomes has scared off women, he said, and men
now think drugs are going out of style.
"The thing now is to sit around and try
to break down each other's mind without any
drug at all. Or to try to develop within one's
self a state of absolutely nothing or only one
all-pervading thought."
There is an other state of mind, called
integral thought as opposed to analytic thought,
in which deep insight can occur, Riedel said.
It is a truly creative process.
"To have such truly original thought the
mind must throw off its critical guard. It must
put itself into a state of depersonalization."
To do this requires intense attention, much
like that which Zen Buddhists achieve, so the
individual appears to be outside himself, he said.
"Under these circumstances a person undergoes an emotional reorganization — he becomes
Perspective change
in panel discussion
Educational change in historical perspective
is the subject of a panel discussion today at
noon.
Speakers will be Prof. Jan De Bruyn on
renaissance and seventeenth century man, Prof.
Karl Erdman on science and eighteenth century
man, and Prof. Henry Johnson on twentieth
century man and woman.
The discussion, followed by an audience
participation session, will begin at noon in ed.
100.
one with the universe — he has a sense of
liberation."
The desire to escape from reality and to intensify one's own powers has throughout history
led to the misuse of drugs, Riedel said.
The abuse of opium aroused two attitudes
prevalent on the misuse of drugs. First is that
users should be punished. Second, is that misuse
of a drug should be considered a sickness, and
the offender be cured, not jailed.
These two opinions are evident in the marijuana controversy. Many feel that if marijuana
were legalized, society would develop codes and
attitudes towards it similar to those on liquor,
Riedel said.
"The upshot of misinformed fulmination
about marijuana is people in the know feel a
certain superiority. They're entitled to smile
when subjected to the liquor industry's $200
million annual barrage of advertising. They feel
their product is better, cheaper and less
dangerous."
But in contrast to the relation that marijuana
brings, LSD tends to cause dissociation and detachment of the taker, personal insensitivity and
a feeling of superiority, religious and philosophical solipsism, impulsivity, and poor judgment.
"One of the chief concerns of the dedicated
drug-taker is precisely to repudiate the values,
judgments and most basic perceptions of the
persons he believes to represent a monolithic
and repressive authority."
While LSD can be useful in treating schizophrenia and other psychological disorders, it
may produce even more serious results. Its value
as a treatment is very seriously questioned.
Thus, Riedel said, the shift is away from
using drugs for kicks. Shaking oneself loose
from the common world, a process called cosmic
consciousness may next be done not by drugs,
but by Zen Buddhist meditation.
Meanwhile, bananas, morning glory seeds,
peppermint oil and glue may be passing out of
Student concern
pitiful—Robbins
By MIKE FINLAY
Ubyssey Council Reporter
UBC students are failing to take stands on the vital issues
that concern them, says AIMS external affairs officer-elect Tobin
Robbins;.
"There are pitifully few students concerned with what is
going on," said Robbins, arts 3, Wednesday. "The student has
to take a stand on what is going on in government in Vancouver,
in the province and in Ottawa."
"Its our country and we're in the middle
of a mire. Being passive about it is just
perpetuating a mess."
Robbins said he thought about 90 per
cent of the students at UBC were not interested in the issues that affect the country and
themselves.
"The same thing applies to the campus,"
he said. "The student has the right to be
involved in the decision making that directly
affects Ms well being, but he has to work to
get involved." ROBBINS
Robbins said he hopes the new executive and council will
be able to make students more aware of campus issues and what
student government is doing.
"We're going to have to have council meetings during the
day, arid stop this hiding at night. We'll try and put out a
detailed agenda so students can come when an issue comes up
that directly affects them."
He said he was not pleased with the present system of
representation on council and would work for a structure that
was mere representative of population.
"I'm not in agreement with the proposal that representatives
of the board of governors and the faculty association sit as voting
members on council," he said.
"Tie meetings are open to anyone as it is. Besides, we're
a society and they wouldn't be members."
(The proposal failed to pass through council Feb. 26.)
Robbins sees his position as external affairs officer as a
full position which he feels will require preparation during the
summer.
"One of the major jobs will be working with the Canadian
Union of Students. We have to make sure the $12,000 we give
them goes somewhere. We'll go down to the congress, in New
Brunswick."
He said he found the one meeting of the B.C. Assembly of
Students he attended disappointing.
"There's poor communication between here and the headquarters in Victoria and I think there should be a paid president
to make the job effective,'' he said.
"The principal function of B.C.A.S. right now is going to
have to be trying to get more money from the government."
He said there are problems with the bookstore that must
be dealt with if students are to get a fair deal.
"We'll work along with the Canadian association of university teachers and look in to the problem." "We've agreed
that UBC could be a leader in this area of examination."
Jobs would be done by members of the executive who felt
most competent to handle them, even if they did not fall directly
on their office.
"The new president should give direction and leadership to
the council.
"I just hope we elect one who will be as progressive as the
executive is."
'Boston  needs police  draff
BOSTON (CUP-LNS) — Police commissioner Edmund McNamara wants to draft men into the city police forces in the
near future.
The police draft will be necessary, McNamara claims, due
to the persistent disinterest of young men in law enforcement
careers.
He* raised the proposal in a thesis ivritten for the Tufts
University assembly on government to be held in Medford, Mass.
this month.
He: said inductees would be used as civil defense agents
to curb inner-city insurrections. »<.#'£<♦!**,
*< * **«*-<.    <.
>•>.?!'i j.s*TO%
THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the university year
by the Alma Mater Society of the University of B.C. Editorial opinions are
those of the editor and not of the AMS or the university. Member,
Canadian University Press. Proprietor, Ubyssey News Services (UNS). The
Ubyssey subscribes to the press services of Pacific Student Press, of which
it is founding member, and Underground Press Syndicate. Authorized second
class mail by Post Office Department, Ottawa, and for payment of postage
in cash. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary ond
review. City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 224-3242: editor, local 25; photo.
Page   Friday,   loc.   24;   sports,   loc.  23;   advertising,   loc.   26.   Telex  04-5224.
Final winner Southam Trophy, awarded' by Canadian
University Press for general excellence. Co-winner Bracken
Trophy for editorial writing.
"There's nothing we need more in the world
than a generation of young people who are
violently dedicated to social reform."
—Dean of engineering William Armstrong
MARCH 7, 1968
Who's British?
The people of B.C. are not British. Only the British
are British.
So why, we demand, call this province British
Columbia? The brutish adjective British is an embarrassment. It stamps us as a colony, something far from
fashionable these days. It is even more embarrassing in
this respect than the picture of the English lady on our
stamps and coins.
Well-educated Europeans and Asians — who know
Vancouver is a port city on Canada's west coast — have
never heard of British Columbia. When, asked, they
usually place it either south of Cuba or east of the
Congo. Knowing this country has gained some sort of
independence, they are surprised to learn British Columbia is in Canada.
Worse, having a false colonial name blinds many
British Columbians to the danger of the economic neocolonialism engulfing us from the south.
Quebecers and other Canadians have only scorn for
the present name of this province, as they do for the
union jack, God Save the Queen and other colonial trappings. It's time all of this nonsense was tossed out. Taking the British out of British Columbia is a good way
to start.
Bad show
A legislature committee in Victoria is currently
studying marijuana. Its terms of reference, as announced
by education minister Leslie Peterson, include the hope
that the committee can "recommend changes in laws or
other measures to halt the increasing use of drugs."
Also, the committee was to suggest ways combatting
"faulty leadership by professors" on the pot question.
As The Ubyssey pointed out earlier, an objective
study of marijuana is obviously not what this Socred
committee has in mind. Rather, the purpose is twofold:
find a rationalization for tightening the pot laws and
carry out a witch-hunt against professors whose research
doesn't jibe with popular prejudice.
It should have been, we thought, axiomatic that no
professor would have anything to do with an inquiry
with predetermined conclusions.
We were wrong. UBC's Conrad Schwarz, a professor of psychiatry who never misses a chance to gain
personal publicity, was one of the committee's first
visitors. Being of the minority of scientists concerned
with the subject who support strict marijuana legislation,
Schwarz undoubtedly gave the committee just what it
wanted.
We have no quarrel with Schwarz expressing his
views on marijuana. But we must question the integrity
of a scientist who consents to appear before a fraudulent
inquiry, the terms of reference of which include an open
threat to academic freedom.
Scientist-MLA Pat McGeer's hysterical ranting
about LSD in the legislature last year was one of the
most degrading episodes in the history of UBC's faculty.
McGeer's antics were viewed as a prostitution of his
profession in an attempt to gain political support. Although he's not running for office, Schwarz's behavior
is no better.
EDITOR:
City   	
News   	
Managing
Photo	
Senior	
Sports   	
Wire	
Page  Friday
Ass't. City
Danny   Stoffman
■        Stuart  Gray
Susan  Gransby
Murray   McMillan
Kurt Hilger
Pat Hrushowy
        Mike   Jessen
Norman Gidney
       Judy Bing
  Boni  Lee
1 ain't gunna use no puns know how,
said Yuan Kwei-shei and promptly
puked on the newsroom floor. It's
revolting, all these puns we've had all
year. Makes me sick. So he wrote.
Who worked? Only the wizard of id
knows fer damnshur. Maybe Mike
Finlay,   or   Steve   Jackson,   or   Dave
Salmon. Perhaps Paul Knox or Irving
Fetish or Fritz Causey or Mike Fitzgerald. Price is having a party, but
he doesn't want anyone to know, all
the details are on the bulletin board.
They might come and disrupt his sister.   Yuk, yuk.
Ellice Dee, Mary Warner, Robert
Osborne and the despicable, egregious
Lin Tse-hsu came lovingly. The Boor
aurriv-ed and left. Caint win em all,
he muttered. Angie visited, but got
crabby and left. U Thant couldn't
make it, but sent his regards.
Brown hollow wood was used constructively in the darkroom. Twigg
laid out, the sports pages, that is.
He was assisted by Bob Banno and a
new copy boy named Jenson or Johnson or Jessen or something.
A good time  was had by  all
"Mr.   Mayor  —  this  man   says   he   can   solve   the   Hippie
Problem . . . . "
Protesting profs
help Yank fanatics
By GABOR  MATE
Despite their good intentions, the 233 UBC professors
who signed the petition protesting the Soviet government's
recent jailing of Russian intellectuals may have performed a
disservice to the cause of freedom in the -world.
Their action, taken in itself,
is a very honorable one — unfortunately, however, no political act occurs in a vacuum
but always in a real and complex political context. And in
the political context the professors have chosen to register
their protest, their action may
better serve the cause of tyranny than that of freedom.
For what is the immediate
political context of their act ?
Not the Soviet Union, but
North America. It is not in
Russia but in North America
that the protest of the 233 professors will have the greater
consequences. And what characterizes the North American
political climate at the present
time?
In the name of anti-Communism the United States is waging the dirtiest war in history
against the people of Vietnam.
Also in the name of anti-Communism, certain segments of
the American ruling group are
preparing to unleash a nuclear
war on China — not, it is to
be assumed, an eventuality
viewed with favor by the 233
professors. What makes possible such a foreign policy is
the fanatically anti-Communist
mentality the North American
people have been taught to
accept —. are the professors
really furthering the cause of
liberty by catering to this
mentality ?
This is not to say that tyranny should not be opposed wherever it exists, be it our own
society or somewhere else.
But the struggle must be carried on with a view to that
which is most necessary in
terms of our own particular
situation.  In  other words, the
233 professors would have
struck a greater blow for liberty if they had somehow related their love of freedom to
the North American situation.
As the recent jailing of the
black American playwright
Leroi Jones indicates, our increasingly violent anti-Communist foreign policy is being
coupled with an increasingly
repressive internal policy —
once more deriving its justification from the sacred cause of
anti -Communist freedom.
Would our 233 professors not
serve freedom in a much more
tangible way by shedding the
light of their protest on the
lack of freedom in our society?
How many of these 233 are
actively engaged in the struggle to bring justice to Leroi
Jones? Even, closer to home,
how many of the 233 lifted a
finger last year to oppose the
jailing of B.C. labor leaders
whose only crime was that
they tried to serve the interests of their labor following ?
In the 1930's the Communist parties of the western
world demanded progressive
intellectuals confine their
criticism to the West, and
never direct it against the
actions of the Soviet Union. No
such demand is being made
here. But it does seem reasonable that the fight against
tyranny should be waged primarily on the local level, and
if criticism of distant societies
is necessary that it be made in
the context of the local struggle. Unless all our actions are
related to the local struggle,
there exists a danger of our
well-meant statements being
used by the representatives of
the status quo at home. This
has alrady become the fate of
the protest of the 233 professors in the downtown press.
Students willing to assist in
high school distribution of The
Ubyssey's special education
supplement will meet al The
Ubyssey  office  today,   1   p.m.
ZAP
Among upcoming elections
are those for the faculty association . . . some youngbloods
say there's a chance of a radical backlash this year after
last year's reactionary sweep.
. . . Latest faculty club pariah
is commerce prof John Sutherland, who outlined his economic views in a Page Six piece *
in the Sun . . . Among milder
reactions in the faculty club
bar: "neanderthal," "stunning," "asinine." . . . Real
economists — who live in the
economics department, not the
faculty of commerce — were
not particularly disturbed by
Sutherland's rightist leanings:
they merely feel his economic
views bear no relation to
reality. "It reflects badly on
the whole university," said one.
. . . Commerce faculty has a
knack for producing outcasts
. . . all-time champ is Ralph
Loffmark who joined the Victoria  hickocracy.  .  .   .
Will egregious housing czar
cum classics head Malcolm McGregor ever come back from
his Grecian sabbatical? Colleagues speculate old Male
must be overjoyed amid all
that order and discipline
they've got in Greece. He may
not look forward to a return to
this anarchist's haven . . .
Ever wonder about the C-
Fun hotliner who sounds like
a snotty teenager ? Yes, Doug
Brinkley is none other than
Jim Taylor who quit as law
students' president . . . When
ZAP said WUSter Dave Zirnhelt was running for AMS
p r e z, weirdie-beardie Dave
fiercely denied it. "If I'm running everybody else should be
too," he shrilled. Needless to
say, Zirnhelt is running. ZAP
knows more than he does . . .
Despite Dave's assurances,
everybody else isn't running —
only a couple of jock-strap
types named Andy McConkey
and Jack Christopher. Only
platform of each is to see that
the jocks continue to get far
more AMS money than they
deserve. The jock who performs worst at the beginning
of the campaign will drop out
in favor of the other . . .
Lameduck AMS prez Shaun
Sullivan on the idea of second
veep Kim Campbell taking
over ineligible Dave Hoye's
treasurer post: "Oh shit, that's
all we need." A gaggle of Sullivan's flunkies, calling themselves the SPCA, soaked $350
out of student council Monday
to put out a four page paper
which they claim will show
the campus what The Ubyssey
could be if it only tried ...
Observers see it as a desperate
last act of self-justification by
this year's AMS exec, considered the worst in the society's
history ... An example of the
objective reporting to which
students will be subjected:
One Val Thom. who worked
on every committee and subcommittee formed this year by
second veep Don Mutton, interviewed the same Mutton on
his year's activities. Thursday, March  7,   1968
THE     UBYSSEY
Page 5
LETTERS TO THE EmfOR
Mouser  stupid?
Editor, The Ubyssey:
While it is true that I was
critical of the education representative for his failure to
bring to the attention of either
AMS council or the elections
committee the fact that many
of his constituents would be
off the campus on the day of
the recent constitutional referendum, at no time did I make
either of the remarks attributed to me in the paragraph
immediately under the subhead "Mouse Rep Stupid".
In the first place I said that
Gilchrist had not fulfilled his
responsibilities, not that he was
"stupid". In the second, the
alternative would have been
advance polls for education
(sic) students, not postponing
the referendum. In general,
the coverage by The Ubyssey
of the events of the past several
weeks has been both responsible and fair.
CHUCK CAMPBELL,
AMS returning officer.
Bookstore
Editor, The Ubyssey:
In the face of a steady Dow
of criticism the bookstore management has maintained a dignified silence, indicating
either that they consider themselves above such matters as
student criticism or alternately
that they have no answers to
such criticisms. In an endeavor
to tempt the management
down from their aloof and
Olympian heights into print I
would like to pose two specific  questions:
Question 1—Does the bookstore management negotiate
with publishers for discounts
on behalf of students ? Where
comparisons can be made with
city bookstores prices appear
to be the same (with the exception of course of the 5 per
cent tax which is a provincial
government concession and as
such completely separate from
profits). When a professor
nominates a text his students
are required to purchase the
same regardless of price. This
makes   for   a   seller's   market
Albert Ofusu Asiedu
(A  Ph.d.  candidate from  Ghana)
Presents
"An Analysis of Institutional
Changes in Africa"
Thursday, Noon
in the Upper Lounge at
International House
Everyone Welcome
Overseas
Forwarding
of
Household
-Goods & Effects
Call 531-2931
unless a concerted effort is
made on the student's behalf
by the purchasing authority.
Take for instance the basic
text for psychology 100 selling
at $9.65 to approximately
4,000 students. This represents
a $38,600 order, sizeable by
any standards. The text book
trade has developed into a lucrative and highly competitive
one and orders of this magnitude could certainly give purchasing power to buyers. Possibly members of the faculty
are remiss here and could combine with the bookstore management to exert leverage for
sizeable discounts. Two professors have recently been heard to
state they were not aware of
the cost of books for their own
courses. The management will
obviously refer to the 5 per
cent rebates which leads me to
the second query. Enquiries at
the bookstore to find out when
this rebate can be expected
have received a date of May,
i.e. after the Spring recess. If
18,000 students buy on an
average $100 worth of books
and equipment during an academic year they -would qualify
for a $5 per head rebate or
a $90,000 total. If rebates are
made after the spring recess
a conservative estimate of half
the student body would have
dispersed across the continent
or be working and not be in a
position to return to the campus. The bookstore would
therefore stand to save some
$45,000 in rebates at the students expense.
Question 2—Would the bookstore management care to confirm or deny this as an official
rebate policy.
RICHARD HUME,
science 2
FILMSOC PRESENTS
GOLDFINGER
TODAY-AUD.-50c
12:30, 3:30, 6:00, 8:30
AGENT 007 in Color
MRS. LOLA M. LANGE OF THE
"ROYAL COMMISSION ON THE
STATUS OF WOMEN"
THURSDAY, NOON
Room 400 at International House
BRING YOUR LUNCH AND HAVE OUR COFFEE
EVERYONE WELCOME
CANADA'S
LARGEST
BOAT SHOW
Largest collection of new boats,
campers, trailers, mobile homes
and sports equipment in five PNE
buildings including the new Pacific
Coliseum. Plus fabulous Mickie Finn
stage show and special exhibits.
Mon. thru Fri. 6 pm to 11 pm • Sat. 1 pm to 11 pm • Sun. 1 pm to 7 pm
Adults $1.50   Students $1.00   Under six free: with adult
BOAT   SHOW
VANCOUVER-PNE-M^RCH 8-17
FACTS You Should Know
About Your New Student Union Building
HEY YOU!
The new SUB will provide the following social facilities (all
located on the second floor).
—Main ballroom—Seating 800 (seating 500 for banquets)
—Party room
—Party Room Extension — When not in use for large functions, the Party Room and Party Room Extension are
set up as lounges.
—Combination of Ballroom, Party Room & Party Room
Extension could service a dance, accommodating 1,500
couples, with two orchestras.
—Courtyard—64'x 120' (an outdoor lounging area, within
the  building).
For further information, watch for future ads, or
contact the SUB office, 2nd floor, Brock South.
Important Announcement!
AMS CHARTER FLIGHT COMMITTEE HAS ARRANGED
A GROUP FLIGHT TO LONDON
Cost $365
DETAILS BELOW
DATE: June 3# 1968 - Sept. 4, 1968
COMPANY: Air Canada - Economy Class
NUMBER OF SEATS AVAILABLE: 60 Seats
TERMS: Full Payment At Time Of Application
NOTICE TO ALL PERSONS Now on AMS Charter Flight Waiting List - We are
Holding Seats For You on the Group Flight, UNTIL TUES., MARCH 12, 1968. Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
Thursday,  March  7,   1968
'TWEEN CLASSES
Female's status probed
INTERNATIONAL  HOUSE
Mrs. Lola Lange of the royal
commission on the status of
women, IH 400, noon today.
SUS
Dr. W. E. Middleton, science
historian on instruments and
science before 1800, noon today, Henn. 200.
Everyone who wants to
work on science anti-calendar,
black and blue review, sign
name in science common room,
math annex.
COMMERCE US
General meeting, door
prizes, leg auction, today noon,
Ang.  110.
EL CIRCULO
Miss T o m s i c k will show
slides and speak on Velasquez,
noon, IH 402-404.
Oops, we boobed,
Penthouse  clear
A story on page one of Tuesday's Ubyssey said two women
arrested in a raid on the
science stag party were employees of the Penthouse night
club.
This was a mistake.
PRE-MED
Microscope display in anatomy block, noon, today, for
those interested in purchasing
microscopes for next year.
VGH field trip, noon.
ARCHEOLOGY
Archeology lab open to students and faculty Thursdays,
noon to 3:30. Field trip Sunday. Meet at lab 9 a.m.
AQUA SOC
Election noon today, Bu. 100.
ARTS US
Meeting on arts co-ops. Discussion for action this summer,
noon today, Bu. lounge.
SPORTS CAR CLUB
Election, general meeting,
noon today chem. 250.
Everyone welcome Sunday
to sports car gymkhana. Starts
H-lot. Entry fee $2.
FILMSOC
Sean Connery, Honor Black-
man and Gerte Frobe in Gold-
finger today, auditorium, noon,
3:30, 6, and 8:30 p.m. — 50
cents.
AFRICAN   STUDENTS
A critical analysis of institutional changes in Africa by
Ofusu Asiedu, forestry pre-
doctoral candidate, IH upper
lounge, noon today.
VANCOUVER ALDERMAN
HARRY RANKIN
ON
"VANCOUVER POLITICS"
TODAY NOON
Buchanan 102
Sponsored by U.B.C. New Democrats
HELD OVER
NOMINATED FOR
ACADEMY
AWARDS
Truman Capote's
IN COLD
BLOOD
Written for the Screen and Directed by
Richard Brooks
Odeon
682-7468
' 381
GMNVILU
Show Times:
Sun.   to   Pri.
8:30  p.m.
Sat. 6 & 9:15 p.m.
Matinees:
Wed.,  Sat.,
Sun.   &    holidays
2 p.m.
NO ADMITTANCE TO
PERSONSTJNDER i'
CHINESE VARSITY CLUB
Skating party Thunderbird
Arena, tonight from 6:15 p.m.
to  8:15 p.m.
HOUSING SURVEY
Answer the questionnaire
and return it today. A greater
response is needed to validate
the survey.
FOLKSONG SOC
Concert with Joe Mock, today, noon, Brock. Members
free,  others  25  cents.
LEARN GREEK
FOLK DANCES
at the social evening
Fri., Mar. 8, 9 p.m.
MUSIC   BY  THE   G1ANN1S
ELECTRIC   COMBO
Refreshments Admission   $1
Everyone  Welcome
Presented   by
The Hellenic Cultural Society
and International  House
urn
?
New, hot, independent political newspaper needs seven
students with autos to open
newsstand outlets this Saturday. Meet Friday 5 p.m. for
full details. Each Lower Mainland territory will require 2-6
hours each succeeding second
Saturday.
Guarantee
Plus
GENEROUS
COMMISSION
Should gross to $50 this
Saturday, plus $3.00 an
hour and up, on every
second Saturday succeeding. This is a reputable,
responsible effort. Good
fun and profitable for
right persons. Useful, practical experience, especially
to Commerce and Business
students.
PHONE
684-2028
CLASSIFIED
Rates: Students, Faculty & Clubs—3 lines, 1 day 75*, 3 days 92.00.
Commercial—3 lines, 1 day $1.00. 3 days $2.50.
Publications Office, BROCK HALL, UNIV. OF B.C., Vancouver 8, B.C.
Classified ads are not accepted by telephone.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Dances
11
POLKA PARTY!!! MARCH 9, IN-
ternational House, 9:00-1:00. German   band,   only   $1.00!!!
DIRECT FROM LASSETER'S DEN
— "The Five Man Cargo". Place
Vanier, Friday, March 8, 9:00-1:00,
$1.25.
DON'T MISS KENTISH STEELE —
Strange Brew — Light Show at the
Armouries — Saturday, March 9 —
$1.50,   $1.00.
Lost 8c Found
IS
FOUND    —    GOLD    WATCH    IN    H.
Angus,  Feb. 29, please claim pub of.
FOUND:   BULLION DOLLAR INDEX
or   Goldfinger,    today   in   Aud.    50c,
12:30,   3:30,   6:00,   8:30,   color.
LOST: MONDAY 11:30 MAN'S GOLD
automatic wrist watch; broken
wristband; either behind Brock or
at   gym.   Call   Ray   522-0442,   reward.
LOST: KEYS ON KEYRING, MAR.
4, please take to Pub. Office, Brock
Hall   or   phone   224-4219.
FOUND — BLACK GLASSES IN
parking lot beside Woodward lib.
phone   263-4005.
THE PUBLICATIONS OFFICE HAS
three "watches found on campus
plus several glasses. Owners should
identify   and   claim.
THE PERSON WHO TOOK MY
wallet from the Memorial Gym
change room Tuesday night, please
take what you must and return the
rest to Gary, Rm. 284, Haida House,
Totem   Park.
Rides 8c Car Pools
14
Special Notices
15
CONCERT — JOE MOCK — FOLK,
blues, Brock, March 7th, 12:30, admission   25c.
FROM ENGLAND VIA LASSETER'S
Den . . . Dance to The Five Man
Cargo. Place Vanier, Mar. 8, 9:00-
1:00,   $1.25.
SUPER SPECIAL — KENTISH
Steele & Strange Brew — Saturday; Mar. 9th — Armouries — $1.50,
$1.00.   Light   Show  —  8:30-1:00.
GET ON THE BOND WAGON —
Goldfinger. Aud. 50c. Today, 12:30,
3:30,   6:00,   8:30.
AD HOC COMMITTEE INTERNA-
tional House, March 7, 12:30, speaker Ofusu Asiedu doctoral candidate
(forestry) — a critical analysis of
Institutional Changes in Africa.
March 21, 12:30, prof. Fred Stockholder, Quondam Lecturer in English, University of Ghana—on African   Elites.
Typing
40
EXPERT    TYPIST    -    ELECTRIC
224-6129   -   228-8384.
EXPERT   ELECTRIC   TYPIST
Experienced   essay   and   thesis   typist
Reasonable Rates TR. 4-9253	
'GOOD EXPERIENCED TYPIST
available for home typing. Phone
277-5640".
TYPING  —   ELEC.   MACHINE
Phone   738-7881
TYPING.  PHONE 731-7511 — 9:00 TO
5:00.    266-6662   after   6   o'clock.
GIRL WITH B.A. ENGLISH, WILL
type papers. Contact me at 255-
8528.   1770   East   Georgia.
TYPING,  MY HOME   30c PER PAGE.
Linda,   263-8075,   after   5:30.
SHORT NOTICE TYPING DURING
the day: 25c page; phone Ruth,
RE   8-4410.
THESES   TYPED
Elec machine—fast service. 738-7756.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted—Female
81
RELIABLE UNIVERSITY GIRL TO
care for 3 school age children while
mother is in hospital for a week in
mid-May. Phone Mrs. Munn 224-
9375.
YOUNG WOMAN TO LIVE IN AND
care for year old boy. RM. & BD.
FIus   remun.   May   to   Sept.   985-2082
Help Wanted—Male
52
HELP!   NEED TUTOR IN ORGANIC
Chemistry 230.  ph.  224-3155,   Gowan.
LIFEGUARD & SWIMMING IN-
structor wanted. The Village of
Lillooet requires the services of a
lifeguard & swimming instructor
from May 15, 1968 to Sept. 1st, 1968.
Salary range to $500 per month,
depending on qualifications. Interested persons please contact the
undersigned before April 15, 1968,
stating qualifications and salary expected. G. A. Wiley, Village Clerk,
Box   610,   Lillooet,   B.C.
Help W'ted—Male or Female    53
WORK IN SPARE TIME, CHOOSE
your own hours between 9 a.m. &
5 p.m. Up to $5.00 per hour, tel.
253-6712.
INSTRUCTIOll
Instruction   Wanted
61
AQUA   SOC    ELECTION    MEETING,
Noon,   Today,   BU   100.
Travel  Opportunities
16
U.K.    3   CHARTER   SEATS   AVAIL-
able 22 July to 22 Aug. ph.  731-2398.
Wanted—Miscellaneous
18
UBC TEXTS BOUGHT AND SOLD.
Best prices, Busy "B" Books, 146
West   Hastings,   681-4931.
WANTED: STUDENT DISCUSSION
with the Ubyssey. Opportunity:
Thursday, March 14, Brock. Paddy
Sherman,   Gabor   Mate.
AUTOMOTIVE 8c MARINE
Automobiles For Sale
21
'64 CHEV 2-DR. STD. 6-CYD. RADIO
snow times, 43,000, top condition, 1-
owner,   $1,100,   263-6300   or   684-3044.
'67 T.V.R. 0-60 IN 4.5 SEC. SERIOUS
inquiries only please! Any reasonable   offer   accepted,   738-5291.
DELUXE   EPIC   1967   U.-YR.   WAR-
ranty, new condition, $1550, 731-3912.
'64 MORRIS MINX. PRICE $895. ASK
for Peter Marcolis. Phone 879-4233.
Jim  Pattison.
'58 MGA FIXED HEAD COUPE. RE-
built clutch and transmission. Sem-
pervit tires and wire wheels. AM 1-
9437 after 5  p.m.
Automobile Parts
23
V.W. BLAUPUNKT RADIO AND
two winter tires with wheels. Contact A. Martison, Acadia Canvp 32-
12.   Phone  224-9822.
Motorcycles
26
BUSINESS SERVICES
Miscellaneous
32
Orchestras
33
Scandals
37
SELLING YOUR TEXTBOOKS? TRY
The Bookfinder. 4444 West 10th
Ave.  228-8933.
HORNY?     COME    TO PLACE    VA-
nier!     Dance:     "Five Man    Cargo"
from   Lasseter's   Den, Mar.   8,   9:00-
1:00,   $1.25.
Tutoring
FIRST YEAR MATHEMATICS AND
sciences other undergraduate subjects to fourth year. Canadian Tutorial   Centre,   736-6923.
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
Tl
—  OLD   TOTEMS   FOR  SALE  —
1963,   1965  & 1966 issues 50c.
Campus  Life's  25c.   Publications Off.,
Brock   Hall
SOLIGOR FLI 35 MM TELEPHOTO
lens for reflex camera. F2.8, Manual.  $30. Phone 266-4630 after 6 p.m.
HARMONY      CLASSICAL     GUITAR.
With case. Excellent condition. $100.
Phone 266-4630 after 6 p.m. or leave
message.	
ZENITH   TRANS - OCEANIC   RADIO.
Excellent     condition.     $180.     O.N.O.
Phone:   921-9449   after   6   p.m.
RENTALS & REAL ESTATE
Rooms
•1
ROOM TO MOVE AT THE AR-
mouries with Kentish Steele! —
Strange Brew! — Light Show!!
Mar. 9th, Saturday, 8:30-1:00, $1.50
&   $1.00.
WALKING DISTANCE TO CAMPUS
Near Village and Meal Services.
224-9662.   $40  mo.   2250 Wesbrook.
Room 8c Board
Furn. Houses 8c Apti.
1 BEDROOM APT., UNFURNISHED.
April 1st. 15 minutes walk to Cam-
pus.   224-0378  evenings.	
ANYONE WISHING TO SUBLET
their one bedroom apartment from
May to Sept. in downtown area.
Call  Anne  P.   224-9856.
Unfurn. Houses 8c Apis.
84
SCANDALOUS! SHOCKING! UNBE-
lievable! Kentish Steele — Strange
Brew —■ Armouries — Mar. 9 —
8:30-1:00 — $1.50, $1.00. Light show
included —   Saturday.
DO BONDS HAVE MORE FUN?
Find out today. Aud. $50 cents.
12:30   3:30  6:00  8:30  Color.
NEW! SIZE 44. SHORT MEN'S
Navy Blazer. Only $18. Phone after
6:00   Room   547.   224-9944.
BUY - SELL - RENT
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED Thursday, March  7,   1968
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 7
Bird swimmers second in meet;
Hamilton and nationals next
By JIM MADDIN
The UBC swimming Thunderbirds finally
showed how well they could splash through the
water last weekend.
Competing in the Western Canadian Intercollegiate conference championships in swimming and diving, the Birds placed second overall, 26 points behind winner University of Alberta and 26 points ahead of third place University of Saskatchewan at Saskatoon.
The meet determined which swimmers would
go to Hamilton this weekend for the national
championships and UBC placed six swimmers
and one diver on the 22 member WCIAA team.
Leading the list of UBC qualifiers for the
nationals was Phil Dockerill, who splashed his
way to two individual victories in the 100 and
200 yd. breaststroke events. He helped the UBC
400 yd. medley relay team to its first place
finish as well as placing third in the 200 yd.
individual medley.
Nearly matching Dockerill's performance
was two-year veteran Phil Winch, who helped
himself to a win in the 500 yd. freestyle, a
second in the 100 yd. freestyle and a second
in the 200 yd. individual medley.
Another veteran, Jim Maddin, swam to two
individual medley relay victories, the 400 and
200 yd. events, and helped the relay team to a
victory in the 400 yd. medley and a third place
finish in the 400 yd. freestyle.
The two Dorchester brothers, Frank and Ted,
combined to give UBC another block of points
with veteran Frank's two third place finishes
in the 50 yd. freestyle and the 100 yd. butterfly
as well as his butterfly leg of the winning medley relay and a leg of the third place freestyle
relay team.
Freshman Ted, not to be outdone, swam to a
second place finish in the 200 yd. backstroke
event and a third in the 100 yd. backstroke.
Rounding out the list of swimmers going to
Hamilton is Terry Lyons who qualified with
his fine showings in the short sprint freestyle
events and consistent performances in the relay
events.
Representing the diving end of the competitions is diving coach Tom Dinsley, an ex-
Olympian with the Canadian national team in
1964. Dinsley, after weeks of training, dove to
a second place finish in the one meter event
and a third place in the three meter.
EFFECTIVE
RAPID
READING
can help YOU
There's still a lot of reading to be accomplished, understood and remembered.
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while retaining or increasing your present comprehension.
-ENROLLMENT IN READING
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You will enjoy our modern up-to-date class rooms
You will meet our top rated teaching staff
You will be impressed by our detail and personal
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During your classes you will meet and get to know
some interesting people
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LEARN THE MOST RECENT STUDY PROCEDURES
AND RECALL SKILLS
ATTEND A FREE
DEMONSTRATION
TONIGHT,  MAR. 7-8  P.M.
Grosvenor    HoteF   Douglas    Room
•
SATURDAY, MAR. 9-8 P.M.
Grosvenor    Hotel    Douglas   Room
•
MONDAY, MAR.  11-8 P.M.
Frank   Baker's   Capilano   Gardens
Crystal  Room
•
TUESDAY, MAR.  12-8 P.M.
Coach   House  Motor   Inn
North Vancouver,  Salon  C
*
REGISTER   BY   MAIL
Mail this application now to reserve the class of your choice, to:
EVELYN WOOD READING DYNAMICS INSTITUTE,
602-1075 Melville St., Vancouver 5, B.C.
Please accept my application for admission to the Evelyn Wood Reading Dynamics Institute.
Enclosed   is   my deposit   (minimum   $10)   to  reserve   space   in   the   class  Indicated   below.   (Refundable if class of my choice is not available.)   Please forward to me the standard form so
I may complete my enrolment by mail.
NAME          .                                   -   	
ADDRESS          	
       ...                                                       TELEPHONE-—   	
CHECK THE CLASS OF YOUR CHOICE:-
( ) TUES., MAR. 12-7 P.M.       ( ) WED., MAR. 13-7 P.M.
( ) THUR., MAR. 14-7 P.M.       ( ) SAT., MAR. 16-9:30 A.M.
SwAn mod READING DYNAMICS OF B.C. LTD.
(MM-I07& MELVILLE STREET. VANCOUVER S. MM.       PHONE 6S5-2374
SURFER   FOOTBALL?
When the UBC football Thunderbirds go to Hawaii
this fall they won't be allowed to spend their time surfing
\ and swimming said coach Frank Gnup Wednesday.
These two sports dominated the Birds' time on
their last visit to the island paradise and as a result UBC
*   lost 27-6 to the University of Hawaii.
Spring training starts March 11 for anyone wishing to
play fDotball next season. Everyone is welcome to show
up and try for the team and a chance to go to Hawaii.
Excellent football highlight movies are still being
shown every Thursday in room 213 of memorial gym for
anyone   interested.
NOTICE
The Liberal Club will hold a general
meeting Thttr., March 14 in Buchanan
204 for  the election  of officers.
MOVING?
CALL
224-3111
MOORE'S
TRANSFER
ATLAS
VAN    LINES
Also
Storage & Shipping
FILMSOC PRESENTS
Sean Connery Honor Blackman
in
GOLDFINGER
TODAY - AUD.-50c
12:30,  3:30, 6:00, 8:30
FOLK SONG SOCIETY-VILLAGE BISTRO
Concert Series No. 3
JOE MOCK
AND HIS TRIO
FOLK BLUES
Brock - 12:30 - Today
ADMISSION 25c
MAX DEXALI
OFFERS
10% Discount
to UBC Students
2609 Granville at 10th
VARIED SELECTION OF
NEW SPRING FASHIONS
Whatever your need in footwear you'll find it at
Dexall's. Pay them a visit — see the exciting new
styles — and ask for the 10% discount.
Better Shoes for less
DEXALL'S - GRANVILLE AT 10TH - 738-9833 Page 8
THE     UBYSSEY
Thursday,  March  7,   1968
— bob brown photo
COACH  PAUL NEMETH  preparing  some of  his team members for the Canadian championships in  Edmonton  March   15 and   16.
Wrestler wins, team loses
as world champion watches
By JOHN TWIGG
The UBC Thunderbird wrestling team performed before a world champion last weekend
in the WCIAA championships at Calgary but
their performance wasn't world class.
UBC finished last as a team due mainly to
four ineligibilities on the ten-man team. The
ineligibilities arose through complications with
conference rules  and scholastic problems.
Despite the small team, UBC managed two
wins and a trophy. Freshman Dave Gray won
the 160-pound class and was awarded the "outstanding wrestler" title. This is the first time
a UBC wrestler has ever won the award.
Dale Boyd also tied for top honors in the
191-pound class.
A sidelight of the tournament was the presence of Bill Smith, former American national
Collegiate champion and 160-pound Olympic
champion in 1952.
Smith last year held a position in American
wrestling that was generally as advisor and
fitness consultant but he reputedly was not paid
much. The Canadian government hired him as
national co-ordinator of wrestling, one of the
few good moves the government has made.
Your agent happened to meet Smith in Calgary, of all places, and engaged him in discussion while the Birds wrestled three other
WCIAA teams.
Smith views his job as an independent coach
who will help train and prepare Canadian
wrestlers for the upcoming Olympics. Currently
based in Edmonton, he will indirectly select
team members.
When asked what the difference was between
American and Canadian wrestling, he replied,
"Wrestling is more like an intramural sport in
Canada. There is too much sportsmanship."
Though this sounds incongruous, the match
on the mat at the time proved his point. UBC's
Pete Rosburgh was in the process of defeating
Bill Dekort of the University of Calgary in a
one-sided match.
Rosburgh was clearly the better wrestler,
but he lacked the ability or desire to finish off
Dekort. His style was typical of most of the
matches that day in that he would wait for an
opening.
Smith thinks that most wrestlers aren't aggressive enough and attributes this to a lack of
conditioning and lack of ability.
The conditioning aspect is easy to correct
but the ability is more difficult. Frequently a
wrestler would know only one move and -would
spend the match on defence occasionally trying
his move.
This kind of match leads to a points decision,
one that fans dislike. A poor match keeps fans
away and without fan support the wrestlers
aren't encouraged to improve their calibre of
wrestling. It's a vicious circle.
However, Smith sees a solution to the problem. He says, "You've got to force the wrestlers
to wrestle. Make them practice moves until they
are second nature and the many opportunities
that arise in a match will not be missed."
Unfortunately the Canadian wrestlers must
practise hard to reach the level of even American high schools according to Smith, who has
seen 25 years service in all levels of American
wrestling.
Another facet of Canadian wrestling that
Smith hopes to correct is the officiating.
During the meet, Smith became quite upset
at some of the officiating. Apart from missing
a pin, the referees were not calling stalling,
which is a by-product of lack of ability.
A wrestler is not allowed to go through a
match without making an offensive attempt.
Four unreplied offensive attempts by a wrestler
gives him one point and his opponent a warning; three warnings and a man is disqualified.
In Calgary, the officials weren't calling stalls
until Smith talked to them. The calibre of
wrestling improved noticeably when one man
was disqualified.
Smith has already started his job and some
WCIAA coaches, particularly UBC's Paul
Nemeth,  are pleased.
Nemeth, an old acquaintance of Smith, said,
"I was pleased to see him in Calgary, his presence had a noticeable effect on the wrestlers.
I am trying to get him to come to UBC sometime in June."
But Smith has one advantage facing him.
In Canada we start free wrestling in high school
but in the U.S., high schools start by following
the "Greco-Roman" style, which is more constrained than free wrestling. As a! result, American wrestlers must be re-taught at college.
Meanwhile, the Canadian championships are
in Edmonton March 15 and 16, to which UBC
will send seven team members.
100%
HUMAN HAIR
WIGS
21.95, 31.95, 41.95 & 61.95
WIGLETS
$9.95
BEAUTIFUL   FALLS
$29.95
SALES
10%
Discount   to
U.B.C.   Students
& Personnel
SERVICE
"GONE WITH THE WIG"
49 W. HASTINGS ST. £JSP-KSi
Between Woodward's and A. & N. OOO-lZOl
HOOTENUNY
SATURDAY, MARCH 9,1968
8:00 p.m.
FEATURING
HUFFY POTT PADDY GRABER
MARG SHAND MURRY SCHOLBRAID
JIM WALL
PLUS
THE VACANT LOT JUG BAND
and THE BLACKTHORN BOYS
Tickets:-$1.00 at door
John's (Shaughnessy) Parish Hall Gym
St.
27th at Granville
U.B.C. THUNDERBIRD
WINTER SPORTS CENTRE
SKATING SCHEDULE 1967-68
Effective September 29, 1967 to April 14, 1968
TUESDAYS —
WEDNESDAYS   -
FRIDAYS  —
SATURDAYS —
SUNDAYS   —
12:45 to_2:45 p.m.
2:00 to 3:30 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
3:00 to 5:00 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.*
3:00 to 5:00 p.m.*
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
12:45 to 2:45 p.m.
7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
* Except when Hockey Games scheduled:
February 23, 24.
Admission: Afternoons—Students 35c. Adults 60c.
Evenings—Students 50c. Adults 75c.
Skate Rental - 35c a pair. — Skate Sharpening - 35c a pair
For further information call 228-3197 or  224-3205
(F
\
SKI
SALE!
Skis, Ski Boots,
Poles, Ski Clothes
SAVINGS
TO 50%
tmfm
Park Royal - South Mall 926-2524
I —

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