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The Ubyssey Jan 23, 1979

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Array Student returns delayed
Gov't causes tax turmoil
By BILL TIELEMAN
An incredible mistake by
Revenue Canada bureaucrats will
mean UBC students will be unable
to file their income tax forms until
at least the end of February — if
they're lucky.
And the blunder — the introduction of an additional income tax
form dealing with education deductions — will cost the university an
additional $3,200 in postage alone
to distribute to UBC's more than
23,000 students.
According to associate registrar
Ken Young, the trouble began when
Revenue Canada introduced a new
form, the T22-02, for students
claiming their education deduction
of $50 for every month in which
they were in full-time attendance at
a post-secondary institution.
In previous years students were
only required to state that they
attended the institution. The new
form requires the institution to fill
out and issue the forms to every
student, in order to officially verify
the student's attendance.
And because of a lack of
foresight on behalf of Revenue
Canada the new forms were
originally designed to be completed
by hand by the institution, rather
than by computer.
Young said that after UBC and
other large institutions protested to
Revenue Canada that it would be
an impossible task to fill out and
individually sign each of the forms
for thousands of students by hand,
THE UBYSSEY
Vol. IX!, No. 42
VANCOUVER, B.C., TUESDAY, JANUARY 23, 1979
228-2301
^ -—'peter menyasz photo
PORTRAIT OF CONCENTRATION in middle of performance on uneven bars, UBC's Laurel McKay ponders
next motion. Unfortunately concentration wasn't quite enough for UBC Thunderette team in tri-university
women's gymnastics meet here Saturday. University of Washington Huskies won with 128.34 points with University of Alberta at Edmonton close behind at 128.24. UBC settled for 110.63 points.
S.A. trip by UBC professor knocked
UBC could be falsely identified as supporting South
Africa's apartheid regime because of a visit to
Namibia by UBC political science professor W. J.
Stankiewicz, political science assistant professor
Philip Resnick said Monday.
Resnick said Stankiewicz visited Namibia in December at the invitation and expense of the South African
government to observe the constitutional assembly
elections held by the Piet Botha regime.
Foreign observers were required to attest to the
legitimacy of the elections, which contravened a
United Nations resolution calling for a UN controlled
vote in the new state, he said.
Resnick said he was worried the South African
government would use Stankiewicz's presence and
affiliation with UBC as a show of university support
for the apartheid regime.
Resnick also said he wished to make it clear he is not
the source quoted in Thursday's Ubyssey article
regarding Stankiewicz's teaching ability.
Resnick said Stankiewicz travelled to Namibia "to
give some sort of sugar coating of legitimacy to the
election."
He said Stankiewicz was not necessarily there to use
the university's name to legitimize the elections, but
added that he was certain the South African government would not ignore the fact that Stankiewicz is a
UBC professor.
UBC administration president Doug Kenny said
Monday the problem is one common to university
professors and added that he defends a professor's
freedom of action.
See page 7: KENNY
a new form that could be machine
processed was introduced (the T22-
02A).
But because Revenue Canada
didn't print forms for machine use
by the universities earlier there is a
severe shortage of the forms and
students hoping to file their income
tax early are out of luck.
"It's going to be a pain for
students who wanted to file early
tax claims," Young said. "We were
a bit angry about the way it (the
new form) was done."
Young said that UBC will have to
run an extra mailing to students
containing the new form. The costs
of collating and mailing the forms
to students will be borne by the
UBC administration, he said.
"It will be about the end of
February before they get out to
students," Young said. He added
that UBC has not received any of
the forms so far and has been told
by Revenue Canada that they will
arrive in mid-February.
See page 7: FEDS
TAs approve
union drive
By TOM HAWTHORN
UBC's teaching assistants have
accepted in principle unionizing to
improve salary negotiations with
the university.
The Association of Teaching
Assistants accepted in a 48-2 vote
Friday a motion "endorsing the
principle of TAs at UBC being
unionized."
Association president Dave
Fuller said Friday the university administration's attitude towards TAs
would have to change and added
that unionizing would aid the ATA
in its negotiations.
"Their whole attitude was sort of
a paternalistic attitude. It
(becoming a TA) was viewed almost
entirely as a scholarship.
"Now we're heading full steam
ahead towards unionization."
The association has charged that
the administration has "gone back
on its word" on policy affecting
teaching assistants' salaries. A UBC
policy statement issued in 1973 said
TA salary increases were to be
equivalent to increases in junior
faculty salaries.
TA salaries are about $500 less
today than they would be if the
policy had been followed.
ATA executive member Dave
Smith said Friday teaching assistants must be concerned with
negotiations with the administration because a motion supporting
unionization would never have
passed last year.
He also said the move can only
improve the ATA's bargaining
position.
"It's hsird to make it harder to
talk to the university when they
won't talk with us to begin with."
Fuller said the association will
meet with representatives from
UBC's two largest unions, the
Association of University and
College Employees and the
Canadian Union of Public Employees to discuss unionization. The
ATA is also investigating the
viability of forming its own union,
he added.
At least 45 per cent of UBC
teaching assistants would have to
sign a certification card for forming
a union local, while a majority
would have to support joining a
union before the TAs can unionize,
Fuller said.
The association currently represents about 300 of UBC's 1,000
TAs.
Simon F raser University teaching
assistants, sessional instructors,
language instructors, tutors and
markers joined AUCE in
December, to become the first
union of teaching assistants in B.C.
TAs at the University of
Toronto, Ryerson and York
Universities in Toronto, Lakehead
See page 3: ATA
Faculty, students
come to prof's aid
By GEOF WHEEL WRIGHT
UBC students and faculty came
to the defence of UBC political
science professor W. J. Stankiewicz
Monday in reaction to charges last
week from department sources and
students.
Faculty association president
Olav Slaymaker criticized The
Ubyssey for quoting an unidentified source in a story
Thursday charging Stankiewicz
with being constantly late for class,
not handing essays back until after
Christmas exams, assigning irrelevant texts, ignoring course
evaluation sheets, giving low marks
and being inaccessible to students.
"It's an attack on the professor
and the faculty association," said
Slaymaker.
He said the paper should have
named its source and paraphrased
instead of using direct source
quotations.
Slaymaker said readers have a
right to know who is making the
charges to assess their credibility.
Political science department head
Allan Cairns refused to comment
on the story and hung up on a
Ubyssey reporter Monday.
"I found the article irresponsible," political science professor
Michael Wallace said.
He said the article incorrectly
gave the impression that the department faculty had met and formally
taken a position on Stankiewicz's
performance.
Steven James, arts 2, said he was
a student of Stankiewicz's during
the fall term and disagrees strongly
with the charges.
He said the course textbooks
were closely related to course
material, including the books
authored and assigned by Stankiewicz, and he found the professor
highly accessible at all times.
"(Stankiewicz's text) is in our
opinion the best text we have seen
dealing with the course material
which was studied," say James and
fellow student William Low in a
letter to The Ubyssey.
James said the professor was not
consistently 10 minutes late, but
quite often two or three minutes
late.
Stankiewicz refused again
Monday to comment on any of the
charges against him. Page 2
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 23,  1979
It Sounds
Incredible
//
O
BUT EVELYN WOOD GRADUATES CAN READ
JAWS IN 41 MINUTES
At That Speed, The 309 Pages Come Across
With More Impact Than The Movie.
In Living Blood, You Might Say.
You can do it, too. So far almost I.OOO.OOO people have done it.
People who have different jobs, different IQs, different interests,
different educations have completed the course. Our graduates are
people from all walks of life. These people have all taken a course
developed by Evelyn Wood, a prominent educator. Practically all of
them at least tripled their reading speed with equal or better comprehension. Most have increased it even more.
Think for a moment what that means. All of them—even the
slowest—now read an average novel in less than two hours. They
read an entire issue of Time or Newsweek in 35 minutes. They don't
skip or skim. They read every word. They use no machines. Instead,
they let the material they're reading determine how fast they read.
And mark this well: they actually understand more, remember
more, and enjoy more than when they read slowly. That's right!
They understand more. They remember more. They enjoy more.
You can do the same thing—the place to learn more about it is at a
free speed reading lesson.
This is the same course President Kennedy had his Joint Chiefs of
Staff take. The same one Senators and Congressmen have taken.
Com;? to a free Speed Reading Lesson and find out. It is free to
you and you will leave with a better understanding of why it works.
Plan to attend a free Speed Reading Lesson and learn that it is
possible to read 3-4-5 times faster, with  better comprehension.
r
SCHEDULE OF FREE SPEED READING -LESSONS
You'll increase your reading speed
 50 to 100% on the spot!	
Today & Tomorrow
5:30 p.m. or 8:00 p.m.
Student Union Building
TODAY: ROOM 207/209 - TOMORROW: ROOM 205
* EVELYN WOOD READING DYNAMICS	 Tuesday, January 23, 1979
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 3
Students face $ 150 tuition hike
OTTAWA (CUP) — Tuition fees
at Ontario universities could jump
$150 or more if the suggestions of a
consultant's report to the Ontario
government are followed.
The P.S. Ross report, a study
which surveyed mostly university
administrators, suggests basing
tuition on 20 per cent of university
and college costs as one option for a
new tuition fee structure. Tuition is
currently about 15 per cent of costs.
If tuition fees are based on 20 per
cent of costs next year's undergraduate fees would be $876 a year,
$150 more than this year's figure.
Ontario medical school students
would  pay  $3,800   a  year   and
graduate students would pay an
average of $1,622.
Although the report, released
Saturday, makes no explicit recommendation, the 20 per cent figure
was the most favored and a "tacit
recommendation," according to
Mike Hornick, University of
Toronto student vice-president.
The report says there was "no
consensus" among the students,
faculty and administrators it
surveyed on levels of tuition fees,
although no one wanted fees to be
more than 25 per cent of costs.
The "most typical" answer said
20 per cent of costs would be acceptable, it says.
The report rejects free tuition as
an option, saying that only 18 per
cent of those surveyed favored it,
although 52 per cent of students
were in favor.
Nearly half of the respondents
called for greater differentiation
among programs in tuition,
although 44 per cent of students (22
per cent over-all) wanted less
differentiation.
It also said 65 per cent favored
"unpegging" fees, to allow
universities to set their own levels.
Currently, the Ontario government
effectively sets fee levels.
This might mean higher fees at
more established and prestigious
institutions.
The Ontario Federation of
Students condemned the report,
saying it was a "trial balloon for
regular yearly tuition increases at
the discretion of universities that
could put higher education out of
the reach of those of moderate
means."
"We are concerned about the
tendency to move towards tuition
fees that are set by the universities
and geared to program costs. Such
a policy would nickel-and-dime
lower-income students right out of
school."
The Ontario government com-
CORE CURRICULUM FOR Aggies includes annual apple day sale of
B.C. fruit to students to support crippled children. Apple day Monday
also kicked off Aggie Week, with series of agricultural science related fun
—patricia mok photo
events planned for vicinity of SUB at noon hours this week. Scott
Wright, Ruth Tremaine, Linda Wilson, Laila Johnsen and Kathy White
pose in front of "No Golfing" allowed Hebb Theatre.
Hacks race for AAAS presidential post
By KEVIN McGEE
Two definites, one probable, and
a sea of rumors.
Such is the situation as student
representative assembly members
prepare to select a new president to
replace outgoing Alma Mater
Society president Paul Sandhu.
The two confirmed candidates
seeking to become Sandhu's
successor for a two-month interim
period are Jim Bodner, SRA
science representative and Steve
Ferguson, an education representative. There may be other committed
candidates, but they remain silent
so far.
"I'm going to run. I have too
much desire for the position not
to," said Bodner Monday. "I
dropped out of the race last time in
favor of a more experienced
candidate, and I'm not going to
comment on the job I think he has
done."
Bodner said that if elected he
would like to see better organization of" the Alma Mater Society,
using the SUB building manager to
curtail some of the powers of the
student administrative commission.
Ferguson said he wanted to see
students in the education faculty
more actively involved in university
activities.
"We're a widespread, versatile
faculty. Education students take a
large range of courses such as
sciences, arts, physical education,
along with all the other students on
campus," he said. Ferguson added
that because of this versatility
education students are well-
informed on most issues.
Former SRA president Bruce
Armstrong said Thursday: "I'm
definitely interested in running, but
I won't commit myself until I see
what happens at Wednesday's SRA
meeting."
Armstrong indicated that unless
other worthy candidates declared
themselves,   he   would   definitely
consider running.
"One reason that I would like to
run is for continuity," he said. "I
know all of the people involved on
SRA and I've worked with them
before. This has been a dismal year,
and it would be nice if the last few
months could be used constructively."
missioned the report last fall to
determine attitudes towards the
current fee structure and suggest
options for a new structure.
Aggies plan
events to
hoof it up
Aggie Week has begun and
agricultural science students are
offering a series of noon hour
events open to all UBC students.
The events include boat races and
nail hammering today, barrel
bucking and pie eating contests on
Wednesday, a pentathlon, egg
throw, roping contest and bale
throw on Thursday, and a Great
Race from the McMillan Building
to SUB on Friday. The week will
end with a Farmer's Frolic dance in
the SUB ballroom starting at 3 p.m.
All events will be held at SUB.
China Week, happening this
week also, is sponsored by the
Chinese Students' Association
There will be an exhibition of
photographs of China in the SUB
art gallery from 11: 30 a.m. to 2:30
p.m. todeiy until Friday. There will
also be a lecture in SUB 205 on the
Hundred Flowers period at
Wednesday noon, and a slide show
on modern-day China in SUB at
noon Thursday.
On Friday a lecture on modern
Chinese literature will be held in
SUB 205 at noon. My Motherland
will be shown at 2 p.m. in the SUB
auditorium.
ATA defends
foreign TAs
From page 1
University in Thunder Bay, Ont.,
and the University of Saskatchewan
in Regina have also unionized.
Meanwhile, teaching assistants
also decided Friday to combat the
university's treatment of foreign
TAs.
A unanimously-passed motion
states that "the UBC administration is using the issue of foreign
students as a means of denying
recognition of all teaching
assistants as employees. Therefore
the ATA recognizes that attacks on
foreign students constitute attacks
on all teaching assistants. Therefore
the ATA resolves to fight such
attacks."
The motion also states that
problems with the Canadian educational system are a result of monetary cutbacks and not the presence
of foreign students.
'Discrimination necessary for freedom'
ByDOUGTODD
Personal freedom must include the right of
individuals to discriminate against homosexuals, the president of the feminist libertarians
said Friday.
Tonie Nathan told more than 50 people in
SUB that although she considers herself a
liberal, she would protect an apartment owner
who discriminated against a gay because libertarians believe no one should be denied personal freedom.
"We deny the right of government to prohibit any personal freedom," Nathan said.
"Our motto is live and let live. We want to
protect the rights of both gays and bigots."
Nathan said a purely capitalistic economic
system will provide this freedom.
"Capitalism is freedom. Capitalism properly
defined is the free exchange of goods and services. Women should be working for an absolutely capitalistic system.
"Socialism robs some to give to others,"
Nathan said. "Socialism is the really brutal
and rotten system."
Nathan said she believes government hinders
individual freedom by favoring certain groups.
"All governments stress that one group
should receive special benefits. Women should
try to roll back the infringement of the state."
Texans should be commended for bringing
out guns and barricading their doors as an act
of rebellion against big government, the 1972
U.S. vice-presidential candidate said.
Nathan said she is opposed to coercive
government, but added that people need rules
and regulations which are not coercive.
"We should get rid of coercive government,
especially government taxation and governments that interfere with private property. You
have to have rules and regulations that are not
coercive, ones that everyone accepts," she
said.
Nathan added that libertarians encourage
women to become self-sufficient and independent.
"Some women in the working and lower
classes still accept beating and brutality as a
sign of belonging. I believe that women who
seek freedom and individuality don't have a
place to go except to the libertarians.
"Socialism does not offer women freedom,
it offers them economic slavery. Instead of being dependent on men, women are becoming
dependent on government."
Nathan claims that there is no one else in the
world quite like her and she objects to political
attempts to rob her of her uniqueness.
"We don't find ourselves on the right or
left, we're individualists, so we're not on that
spectrum.
"Our system has never been tried. The U.S.
has a mixed economy, not capitalism. It is the
present system which is not working."
Libertarians do not believe in war, Nathan
added.
"We say no war, no fighting. Let's discuss.
Some people say we're really idealistic, and I
say I guess you're right." Page 4
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 23,  1979
The tax man
Somewhere in Ottawa is a man, a
smallish man, balding at the top with a
pencil over his ear. His job is to create
unnecessary work for other bureaucrats
and people who deal with the government.
He's good at his job and smiles wryly
when he manages to create a particularly difficult form for a particularly easy
administrative task.
Meakins, or "Meeky," as he is known
by his mates, excelled in the department
of national defense and his promotion
up the hierarchy was meteoric and government business under his jurisdiction
quickly ground to a halt under the
mountains of new forms and paperwork
he instituted.
Meakins was a man to be watched
and rumors abounded in civil service
circles that he would soon be moving to
the prestigious tax department, the peak
of achievement for a form drafter.
Meakins was ecstatic about the move
and set to work eagerly to impress his
new superiors, not an easy task in this
department, which had long since instituted the most complicated and time-
consuming method for doing
everything. But Meakins was not to be
deterred.
For months the plucky fellow worked
late into the night devising new twists
and complications and finally, with
much fanfare, he unveiled his scheme to
foul up business in the department and
among many other government institutions. The plan was diabolical in its
simplicity.
The cunning Meakins had devised a
new tax form to deal with the education
deducations which students at univer-.
sities and other post-secondary institutions would be required to fill out with
their income tax forms. The new form
(T22-02) would require the educational
institution to fill out and issue the forms
to all its students. Further, the registrar
of each institution would be required to
sign all the forms.
Meakins and his pals clapped in glee
at the thought of the bureaucratic havoc
to be created at large universities such
as UBC and the University of Toronto.
Meakins' special touch was to release
the forms just before the other tax forms
were sent out, creating a record bureaucratic nightmare at universities across
the country.
Students, many of whom depended
on their refunds to survive the final
month of school, were of course out of
luck.
But Meakins became the toast of Ottawa.
HEUO, t* THIS Kfc.
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Letters
Appalling treatment undeserved
We are appalled at the treatment
given professor W. J. Stankiewicz
in your article "Colleagues hit arts
prof" (Jan. 18).
The article begins by stating the
UBC's political science department
has unanimously agreed that one of
its tenured professors is a "crackpot" . . . and is "a total piece of
deadwood." The article however,
gives   no   firm   evidence   of   this
"unanimity," and instead relies on
a "highly-placed," and unnamed
"department source" for this
completely unsubstantiated information.
Indeed, the only individual in the
department who is named
(department head Al Cairns) stated
that "he was not aware of any
student complaints about Stankiewicz this academic year," a fact
which glaringly contradicts the
second hand allegation that the department was in "unanimous"
condemnation of Stankiewicz.
Not only is the source of this uncorroborated "evidence" unnamed, but nowhere is it mentioned
whether the source is even a
professor in the department; for all
one knows the "highly-placed"
mystery man may be a teaching
Prof's students privileged
I was appalled at the allegations
directed  against  professor  W.   J.
Stankiewicz in last week's Ubyssey.
As one  of  his  students,   I   hold
nothing but the highest regard for
professor Stankiewicz, and  I  am
convinced that the great majority of
those privileged to study under this
man would wholeheartedly support
me.
His professionalism and dedication to his career should serve as an
example to all of his colleagues in
the political science department,
especially those who have taken the
liberty to make public their dislike
of him.
Apart from h i s impressive
academic credits, professor Stankiewicz is also a warm and
congenial human being. As to the
specific criticism listed in last
Thursday's article, I would like to
assure both the students and faculty
that they are entirely untrue, save
for one rather diminutive exception. Yes, the man's late now
and then and occasionally (gasp)
missed a lecture altogether. Of
course, we may all rest assured that
no student has ever been known to
do the same . . . perish the thought!
For God's sake, the next thing
we'll hear is that somebody is
disturbed by the pattern on his tie
or the length of his hair!
Jeremy Thornburg
Enema needed
If an enema is ever administered
to this university, it should enter
r
THE UBYSSEY
JANUARY 23, 1979
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University of
B.C. Editorial opinions are those of the staff and not of the
AMS or the university administration. Member, Canadian
University Press. The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary and review. The Ubyssey's editorial office is in
room 241K of the Student Union Building. Editorial departments, 228-2301; Advertising, 228-3977.
Editor: Mike Bocking
While the rain slashed down, the newsroom was its usual heated den of iniquity and all the little staffers were dreaming of far away places. Mike Bocking was off to Metropolis to fight for truth, justice
and the Canadian way of life as Bill Tieleman dreamed about snuggling up to a cosy bench in the
House of Commons with Jean Chretien. Kevin McGee was floating across the Pacific, on an air mattress, martini glass in hand and destination unknown. Verne McDonald was off to India to marvel at
the wonders and the price of illicit drugs while Geof Wheelwright, having a strange desire to relieve his
birth, was soon to leave for Bermuda. Julie Wheelwright and Bridget McPhail were ready to begin illustrious and debauched adventures in the land of the Kiwi fruit. Tim Langmead had packed for Bennett country in hopes of skiing, while Robert Cameron fantasized about a Paris garret to begin a writing
career. Tom Hawthorn and Peter Menyasz had converted to a strange, unknown religion and were
treking south to find the home for old arm chair quarterbacks. Don Maclntyre, Kevin Finnegan and
Patricia Mok were seeking the Holy Grail and all were muttering about swallows and coconuts. Mike
Mong and Doug Todd had just heard that Mexico was in this year and they were leaving to mingle with
the beautiful people at Puerta Valletta.
through the UBC finance department. Ever try to find out what
happened to your grant (i.e. this
month's food and rent etc.) that
should have been here two weeks
ago? Just try.
UBC stands for the University of
BureauCracy. An appointment
with the emergency loans officer
takes five to 10 days, because one
of them is away (during peak
season), another has courses to take
(this is a finance department?), and
the others have a lot of pencils to
sharpen.
It would take at least four days to
find out what happened to my
grant, never mind get my hands on
it.
This university is the biggest
capitalist joke in B.C.; when are
we, as students, going to realize
that we are being screwed in the ear
every time we turn around?
When the enema finally leaves
(I'll leave it to other irate students
to suggest where it should go next),
believe me, I'll be the first to flush
the toilet.
Lisa Barnes
assistant, or even a custodian who
lurks in the dark shadows of
Buchanan building bent on revenge
for some past slight.
As students who recently
completed political science 305 with
professor Stankiewicz last term, we
feel it is our duty to deal specifically
with each of the charges your invisible source levels at professor
Stankiewicz.
The first is that Stankiewicz was
"guilty of habitually arriving 10
minutes late for class." This is a
gross exaggeration, and was certainly not true for the particular
course in which we were enrolled.
Quite often professor Stankiewicz
was two or three minutes late, but
this is not unusual among either
instructors or students, and is
hardly criminal in nature.
The second attack concerns not
handing back two assignments
before the Christmas exam, and not
handing back marks. This is one of
the few allegations which we can
affirm to be true; one wonders
however what is precisely so reprehensible in this action.
It is not as if professor Stankiewicz intended to never give back
marks; they have been available
since mid-January for whoever
took the time to see him during his
office hours. As for not handing
back assignments, neither of the
undersigned felt particularly inconvenienced by this, and professor
Stankiewicz made clear that he
desired to have a full representation
of each student's work in front of
him before assessing any marks.
This doesn't seem too much to ask.
His statements on course evaluation sheets have been taken
completely out of context, and as
he notes, the most effective means
of student feedback is for an individual with a complaint to see
him personally or discuss the matter
with the head of the department.
Regarding "cancelling classes
and rescheduling a Christmas
exam," we can only say that in our
section no more than one class was
cancelled, and the Christmas exam
was not rescheduled. If rescheduling did occur in any other
course it was probably due to a time
clash, rather than any diabolical
plan by professor Stankiewicz to
make his students suffer.
Among the most outrageous and
ridiculous of the allegations advanced is that which condemns
Stankiewicz for "assigning his own
texts which deal remotely with
course material." Of 16 books on
the reading list for political science
305 taught by professor Stankiewicz, two were his own, and only
one was required.
The latter is, in our opinion the
best text we have seen dealing with
the course material which was
studied. As a symposium of
positions by other eminent authors
it was clear, concise and extremely
relevant to the course matter.
The allegation attacking professor Stankiewicz for giving
"ridiculously low marks," is one
upon which we cannot comment, as
neither of the undersigned has yet
learned his marks, or knows of the
marks of others. We can thus
declare our position an unbiased
one, not based on any personal
treatment we might have received
from the professor.
The claim that Stankiewicz
"created an utter inability" for
students to communicate with him,
is quite simply false, and is a piece
of vicious nonsense hardly worthy
of attention. We found professor
Stankiewicz at all times attentive to
students' questions, and always
ready to engage in discussions and
comment fairly on students' views.
This particular allegation serves to
fully reveal the malicious and
extremely low level upon which the
over-all attack upon this highly
qualified individual is waged.
Unlike the "unnamed source" of
the article, we are willing to stand
up and sign our names to our views.
The "source" would do both the
students of UBC and professor
Stankiewicz a service if he did the
same. Unconfirmed allegations
from anonymous sources are
worthy only of the nearest available
trash receptacle.
William Low
Steven James Tuesday, January 23, 1979
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 5
Letters
Poli sci student defends professor
On Jan. 18 you published an
article describing arts professor W.
J. Stankiewicz as a "crackpot." As
one of his past and present
students, I feel I am qualified to
express some of my own views on
his ability as an instructor.
In the first place, only four of the
eight complaints listed could be
considered as objective criteria for
judging him or anyone else a
"crackpot." In the second place,
describing him as having actual
"contempt  for  students"   is  like
Vicious attack
I was angered by the viciousness
of your front page attack in your
issue of Jan. 18 on professor
Wladek Stankiewicz, and disgusted
by the lack of journalistic responsibility evident in the method
you chose to employ.
Dr. Stankiewicz's retort to the
charges as well as Alan Cairns'
positive statement as to his record
were tucked away inconspicously at
the very end of the last page, while
the first paragraph gives as facts the
extremely damaging statements
later admitted to stem from an
anonymous "highly-placed department source."
Professor
supports
Your article about professor
Stankiewicz ("Colleagues hit arts
prof," Jan. 18) was irresponsible.
It is entirely unfair to publish such a
defamatory attack by an anonymous "highly-placed department
source."
If this "colleague" lacks the
courage to be identified I can only
conclude that your "source" is
fictional.
H. Olav Slaymaker
president
faculty association
That conclusion would be
false.—Staff.
This "source," who in spite of
his allegedly elevated position is
unable to express nimself either
coherently or grammatically, does
not seem to be able to decide
whether his resentment is directed
primarily at Stankiewicz or at the
department and its "minimal
standards of teaching," but has
obviously grasped the principle that
it is easier to stab one colleague in
the back than several.
The complaints listed are partly
ludicrous (why shouldn't an
authority in his field assign his own
texts as required reading?), partly
questionable (are the "ridiculously
low" marks always unwarranted?),
and wholly unsubstantiated by
anyone who is willing to state his
name in public. The web of accusation is woven by our redoubtable "source," together with a
second anonymous colleague of the
victim at second hand and a current
student who "asked not to be
identified" but obligingly quotes
"one guy in the class" who remains
equally faceless.
Perhaps there is no point in
reminding you and your correspondent that such tactics are
shameful. As for the behavior of
your faceless, spineless and highly-
placed source — it is beneath
contempt.
Patrick O'Neill
Germanic studies
r
(Sy
Cops cop bear
The setting:
The Buchanan lounge, 5:05
p.m., Friday, Jan. 19, 1979.
The occasion:
The first arts beer garden of
1979. (Rumor had it that they
were planning to give away free
beer.) We were prepared.
Our plan:
We knew we were going to be
KEVIN McGEE
0
dealing with sickies. We briefed
our best men (in fruit of the loom)
and assumed battle stations.
Corporal Brownbridge, Constable
Teague and Constable Sutherland
had spent their entire lives
preparing for a moment such as
this. We knew the risks that would
be involved, but we realized that a
higher principle was at stake. The
UBC detachment of the RCMP
could only play checkers for just
so long before some smart-ass
politician demanded to know
exactly what we were being paid
for. Our time had come, and we
intended to make the most of it.
Constables Teague and
Sutherland were stationed in the
men's washroom just below the
scene of the felony. Un-
fortuBHtciv onerations were
slightly delayed while the constables took time out to transcribe
the literature in their stakeouts.
Nonetheless, oar strike was
launched after 5 p.m.
What happened:
We entered the scene of the
crime at approximately 5:06 p.m.
At least 20 young subversives were
reclining in chairs, obviously
under the influence of the illegal
intoxicants. They were quiet and
well-mannered, and were apparently too far gone in their
stupor to realize the implications
of their foul deeds. We approached the ringleaders of the
insidious plot and by the hasty
way in which they complied with
our investigation, we knew that
they were up to no good.
Further investigation confirmed
our point. The crowd of people
became dangerously unruly and
we could hear muttered complaints of what fascists we were. It
was then that we knew that our
cause was just. We confiscated the
remainder of the demon brew and
had a wonderful time scaring the
freestyle
stuffing out of the organizers of
this disorganized rebellion. We
don't expect to have any further
problems with them, and as a
pleasant bonus the Olympia tasted
pretty good considering that it
was almost as old as we are.
Synopsis:
Another successful blow
against student anarchy. If we let
students go around giving away
free beer who knows what they
might do next?
comparing the journalistic integrity
of The Ubyssey to that of the
Washington Post.
But don't get me wrong. Many of
the complaints listed do have
validity, and come from some
students who really are interested in
their own education. Sure it's a
pain in the ass to submit two class
assignments and then go into the
final exam not knowing your
marks. (Theoretically though, a
student should always be giving 100
per cent.) The point I'm trying to
make here, is that Stankiewicz
knows his material, and does more
than an adequate job of conveying
it to his students. There is no
justification for terms like "dead-
wood" and "embarrassing," as
long as he can continue to teach the
material.
Furthermore, any faculty that
cannot resolve minor problems
such as that of a professor arriving
late for class, or cancelling too
many classes, is in serious trouble
itself.  I  have had  far more' in
structors who have been punctual
and never missed classes.
Finally, I would suggest that
those of the "shell-shocked mass"
were those students who had their
minds blown the first time they
opened a book that didn't contain
inch-high letters and pictures on
every second page. Tell me, how
many of those students who didn't
receive "ridiculously low" marks
are complaining anyhow?
Joel Wiseman
arts 3
BANK OF MONTREAL.
YOU
REALLY
SHOULD
LOOK
INTO IT.
We'd like to talk with you
about something that might not
have occurred to you...working
for us. Maybe you feel that banking is a business that hasn't
changed (or hasn't had to) since
your grandfather was your age,
and that the skills you've acquired in college or university
wouldn't be used in a career
with us.
That's just not true anymore.
The fact is, Bank of Montreal
has become the leader in an innovative movement that's seen
Canadian banking change more
in the past ten years than it has
in the past fifty. And we canpf-
fer you responsible, challenging
points of entry into a dynamic
business that just might go farther and faster
than any other in the next few years.
We need special people to keep us out in
front. "Special" means people who can
effectively manage and motivate others and
who are always perceptive and responsive
to our customers' needs. A career within our
branch system provides this continual challenge and a comprehensive
grounding in business and people
management.
The only common denominators with people who work
at Bank of Montreal these
days are the characteristics
that never go out of date...
talent, ambition and
determination.
You can find out a lot more
by dropping by. We're not into
hard sell on a career with Bank
of Montreal. We'll just let the
facts speak for themselves.
We'll be at this campus on the
dates shown below.
We are on campus January 31 and February 1, 1979 and are interested in
talking with Commerce (all majors) and Arts (Economics) students.
Please contact the Canada Manpower Centre on campus to arrange an interview. All applicants will be interviewed.
J^L   The First Canadian Bank
Bank of Montree*! Page 6
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 23,  1979
'Tween classes
TODAY
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
General meeting, noon, SUB 130.
AMNESTY UBC
Information booth with form letter, 11:30 a.m. to
2:30 p.m., SUB main lobby.
ENGLISH DEPARTMENT
VISITING POETS
Poetry reading by James Reaney and Coileen
Thibaudauel, noon, Buch. 203.
BAHA'I CLUB
Informal discussion on the Baha'i faith, noon,
SUB 113.
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Sports' night, 7:30 p.m., Thunderbird Winter
Sports Complex gym B.
Display of China's history, 11:30 a.m. to 2:30
p.m. from today until Friday, SUB art gallery.
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB
Free films on skiing and avalanches, 8 p.m..
Woodward lecture hall 1.
SCIENCE FICTION CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 216.
CO-REC INTRAMURALS
Cross-country skiing at Cypress Bowl on Jan.
27, sign up by Jan. 25 in War Memorial Gym
room 210.
PROGRESSIVE CONSERVATIVE CLUB
OF UBC
Regular meeting, noon, SUB 119.
Floor   hockey   (bring   AMS   card),   7:30  p.m..
Physical Education Centre gym E.
S.I.M.S.
TM group meditation, noon, Angus 210.
CHARISMATIC CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Prayer and sharing, noon, SUB 213.
LUTHERAN STUDENT MOVEMENT
Supper and film on Sexuality and communication, 6 p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre.
PRE-MED SOCIETY
Dr. H. D. Sanders speaks on Hypertension from
a pharmacologist's viewpoint, noon, IRC 4.
WEDNESDAY
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Lecture on The hundred flower period,  noon,
SUB 205.
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Guest speaker on Color vision defects,  noon,
Angus 110.
AMNESTY UBC
Information booth with form letters, 11:30 a.m.
to 2:30 p.m., SUB.
Letter writing workshop, noon, SUB 212A.
ART OF LIVING CLUB
Art of living series no. 2 on Man in the 1980s,
noon, Buch. 319.
HUMAN SETTLEMENTS'
AUDIO/VISUAL LIBRARY
NOVA presents B. F. Skinner documentary, 12
noon, IRC room B-80.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Lesbian drop-in, noon, SUB 130.
VARSITY OUTDOOR CLUB
Slide show, noon, Chem. 250.
UBC SAILING CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 205.
THURSDAY
CHINESE STUDENTS' ASSOCIATION
Slide show on China, noon, Buch. 100.
WOMEN'S COMMITTEE
Women's drop-in, noon, SUB 130.
PSYCHOLOGY STUDENTS* ASSOCIATION
Discussion on What does one do with a BA in
psychology?, noon, Angus 110.
General meeting, noon, Angus 104.
Bzzr party, 5 p.m., SUB.
AMNESTY UBC
Information booth with form letters, 11:30 a.m.
to 2:30 p.m., Scarfe.
UBC LIBERALS
Liberal MP Herb Gray speaks, noon, Angus 326.
326.
UBC NDP CLUB
General meeting, noon, SUB 211.
AWARDS OFFICE
Awards office representative will discuss financial  aid  for  students,   noon,   SUB   Speakeasy
UBC LIBERTARIAN SOCIETY
General meeting, noon, SUB 224.
PRE-DENTAL SOCIETY
Tour of UBC dental school, noon, Macdonald
Building lobby.
DEBATING SOCIETY
Briefing for speakers and chairpersons, noon,
Buch. 205.
HEALTH SERVICES STUDENTS' COMMITTEE
Health   minister   Bob   McClelland   speaks   on
Health care policy in B.C., noon, IRC 2.
CCF.
Bible quiz, noon, SUB 111.
AMNESTY UBC
Informal meeting, noon, SUB 212A.
STUDENTS' INTERNATIONAL
MEDITATION SOCIETY
Transcendental   meditation   weekly   meeting,
noon, Angus 210.
FRIDAY
AMNESTY UBC
Information booth and form letter, 11:30 a.m. to
2:30 p.m., SUB.
PUBLIC
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7:30 p.m. - 9:45    p.m.
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STUDENTS
8. CHILDREN     .75
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ADULTS           $1.25
THUNDERBIRD
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WINTER
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CLOWNS 7:30
JULIET OF THE SPIRITS 9:30
SATURDAY ONLY
ROMA 7:30 SATYRICON 9:45
SUNDAY ONLY
THE WHITE SHEIK 7:30
8% 9:15
Box office opens 7:00
16th & ARBUTUS, VANCOUVER
738-6311
Playing this week—8:30 p.m.:
Tuesday
JAM NIGHT with DON OGILVIE
Wednesday, Thursday
LANCE HARRISON ALL STARS
(memberships available)
$2.00 members only
Friday
WESTSIDE FEETWARMERS
Saturday
DAVE ROBERTS JASSBAND
TUES/WED/THURS - FREE for Members
LIVE—NEW ORLEANS JAZZ
36 E. Broadway - 873-4131
_   YEARLY MEMBERSHIPS — $3.00   ^
REGISTER NOW!
WE WILL HELP YOU
READ, WRITE, STUDY!
Your U.B.C. reading, writing and study skills centre gives
short, non-credit courses which will help you write correctly,
read quickly and study efficiently. One of these is sure to do it
for you:
— grammar and composition
— writing the short essay
— writing the long essay
— study skills development
— reading improvement
— vocabulary building
— spelling improvement
Courses begin the week of
January 27, 1979
CALL US AT 228-2181, LOC. 245
HAIRWORLD
\Q SASAMAT (W Oh AVE. & SASAMAT
VANCOUVER
■y^W^PWP^f
RATES?. Stwfcat --#Bb<*:*^:*I^^
5 — Coining Events
"Ethic Communities
of the Pacific Rim"
An Informal Evening
in Coffeepiace
with Dr. Bob Aldrich from the U. of Colorado's
Dept of Preventative Medicine &
Anthropological Studies
Tuesday, Jan 23rd Coffeepiace 7:30 p.m.
The COLLEGE
OF BUSINESS
ADMINISTRATION
of the
UNIVERSITY OF
OREGON
will have a representative available on campus on January 29, 1979 to interview
students (all majors) interested in pursuing
Master's and Ph.D programs in business.
Please contact the Office of Student Services Ponderosa Annex F, for an appointment.
HELP PREVENT
THEFT, PROTECT
YOUR PROPERTY!
REPORT ALL THEFTS TO THE R.C.M.P.
224-1322
TUNE IN!
Come watch the best debaters
in Western Canada argue
about the CBC at the
McGOUN
DEBATE
CUP
this Saturday, January 27
from 11 am to 4 pm in the Buchanan
Building
Sponsored    by    UBC's    Debating
Society
- ALL WELCOME -
EUROPE. Film on camping tours.
Thurs.. Jan. 25, 1:00 p.m. Room 215
SUB. CUTS Travel 224-0111.
5 — Coming Events (Conf.)
11 - For Saio — Private
COMMUNITY SPORTS — Excellent
prices for ice skates, hockey, soccer,
jogging and racquet sports equipment. 733-1612. 3615 West Broadway,
Vancouver, B.C.
NEW Apollo 19 in. 10 speed, ridden
only 35 miles. $160 new, want $120.
224-1678.
20 — Housing
35-Lost
LOST. Little black diary-Address book.
Jan.  19. Urgent. Call Doug 261-3995.
SCHOOL RING CC arson-Graham) with
green stone. Over X-mas. Phone
980-7297.
40 — Messages
EUROPE   CHARTERS
Special student, staff, and faculty
rates. See CUTS Travel, SUB.
234-0111.
65 — Scandals
70 — Services
85 — Typing
SHARED ACCOMMODATION vacancies
available, some completely empty
doubles, in Place Vanier and Totem
Park. Convenient location for enthusiastic students. Contact the Housing Office at 228-2811 or come and
see us at the Ponderosa 8:30-4:30,
Monday through  Friday.
25 — Instruction
PIANO and Theory tuition for Grades
1-10 and A.R.C.T. by Graduate of
Musikhochschule Frankfurt, Germany.  Westend.  682-4141 or 682-7991.
TYPING — 75c per page. Fast and accurate by experienced typist. Gordon,
685- 4861
TYPING: Essays, theses, manuscripts,
reports, etc. Fast and accurate ser-
viae. Bilingual, demy 324-9414.
90 - Wanted
READING and/or typing service required for blind student. Wages
negotiable. Call Bruce 224-9545, room
406, Caribu House. Student preferred.
Some minor editing of essays for
spelling,   grammar  required.
30-Jobs
SUMMER      EMPLOYMENT:      How     to
secure summer jobs in B.C. Labour
jobs, clerical, local and Northern
employment, etc. Best to apply
early! Send $2 for student Summer
Employment Guide. Satisfaction or
refund. Labour Market Info Service,
Box 7810 Sta-A (Dept UB), Edmonton,
Alta.   T5J3G6.
WANTED — Two tickets to cinema 16
Kurosawa series. Call Tammy or
Harvey   879-0739.
99 — Miscellaneous
SKI   WHISTLER
Rent   cabin   day/week   732-0174   ere*
AMSTERDAM   —    STUDENT/YOUTH
FARES
25 and under. $489 open return. Subject to government approval. See
CUTS   Travel,   SUB.   224-0111. Tuesday, January 23, 1979
THE       UBYSSEY
Page 7
Feds dream up 'bureaucratic nightmare'
From page 1
Young and other university
administrators across Canada had
harsh words for Revenue Canada's
handling of the situation.
"Revenue Canada, in their own
way, didn't realize that universities
like UBC and the University of
Toronto couldn't process a hand-
signature form. We'd have
thousands of students in lineups
(for the forms)," Young said.
William Kent, the U of T
registrar and president of the
Association of Registrars of
Universities and Colleges of
Canada, says the situation is
"absolutely ludicrous."
"There's no reason for these
forms. We weren't even consulted
before they decided to institute
them. I've written a number of
letters to the ministry and argued
for the honor system. There's no
Kenny says trip personal
From page 1
"I imagine that (Stankiewicz's
trip) is a personal arrangement. He
certainly didn't make it as a representative from UBC," he said.
Stankiewicz refused to comment
on his trip or the allegations
concerning his observer status in
Namibia.
The election was attended by
more than 300 other "impartial
observers" and the Democratic
Turnahlle Alliance, supported by
the Botha regime, was swept to
power   while   the    other    major
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political force, the Southwest
African People's Organization
decided not to participate in the
election, Resnick said.
He said Kenny should make a
statement that the university does
not sanction the activities of the
South African government and that
Stankiewicz's action should not be
interpreted as a UBC endorsement
of them.
Resnick said Stankiewicz has
lectured in the past in South Africa.
"Obviously there is some sort of
sympathy to the regime."
HOLLYWOOD
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at 9:20
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Adults & Students $2.00  •
evidence   that    individuals   were
falsifying documents," he said.
"These are times of budgetary
constraints and the government is
just adding additional costs and
bureaucracy," Young said.
Brock University registrar Peter
Bartram termed the situation a
"bureaucratic nightmare." Bar-
tram said the government had
printed four million of the fill-out-
by-hand T22-02 forms before any
post-secondary institutions had
even heard about them.
"There's nobody in the
university system who can find a
reason why these forms should be
instituted. The government's basic
assumption is that everybody is dishonest."
And UBC's Young also warned
students desperate for their income
tax refunds not to file their income
tax without the new form. It will be
returned as unacceptable by
Revenue Canada, he said.
Young said students will only be
able to receive the forms from the
registrar's office in the mail, as it
would be impossible for administrative staff to handle individual requests from students for
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the forms when they arrive.
The directive for the new tax
forms was originally issued in
December, 1977 but when general
confusion resulted a one-year
moratorium was imposed, making
them unnecessary for 1978 returns.
OPTIC
ZONE
AMS WOMEN'S
COMMITTEE
OPEN HOUSE
FRI. JAN. 26
12:30 - 4:30 p.m.
REFRESHMENTS
WOMEN'S CENTRE
SUB 130
EVERYONE WELCOME
SOFT
CONTACT
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Per pair
All Fees
Inclusive
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Student Discounts
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EYEGLASSES
Student Discount
Available on Eyeglasses
Bausch & Lorob SOPLENS also, available
KAUFMANN & JESSA OPTICAL SHOP
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IT'S OUR
TWO FOR ONE
TACO SALE
AGAIN!
Last year, Senor McTaco had a two for one taco
sale that was so popular that we 've decided to do it
again this year, too.
For 800 and the coupon below, you'll get two of
our delicious tacos . . . two for the price of one!
That's a big deal for big appetites, especially if you
know that our tacos are the best tacos in town. Just
cut out the coupon below and bring it into either
Senor McTaco's restaurant. Ole!
SENOR
MCTACO'S
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or, 3396 West Broadway Ave. (at Waterloo.)
U This coupon is good for the purchase of two tacos
U for 80(2. Coupon must be presented. One offer per
A person. Offer expires January 31, 1979. Page  8
THE       UBYSSEY
Tuesday, January 23,  1979
'Birds lay another egg
SPORTS
By DON MacINTYRE
The UBC Thunderbird basketball team was a gracious
host this weekend, allowing the visiting Victoria Vikings to
sweep a pair of weekend games from the lowly home side.
The Vikings lead the Canada West Intercollegiate Conference
suffering only two defeats in 10 games. The 'Birds are currently in fifth place two and eight, with the University of
Saskatchewan Huskies being the only team with fewer points.
—mike mong photo
VIKING PUTS FINE tuning on shot by Frank Janowicz in basketball game at UBC Saturday. University of Victoria put it to 'Birds twice on weekend to extend first place lead and sink 'Birds deeper in Canada West standings.
Next week Thunderbirds try luck again against Calgary.
World championship to be at UBC
"Canadian women are very good
losers," sighs Marina van der
Merwe. "They must be taught to
win."
Van der Merwe, as coach of the
national women's field hockey
team, has until Aug. 18 to teach the
29 members of her team the fundamentals of winning. On that date
Canada will meet the Netherlands
in the first game of the 1979 World
Championships, to be held on the
UBC south campus playing fields.
The Canadian team members,
including 15 B.C. natives, will be
stationed at the Johnny Owen
pavilion until the championships.
The grueling routine of five-hour
practices each week day will be
broken only briefly by three tours,
and will continue for the next six
months.
Van der Merwe sees competition
as the answer to the lack of winning
drive, and has acted accordingly.
Only 14 of the 29 athletes training
will make the final squad for the
championships. The team will meet
top international squads on their
tour of Great Britain in February,
Europe in May, and North America
in July.
The Canadian team, presently
ranked ninth in the world, has
additional motivation entering the
championships.  Women's  field
hockey will be an Olympic sport for
the first time in Moscow in 1980,
and the top five teams from the
UBC matches will qualify.
Canada's task will be made
somewhat simpler because the
Soviet Union qualifies
automatically as host country and
England, Scotland and Northern
Ireland, among the best teams in
the world, will combine to represent
Great Britain in Moscow. The
Canadian team ranks sixth among
the remaining potential qualifiers.
The championships will utilize
seven pitches, including three on
the area presently being converted
to all-weather fields with underground drainage, irrigation and
fertilization systems. The conversion will cost $350,000 and will
Jock
Shorts
The Thunderette volleyball team
lost a tournament final to the Old
Time Ladies for the second time in
as many weeks on Sunday, losing 6-
15, 4-15, 9-15 in the Victoria International final. UBC's Kim Brand
and Jayne Cryer were named to the
all-star team.
provide UBC with a playing surface
usable even during the monsoon
season.
The initial contest on Friday saw
the Islanders dump the 'Birds
89-48. The return match Saturday
ended 68-48 in the visitors' favor.
UBC never really got on track in
Friday's game, but did manage to
stay close to UVic for most of the
game played Saturday.
The teams traded baskets in the
early going. UVic mixed their offense well, relying on the inside play
of veteran forward Reni Dolcetti
and the excellent outside shooting
of guard Ian Hyde-Lay. The
general of the Vikings attack is 5'8"
guard Robbie Parris. Parris was a
constant threat to UBC defenders.
His quickness allowed him to get inside effectively, and once inside he
was at home.
When confronted with the always
taller UBC defenders, he would
display body control that would
dazzle any onlooker. His biggest
asset is his ability to pass the ball off
from the inside or on the fast break.
Parris assists led to many easy
buckets for the visitors. It is nice to
know that there is still room for the
little man in college basketball.
UBC tried early to take advantage of an obvious height mismatch. Thunderbird guard Ian
MacKinnon is an excellent ball
handler and at 6'0" had a big edge
on defender Parris. MacKinnon
was able to work himself free on
numerous occasions, but unfortunately he was not able to get inside with any consistency, but
despite these early problems UBC
headed to the locker room room at
half-time down by only six points at
30-24.
Both teams came out looking
stronger in the second half and it
looked as though the game would
not be decided until the final few
minutes. The difference proved to
be the superior offensive attack of
the Victoria team. When UBC
employed the zone defence UVic
would rely on its consistent outside
shooting. If the 'Birds switched to
man-to-man the Vikings would
work the ball inside to Dolcetti,
who dominated the game for the
Victoria team in the second half.
The only thing that kept UBC
within striking distance was the outstanding individual effort of rookie
centre 6'6" Rob Forsyth. He mixed
his play well, getting the ball inside
on occasion and showing
remarkable outside shooting ability
for a big man. But his game high,
25-point performance was not
enough to carry the Thunderbirds
to victory. UVic opened a 20-point
lead which they carried to the final
buzzer.
The statistics reveal the varied
and potent nature of the Vikings offense. The visitors were led by Reni
Dolcetti's 18 points, 12 of those
coming in the second half. Ian
Hyde-Lay, using his deadly outside
shooting to tally 14 points, was
closely followed by the outstanding
12-point effort of Parris.
The distribution of points on the
Victoria team shows how versatile
their attack is and why they achieved a number three ranking in the
latest Canadian college poll.
The Thunderbirds had to rely on
rookie sensation Forsyth to carry
the load after guard MacKinnon
had difficulty finding his range.
The usually reliable forward John
Doughty managed only two points
in this contest. No one was able to
hit double figures, other than Forsyth's 25 points, with MacKinnon
and Rob Cholyk getting six each.
Forsyth led all rebounders with 15,
which carried UBC to a 34-33 edge
on the boards for the game.
The last statistic is an interesting
one, considering the decided height
advantage UVic enjoyed. If UBC
can continue to utilize its rebounding ability the future can only
be brighter. A more balanced offensive threat is necessary before
the 'Birds can add to their season
point total.
Coach Peter Mullins' hope for second place floats on a Thunderbird
wing and a prayer.
The 'Birds will try to improve on
their season record this weekend as
they host the University of Calgary
Dinosaurs (4-6). The Dinos are
fresh off a pair of weekend defeats
at the hands of the University of
Alberta Golden Bears. First game is
Friday night at 8:30.
— peter menyasz photo
ASSISTANT WRESTLING COACH Mike Richie stares in amazement at latest recruit Mork from Ork. Action
was in weekend dual meet against Pacific Lutheran University from Tacoma, which UBC won 29-22. Richie's opponent is really Barry Schultz, who won match by forfeit and needed practice.

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