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 +$0.65m
+$1.44m
+$1.77m // Page 2
IKiaWiVH
Wimumt
EVENTS
FRIDAY ' 5
THIS WEEK, CHECKOUT.
CANDLELIGHT VIGIL
10:00 A.M. - 4:00 P.M.. @ SUB CONCOURSE
UBC is hosting a candlelight vigil in honour of the victims ofthe Ecole
Polytechnique massacre and to commemorate the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence Against Women. Free
SATURDAY • 6
TRIUMF EARTHQUAKE LECTURE
10:00 A.M. -12:00 P.M. @ TRIUMF AUDITORIUM
Learn about one ofthe most destructive earthly forces — and one ofthe biggest environmental threats to Vancouver — at this lecture on earthquakes.
Free
ALL MONTH
UBC ICE SKATING
TIMESVARY@THUNDERBIRDSPORTSCENTRE
Though not quite as exotic and romantic as Robson Square, UBC offers free
public skating to students. It's a great place to relax after exams or for a date.
Free with UBC Card; skate rentals $3.50.
ON
THE
COVER
I'm definitely more excited about
the snow portion ofthe cover.
-NickAdams
Want to see your events listed here?
Email your events listings to
ourcampus@ubyssey.ca.
^^*f^  ¥ ■ < -v t  ■  «
UBYSSE
\JTHE
Y
■*-                                  DECEMBER4.2014 | VOLUMEXCVI | ISSUEXXVIII
EDITORIAL
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OUR CAMPUS//
JRTESYPETERV
Craigen has taken the reins of one of UBC's biggest and most well-known clubs.
Ski and Board Club Pres. Peter Craigen has big boots to fill
Leo Soh
Staffwriter
Peter Craigen, the new president of
the iconic UBC Ski and Board Club,
is hoping to continue his club's
storied traditions — and he has big
shoes to fill.
Peter Wojnar, the previous
president of Ski and Board, was a
magnetic figure, truly representing
what he thought to be the three
pillars ofthe club: "Skis, boards
and sex appeal." His legacy is Ski
and Board's reputation for partying
hard and hitting the slopes as
much as possible.
Although Craigen is still
creating his legacy, time is on his
side. With over two years remaining before graduation, Craigen is
looking forward to creating more
memorable experiences with the
Ski and Board Club.
Some of the older
execs made a big
announcement... that
they were gonna have
every single person
that wanted to ski
with them meet up
at the bottom of the
Jersey Cream chairlift
at noon. They showed
us around the whole
mountain and skied as
fast as they could."
Peter Craigen
Second-year political science
major and president ofthe UBC
Ski and Board Club
"I am in second year and
studying political science, so
at the end of this year I'll be
declaring and hopefully accepted
into the major of poli sci. I came
into university knowing that was
what I wanted to do, and I like it
a lot."
What inspired Craigen to run
for presidency this year was his
experience with the club as first-
year representative.
I like [being president]
a lot. It's a lot of
responsibility but it's
a pretty cool position;
you get to see the
behind the scenes
things, and it's fun."
Peter Craigen
"At the beginning of last year
when I was looking to get involved,
some ofthe older execs made a big
announcement on Condo Cram
Weekend [the first trip to Whistler]
that they were gonna have every
single person that wanted to ski
with them meet up at the bottom
ofthe Jersey Cream chairlift at
noon. They showed us around the
whole mountain and skied as fast
as they could. It was a cool and fun
experience."
His first year with the club also
involved hard work in preparation
for events, and other memorable
club experiences off the hills, such
as the UBC Undie Run held in
April, a charity event and just what
the name suggests.
"That was one ofthe coolest
experiences ofthe year. It was a big
stress reliever."
Craigen is enjoying his role as
head ofthe club.
"I like it a lot. It's a lot of
responsibility, but it's a pretty cool
position; you get to see the behind
the scenes things, and it's fun."
Unsurprisingly, his responsibilities as president are very different
from those as first-year representative.
"Last year, I got to experience
the physical labour side of Ski and
Board: moving pylons here and
there, setting up events. But this
year I've really had more to do
with the AMS: having good relations, making sure that everything
is in check by having the right
documents: the kind of stuff that
as a first year rep I had no idea
happened."
The Ski and Board Club is always looking for new members.
"We do a ton of trips: we're running three trips this year," Craigen
said.
With Whistler Blackcomb,
Whitewater Ski Resort (Nelson,
B.C.) and Revelstoke Mountain
Resort (Cariboo, B.C.) as the
planned destinations, these trips
will all surely be, accordingto
Craigen, "quite a weekend." Some
ofthe club's other events include
the Locals Pro Sale, the Annual Ski
and Board Rail Jam, the aforementioned Undie Run and seemingly a party for every occasion.
Getting involved with the Ski
and Board Club is easy.
"If you missed out on clubs days
or any other sign up day a great
way to start is by joining our Facebook group: UBC Ski and Board
Club. From there you can find
all our upcoming events and you
are bound to meet plenty of new
friends on our trips or parties. We
are a friendly bunch and we accept
absolutely anyone to our club!" tJ
=HOTOCOFJRTESYPETERCRAIGEF
The Ubyssey is going on holiday after
Monday but we'll still be updating online
at ubyssey.ca throughout the break.
Our first print issue of the new year is on
Jan. 5.
See you then! // News
EDITORS JOVANAVRANIC +VERONIKA BONDARENKO
URSDAY, DECEMBER 4, 20
MONEY »
MONEY »
Prof weighs in on positives and negatives of a $15 minimum wage
STARTUPS»
Kelley Lin
Senior StaffWriter
The B.C. Federation of Labour is
petitioning to increase the minimum wage in B.C. to $15 an hour.
This is the first proposed increase
since 2011, when the minimum wage
was raised from $8 an hour. The
current minimum wage of $10.25 is
eighth highest in Canada, with Ontario leading with $11.00 and New
Brunswick trailing at $10.00.
David Green, a professor at UBC's
Vancouver School of Economics,
believes this is an issue that's been
on the rise in recent years.
"[B.C.] ranks pretty poorly in
terms of poverty overall," said
Green. "There was the whole Occupy movement, and coming out of
that, a bunch of people were looking
to figure ways to try to implement
the responses to concerns that
people have, so minimum wage is
something that comes up often."
However, controversy still
remains on whether an almost 50
per cent change would help B.C.
workers or alter the B.C. economy
for the worse.
Accordingto the B.C. Federation of Labour's (B.C. Fed) website,
their organization believes that the
increase to $15 will pull the 120,000
workers receiving minimum wage
out of poverty.
"As the cost of living continues to
go up, workers earning minimum
wage cannot make ends meet," said
a statement on the website. "It's not
just mom and pop shops."
Despite the B.C. Fed's belief
that the proposed increase will
help workers and businesses of all
varieties, Green predicts that the
EXAMS»
A higher minimum wage might not be as good as it initally seems.
proposed increase would mostly
affect teenagers and newcomers to
the labour market.
"Minimum wage is sort of interesting in the way it affects things,"
he said. "Once you start looking at
older workers, you don't find much
of an effect at all."
Accordingto Green, the wage
increase might benefit those on
the low end ofthe labour market,
including workers with low skills or
experience, but such a quick change
would take a toll on firms as well as
the employment rate overall.
"Workers [may] take a somewhat longer time to find a job, possibly because firms get pickier, but
once they find a job, they tend to
keep it longer," said Green. "[We]
should move in the direction that
gives firms plenty of warning so
that they can make their investment adjustments."
Between the two sides ofthe
debate, it seems that the recurrent
=ILE PHOTO JOSH CURRANFFHE UBYSSEY
consensus is that increasing the
minimum wage this much in such
a short period of time will not be
without its costs.
"I would be in favour of moving
in that direction, but in order to be
fair to the businesses and consumers that will be affected and to
make sure that we do it the right
way, I think it should be done in
stages," said Green.
"I don't think that we should,
overnight, change to $15." Xi
Staying focused: how and why to avoid study drugs this finals season
Karolina Kapusta
Contributor
The end of a school semester
calls for extra focus and excellent time management, but
one should think twice before
reaching for a study drug to help,
says UBC associate psychology
professor Amori Yee Mikami.
Mikami is adept with stimulant pharmaceuticals as she
focuses her research on Attention Deficit Hyperactivity
Disorder (ADHD). These drugs,
such as Adderall or Ritalin, work
as stimulants on the part ofthe
brain that helps control behaviour.
"It sounds counter-intuitive,
someone who is hyper-active
taking a stimulant," Mikami
said, but the drug stimulates the
part of the brain that acts like
"brakes on a car." Therefore, it
helps someone pause before acting and think out consequences
more clearly.
Accordingto Mikami, these
stimulants function the same
way on individuals without
ADHD. That's why they are
helpful, in the short term, for
students who want to concentrate more and study for longer
periods of time.
There are side effects regardless of whether you have ADHD
or not, Mikami said, they just
vary depending on who is taking
the drugs.
Relatively minor effects include trouble falling asleep or a
disrupted sleep routine and problems with eating habits or digestion. The more severe potential
side effects include addiction and
heart problems and while "not
common, they certainly exist,"
she said.
-IFE PHOTO GEOFF FISTERFTHE UBYSSEY
According to associate professor Amori Yee Mikami, the benefits of study drugs do not outweigh their potential side effects.
"There is not enough information
about these medications to fully
know their effects just yet, but as
with all drugs, there are risks and
benefits," said Mikami.
"No medication is perfectly safe,"
she said. For someone with ADHD,
the pros outweigh the cons and
make the medication worthwhile,
but for a student who needs a temporary boost it might not be.
"There's a concern when individuals who don't have ADHD take
the medication for it because there
might be a potential downside that
outweighs the potential benefits,"
Mikami said.
There are many risk-free options
to help ease the pain of long study
sessions and stay focused.
Accordingto Shane Galway, a
fourth-year geography student in
Environment and Sustainability
Studies, his fellow students look
for a quiet space and a cup, or two,
of coffee.
Still, too much caffeine can have
the opposite effects than desired.
Dominique Salh, a third-year
psychology student, said that she
takes 10 -15 minute breaks every 60
minutes of studying and that due to
a busy schedule, "short small bursts
of studying" work best for her.
For long study sessions, it is important to find ways to boost attention and create as pleasant of an
experience as possible. With whatever method chosen, it is imperative
to weigh the risks and benefits and
find out if it will be beneficial and
safe in the long run. Xi
New grocery
delivery service
reaches out to
students in rez
HFE PHOTO CHARFESTOFTHE UBYSSEY
Birtto is a grocery delivery service catered
to UBC students who live in rez.
JovanaVranic
News Editor
Two UBC students are co-founders of a delivery service that brings
groceries to your dorm room.
Birtto, which is a grocery
delivery service started by third-
year computer science student
Irene Chen, fourth-year commerce
student Bowen Li and University
of Saskatchewan graduate Bo Sun,
has been created specifically with
student interests in mind.
Accordingto Chen, Birtto first
started as a thought that such a
service would really help students,
particularly during busy times ofthe
year and exam periods, who are too
busy studying to make the trek to a
grocery store. As a result, Chen, Li
and Sun created Birtto in November.
"It's really annoying to bus to
Save On Foods, especially during
exam season, so I thought how nice
it would be if someone would just
deliver it to me," said Chen.
While there are numerous grocery delivery services in Vancouver,
Birtto is unique in that it caters
specifically to students who live in
the UBC residences.
Currently, the three co-founders
bring groceries to Totem, Thunderbird, Gage and Marine Drive residences but plan to start delivering to
Vanier in the near future.
"We're definitely looking into
expanding to more residences,
probably Vanier next," said Chen.
"We're also going to expand our
product line more, we're constantly
adding products."
Birtto currently sources their
products from Superstore and For
Real Food Mart in Richmond. Aside
from sourcing groceries such as produce, bread and meat, their website
includes sushi boats, soft drinks and
personal hygiene items like soap
and toothbrushes.
Accordingto Chen, they currently have about 250 students signed
up for their services and receive
anywhere from 30 to 35 orders a day.
In the upcoming months, Chen
and her colleagues are planning to
include alcoholic drinks in their
list of products and eventually
expand the circle of deliveries to
Metro Vancouver. Xi
Write
Shoot
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COME BY THE UBYSSEY OFFICE
SUB 24, FOLLOW THE SIGNS NEWS    I   THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4, 2014
International Tuition
The Board of Governors passed a 10 per cent increase in international tuition for 2015
*#>■
_
Words by Veronika Bondarenko
Graphics by Jovana Vranic
V
Why increase tuition?
Invest to provide an excellent
university experience and
a valuable credential to our
students
Address pressures and priorities
in faculties, central programs
and services
c
Support for international
students
*Quoted from UBC Consultation
Proposed Allocations
I
58% Faculties
33% Central Operating Budget
7.5% Student Financial Support
1.7% Bad Debt / Credit Charges
The university has approved increases to international tuition.
At a Dec. 2 Board of Governors
meeting, the Board passed the
motion for a 10 per cent increase
to undergraduate tuition for all
incoming international students
and a three per cent increase for
the next four years.
Prior to the vote, Board Chair
John Montalbano said the Board
understands the financial pressures that students face, but still
has a primary responsibility to
the university and maintaining a
top-notch level of education.
"We must vote in a manner
that is in the best interests ofthe
university," said Montalbano.
UBC Provost and VP Academic David Farrar said that,
while the university has made
efforts to consult students and
keep education affordable, the
tuition increases are necessary
due to funding cuts from the
provincial government.
"This is not balancing our
books in any way," said Farrar. "In
fact, our first step in balancing
the budget is a hiring freeze in the
central administration and taking
$7 million out of that budget."
Farrar also gave a presentation that summarized where
the money gained through the
increases will be spent, specifying that 58 per cent will be going
individual faculties, 33 per cent
to the central budget, 7.5 per cent
to student financial support and
1.7 per cent to outstanding fees
and credit charges.
AMS President Tanner Bokor,
AMS VP Academic and University Affairs Anne Kessler and
May Anne Then, president ofthe
International Students' Association, gave a presentation that
summarized students' opposition
and expressed dissatisfaction
with the university's justifications for the increases.
"The AMS recognizes that the
university is in a difficult financial situation with cuts from the
provincial government, but we
are still opposed to the proposal," said Kessler.
"This is not only because we
believe in accessible education,
but also because we feel that these
increases were not well justified."
Believe me that if I
could figure out other
ways to raise our
profile, I'd be the first
one to do it because
these are real issues
about the growth of
the country and where
we want to position
Canada long-term...
the reality still remains
that my job and the job
of the administration
is to figure out how to
run the university and
how to maintain the
university"
Arvind Gupta
UBC President and
Vice-Chancellor
Board student representative
Chris Roach asked that, if the
increases were to go through, the
university increase open-ended consultation with various
student groups to ensure that the
money is being spent in a way
that truly benefits students.
"I really would like to see this
be a joint process, but I think
that one ofthe major issues from
the past little while is that the
student population is becoming
less trusting ofthe administration and I would really like to see
that change," said Roach.
VP Students Louise Cowin
said that they will make an effort
to ensure that such consultation
takes place, but that it may not be
possible to give students the level
of detail that they are looking for
since the money is being distributed across many different areas.
"I'm happy to return to the
table to continue those conversations, but if you're looking for
precision or an expectation of
precision, I'm not sure that we're
going to be able to give it."
UBC President Arvind Gupta
finished the discussion by saying
that while the decision to increase international tuition was a
difficult one, it is also a necessary to maintain the educational
and research standards that the
university is known for.
"Believe me that if I could
figure out other ways to raise our
profile, I'd be the first one to do
it because these are real issues
about the growth ofthe country
and where we want to position
Canada long-term," said Gupta.
"The reality still remains that
my job and the job ofthe administration is to figure out how to
run the university and how to
maintain the university."
A group of IAmAStudent
protesters stood up with signs
throughout the discussion and
read out an opposition statement
about the increased inaccessibility
of a UBC education despite the
Board's request that Bokor be the
one to speak on behalf of students.
After the students finished, the
Board voted almost unanimously
in favour ofthe increases. Xi
Financial Support Breakdown
.
41% Entrance: merit & need
27% Entrance: merit
13% Entrance: multi-year merit
10% Continuing: merit
6% Continuing: work learn
1% Go Global
1% Emergency Bursary
1% Other (athletics, music, etc.)
Central Increase Allocation
2015/16
2016/17
2017/18
2018/19
5.5
$ million
Strategic Initiatives & Capital
Infrastructure
International Students Support II Culture I
JENICA MONTGOMERY
iMBER4,20
FINALS »
BEST STUDY
SPOTS
Words by Miguel Santa Maria       Photos by Cherihan Hassun
When it comes to cramming for that sluggish late-night exam or the deadly
early morning counterpart, usually location means everything. After all, if
you're going to spend the next six hours burning complex formulas or Roman
Army formations into your brain, you at least — to quote the film The Hurt
Locker— "want to die comfortably." So with that said, here are some ofthe
more ideal spots on-campus to prepare yourself for the coming carpal-tunnel
onslaught.
KOERNER LIBRARY
The upper floors of Koerner Library are the perfect traditional
library study space. Although
there are no comfy sofas, it is the
most ideal vanilla study space
for those with simple tastes.
Just you, your desk, virtually
perfect silence and to top it off,
the great outside view that you
can just glance and contemplate
at during your short burst study
breaks. Something your buddies
in the lower silent floors have to
be envious about.
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BL—y^. 1'y t?w?^",4
THE CHAPMAN
LEARNING COMMONS
For those who still prefer some
noise but have an utter disdain
for human chatter, The Chapman Learning Common has got
you covered with its subtle ambience of printing and keyboard
strokes to get your productivity
going. Also, you get to pretend
that you're in Hogwarts if it ever
decided to invest in actual modern day technology. However,
as always is the case in the 1KB,
get ready to spend 15 minutes
trying to find a seat first.
ALLARD HALL LAW
LIBRARY
STUDENT UNION
BUILDING
If you find aesthetics to be an
essential part of your study
experience, then you might just
find yourself at the Allard Hall
Law Library. Not only is it a
space with a really nice modern
minimalist architecture, but one
that gets a good regular amount
of bright natural light coming
through the windows for your
Vitamin D needs. Accordingto
pharmacy student Reanne Li, it
comes with a bonus perk: "Good
looking grad students."
If you are one of those types
that can't stand total silence and
needs some sound in your life
constantly, the SUB can be your
surprise back-up plan. "I like
studying in the SUB by myself,"
said film student Arjun Hair.
"The constant activity in the
SUB turns into white noise for
me." The third floor couches
are likely your go-to site, with a
sufficient amount of subtle background noise as well as some
comfy couches more available
than the ones at 1KB.
THE EDUCATION
LIBRARY
THE GREAT
OUTDOORS
For those finding themselves
at Science side ofthe campus
and too lazy to trudge all the
way to 1KB or Koerner, fret not
because what can be one ofthe
most pleasant libraries is (sort
of) nearby. Located right next
to the Martha Piper Plaza, the
Education Library can not only
be considered to be one ofthe
coziest libraries in that part of
campus, but it also has a solid
collection of storybooks to read
on your study break.
However, if studying inside is
not your kind of thing, then
UBC also has loads of benches,
trees, and recently, tree swings
for you to use at your disposal.
Of course, it's highly inadvisable to do that right now given
the current weather, but come
spring and summer, nothing
beats jotting your notes down on
a bench located at the northern
tip ofthe peninsula. Xi
FILM»
After Film School plays on the
plights of recent graduates
Tammy Hsieh
Contributor
Produced by recently graduated
Vancouver-based film school students, After Film School focuses
the plight of young filmmakers
and the hilarious musical comedy
'High School Shooting: The
Musical.' The film will have its
world premiere on December 5 at
the Whistler International Film
Festival.
Joel Ashton McCarthy is best
known for his award winning
documentary, Taking My Parents
To Burning Man. After Film
School is his first feature narrative. Shot in a mockumentary
style, After Film School is about
broke and jobless Adam Baxter
one year after he graduated from
film school. When his friend
Max passes away he decided to
turn Max's script into a comedy musical titled 'High School
Shooting: The Musical,' hoping
to knock on the door of fame and
fortune.
After Film School is inspired
by McCarthy's and other's recent
experiences as a graduate of
film school.
"You get to that point when
you're graduating, and you see
people fighting each other for
a $15,000 job, which all of a
sudden became one ofthe good
jobs," said McCarthy. This is the
common fear shared by most
post-grad millennials. After Film
School wants to shed light on the
point in post-graduates' lives
when they're in-between, they
start to doubt their dreams and
the next step of their life.
The film parallels the personal experience ofthe crew as
well. "The film itself was about
making a film next to no money,
pulling the resources of your
friends and family to make a film
and it very much became what
we had," said McCarthy. Unlike
traditional film making, the
movie is completely operated by
volunteers across Vancouver.
"One ofthe amazing things
about calling your friends and
asking for favor is to find out
that there are so many people in
Vancouver who actually want to
be in the filming industry, either
in school or part of different
types of communities. And they
just want to help out [because] ...
they want to get their foot in the
door. It's kind of a project where
everyone sort of launches their
career," said Lana Otoya, one
of the producers of After Film
School.
"The one benefit of being
an independent film maker in
Canada is that there is a lot of
support and there is a lot less
competition," said Sophia Dagh-
er, another producer of After
Film School and graduate of
UBC's film department.
McCarthy wanted to stress
that there are many things we're
allowed and, specifically, not
allowed to make fun of in our
culture. This is why he chose
the outrageous theme of a high
school shooting, and chose to
turn it into a hilarious musical.
"I feel like if we are so particular about what we can make fun
of, and this false category is in
a way limiting our free speech,"
said McCarthy. For the future
of comedy, he hopes people will
discuss why some topics are
laughable whereas some remain
as social taboos.
"The title of 'High School
Shooting: The Musical' is so
absurd, you hear it and you either
laugh or your face falls, right?
You can't really do anything
between here and that. It just
elicits such strong reaction from
people from the back. And for
indie film, it's so hard to make
people [interested]," said McCarthy. For independent filmmakers, that's exactly what they
want — to elicit strong reactions
from people. Without big name
stars to attract an audience, they
need to act boldly to grab attention. McCarthy recalled how he
was intrigued to watch Wolf of
Wall Street based on the fact that
people hated it so much.
Overall, McCarthy hopes to
convey some positive messages.
"I want to make people think
that the time to act on your
passion is now," he said. After
Film School encourages people to
follow their dreams, even when
it's eye-catching.
On the same night of the premiere
at Whistler Film Festival, After
Film School will be available online
at 8:30 p. m. as part ofthe First
Weekend Club's Video on Demand
service, Canada Screens. Xi
Culture'
Culture:
Last week the Museum of An
Did you know that UBC Library
thropology opened their newest
recently acquired the legendary
exhibit Piga Picha! 100 Years of
Videomatica collection? From
Studio Photography in Nairobi.
Miyazaki films to classic horror
The exhibit showcases photos
films, the Videomatica collection
from Nairobi photographers and
most likely has it.
celebrates popular photo culture
The Videomatica collection
in Nairobi. The exhibit was
was acquired by the University in
curated by professional photog
January and provides students
rapher Katharina Greven.
with the best way to procrastinate:
The exhibit opened on Nov. 25
Movies.
and will remain open until April 5,
Learn more at collections.
2015. Learn more atmoa.ubc.ca/
library.ubc.ca/featured-collec-
portfoliojpaqelpiqapichal
tions/videomatica/xt 6    I    CULTURE    I    THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4,2014
HEALTH »
THEATRE»
Use alternative medicine
to stay healthy this
exam season
East Van Panto brings community feelings to Cinderella
Yoga and prayer fall under alternative medicine.
=HOTO CHERIHAN HASSUN/THE UBYSSEY
Boluwaji Ogunyemi
Contributor
The number of complementary and
alternative medicines is growing so
fast that it is hard to keep up. When
asked why UBC students consider
complementary and alterative treatments, Patricia Mirwaldt, director
of UBC Student Health Services
explained that "students recognize
that there is more than one way to
treat a medical problem."
This sentiment is shared by many
British Columbians. In a report
released in 2006 by the Fraser
Institute, 83 per cent of British
Columbians used complementary
and alternative approaches for
medical treatment in their lifetimes.
The most common were, in order,
massage therapy, yoga, relaxation
techniques and prayer and acupuncture.
"Some alternative treatments
such as yoga and massage therapy
are considered mainstream but
their usefulness depends what one
is using it for," said Mirwaldt. She
goes onto describe that "while
massage therapy is useful for aches,
pains and some types of headaches,
it would not be a valid treatment for
diabetes."
With similar terms and designations, it almost requires a degree
just to differentiate between the
different types of alternative
approaches available.
Conventional or mainstream
medicine is termed allopathic
medicine. Homeopathy is based
on the belief that "like cures like."
Practitioners believe that a disease
can be treated with diluted amounts
ofthe agent that causes the illness in
healthy people. For example, applying watered-down poison ivy to the
skin of a person with eczema would
provide relief. Randomized trials
have consistently failed to provide
benefit for homeopathic medicine
over placebo.
Naturopathic medicine is a system of medicine based on the belief
that the human body has a natural
ability to heal itself. Many naturopathic practitioners incorporate a
number of alternative treatments
such as homeopathy, acupuncture
and chiropractic care into their
practice. Since 2009, Naturopathic
Doctors (ND) have been allowed
to prescribe a limited number of
prescription medications in British
Columbia.
Osteopathic medicine is a system
that emphasizes the role ofthe
musculoskeletal system in health.
Accordingto the British Columbia
Osteopathic Association's official
website, "when indicated, they
[Osteopathic Doctors, OD] focus
special attention on the musculoskeletal system, which reflects and
influences the condition of all other
body systems.
A consideration for price-sensitive students, herbal medications
are not covered under the UBC
Student Health Benefits Plan
while up to 80 per cent ofthe
costs of many prescription medications are covered.
With the same example of massage therapy, as only the first $20
of each session — which can easily
run up to about $80 — are covered
under the medical plan for UBC
students. Beside more conventional health practitioners such
as physiotherapists, dietitians
and speech therapists, the UBC
Student Health Benefits Plan has
provisions for certain alternative
health practitioners as well: the
first $20 ofthe cost of a visit to
chiropractors, naturopathic and
osteopathic medicine practitioners is covered by the plan.
Vitamin supplements are quite
common and generally safe.
Mirwaldt recommends obtaining
nutrients from a varied, healthy
diet as it is both more sustainable
and affords "less medicaliza-
tion ofthe diet." In general, it
is important to discuss alternative treatments and especially
herbal treatments when speaking
with your physician as some of
these medications may interact
with others.
While massage therapy and
chiropractic care have become
more mainstream, other complementary and alternative
medicines still remain on the
fringe of conventional medicine.
Sherry Mood is a clinical lecture
at the University of Alberta and
director ofthe Pacific Institute of
Advanced Hypnotherapy in New
Westminster. She describes the
ideal candidate for hypnotherapy
as "open minded and having a
good imagination."
Hypnotherapy has shown
particular promise in pain associated with labour and cancer,
smoking cessation and anxiety
disorders, with prices ranging
from $100-$200 a session.
Smoking cessation therapy may
require only a single session
while using hypnotherapy for
other reasons requires multiple sessions. Individuals with
psychiatric history should
speak with a physician before
considering hypnotherapy.
When students come to see
any ofthe six physicians that
work at Student Health Services,
Mirwaldt maintains that she
will support complementary and
alternative treatments if she can
find evidence from research to
support their use for a specific
patient's problem.
Boluwaji Ogunyemi is a Resident
with UBC Dermatology. Xi
East Van Panto returns for another year of pantomime.
=HOTO COURTESY TIM MATHESOF
Olivia Law
Senior StaffWriter
Nothing is more reminiscent of
a childhood holiday season than
an old-fashioned pantomime.
Traditions of cross-dressing,
audience participation and well-
known songs are held closely in
the hearts of many, and definitely are part of a holiday season
convention which sets aside the
shopping, stress and commercialized activity for a few hours
of enjoyment.
This year, the East Van Panto
is back on its feet for their second
annual show — Cinderella. Written by UBC creative writing prof
Charlie Demers, and starring
several UBC alumni, this is an
experience not to be missed.
Setting itself apart from other
pantomime shows, however, is
the sense of closeness to home
Cinderella: An East Van Panto
brings.
Set entirely in Vancouver,
there are plot references, script
references and an entire backdrop
ofthe Vancouver skyline painted
by a local painter to enhance the
community feeling ofthe show.
Dawn Petten, a UBC BFA
theatre graduate, is back for her
second year of East Van Panto
— and keeping to tradition, is
playing the cross-dressing Prince
Grumpy. The community, Vancouver-centric theme is, in her
eyes, the most exciting aspect of
the pantomime. "To come into the
theatre for just two hours in the
midst ofthe chaos and stress of
the holiday season and just laugh
and join in the community and
the celebration of our city in this
very Van-style version of Cinderella just makes it such a joyous
experience, and a great annual
tradition."
Petten knew she wanted to
return for a second year of pantomime after her first experience
last year. "I don't usually take a
Christmas show that'll keep me
from going home at Christmas,
but this is such a special one and
the amazing comedic writing of
Charlie Demers is unreal — it was
such a great experience that when
they asked me to return again this
year it was a no-brainer."
The audience is full of generations of families, from small
children up to their grandpar
ents — featuring jokes appropriate for everyone. "Everyone
has en equally great time, which
is what's so amazing about this
tradition. There are adult jokes
kind of snuck in that'll go over the
kids' heads, so the adults can kind
of chuckle under their breaths,"
said Petten on the nature of jokes
within the pantomime. "At the
same time, kids might laugh at
the funny sounding words, or
just enjoy that everyone else is
laughing."
Keeping with pantomime tradition, Cinderella is full of larger
than life characters, creating comedy for everyone. The word 'joy' is
thrown about a lot in conversation
with Petten. Commenting on the
community feel and family experience surrounding the pantomime,
it is easy to see why everyone is
anxious to make this an annual
tradition.
"There was something so
special about seeing all these
families come in droves to watch
this show," said Petten. She tells
the story of one young viewer,
who, overwhelmed with the panto
experience, shouted from the
audience "I wanna live here!" The
world ofthe pantomime makes the
show feel like a community event,
where the city is portrayed using
recognizable characters, locations,
and city-specific jokes for the
Vancouver audience.
The Vancouver-based storyline becomes a celebration of
home for residents of East Vancouver and beyond — and with a
larger cast, more song and dance
numbers and more outrageous
costumes than ever before, the
pantomime is only getting bigger,
better and more successful.
As Petten puts it, "everyone
should come and experience the
theatre show in that amazingly
young way — that is a magical
mix and a recipe of laughter for
everyone." Xi
Notice of Development Permit Application - DP 14027
Public Open House
University Boulevard - Site B
You are invited to attend an Open House on Wednesday, January 7 to view and comment on a
mixed-use development proposal for University Boulevard - Site B. Plans will be displayed for a
new 6-storey mixed use building with retail/commercial uses on the ground floor and 5 storeys
of residential rental accommodation for students, faculty and employees at UBC.
Date:
Place:
'ednesday, January 7,2015 11:30 AM -1:30 PM
Memorial Gymnasium Lobby, 6081 University Boulevard
North
Bus Loop
New
Aquatic
Centre
UBC
Life Building
(Old SUB)
11
Subject     GSAB JBMacdona'd
.,'e"          Strangway
Site \   |—  —7 _
2>       DH Copp
Med
Sciences
New
Sub
Alumni   7     Wesbrook
3uilding Cunningham'
©
Representatives from the project team and Campus +
Community Planning will be available to provide
information and respond to inquiries about this
project.
The public is also invited to attend the Development
Permit Board Meeting for this project to be held on
January 21st from 5:00-7:00pm, at the Centre for
Interactive Research on Sustainability (CIRS) Policy
Labs A+B, 2260 West Mall.
For more information on this project, please visit:
planning.ubc.ca/vancouver/projects-consultations
For further information:
Please direct questions to Karen Russell,
Manager Development Services
karen.russell@ubc.ca   604-822-1586
This notice contains important information which may affect you. Please ask someone to translate it for you.
Mfflftft-frgMinM., Si>rfB£*nfifls.     o| #x|^ g&s n|s ^ si^ ss& SM?h »cH 2l#Mch
if JLUj#iS#. 94!* $\m =l a# H^§H= M&9 ^2|§hA|7| huhcr.
a place of mind
campus+community planning
THE   UNIVERSITYOF  BRITISH COLUMBIA  Editor's
by NickAdams
A
ks of this October, B.C.'s unemployment rate
is at 6. i per cent, the highest in Western Canada. Some
might argue that snow bums signifigantly contribute to
that number. To help dispell that myth, we put together
an issue focused on highlighting student snow bums who
have worked hard to chase their passion and contribute
to society in a creative way.
This issue gives students a perspective on the UBC
Ski and Board Club that they usually don't get. Although drinking and partying are a big part of the club's
culture, believe it or not they actually ski and snowboard too. From group trips to world class competitions,
the club has cemented itself as one of the biggest on
campus. Whether you're a part of the club or not, dive
into the world of snow in these next few pages and live
vicariously through them. Xi
Table of
t
Mountain Guide
Photo Gallery
Leo Zuckerman
+
Hamish Baxter Mountain        Skiable        Student
Acres      Discount
Cost
Drive time
from UBC
Chair
Lifts
IMA
UIDE FOR UBC STUDENT
Jsfc-^— Tim McChesney, N. Vancouver
One ofthe best sessions I've been a part of which due to typical PNW
weather nearly didn't happen. A 30 min gap in the clouds gave a short
but sweet window with everyone going all out at a classic N. Vancouver
spot. Peter Wentz, Pemberton Icecap
A seemingly endless fantasy land of perfect snowmobile access ski lines
in an endless number of valleys. It was also a good reality check of how
unreliable snowmobiles can be and just how much effort goes into each
day shooting that far into the backcountry.
L eo Zuckerman
Videographer
When I came to UBC, I knew I wanted to
spend time in the mountains, and I knew I
wanted to document it through short videos.
But without any experience, I lacked the resources and direction to achieve what I had envisioned. It was through the Ski & Board Club
that I met a network of people, who helped
guide me, and who have since become some of
my best friends, and professional colleagues.
That's the very polished definition of my
experience. What actually happened involved
plenty of booze, some very cold and unexpected nights in the backcountry and many lessons
learnt "the hard way". Nevertheless, some of
my most proud moments have spawned out
of the projects and relationships that were
fostered in the Ski & Board Club.
H2SH
September Southbound
With only a few days notice, we were grantee
an opportunity to go on an 18-day trip to the
south island of New Zealand. We happily
traded board shorts for ski boots and made
the jump from Vancouver to Queenstown,
Summer to Winter. This is the "movie trailer
Q&A
Where is your
favorite place
to shoot?
Anywhere I've
never been
before. The
more remote, the
better.
What advice
do you have
for aspiring
film-makers
at UBC?
Practice your
craft, emulate
others, find your
style.
h:sh
ELIXR
More than a few late nights and weekends ago,
Nick Geddes and I set out to make this little
film. As an intermittent project, it had it's challenges, but Nick's an inspiring dude, and we've
done our best to represent his story through this
short vignette. Enjoy.
Restless
Shot and edited in seven days for the
Intersection competition at The World Ski
& Snowboard Festival, 'Restless' won the
People's Choice and ist Place awards.
Baxter
UBC Ski and Board Club. I can't help            everyone in the club together was a love          and find ourselves in suits and ties more
cracking a smile when I hear its name            of skiing and snowboarding and in my           often than ski pants and behind the lens,
come up in conversation. It summed up          case, documenting everything surround-       when the snow hits and "sick days" are
everything that "college" was supposed          ing that. This translated into four years          called in nothing has changed one bit.
to be; the parties, the girls, the trips, the          of blissful chaos fueled by a dedication              Jobs, schoolwork, responsibilities,
pranks and the occasional reality check of      and camaraderie. I've yet to find another        it all becomes worth it when you're
academic deadlines.                                         friend group that I will have for life.                exactly where you want to be taking
But unlike the American Pies and                  While many of us from that particular         pow laps and trading high fives with
Photographer
fi*i
m- •*_ // Opinions
LAST WORDS »
ADVICE »
LAST WORDS//
FOR UBC, CONSULTATION
SEEMS TO BE NOTHING
BUT A FORMALITY
In a turn of events that shocked
practically no one, UBC has
approved the 10 per cent tuition increase for international
students. The views expressed by
governors who spoke at Tuesday
morning's Board meeting were
almost identical: being a student
is difficult and increases are not
desirable to anyone, but they
are going to make them anyway
because the economy isn't great
and other schools are doing it
too. Tough tater tots to those
who disagree.
Surprise, surprise. Once the
university makes this kind of
decision from the top down, it is
only a matter of time before they
follow through with it. What is
insulting, however, is that they
maintained the 'we-are-com-
mitted-to- student- consultation'
facade come hell or high water.
Let's not pretend that anything
that the students said at the three
town halls that they organized
made the university reconsider,
even for a moment, not passing
the increases.
'We'll listen to your opinion
and then promptly ignore it' has
been a recurrent theme throughout the consultation process and
the vote on Tuesday showed just
how true this turned out to be.
MINIMUM WAGE
INCREASE PROPOSAL HAS
PROS AND CONS
B.C. interest groups are pushing
for an increase to the province's
minimum wage — to $15 — and
we're conflicted. On one hand,
we believe that trying to raise
people out of poverty by paying
them a living wage is fantastic.
On the other, we don't know if
raising the minimum wage to $15
is the right way to do it.
We aren't professional economists (obviously — we work at a
newspaper). But even to us it's
apparent that raising the minimum wage will not simply mean
that everyone has more money to
spend.
Mandating higher salaries
has effects on businesses, which
have to spend more on wages. It
also means that a dollar is worth
less in B.C. — if everyone has
more money, nobody does. This
inflation will push up prices
and decrease the value of our
savings. With all of this taken
into account, it seems that the
net drawbacks may outweigh
the benefits.
A more serious problem is
that an increase of this magnitude would create high costs
for businesses. In turn this may
cause them to reduce the amount
of staff they employ, worsening
B.C.'s unemployment rate. This
will mean the government will
have to dish out more benefits
which will further strain their
budget. A guess where they get
their budget from? Taxes.
The other side of this issue is
possibly even more significant:
many ofthe poorest people in B.C.
wouldn't be helped by a minimum
wage — they don't have jobs. And
if, as we predict, a higher minimum
wage would contribute to higher
unemployment, though the situation may improve for some people
living below or close to the poverty
line it would do next to nothing to
help the people who need it most.
FFFCTRATIONJFJFIANYUmE UBYSSEY
Maybe raising the minimum
wage really would have a net
benefit both to the economy
and to people living in poverty.
But it's important that we (yes,
including we Ubyssey editors)
don't all just jump at the thought
of another $4.75 per hour — great
as it may sound. In theory, it's
fantastic — but it can have consequences beyond what one might
anticipate.
GROCERY DELIVERY
ISN'T JUST FOR LAZY
STUDENTS
Birtto is a new grocery delivery
service created by students for
students, and we think its great.
While it could be argued that
the service will contribute to
student laziness (as if we need
another reason to be lazy), for
many students this could be a life
saver.
There are many students on
campus who suffer from depression and anxiety, making it
difficult to perform mundane
everyday tasks — like grocery
shopping. Having a service that
brings students their groceries can help those students
stay happy and healthy during
stressful times. Not only that, but
students who spend all their time
studying — especially during this
hectic time ofthe year — could
easily forgo grocery shopping if
it means getting an extra hour of
studying done, and that's where a
service like Birtto comes in.
Sure, students shouldn't be
lazy, but for those who have
difficulty getting out of bed or
putting down the cue cards, a
grocery service can make life just
a little easier. tJ
Ask Natalie: On buying gifts
and what to do on the break
NATALIE MORRIS
Advice
"Hey Natalie, I was wondering
if I should be getting my new
university friends holiday
gifts. What's the protocol?"
It largely depends on your friends.
Are you doing any holiday/winter celebrations? Do they celebrate any holidays around now?
Have they mentioned getting
you anything?
Personally, my group of
friends have a holiday "party"
(does a party in the middle of
exams really count?) but we only
gave each other gifts when we
lived in residence together. This
year, for example, we are holding
a pot luck party with the food we
are bringing acting as our "gifts"
for each other.
Ask your friends. You can pose
it innocently: "Hey, are we doing
anything for Christmas/Hanuk-
kah/the holidays? I'm down for
anything!" This is an easy way to
figure out if you have to get gifts
for anyone.
"Natalie, I just started seeing
this girl and with Christmas
coming up, do I have to get her
anything? "
Quite frankly, I love giving gifts,
so I usually lean towards yes,
especially when you are seeing
someone. But you don't have to if
you really don't want to. You never
have to get gifts and if a weeks
old relationship is something you
think is too soon for a gift, then
tell her that so she doesn't end up
getting you something. Also keep
in mind, she may not celebrate
any winter holidays so gift giving
might not be expected.
But even if you decide to exchange gifts, that doesn't mean
you have to spend a whole lot. If
you get her a ring or an expensive
gift, don't. Just don't. That just
screams crazy.
A simple gift is the way to go.
You do not need to buy a huge
thing, since your relationship
is so young. Think about her
hobbies, what she likes — maybe
what TV shows she likes? You
can get a meaningful gift without
breaking the bank. Do you have
any inside jokes that would work
as a gift?
Some ideas: for the tea lover,
a pretty mug with a selection of
teas to try. For the gamer, a fun
board game you could play as
a group. For the reader, a book
she's been looking into. Do they
love wine? A good wine from the
Okanagan is a great present.
"Hi Natalie, unlike most of my
classmates I'm staying in Vancouver over winter break. Any
ideas on what to do?"
While I haven't spent a winter
break in Vancouver (I prefer the
snow of everywhere in Canada
but Vancouver) I do know of
excitingly wintery things to do
during the break.
Vancouver's mountains (especially Seymour, Grouse and
Cypress) provide a wide range of
winter activities. Cross-country
and downhill skiing, staking,
sledding and snowshoeing are
all fun winter things that can
keep you entertained during the
winter break. The mountains will
have facilities that offer rentals
and lessons, if needed.
Robson Square holds free
skating (skate rentals $4). Great
date idea, by the way. Located
by the Vancouver Art Gallery
downtown, skating runs until
late February. UBC also has free
skating with your student ID
(skate rentals $3.50) but only at
public drop-in times.
I always love the Vancouver
Aquarium. I can't guarantee that
it won't be busy, but I think that
it's always worth a visit. For the
rest of this year, the Aquarium is
using their winter rates ($20 for
a student) and if you show your
bus pass, you should be able to
receive another $2 off.
The Vancouver Christmas
Market, or the German Christmas Market, is currently running
downtown until Christmas Eve.
While not free ($7 on weekends,
$4 on weekdays) the Market is
full of authentic food and beverage as well as unique gifts like
wood cravings, knitted goods,
pottery and even nutcrackers.
The market shares in the 700
year history ofthe German Christ-
kinlmarkt (Christmas Market)
and is a delightful way to enjoy the
winter break.
A completely free activity that's
enjoyable year round is Stanley
Park — personal favourite of mine.
While chilly around this time of
year, the park will still be beautiful.
The seawall is worth a run, walk
or bike around and the trails in the
forest are incredible (although I
admit that I have a thing for trees).
Need advice? Write to Natalie at ask-
natalie@ubyssey.ca and have your
questions answered in an upcoming
issue ofthe paper. Xi
NEED TO
SOLUTION FOCUSED
COUNSELLING FOR
STUDENTS & STAFF
TALK? EDITOR JACKHAUEN
II Sports * Rec
UBC VARSITY SPORTS REPORT CARD: TERM ONE
Words by Natalie Scadden and CJ Pentland
Women's field hockey (5-1-2)
CIS finish: 1st
This season saw the T-Birds win their 25th Canada West
title and 16th CIS title — both all-time highs in the sport.
They overcame goal differentials to put themselves in the
national final and beat an undefeated host team (Toronto) to
win it all.
Best players: Poonam Sandhu became the only women's field
hockey player in history to win five CIS titles and scored the
game-winning goal in the national championship.
Needs improvement: Short of a perfect record, what more
does this team need to do to prove themselves?
Cross country
The women's side recently snagged their third straight NAIA
national title, while the men finished sixth for a combined
championship. At nationals, three UBC women placed in the
top four spots in a race with over 300 competitors. It's a fitting
end to head coach Marek Jedrezejek's storied UBC career.
Best Player: Maria Bernard led the way with an individual
gold medal at NAIA, finishing more than 30 seconds ahead of
the second-place finisher in the 5K race.
Needs Improvement: It'd be nice to see the guys match the
girls' success and bring home a UBC sweep.
Women's basketball (5-3)
Canada West standing: 3rd in Pioneers Division
After a dominant 7-1 preseason, they've dropped off the pace a
little bit so far, but their three regular season losses have come
to teams with winning records and no opponent has swept
them. With their first six games in January coming against
teams below .500, they should hit the ground running.
Best Player: Kris Young and Harleen Sidhu. The pair average a
combined 31.9 points and 15.5 rebounds per game.
Needs Improvement: Two of their losses saw them allow
their opponents to shoot 51.9 and 49 per cent from the field,
respectively, while also getting substantially out-rebounded.
Men's soccer (9-2-1)
Canada West finish: 3rd in playoffs
Having lost just one of their past 45 games in the past two
seasons, the expectations were high for the two-time defending CIS champs, but they faded into the playoff stretch
and were shut-out by Alberta in the Canada West semifinal.
Best Player: Navid Mashinchi was the most dominant offensively and was awarded the conference MVP award for his
eight goal, nine assist regular season effort.
Needs Improvement: With Mashinchi and team captain
Paul Clerc graduating this spring, they'll need some younger
guys to step up.
Swimming
Canada West standing: 1st
Both teams took home Canada West titles with 1,000-point
efforts from each side. They broke 12 conference records
in 38 events, and were kept off the podium just once. They
also swept the individual awards for Canada West Rookie,
Swimmer and Coach ofthe Year on both sides.
Best Player: Coleman Allen: six golds and a silver at Canada
West while setting conference records in 100- and 200-metre
butterfly, 100-metre backstroke and a couple of relays.
Needs Improvement: The men's side will need to get past
Toronto, the two-time defending CIS champs.
Men's volleyball (10-6)
Canada West standing: 5th
They stormed out ofthe gate at 8-1, but have lost five of their
last seven against some ofthe better teams in the country.
They've held tough in those contests, but the losses show that
they need to do a little bit more to reach that upper echelon.
Best Player: Irvan Brar has ramped up his game this year,
sitting fifth in the conference in kills and also fourth in digs
to show his strength in all facets.
Needs Improvement: The 'Birds have looked extremely
dominant for stretches of play, but need to work on sustaining
that pressure.
Women's hockey (8-4-4)
Canada West standing: 5th
After a strong start to the season that had them in first
place, the 'Birds have skidded a bit as of late and head
into the winter break with five-straight losses — yet they
still sit just five points back of first in a crowded Canada
West leaderboard.
Best Player: Samantha Langford has taken over the starting
reigns in net and helped backstop a strong T-Birds defence
with a 1.83 GAA and 0.935 SV percentage.
Needs Improvement: In five trips to overtime, UBC has
won just once — leaving four possible points on the table.
Icon /"
Women's volleyball (9-7)
Canada West standing: 5th
This time last year they were undefeated through 12 games.
They reached the CIS final, but were stunned by the Manitoba
Bisons and lost in straight sets. They haven't looked quite the
same since, and have already lost more games than they did in
the previous two seasons combined.
Best Player: Danielle Brisebois has put up strong offensive
numbers in an increased role, leading the team in kills (170)
while hitting .268.
Needs Improvement: They need to finish stronger, as all
seven of their losses have come in five sets.
Men's basketball (3-5)
Canada West standing: 9th in Pioneers Division
The season got off to a bit of a rough start with five losses in
their first six games, but last weekend's games showed what the
T-Birds are capable of when firing on all cylinders. The team
put up a combined 200 points over the two games.
Best Player: Tommy Nixon has been a strong veteran presence, averaging 16.6 PPG on 47.9 shooting from the floor, 45.9
from beyond the arc and 90.2 from the free throw line.
Needs Improvement: Defence and rebounding. They can no
doubt score, but UBC allows an average of 82.9 points per game
and opponents are shooting48.4 per cent against them.
Men's hockey (7-8-3)
Canada West standing: 5th
They flew out of the gate with some big wins, but a stretch of
seven losses in eight games saw them slip a bit. However, they
still have wins against the top three teams in the Canada West,
proving that they have the capability to hang with the big boys.
Best Player: Anthony Bardaro leads the balanced attack with
13 points and 53 shots on goal. Rookie Eric Williams has posted
a 2.37 GAA and 0.925 SV percentage in split time with Matt
Hewitt.Needs Improvement: Puck possession. In UBC's
wins, they record on average 29.4 shots and allow 27.7. In their
losses, they give up 31.6 and record 26.1.
Women's soccer (6-4-2)
Canada West finish: lost in QF to Trinity Western
After an 8-1-3 campaign in 2013, they lost many of their top
players and regressed in their second season under head coach
Andrea Neil, who resigned following an early playoff exit. A
once-prolific offence that scored 46 goals in 2012 slipped even
further, down from 29 last year to just 19 this season.
Best Player: Taylor Shannik was named a Canada West All-
Star with two goals and two assists in nine games.
Needs Improvement: UBC is hosting the CIS tournament
next season and will get an automatic berth. Whoever ends up
as their new coach is going to have to teach them how to score.
Football (2-6)
Canada West finish: 6th of 6
The Thunderbirds fell flat right out ofthe gate and could never
fully recover. Despite moments of brilliance, UBC could not
sustain their strong play for more than a couple quarters at a
time. They finished last in the conference in points per game
and yards per game. Head coach Shawn Olson was fired two
days after the season ended.
Best Player: Marcus Davis was named Canada West Rookie
ofthe Year and a CIS all-Canadian after averaging a conference-leading 161.6 all-purpose yards per game.
Needs Improvement: Just put this season behind them. THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4,2014    I    SPORTS    I   15
CLUBS»
Ciaran goes clubbing: salacious swordplay
Ciaran Dougherty
Copy Editor
Before my trip to UBC Fencing
club last week, I was pretty certain that the sport consisted of
real-life re-enactments of Pirates
ofthe Caribbean scenes (specifically, I was hoping for the first
meeting of Jack and Will). With
that in mind I prepared for my
visit by watching all of the films
back-to-back.
Immediately it became apparent that this was not enough
preparation. We quickly began
with some footwork drills that I
struggled through clumsily, before
beginning the rather odd practice
of throwing and catching gloves. I
assume it was partially to improve
our reflexes.
The club members and coach
were chatty and informative
before starting so I felt welcome
straight away. Each member
was happy to give little pointers and guide me through drills
and maneuvers.
The fencing club is not just
for students, members ofthe
community join in as well. It was
interesting to see members interacting with other people who live
on and near campus as it's something that is often neglected in the
lives of university students. People
of all ages come to practice, which
allows for a range in experience
and ability.
Founded back in 1928, the club
is one ofthe oldest athletic clubs
at UBC and nowadays they have
around 30 members. With fees of
$10 for membership, plus equipment leases per term, the club is
affordable.
Geoffrey Hohert, the club's
president, explained how they
function: "The vast majority ofthe
people coming to us have never
THUNDERBIRDS »
He never stood a chance.
tried fencing before. Every now
and then a few each year that
fenced say five or seven years ago
... [come] back to fence again," said
Hohert.
Competitively the club doesn't
take itself too seriously, but they
do encourage their members to
compete and some do very well.
"In some smaller tournaments
we place, I don't know of any
current members placing high at
the larger tournaments at least.
One of our sabres at least got gold
in our last tournament in California," said Hohert.
The sport itself is very complex and I had a hard time just
learning the basics. Having said
that, it was still a good time. Although I repeatedly got stabbed
=HOTO CHERIHAN HASSUN/THE UBYSSEY
when I tried some friendly competition, the team was fun and
enthusiastic.
If swinging a sword around
and stabbing your friends sounds
appealing, the UBC Fencing club
might just be for you. tJ
T-BIRDS 5-ON-5
SPEEDY SNOWBIRDS
1. What's your favourite mountain to ski?
Big White. It's got lots of
powderand you can always expect the ski patrol
toputinagoodchase.
Castle Mountain. Most
underrated mountain in
Canada — tonsofter-
rain, no lines, reasonable
ticket prices and always
has snow.
Georgian Peaks, Ontario. It's the mountain
I grew up on and have
some pretty good
memories there.
Whichever has the
deepestsnowona
given day.
Le Massif in the Charlevoix region of Quebec
because it has the most
spectacularviews ofthe
St. Lawrence River and
the best apres-ski food.
2. What's the craziest outfit you've worn while       | once did a ski race in a
skiing? Hawaiian hula skirt.
One piece spandex
suit.
When I was little we had
crazy helmet day. Toys,
streamers and anything
else I could find was
taped to my helmet.
One piece spandexin
-50C.
Whenit's-30C(orany-
where below freezing)
think the craziest thing
you can wearisathin,
spandex race suit.
3. What's the worst thing about snowboard-
They get stuck on every
Nothing. Can't weall
The worst thing about
Theirinnate ability to get
Thewaytheytakeupall
ers9
flat, scrape off all the
just befriends?
snowboardersisthey
stuck on the flats.
thespaceonthechair-
powder, sit in the worst
perpetuate the ski racer
lift. Where are my feet
places and fall a lot. They
hate.
supposed to go when
make great obstacles to
their board is there?
ski around.
4. Sum up your best/most interesting ski trip
in 10 words or less.
When myteamtried
to train in Austria and
ended up in Italy.
Travel, more travel,
snow, more snow, cold
face, much fun!
New Zealand: Kiwis,
earthquakes, surfing,
avalanches, Fiji. Very
interesting.
Skiing in the Andes
and surfing the Chilean
coast.
Summertraining on
theSaasFeeglacierin
Switzerland.
5. Name a random (i.e. non-skiing related)
item off your bucket list.
To go scuba diving in the
Galapagos.
Move to a remote location forsix months and
learn howtosurf.
I reallywantto goto
Hawaii and surf. Aloha!
Does such a thing exist?
Playing the old golf
courses on the British
Isles would be awesome.
I really wantto play
the piano outside the
SUBbutallthepeople
watching makes it scar-
ierthan a downhill. 16    I    GAMES    I   THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4,2014
DOSEAH
UBC's first snowfall.
1
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"
-
14
15
16
hip-
1-Prices paid
6-Matures, as wine
10- Fjord explorer?
Sneak (glimpse-
Romanian coins
"That's clear to me,'
pie-style
17- Dog found in the pound
18-New York canal
19- Grandma, affectionately 20-
Easy 21-A lift, in Aspen
22-Alumnus, forshort
23- "Say " (dentist's request)
25-Pungent-smelling
27- Forrest Gump's forte
COURTESY KRAZYDAD.COM
DEC 1ANSWERS (AGAIN;
COURTESYFREEDAIFYCROSSWORDS.COM
31-Abstains from
65-San Juan, Puerto
6-Aid in crime
40- EmpireState Building climber
35-By way of
66- Emit amplified light
7- Pig, in the Flintstones' kitchen
42-Outfielder's call
36-Winterfall
67-Subtle sarcasm
8- Early 30-ton computer
45-Title of respect
38- Aid one's alma mater
68- "Back hour" (shop sign)
9- Lead-in for "Madre" or "Leone"
47-Stuck-up sort
39- Eat an ice cream cone, e.g.
69- Quarter-miler's path
10- Door opener?
50-Immature
41-You can't tell if she's coming or
70- Launch a tennis ball
11- Jewish month before Nisan
52-Hunter, at times
going?
71- Bachelor's party
12- One of Columbus' three ships
54- Dry white Italian wine
43-Stripin theMiddle East
72-Flogging memento
13- "Goodness gracious!"
56- Jewish rite of circumcision
44-City of Light
73- Some playing cards
24-Celeste or Ian
57- The "non-existent" contraction
46-Mischievous type
48-Coop resident
26-"Direct" ending
27-Insect feelers
58-"Sweet 16" org.
60- Soften, as chocolate
49-Affording a view
DOWN
28-"Sacro" addition
62-Skin orifice
51- Monotonous in cadence
29-Mother-of-pearl
63-Green feeling?
53-Comprehension
1- Dwelling in Durango
30-Atide
64- Pre-Easter purchases
55- Geological time 56- River
2- out (withdraws)
32- "Famous potatoes" state
border
3- Word in a Doris Day tune
33- Thirteen, to some bakers
59-Weaver's tool
4- Little sack of leaves
34-What the hillbilly batter did?
61- Mended temporarily
5-Airport porters
37-Vehicle at a stand

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