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The Ubyssey Feb 10, 1967

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Array Vol. XLVIII, No. 47
THE UBYSSEY
VANCOUVER, B.C., FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 10,  1967 <<^>"
with
secrets
224-3916
Board keeps doors closed
Governors bar Ubyssey,
keep decisions secret
— derrek webb photo
"NEXT TIME I'll bring my own Easter egg," says UBC
rugger player, in solid shirt, as he tries to outstretch
University of California Bears team member in Thursday's
noon game. California won 11-6. (Story p. 15)
Two candidates
in by acclamation
Moving into office unopposed, David Hoye, arts 4, became
AMS treasurer and Jim Lightfoot, applied science 3, remained
AMS co-ordinator Thursday for the year 1967-68.
They were two of five candidates running for offices of
AMS treasurer, co-ordinator, and first vice-president.
In the vice-presidential race are Ray Larsen, arts 4,
Donald Munton, arts 4, and David Frith, arts 3.
Lightfoot said there would be no change in his co-ordinating policy.
"I plan to support in every way newly elected AMS
president Shaun Sullivan," he said.
"I think students should put the pressure on the board
of governors to force them to decide priorities."
Lightfoot said he would not support a strike but agreed
with plans to withhold any proposed fee increase.
Larsen claimed the center of his platform was the creation
of an AMS supported experimental college at UBC.
"The college would offer professors a chance to lecture in
subjects other than their special interest and students a chance
to participate in lectures other than their regulated curriculum,"
said Larsen.
"I also wish to see increased undergraduate activity, constitutional revisions, and increased library, housing, and food
facilities."
Larsen further claimed that the present athletic fee paid
by the AMS should be switched to the administration in order
to give athletics a sounder basis.
President of Totem Park, Munton claimed his main concern was residences and the building of new accommodation.
He demanded an improvement of the present housing
advisory committee.
"I would like to see students on the senate but students
on the board of governors can wait," Munton said.
"I just want to do the things that are realistic, the things
we can do next year."
Frith and Hoye were unavailable for comment Thursday.
The second slate elections are on Wednesday, February 15.
UBC board of governors Thursday declined to come out in the open.
At their monthly meeting the board refused a request by Ubyssey editor John
Kelsey that the student paper be allowed to
cover the closed meeting.
No announcement of the decision has yet
been made by the board.
"The board had a full discussion of the
letter and the president will make a statement in due course," administration spokesman Ralph Daly said Thursday. Daly refused to admit the board had decided to
continue its concealment policy.
The Ubyssey learned of the decision
through a reliable source.
FACULTY REPORT
A selected account of the board's proceedings will be distributed to faculty members Monday in the Faculty Gazette, a board
publication.
Kelsey's request was made in an open
letter to board chairman Mr. Justice Nathan
Nemetz. The letter read:
"Although it is not required by the universities act of this province, the University
of B.C. board of governors finds it necessary to meet in secret.
"This gives the university the character
of a corporation when the reality is more
akin to a municipality and students are
more analogous to citizens than employees.
Municipal councils meet publicly and openly, moving in camera only for personality
discussions and certain contractual debates.
"In the final analysis, the interests of
the board and of students are identical — a.
better UBC. If students were privy to the
board's deliberations, new information and
new directions might be evolved for the
board by students. In return, students would
gain a better understanding of the why of
the university situation."
COUNCIL SUPPORT
The letter was reprinted in the Province.
The Vancouver paper ran an accompanying
editorial backing The Ubyssey's stand.
The request was also backed by the UBC
student council.
Requests for open meetings of governing university bodies and student repre-
senation have spread across the continent in
the past several years.
California's extreme right-wing education superintendent Max Rafferty last
month recommended student representation
on the University of California's board of
regents.
But a report by Dr. B. N. Moyls at UBC
advised against students on the board. It
recommended a "rector" — non-student to
represent students — instead.
UBC 'A COMPANY'
Moyls also advised continuation of the
board's concealment policy.
The board's conception of UBC as a business concern was made plain in a 1962
letter to a student council official from dean
of administrative and financial affairs E. D.
MacPhee. The student had asked for board
minutes concerning the new Student Union
Building. MacPhee refused.
"This is general company policy and I
hope you will appreciate it in these terms,"
MacPhee wrote.
"This is just what we expected from a
board composed of nobody but corporate
elite businessmen. This is not the end of the
issue," Kelsey said Thursday.
Ed meet fails
apathetically
Open-mouthed education students
Thursday gobbled lunches while education undergraduate society officers
took to loudspeakers to plead for a
general meeting quorum.
But only 25 responded and the
bi-annual general meeting—required
by the society's constitution — was
cancelled.
Ten per cent — about 270 students
— were needed for a quorum.
"As a whole education students
are dolts," EdUS committee member
Fred Spencer said Thursday. "They
are apathetic — they just sat there
eating their lunches."
The meeting was held to discuss
giving EdUS officers bursaries for
their services.
The meeting has been re-scheduled for Monday at noon in Ed. 100.
"I don't think they'll get a
quorum," said Spencer. "It means
there'll be trouble getting a full slate
of candidates for EdUS positions."
COMMENT
BY NORMAN GIDNEY
Allocating college cash
The financing of universities in B.C. has
become a political manoeuvre between the
federal and provincial governments.
All provincial allocations to the universities in B.C. are first considered by a supposedly independent advisory board headed
by Dean Sperrin Chant.
Last year the board had $25 million to
allocate as it wished. This year, because of
the federal government's education allotment being channelled through the provinces, the committee has $45 million to
play with.
If it allocates the money per student as
CHANT
it did with the
provincial grants
last year, Simon
Fraser Academy
will get almost
twice as much per
student   as   UBC.
This explains
the not-unfounded
claims that the
board is not so independent.
Independent should mean that the board
is free of political pressure.
Proposed   by   the   Bladen   commission,
To Page 2 - See: DOIN' Page 2
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,   February   10,   1967
FROM PAGE  .
Doin  the Bennett shuffle
formula financing simply means distributing federal grants according to the cost of
educating students.
For example, the grant would be higher
to a university with a higher proportion of
graduate students than the undergraduates
because it costs more to educate a graduate
student.
Last year the federal government accepted this formula when it gave UBC a
higher per student grant than SFA or UVic.
There is a great disparity between the
education finance policies of the federal
government and those of the Social Credit
government in Victoria.
The per-student grant of the federal government for UBC in 1966-67 was $335,
Simon Fraser's was $255 and UVics, $271.
The federal government thus recognized
the higher cost of educating graduate students. UBC has the only graduate schools
in B.C.
The provincial government turned the
tables and granted UBC $730 per student,
Simon Fraser's was $255 and UVic's, $271.
The students have every right to ask
why one government in Ottawa thinks UBC
needs 30 per cent more money than SFA
while another government in Victoria de-
dents. UBC has the only graduate school
than UBC.
No stronger case can be made for an independent grants commission.
Last year Bennett suggested to the federal government that instead of using the
formula system of financing universities,
federal grants should be made through the
provincial advisory board.
Bennett was the only premier to object
to the Bladen commission recommendations
for formula financing.
In a quick shuffle Bennett said: "I believe it would be a good policy if the federal grants and the provincial grants are
dovetailed in such a way so that our three
public universities would feel they receive
equal treatment."
In adopting the Bladen recommendations
the federal government gave Bennett just
that power. The whole thing now becomes
a political football.
It is likely that the advisory board will
follow Bennett's recommendations.
In his legislature speech last year education minister Les Peterson said: "I would
hope the advisory board, in recommending
the division of provincial funds would also
take into account the proposed distribution
Of federal funds to ensure that the universities of this province are each treated in a
fair and equitable manner."
This was seen as a directive to the supposedly independent advisory board that if
UBC got a higher percentage of federal
money through a formula system it should
get less provincial money than it would
normally receive.
That's exactly what happened.
Referring to individual universities in
B.C. last year's provincial grant to UBC
was increased $1 million, UVic just under
a million and Simon Fraser more than $4.5
million.
Does the fact that SFA's enrolment
doubled justify having its grant tripled?
It's not so much a question of being fair
or competition between the universities
for public funds. It is a question of getting
the most out of higher education for each
tax dollar spent.
This means the province should underwrite one fine graduate school, not merely
several mediocre universities.
It means giving one university more
money than the others to develop the
courses, the equipment and the faculty to
offer the finest training in  Canada.
Winners trip out
Winner of the Mardi Gras draw first
prize—a trip for two to Mexico—was announced Thursday.
Mexico-bound will be A. K. Griffith, of
Vancouver. The trip was donated by Canadian Pacific Airlines.
Second prize was a two-person trip to
Harrison Hot Springs. Winner was R. B.
Calelen, of Vancouver.
The third prize in the draw—a fur stole
—went to Roberta Sheckter, of Edmonton.
TIRED OF
INSTITUTIONAL
FOOD ? solution —
The  FRIAR  Tuesday!
/fsE
FORMAL
AUD
SEMI-FORMAL
rental and talet
rOVHIW   MM
RMfMIIQ   costs*
McCUISH «»MM wi*t
STUDENT RATES
2046 W. 41 $t - Ph. 263-3610
OPPORTUNITIES FOR
GRADUATES IN LIBRARY SCIENCE
with the
NATIONAL LIBRARY
and
MAIN LIBRARIES OF GOVERNMENT
DEPARTMENTS
AT OTTAWA
AND OTHER CENTRES
$6118 • $6489
Interviews on campus February 15, 16 and 17.
Appointments for  interview may   be arranged  through
the Office of the Director of the Library School.
AMS Charter Flight to Europe!
'New DATES! •New FARES!
Vancouver — London and Return
MAY 11th - Aug. 29th
$37500
Call in at the AMS Office or Phone 224-3242
(SORRY - NO  ONE-WAYS)
NEW     HOURS
BROCK SNACK BAR
STARTING MONDAY, FEB. 20, 1967
Monday through Friday: 8 a.m.-lO p.m.
Saturday 8 a.m.-   6p.m.
Suppers available 5-6 p.m.
Hamburgers   and   short   orders   available   all   day!
MURRAY GOLDMAN'S
Dirty Shirt
SALE
Ifs a dirty shame to sell merchandise at these crazy
prices ... but we must clean house. From shirts to suits,
some dusty, others merely wrinkled including our
buyer's 1966 mistakes (me). . . It's a dirty shame, but
a very very dirty shirt sale.
Excute nu white I go tooth mv lace. . . . Murray
iWEA I CK9 Every conceivable style—
onlly cellophane dusty—if the sheep knew
how cheap they are selling they'd go BAAHI
CASUAL JACKETS
Complete fall selection. We deliberately threw
dust on them to ease the pain of selling 'em
so cheap. Pie-lined, corduroy, etc.
Corduroy Sports Jackets
Ever see grown men cry?—at this price you'll
see it happen when you buy one. Assorted
shades and worth more than double the
price.
TO PCO ATS What's wrong with them?
—You tell me—we couldn't sell them. Yes
they come with sleeves—but don't expect too
much when you see them.
300 SUITS A double rack full of suits
accumulated for one reason or another —
(We hate to tell you some of the reasons).
Mostly grey and blue. Cdsh and Carry only.
RAINCOATS Zippity-do-dah all day
for hot or cold' weather—it's fun. Pile-lined
and have we got a pile of 'em.
TURTLE NECK DICKIES
All shades, double knits. Can be used as
sweaters for men 6 inches tall. Free soap
with extra dirty dickies.
WERE
NOW
$18.00
$8.00
$30.00
$10.00
$30.00
$12.88
$60.00
$10-15
$20
$70.00
$20-30
$35.00
$17.00
$3.95
$1.00
You'll easily spot our salesmen. They're the ones with
the dirty shirts.
Credit Gal Evelyn says we'll
come clean with credit on
our dirty shirt sale.
5000 SPORT SHIRTS
Ohl Please come and buy them. We've been
missing a salesman and we think he's under
the pile.
$8.00
$3.00
3 for $8.50
RAINCOATS   Sorry they're not dusty
but very  waterproof—we'll  gladly  throw  a
bucket of water at you to prove it. Beige
and Black only.
$20.00
$10.00
DKfcii    jLAyV Buy them, jump around
and the dust will disappear. All-wool Venetian and flannels by Days.
$20.00
$8.50
2 for   $15
SPORTS SHIRTS
Two of our salesmen gave up smoking, got
nervous and started throwing the shirts . . .
now they're substandards.
$6.95
$1.50
SPORTS JACKETS
Bring along a broom to fight off the crowd
—   they're   shoulder   dusty   and   served   by
shoulder dusty salesmen. Two or three button styles. (No charge for buttons).
$35.00
and
$40.00
$10-15
CASUAL JACKETS
Zipper and button  styles,  lined, hip and %
length—very    dusty,   so    bring    along    your
whisk.
$14.95
$3.63
$500
CORD SLAX     Wide   wale   corduroy
by DAYS. All shades—grab 'em.
%
Price
MURRAY GOLDMAN
Has Three Stores To Serve You
774 GRANVILLE - VANCOUVER
760 COLUMBIA - NEW WESTMINSTER
164   W.   HASTINGS     -     VANCOUVER Friday, February  10,   1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 3
AT  UBC SYMPOSIUM:
TURNING ON to the piercing sound and
staccato flashing of light patterns, cavorting coed gives body and soul to Radial
Changes display in Brock this week, part
of Festival of Contemporary Arts.
Ryerson rag cuts
CUP fies—again
TORONTO (CUP) — The Daily
Ryerson has resigned from the Canadian
University Press.
The Ryerson Polytechnical Institute's
laboratory newspaper announced its
withdrawal Thursday, six weeks after
being readmitted to full membership in
CUP.
The daily paper had been suspended
for one year late in 1965 by CUP editors because of 'implicit censorship'
exerted over its student editor by the
institute's journalism department.
Indian youth want identity
By VAL THOM
Indian youth will no longer accept direction or paternalism
from outside sources, said Harold
Cardinal, president of the Canadian Indian Youth Council, Thursday.
"We must organize on a
national basis and try to find
new directions and dimension,"
said Cardinal.
Cardinal, speaking on colonialism in Canada, was addressing the
first meeting of the Indian Youth
Symposium, held on campus.
The symposium, entitled The
Indian Future—Now, is sponsored by the Canadian Union of
Students. More than 30 students,
mostly from Vancouver, are attending the symposium, open to
all UBC students.
Three students arrived from
Toronto Thursday night.
"After the early 1800's the government ceased to observe the
Indians as allies in their wars
but rather as wards to be taken
'New arts program
still in flux—prof
By   CHARLOTTE HAIRE
Anything is possible for next
year's new arts program, according to one of its organizers.
Father G. F. McGuigan, assistant economics professor, said
Thursday that nothing has been
settled for the program yet.
McGuigan is head of one of the
two six-professor groups selected
Wednesday to run the experimental arts program.
He said the program will work
both individually and in their
groups to draft new arts policy.
The two groups will likely vary
in curricula,  he  said.
"We will be acting as individuals," he said. "It wouldn't be
much use if we all taught identically."
As to topics and general class
procedure, McGuigan said nothing is decided.
"We have the whole summer
to discuss these problems," he
said.
McGuigan said selection included those who had worked oh
the program last summer. Others
were required to be present this
summer, and to have no prior
commitments to their departments.
Each group of professors will
teach 120 students.
Hefner raised
to new heights
What's so special about Playboy?
Answer: it's in special collections.
Bound volumes of the popular
U.S. skin mag, until recently kept
in the main stacks, have been
moved to the special collections
division on the top floor of the
library to protect them from
theft.
The division also houses rare
books, original manuscripts, UBC
these and old maps.
Special collections division
head, Mrs. Anne Yandle, said
Thursday Playboy is safer with
her.
care of," Cardinal said.
"The natives were settled on
reserve areas where their abode
was fixed.
"There they were civilized and
Christianized into conformity."
(According to Cardinal, the conversion from paganism to Christianity is the most important factor in judging an Indian's acceptance into white society.)
"The reserve was a forcing
ground where the lesson of work
was imposed."
Cardinal stated: "The Indian
has always known how to work,
always has worked, and always
will work."
"The amount of work most Indians do could not be equalled by
white men," he said.
Cardinal also railed against the
Indian Act of Canada.
-"They are trying to make us
over into brown white men, by
making us forget our life and
philosophies and adopt those of
the white society.
Cardinal felt that the CIYC was
a beginning step in the solution
to the Indian problem.
"Together we can learn to
forge an identity we can be
proud of."
The symposium continues today and Saturday in the Green
Park building, near the school
of social work on Marine Drive.
Today's activities will be:
• The Indian Leader — Past,
Present and Future: panel, 9-10
a.m.
• Community Development—
the Future: Gerry Garbill, John
Boots, Mike Mitchell, 11-12:30
p.m.
• Self Determination for Indian Communities, 1-3 p.m.
Saturday:
• What can the University do?
—talk by Daphne Kelgard, 9:30
a.m.
NUCLEAR RESEARCH
...COSTS $3  MILLION
UBC TRIUMFs in 1972
In order to sustain and expand
the present nuclear program in
western Canada, TRIUMF is coming to UBC.
TRIUMF is not the name of a
card hand but stands for Tri-
University Meson Facility or a
facility where intense beams of
mesons (subatomic particles) and
high energy protons can be
created.
Nuclear scientists at the University of Alberta, Simon Fraser
Academy, and UBC are pressing
for the development of the $19
million TRIUMF at UBC.
UBC has provided a five acre
site on the southern half of the
campus. The UBC board of governors will be legally responsible
for the facility's operation.
The annual operating costs will
be about $3 million and capital
funds are being sought from the
federal and provincial governments.
"TRIUMF is expected to be the
first project of its kind to be completed anywhere in the world,"
a spokesman said Thursday.
"As a byproduct to its nuclear
science, TRIUMF will provide
major facilities for chemistry and
materials science.
"As the first facility with very
intense beams of mesons and high
energy protons, TRIUMF would
open up new areas in the understanding of nuclear processes, contribute to the long-range exploitation of nuclear energy, and provide new tools for materials
research."
The TRIUMF study group includes 42 physicists and chemists
on the staff of the four participating universities.
When it comes into full operation in 1972, it is estimated that
90 staff members and 180 graduate students will be involved, as
well as 80 technical personnel
staffing the machine.
THEV
AP01KE
CRIME VET,
ARRANGING TO    ^ THE UBYSSEY
Published Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays throughout the
university year by the Alma Mater Society of the University
of B.C. Editorial opinions are the editor's and not of the AMS
or the university. Member, Canadian University Press. Founding member. Pacific Student Press. Authorized second class
mail by Post Office Department. Ottawa, and for payment
of  postage  in  cash.
The Ubyssey publishes Page Friday, a weekly commentary
and review. City editor, 224-3916. Other calls, 244-3242:
editor, local 25; photo. Page Friday, loc. 24; features, sports,
loc.   23;   advertising,   loc.   26. Telex   04-5224.
Winner Canadian University Press trophies
for general excellence and editorial cartoons.
The tygers ot wrath are wiser than the
horses of instruction.
- Wm. Blake
FEBRUARY 10, 1967
Aftermath
The aftermath of Wednesday's election
carnage is the easiest place to look back from
and perhaps predict what will happen next
year.
Three weeks ago, while the radicals outside
council fought internally to organize a slate of
candidates, and the Brock establishment fought
internally to produce its slate, first vice-president Charlie Boylan moved to hold a strike
referendum.
Boylan's plan was to stage a week of concern
containing a one or several day long protest as
a show of student solidarity against the Social
Credit government and against the forces that
co-incidentally combine to raise fees.
His strike-cum-boycott, which was never
clearly articulated in council, was modified by
council's derring-do and the games surrounding
the coming Victoria march. The result was a
referendum   calling  for  a   complete   university
shut down,   which   council   u^dvertantly  supported.
Treasurer Lome Hudson, all the while firmly opposed to a strike or boycott of any kind,
seized his chance to squelch forever any radical
movement by ineerting the "would you be
willing to serve on a picket line" clause. This
delineated absolutely the character of the protest, an unacceptable kind students would be
certain to vote down.
Strike, to the son of a middle class office
manager, is a very dirty word. Most students
are from the middle and upper classes, not
from blue collar families. To most students the
word strike is equivalent to communism, and
therefore penultimately evil.
Between that Monday night and next, groups
and individual opportunists seeking AMS office
organized their candidates. Councillors realized
what kind of referendum they had endorsed
and sought face-saving ways out of it.
Boylan then tired to squash the strike vote
completely, recognizing the picket line clause
and the wording as contrary to his original,
unclear intent, and therefore totally unacceptable. But council, wiping egg from its chin in
the best liberal, backpedalling tradition,
simply removed its support and urged students
to vote no.
Thus council refused to consider alternate
action plans that might be feasible, and the
referendum was totally nonsensical.
Students became aroused over the strike as
put by council, and it became the major electoral issue. Both candidates rejected utterly
council's strike referendum, and both proposed
different alternatives. Loser Bob Cruise was
politicked to appear to support the council
version of strike, while winner Shaun Sullivan
was able to differentiate between that plan and
his boycott-cum-second Back Mac campaign.
The reality was nobody involved in the
election or on council support the referendum
council asked students to vote on, and students
correctly smashed it down.
And even if the referendum had succeeded
nothing would be changed — students do not
have a working plan to act effectively within
the university.
Ad hoc year
The universities, with $66 million or $54
million, are still knowledge factories stamping
out graduates like paper cups, not human beings
able to work and act within their society.
Council was grossly negligent of its leader
ship duties by its failure to evolve and present
a workable way for students to act against the
present university situation.
Students are united against a strike, but not
united for anything. Many students and student
leaders are walking about feeling all glowing
after smashing the radical menace — but nothing at all has changed. Thursday's two ac-
claimations and Wednesday's elections mean a
council next year that is exactly the same as
this year's. The problems that faced this year's
council, the problems the council could not meet
or solve, still confront a duplicate of this year's
council.
The struggle is clearly outlined: the university hasn't enough money;_ student leaders
and the university administration together have
proven they cannot devise a tactic to make the
university needs or the reasons for them clear
to the government.
Everybody, students and profs together, has
vague feelings of disenchantment with the education UBC offers. The arts, faculty will operate a small pilot plan to attack contemporary
education, nobody else has moved.
Sullivan's platform, after the strike and the
standard cliches are stripped away, is nothing
but the nebulous bones of a good long-term
strategy. It contains no immediate tactics to
effect that strategy. Just as Peter Braund made
the same kind of statements when he was
elected last year and failed to solve the pro-
blms, Shaun Sullivan will fail.
Yesterday, we said students voted wisely if
Sullivan can implement his program. When he
fails, the problems we face now will still confront students. It looks like a year of ad hoc
committees — or another year like this one.
By* ■ ■ ,.<>     •.•*»■"      ',-.."'•
Kp-    ■•,    *.   •....•;■■■     , «•• ■
^#^&>;-:':::y
Vietnam  means
Editor, The Ubyssey:
The other day I received by
campus mail a circular
stamped by addressograph
urging me to sign a prepared
statement. This document, to
be forwarded to the federal
government, calls for action
to try to stop the war in Vietnam.
This is obviously a laudable aim. The appended list
of faculty members who have
Already signed is most im-
jiressive, and I am sure that
most of them are men of in-
t e g r i t y. Nevertheless, on
(thinking the matter over I
cannot help wondering if all
pi them realize the position
in which they have been
placed toy one or more of their
colleagues.
; Not all members of the university staff are professionally qualified to bring down
value judgments. Each in his
academic capacity professes
more than average knowledge of his own special field.
But if his professional field
is in neither political science
nor international affairs, does
his position in that other
field give special weight to
opinions he may hold as a
person outside that field? I
think not.
If asked for support as a
faculty member, and as campus mail and UBC facilities
are for UBC affairs it is obvious that those who used
fhem are indeed enlisting my
professional support, then I
am    being    asked    to    give
weight, based only on my
position, to a personal opinion.
In actual fact, I am being
asked to lend a spurious air
of professional sanction to a
judgment and course of
action for which I lack professional knowledge: in other
words to masquerade under
false colors, to be professionally dishonest.
Had the petition been circulated privately and mailed in
the proper way I might have
signed it. As it is I am tempted to regard it as an affront
to my integrity and to suspect the motives of those who
instigated it.
I do not, however, doubt
the purity of aim of all those
signing this petition — to oppose the carnage in Vietnam
(who doesn't?) — what I do
not like is the quasi-official
means of seeking to accomplish these aims. The means
employed are at best indica-
t i v e of irresponsibility; at
worst, of intellectual dishonesty.
If UBC stationery, staff
time, equipment and mails
are used for affairs which are
patently not affairs of the
university, how are we to
justify our requests for bigger provincial grants? If we
act irresponsibly, can we in
reason demand faculty participation in university government?
No  matter   how   right   the
ends    may    be    the means
should not be wrong.
R. V.  BEST
Dept.   of  Geology
'Neither side
Editor, The Ubyssey:
Re: The Feb. 15 ballot and
the second referendum "to poll
student opinion on the Vietnam war".
The bureaucrats have taken
it upon themselves to speak
for the students on this vital
matter. Who has authorized
them and who wants them to
speak for us? What about those
who do not wish the AMS to
advise the government one
way or the other?
The wording in regards to
the second alternative is biased
and the question is loaded; it
should be changed or "which
implies support of the war"
should be deleted.
I say it is a loaded question
because support of Canadian
arms sales to the U.S. implies
no support of the latter's policies.
Examine the reasoning. If
support of Canadian arms sales
is an indirect support of the
U.S. then purchases of American arms by Canada implies
that Canada is against the
Vietnam war. Furthermore,
since Canada buys more arms
than she sells, it must mean
that, in total, Canada has come
down as being against the war.
The person who votes on this
referendum as it is presently
worded, must take sides. He
will vote either for it or
against it. What about the
people who prefer the status
quo and who wish to express
their views without implying
support for either side?
OTTO HIEVE
Port    Coquiilam
»••>.«. MAC DC*»« k 0   £*.loMt
EDITOR:  John  Kelsey
City . _   . Danny Stoffman
News  __  Al Birnie
Photo _     .   _-        Powell Hargrave
Page Friday _ Claudia Gwinn
Sports      _ __. __     ,    Sue Gransby
Managing Murray McMillan
Focus .....      Kris Emmott
Ass't News   Al Donald
Ass't City     .-_.    Tom Morris
CUP Bert Hill
—from the Carleton
Great big bash, Ubyssey people
and others, Saturday. Find out
where, here.
Don Stanley, In a crazed search
for an elusive bunny, wound up
with playboy In special collections. Correspondent Charlotte
Haire tried many things. Val
Zuker blew a tube and the copy
went slowly. The Beard rescued.
Unnamed Source came thru lineally. David Hastings, Val Thorn,
Joan Fogarty, and Boni Lee found
out what happened. Seedless Ka
Ying  Chi  celebrated  new years.
Rugby-watchers, in tears, were
the Great G, Mike Jessen, and
Tony Hodge.
Pictures came from Don Kydd,
Kurt Hilger, Al Harvey and Chris
Blake. ;'?' ^''^ .' l^".I'•'■?*£
*•*•»(§;
J!«S»f?'l#Sj|^t*
'-*S P<     Critic
... a weekly magazine of
comment and reviews.
FEBRUARY  10,   1967
On the cover: Al Harvey
photo
editor: claudia gwinn
assistants: judy bing
tnx to
sue richter
We've been talking to our
friendly bard re the Festival, and according to our
quickie survey system have
observed that this particular
event lacks something. Organization!
It lacks co-ordination, cooperation and communication with its audience—the
students, and administration.
Timing is bad, even
though the actual plans for
festival week, we know, are
talked about well in advance
it seems the down-to-earth
scheduling is delayed until
the last minute.
Wouldn't some type of
communications department
be of assistance in the booking and synchonizing of
events to avoid (a) overlapping (b) omission of worthwhile artists and (c) to elim
inate the inter-departmental
rivalry arid tensions.
The department or committee could then arrange
festival activities in harmony with other arts-advocates like SFA, Vancouver
College and the public library.
By not doing this type of
organizing, the festival is
wasting both time and
money (e.g. Leonard Cohen
who could, have appeared,
we are sure, at any of the
three places mentioned.)
We like the idea of having
not one prolonged festival
but two or three small highly concentrated ones. That is
all activities would take
place in a one or two day
period during which time
classes should or would be
cancelled.
The two biggest criticisms
of the Festival as it happened this year were that there
were not enough night
events nor was there any
repetition of events.
Festival flowers bloom
but only with initiative and funds
to turn UBC on to the revolution
By SCOTT LAWRANCE
Flowers. The city is a
flower. Love is a flower.
These things, left alone know
how to grow.
Art is a means of focus,
the eye of the world, that it
may perceive. Today's artist
is urgent, proclaiming the
glory of his flowers and denouncing the bullshit which
would smother those flowers.
The revolution is a flower.
Lawrence
I write to you of the revolution. The revolution rides on
vehicles of anarchy, drugs,
sex and love. To be overthrown are the vehicles of
slavery and hatred, primarily the State and its more in-
siduous corporations.
The deaf public ear must
be shattered, the massive eye
pierced, so that new per cep-
tions can be made. The poets
and the artists are the new
world surgeons. Festival is
their operating table.
And where has this festi-
cept for personal breakthrus
for the artists, brief orgasms
of satisfaction, the wave of
the revolution has not been
intensified. And except for
the attempts of a few mav-
pf 2wo
erick poets, no news of the
val taken us? Nowhere! Ex-
revolution would have gone
beyond the narrow confines
of the  hippy sub-culture.
FESTIVAL!
Any possibilities of festivity have experienced a
seemingly calculated starvation by the organizers of the
festival. The budget of this
fiasco was all of $300. The
lack of imagination and initiative is as astonishing as it
is disappointing.
Art must be taken to the
people, the revolution must
flow through the streets. I
am being opimistic if. I suggest that half of the student
population at UBC was
even aware of the Festival.
Instead of turning people
on to the revolution, or even
informing people that there
IS a revolution, all the festival succeeded in doing is letting the artists see what each
other is up to.
Some suggestions. First,
more money; with that, initiative at least seems to come
somewhat easier.
As to communication, the
festival should be taken into
the streets, literally. This, as
Leonard Cohen pointed out,
is the first period in the history of the known world,
when a people has embraced
its own culture as art. So we
should grab on that.
Pop music is art. Signs are
art, or are becoming that
way. Theer is a revolution
in graphics. Why not make
people aware of these things
as art?
Why wasn't there a massive rock dance, or several
at once, or a trips festival,
running even the length of
the festival?
And why not speakers for
the duration, loud-speakers
placed strategically over the
campus, from C-lot to Brock,
with programmed poetry,
music both pop and classic,
and newscasts of love and
revolution. And why not
banners, printed poems waving the height of the library,
and paintings produced the
same way, or on billboards.
My advice to the organizers — think big! Shake out
the apathy in yourselves.
Realize how big the revolution is becoming and help
further it. Let's mobilize
whole armies of artists to
spread the message!
Radial changes and Sidewinder
Acid style
like wow
By IAN WALLACE
Phosphenes are brilliantly colored energetic complex
patterns which occur in the eyes (orin the brain) and are
usually visible only when the eyes are shut or under
stroboscopic or psychedelic stimulation.
These extremely beautiful configurations have formed
the basis for the so-called acid style which is becoming
more and more evident in fashion, painting, and posters.
Two examples of the acid style are John Stocking's
cerebral cosmographs currently on view at the Bau-Xi
Gallery downtown and Dallas Selman's film Sidewinder,
which has been showing around the campus for the past
week.
The cereral cosmographs are intricately detailed dayglo designs silkscreened onto brilliantly colored paper.
When we see a field of grass as a whole,
we remain intellectually detached from it in a rational
sense. But when we try to see every individual blade of
grass in the field, our perceptive senses become totally
absorbed. The act of seeing demands so much effort that
there is a complete visual concentration. Since the blades
of grass and the minute particles of Stocking's prints have
qualities that are irrelevant to any concept of ego or self,
a total concentration of the mind upon their visual qualities will lead to ego-dissolve or a form of self-hypnosis.
Without the involvement of ego or sentiment, the
emotional and aesthetic responses to the configurations
outside-of-ourself can be extremely powerful because of
their purity. The only proper verbal communcation of this
kind of feeling is "wow"!
Much of the foregoing can also be applied to Dallas
Selman's Sidewinder films which, because of the impact of
motion, light, and color have an even more powerful
effect. The fact that Selman works towards creating an
effect which demands a perceptual response differentiates
him from most other film makers who want to convey
feelings, ideas, or information.
A man of many talents, Selman knows exactly how to
use the film medium to create the effects he wants in a
way that only film can do. He usse brilliantly colored
phosphene images that blast through the space barrier
between screen and spectator, sucking into depth or exploding from depth with an intense orgasmic rhythm.
When Selman's Sidewinder is combined with Helen
Goodwin's The Co. dancers and Pierre Coupey's sound
orchestration the result is beautiful (wow) Radial Changes.
Play
is hell
By CLAUDIA WIENER
"Play" by Samuel Beckett as produced by the
Theatre 520 class last Thursday and Friday was sheer
hell.
This is no criticism of
their performance but rather a measure of their success.
Play is about three people
in hell — existentialist hell.
Their lives have apparently
been fossilized — they are
agonizing about decisions
and choices made in the
past. They have tormented
each other by first wanting
to establish human relationships and then wanting to
break them. Now nothing
remains but a monotonous
regurgitation of the past.
What is remarkable is the
dramatic impact of Play. An
overpowering atmosphere of
bleak frustration forces one
to re-examine the issues involved.
As an example of a dramatic art which achieves its
aims through frustrating its
audience, Play was well performed. Grad student Judi
Freiman did a competent
job as its director.
Page 6
THE      UBYSSEY
'_ < v t: v
Friday,   February  10,   1967 (Sritedr &b*poN£>  of fkee*$*»v °
NO. i. iW Vie. ge/i'es
Ty CQF\ u.b.c.
?**t" ; 'v^'^fXTT'fiX^ 'oV'«
«><*-?'&* tf\
She stoops
to conquer
dull theatre
By KEN  LIVINGSTONE -
She Stoops to Conquer currently at the Playhouse is ultimately a dull evening's theatre.
There is always the danger of catching a play
on a particularly bad night when the actors seem
to be doing little more than going through their
paces, but it seems highly unlikely that any performance of this particular production could
ever rise above the drabness of its conception. It
lacks pace, energy, and vitality.
Written in 1773, Goldsmith's play has little
in common with the foppish wit and high style
of the Restoration. However, to suggest, as does
the director Ronald Pollock, that the play is a
bridge to the drama of Gogol, Tennessee Williams
an the "kitchen sink" realists, is surely a misinterpretation of its spirit.
JBy directing it in what is supposedly a realistic manner and then having the various asides
pl»yed directly to the audience, the production
is awkward where it should be amusing, and
tedious when it should sparkle.
The down to earth humour of the play is
wholly dependent on the charm of the individual
characters and at the playhouse charm is sadly
lacking.
Is is unfortunate that Pat Gage, who is certainly vivacious and full of life whenever she
appears is miscast as Kate. A far stronger suitor
than Terrence Kelly's Marlow would hesitate
before her onslaught. As Ms. Hardcastle, Ted
Greenhalgh gives the most enjoyable performance of the evening but it too lacks the energy
that would involve us completely in the fun of
the play. Wayne Robson is more Rumplestiltskin
than Tony Lumpkin and is inclined to be petuiant
rather than mischievous.
Friday,  February   10,   1967
Gregory Ried makes the most of Diggory, the
old farmhand promoted to butler, in a part that
has been expanded out of all proportion to the
text, evidently to give some motivation to the
extremely  awkward scene changes.
If Charles Evans' set was designed to make
the Hardcastle home appear like an inn, he certainly achieved his aim. But it is an inn where
few would wish to stay.
The general lack lustre effect of the setting
is hardly improved toy the fact that while the
evening wears on and candles light the room, the
sky outside remains 'bright blue.
The use of screens to vary the locations might
work quite well were they more appropriate to
the period than stretched canvas on aluminium
pipes.
And why not a two sided screen so the backdrop for the tavern is not the same group of
trees that is used for the garden?
Such obvious inconsistencies aside, the play
Is underdirected and under-acted and consequently never becomes the hilarious but word-
ly wise romp, that it might have been.
Poets push
pop porno
By STEPHEN SCOBIE
Kenneth Tynan once shook to the core the
genteel world of London Sunday paper reviewers by commending a movie in the words: "It
makes you want to jump straight into bed."
(Nor was he speaking of its soporific effects.)
In answer to indignant , protests, Tynan
further asserted that "The arousal of sexual desire in and for itself is a legitimate aim of art",
and that he saw no reason why this should be
restricted to works of genius.
Why should the bad writer be excluded? What
is so special about pornography that we can tolerate it only at the highest level of literary excellence?
THE      UBYSSEY
The fashions of love and marriage come and
go, responsive to the bidding of social whim and
commercial necessity, and with them vacillate
the literary and linguistic expressions of the
sexual  urge,  which  remains  joyfully  constant.
One of the basic difficulties of our language
is to find words for the sexual act which are free
(a) of the obscene, connotations which have
irrevocably built up around the simplest and
most natural words, and
(b) of the hideous medical formalities in
which it is so often disguised. (The jolliest example of this is Krafft-<Ebing, who puts all the
dirty bits in Latin.)
The word "fornication" has a certain healthy
relish to it, but my own favourite is a Scots word—
"houghmagandie"— which seems to me to express with great energy the fundamental truth
about sex, viz., that it's fun.
For further examples and illustrations of this
endlessly fascinating topic, you are cordially invited to a Reading of Erotic Poetry to be given in
honour of St. Valentine's Day at noon on Tuesday (14th of February) in Buchanan 104 by
Helene Rosenthal, Seymour Mayne, and Stephen
Scobie.
We hope that it will serve to enlighten an
Eng. 100 student of my acquaintance who once
defined the word "erotic" as meaning "strange or
unusual, in the sense that it has not been done
very often before."
Erotic poetry . . .
Page 7 ■'ytsqJSJ*!"*'
Raise raises rally
Irvine students' It Can't Happen Here
committee refuses Reagan's fee hike
By  TOM  WAYMAN
UC Irvine charges an "incidental fee" of $219 a year
in addition to the ASUC1
fee of $21.
The university itself estimates the annual cost of an
education here to be $1,850,
including personal expenses.
To add $400 to this — despite the promised scholarships and loans for intelligent and impoverished students   —   would   further
widen the gap between the
educated well-to-do and the
working  less-affluent.
(Canadians must remember, too, that U.S. students
on the quarter system have
only three summer months
to earn their way if their
families are not supporting
them. The fall quarter begins about the middle of
September, and the spring
quarter ends in Mid-June.
Out-of-state  students pay  a
-r** ^^"toXi^^e&imwifcj^te^;
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Evenings  7:30-9:30
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SUZUKI
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3627 W. Broadway
ACCESSORIES
731-7510
tuition   charge   of   $800   a
year).
And in a nation where not
attending university makes
a young man eligible for
participation in the butchery of a certain Asian nation in the cause of peace—
never a pleasant occupation
at best — it was felt around
Irvine that opposition from
the "little man" of around
$10,000 annual income,
whose sons would be affected by the extra, life-and-
death $400, would soon
bring  Reagan to   Reason.
Reagan was hung in effigy
around the state, beginning
with demonstrations at Fresno State College. Everyone
was waiting for Jan. 31,
when the budget is scheduled to go before the legislature.
But on Jan. 20, Reagan
struck.
A meeting of the Regents,
by state law now including
Reagan and a number of
his high officials, fired Clark
Kerr.
In his eight years as UC
president Kerr had made
enemies, as a supplier of
educated raw materials to
industry. He had made enemies among the liberals of
the state for his actions
dur|ii_ig the Berkeley
troubles of 1964. And he
made   enemies   among   the
TIRED OF
INSTITUTIONAL
FOOD ? solution —
The  FRIAR Tuesday!
G.S.A. ANNUAL
GENERAL MEETING
LOWER  LOUNGE OF THE  GRADUATE   STUDENT  CENTRE
THURSDAY,   FEBRUARY  23 at   12:45   P.M.
GSA    ELECTIONS
Nominations for the positions of:
President
1st  Vice   President
2nd   Vice-President
Treasurer
Secretary
Social Officer
Special Services Officer
Club Night Chairman
Sports  Officer
Public   Relations Officer
Cultural  Officer
open at 9:00 A.M. Thursday, February 16, 1967 and close
at 5:00 P.M. Thursday, February 23, 1967. Nominations
should be addressed to:
THE RETURNING OFFICER
G.S.A.
GRADUATE STUDENT CENTRE
Election of Officers will be held by secret ballot at the
Graduate Student Centre Friday, 24th February, 9:30 A.M.
to 5:00 P.M.
conservatives for allowing
Berkeley's Free Speech
Movement to come into
existence at all.
However, in the days immediately preceeding his dismissal, Kerr had won the respect of most enlightened
people in the state through
his unflagging opposition to
Reagan's regressive educational policies. And, as the
editorials and orators of the
next few days pointed out,
Kerr was a good administrator.
So there was a feeling of
outrage at Kerr's cavalier
dismissal. As more and more
regents made statements to
the press, it was made public that the Regents had
tried to get him to resign
but he had refused. He told
them the responsibilty for
his firing rested with them.
At Irvine, Kerr's actions
were applauded. People said
the whole future of UC
seems now to be tied up
with politics — what the Regents think Reagan wants.
Friday, Jan. 20, at 5 p.m.,
a hastily collected open
meeting of students called
for a boycott of classes Monday, Jan. 23 and a noon
rally.
And ad^hoc group was
formed, the It Can't Happen
Here committee, to organize
Irvine's resistance.
Seeking a more constructive and positive method of
expressing students' concern over the Kerr firing
and the whole future of
higher education in California, another ad-hoc committee was organized.
Chaired by myself and
Dennis Saleh, another writing graduate student and a
Fresno State College graduate, we began to organize a
state-wide, all-campus car
cavalcade to the state capi-
tol in Sacramento. Our plan
was to leave Irvine very
early in the morning of Jan.
28, on Saturday, and drive
north along the eight-hour
route, collecting delegations
from the other campuses as
we went. We planned to
rally on the Capitol steps
for an airing of grievances.
Sacramento's proximity to
the Berkeley, San Francisco
and Davis campuses of UC
—not to mention Sacramento and several nearby State
Colleges — made us optimistic.
Telegrams were sent inviting Gov. Reagan and a
representative of the Regents
to address the gathering.
A morning on the UC
inter-campus phone hook-up
assured us of wild support
from Santa Barbara, and
varying degrees of enthusiasm from Riverside, UCLA,
San Diego and Santa Cruz.
The idea seemed to go
over to the 1,500 students
attending Irvine's rally Jan.
23.
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Page 8
THE     UBYSSEY
Friday,   February 10,   1967 Acid commentary
This is the first of three objective articles
on LSD by fourth year arts student Bob
Wieser.
LSD—When was it discovered? What is
is it? Is it really used extensively on this
compus?
LSD is the abreviation for lysergic acid
diethylamide.
Lysergic acid had been known for
hundreds of years as a contractor for the
uterus. Midwives extracted the acid from
ergot, a fungus which ruined rye crops in
Europe. Then they administered it to women
after child-brith.
Preliminary research with the acid attracted much attention for phamaceutical
purposes. The Sandoz Lab was established
to do nothing but process the acid for marketing.
In 1938 when Dr. Albert Hoffman, working for the lab in Basil, Switzerland, syn-
thesised lysergic acid with diethylamide
nothing happened. This was one of many
compounds Dr. Hoffman made from lysergic
acid.
He was attempting to develop new drugs
for contraction of the uterus. He did not
realize the importance of the drug until
several years later.
Then on April 19, 1943, at 4:20 p.m.,
Dr. Hoffman put a few drop of lysergic
acid diethylamide into a beaker and drank
the solution. This resulted in the first acid
trip. Dr. Hoffman said he felt funny, got
on his bicycle and rode home. His assistant
followed. Several hours later Dr. Hoffman
could not remember riding home but did
recall the fantastic visionary changes.
He said, "I was overcome with a not
unpleasant delirum which was marked by
an extreme degree of fantasy. In a sort "of
trance with closed eyes, fantastic visions of
extraordinary vividness accompanied by a
kaleidoscopic play of intense coloration continuously whirled about me."
He realized this was not an ordinary
hallucigen. Morning glory seeds and marijuana had been available for centuries but
neither elicited the same kind of behavior
that LSD did.
For the following four years Hoffman
administered the drug to volunteers and
found that even a dose of 30 micrograms,
eighty-three times smaller than his initial
dose, caused hallucinations.
His associate at the initial creation Of
the compound Dr. Stoll, began experimentation in 1947 in the Psychiatric Clinic of
Zurich University. He found the same thing
happened every time.
Then in 1949 the first LSD-25 was
shipped to Dr. Rinkel at the Medical Health
Centre in Boston, Mass. He received the
same results there as his European counterparts. But with one important difference.
The volunteers for his experiment liked
the  drug. Dr.   Rinkel found  some  of the
volunteers wanted to acquire the drug for
self-administration.
Dr. Rinkel did not understand this. He
had noticed that his subjects in the experiments acted like schizophrenics. He
even called the drug a psychotomemetic,
mimicker of a mental disorder.
Meanwhile in Europe psychiatrist Dr.
Benedetti found that LSD cured a hopeless
alcoholic by giving the alcoholic an insight
into what caused the need for alcohol, in
this case  a  childhood  experience.
The answer to the puzzle why people
voluntarily wanted to take the drug, cryste-
lized. LSD takers said they received insight
into their problems plus a better understanding of their surroundings.
By 1951 the drug still was not classified
t-./\>/  ID       S.OANl
as dangerous. But in this year Dr. Loeb,
New York State conservationist, found that
the drug when administered to spiders and
fish impared the mental process. Dr. Louis
West, University of Oklahoma psychiatrist,
killed an elephant with 300 milligrams of
LSD, an amout in proportion with body
weight that humans took.
Questions of body tolerance arose. Also
ex-subjects of LSD experiments wanted the
drug. And doctors did not know what
happened to the drug in the body tissues.
These reasons culminated in public
awareness of the drug. The word began to
spread. All forms of new media picked up
the ball, running stories of the drug.
1955 saw Aldous Huxley addressing the
American Psychiatric Association proposing
distribution of the drug for public consumption.
Most psychiatrists discovered that LSD
had some therapeutic uses and wanted the
distribution limited to prescription only.
Saskatchewan psychiatrist Dr. Abram
Hoffer, on the other hand felt that USD
would relieve man of the most mental prevalent disorder, schizophrenia.
In the mid 50's tranquilizer sales in the
U.S. were rising rapidly. Frustrations and
tensions can be solved by drugs, as least
that's what the commercials insisted on.
So when the word was outN about a new relaxant mi-ltown, made from the same ergot
as LSD, sales soared.
In a single year more than ten billion
pills were sold involving close to $750
million.
Nothing significant for LSD happened
until 1963.
(Next week the second of three parts:
What happened in 1963? The third part will
be: LSD on this campus fact or fiction?)
Friday,  February 10,   1967
pf 5ive
THE      UBYSSEY
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Page 9 VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA. CANADA
34 usm. >to»Ju«JUt*r SoXjurdo^u y+PMuJva ic
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Black
power
is love
By PETER LINCOLN
Welcome again to Teach
In, the weekly discussion
show that highlights and discusses the important problems facing Canadian university students.
This week the topic is the
American negro and we
have a truly distinguished
panel to deal with it.
On our far left we have
Leroi Jones Midzensky, one
of the few white advocates
of black superiority, who
was himself born in the
southern part of Burnaby.
Seated next to him we
have the distinguished and
respected student activist,
Louis Riel, who has not had
any personal contact with
the south but who nevertheless has read all of James
Baldwin's books.
On the right we have Dim-
itius Pompkonov, a well-
known professor of Greek
in his own right but who is
here tonight because he
knows one real negro.
And right in the middle
we have Mr. Sam Jackson,
the American negro.
Let's start the discussion
right off. The first question
is what does the American
negro want, Mi". Midzensky?
"Well, man, it's simple. He
wants his own scene, none
of that fay blue-eyed wonder
land of opportunity jazz.
We want our own land,
whitey, and we gonna get it.
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February 21 — Byron Pope Quartet
February 28 — Don Crawford
. .  . and other politically dominated events!
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Cause we know where it's at
man, and any time you
whites want to find out you
always gotta come to us and
ask.
Well, we've had it. We're
forming our own country,
the United Spades of America."
"Do you have anything to
say to this, Mr. Pompkonov?"
"Well, I tend to disagree
with Mr. Midzensky. The
American negro wants to
be treated just the same. He
doesn't want any favors.
"All he asks is the right
to live a decent life; raise
his family; send his children
to school. These are the
rights of any man, regardless of what color he be."
"Lies, Lies.",
"Mr. Riel, you disagree?"
"They are both wrong. It is
the capitalistic industrial-
military fascist ruling clique
that has brought about prejudice. I myself was in the
South for well over a day
once and these suspicions
were confirmed.
"I notice you were going
to say something, Mr. Jackson."
"No, I was just reaching
for the water."
"Yes, a very understandable
move, a man reaching for
the basic necessities of life
which he has been deprived
of for so long. It proves the
truth of my argument and
defeats Mr. Riel's and Mr.
Midzentsky's. A universally
understandable gesture. Go
ahead drink it, drink it all."
"Wrong, a thousand times
wrong. It is a hangover from
the capitalist structure. It
brings back memories of
that was pushed on the poor
people by the wall-street
ministers. Don't drink it.
Throw it aside, break it.
Cast off your chains."
"Uncle Tom, Uncle Tom."
"Gentlemen, could you
hold it for a minute, while we
have an important break.
"Are    your    whites    not
white   enough?   New   Pure
White Snow. Cleans like a
white tornado."
pf 6.x
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Suits Altered
and Repaired
Tuxedos Remodelled
Expert Tailoring
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Now it's your turn. Write
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CUSO
The Canadian Peace Corps
Page 10
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,  February  10,   1967 This review probably
comes too late for most of
you, because it concerns this
year's Mussoc production
How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying, and I imagine most of
you have already seen it,
and those of you who
haven't probably can't get
tickets at this date, but if
you haven't seen it, for
God's sake try.
This is the sixth Mussoc
effort I have seen, and it is
by far the best. I have never
enjoyed a university production as much, and I can
think of few professional
productions that gave me as
much pleasure. The show is
great, great, great.
The music and lyrics were
written by Frank Loesser
(of Most Happy Fella fame)
and the book was the brainchild of Abe Burrows, who
has turned out more hits
than Carters has pills. The
combination is a winner.
The show sparkles from beginning to end, and the performance of this year's Mussoc crew is well up to the
calibre of the writing.
The plot is a classic potboiler: young man pulls
himself from window washer to chairman of the board
by being just a little bit
sharper than anyone else.
But the manoeuvres he goes
pf 7even
through on his way are fantasia.
There are two parts to
any comedy — the overall
picture and the 'bits'. The
overall effect of the story
line is, as I have said, great,
but the bits are what really
make the show.
The first such is a coffee
break without any coffee.
Whoever wrote this scene
must have been there.
There's a massive nausea,
and the song that goes with
the tragedy is the hit of the
show, to me.
Later, there is a series of
conversations as the office
staff get into the elevator
that ends with the funniest
line I have ever heard on
any stage.
My only real complaint with
the show is that there isn't
enough business. Of course,
this is a complaint that I'
have about every show. At
one time, each actor supplied his or her own business, (business being an
action or series of actions
that have very little to do
with the actual show) and it
added a lot to productions.
The actors in this show
are, without exception, more
than adequate. The lead man
and woman (Hank Stinson
and Pat Keenan) were as
good  as one would  expect
the stars of a show of this
calibre to be.
Roger Sparks, as the knitting president of the World
Wide Wicket Company, was
excellent. He looked more
like a sixty year old president than many such I have
seen. He even managed to
sing like one, and still get
the songs across.
There are too many supports to list, but I am compelled to list Gerry Cook
and Maureen Macdonald.
Mr. Cook works' in an office
(he is a Commerce graduate) and he must fill the role
of "young executive" to a
tee. He certainly does in the
show. Miss Macdonald has
one of the nicest voices I
have heard on the stage.
She was a  standout.
I hope that when you see
it (or saw it) the orchestra
does (or did) a better job on
the overture than they did
when I was there. At first
they were so far out of tune
I wondered if they were
playing in the same key.
•    •    •
Last Friday I saw the
Vancouver Metro group
take   a   good   comedy   and
RECORD SALE
BUTTERFIELD BLUES  BAND   	
THE BLUES PROJECT PROJECTIONS
$4.49
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* Dave van Ronk • David Blue * Butterfield
Blues Band * Ray Charles * Donovan * Tim
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AH the Great Artists-Latest Hits-
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Hurry down—pick out your favourite record
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LOWEST PRICES IN TOWN
A*B SOUND
turn it into a mediocre one.
The show was Under the
Yum Yum Tree, and the
writing was great but the
acting was insipid.
It is a real shame, too, be
cause Metro has had good
productions in the past, and
they are in hot water now
as far as dat ol debbil mortgage goes. I hate to say it,
but the only reason I can
see for seeing this show is
that it will help to keep
little theatre alive in Vancouver.
¥
Two of the leads (both
females who shall remain
nameless) were bloody awful. The male leads were
better, and the case of
Harry Saunders, who played
the lecherous landlord,
much better.
I might suggest seeing it,'
as it's better than a movie,
but only just.
Open Friday Until 9 p.m.
571 GRANVILLE (ot Dunsmuir)
MU 2-4846
Friday, February  10,   1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 11 Neo-nationalism
Editor, Page  Friday:
The frightening thing
about the fact is not the fact
itself, but that many many
students here just believe it
exactly as Mr. Plummer has
»stated it to The Ubyssey
after he came to his conclusions by 'research and extensive reading'.
The fact isn't frightening,
as it doesn't exist. The real
danger is that an attitude
like Mr. Plummer's towards
Germany, when felt by Germans on a broad scale,
might encourage national-
. ism.
This certainly would not
end in a resurrection of
Nazism in Germany, but
would be an obstacle to a
united Europe.
In Germany we can well
understand that other countries are still, even after
more than 20 years, watching us very critically. When
this becomes unfair and
ridiculously e x a g g e rated,
then some people in Germany think: "Why shall we
always endure that, why
still be struck? We have behaved well in the world
•since 1945, and we really do
our best to continue so."
They suggest: "We need a
bit  of  wholesome  nationalism too. All the other countries have  it, only we  did"
not dare until now."
And then, as a psychological reaction, they
vote for the NPD, as this is
the only political party in
Western Germany that is
not pan-European.
But this is almost all the
NPD have in common with
Hitler's Nazis. Apart from
not appreciating some of the
modern arts, which they call
decadent, and not liking
boys    wearing    long    hair.
Like the Hitler people, but
also like many Canadians,
they are against low morals
and sex in movies and on TV.
That means the NPD are
just babbitts. And a bit
, ridiculous.
Nevertheless everyone in
Germany is anxious to keep
them down, and to analyze
them.
This is because we don't
want nationalism in Germany again, not even as
little as in France, or many
other  countries.
During the past 50 to 100
years most of the established
democracies in the world
have had an extreme right
wing.
In Germany, however,
since the war we haven't
had any rightists at all.
Only now, with the NPD,
has the normal democratic
pattern come about.
That this happened more
or less suddenly is due to
the strongly increasing dissatisfaction with the governing coalition (Christian
Democrats and Free Democrats) which preceded the
dismissal of chancellor Er-
hard.
People who didn't want
the left-wing Social Democrats demonstrated their
dissatisfaction, by giving
their votes to the NPD.
Those who still are
afraid of Neo-Nazism in Germany should not believe irresponsible lies, but inform
themselves properly about
the program of the NPD
and compare it with the program the Nazis had from the
very beginning.
That's what we ask for in
this affair: to be judged
fairly, by good and honest
information.
JENS P. FOUCHS
&^%*
THE 1967 GRAD CLASS PRESENTS
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TICKETS $1.50 CPL ALUMNI OFFICE
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7:30 p.m.-THE NEW MORALITY in  TALK-BACK
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2. "THE NEW MORALITY AND WAR"-Dr.  John Conway
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Page  12
THE      UBYSSEY
Friday,   February  10,   1967 Friday, February  10,  1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 13
Seconders sound off
LARSEN
First, experience: Member
AMS finance and Brock management committees, AMS
housing co-ordinator and past
chairman, academic activities
committee.
Second, proposed projects:
AMS commission on off-campus housing (equality, zoning
by-laws, standardized rates).
Full AMS support for residence students (rules changes,
rate hike, activities).
AMS task force educate
and solicit public support for
higher education financing.
Transfer $70,000 AMS
share   of   athletic   budget   to
administration,  taking  strain
off AMS budget.
Academic student - faculty
review committees in all faculties.
Increased support for undergraduate society activities
and  publications.
DAPHNE KELGARD
MUNTON
Leadership and experience
are two essential qualities required of the first vice-president.
Don Munton has both of
these.
Two years as president of
Totem Park residence and
active   participation   in   resi
dence planning have brought
him into close contact with
the problems of the AMS.
Don Munton urges equalization grants receive top
priority.
He will personally act as
ombudsman for all students'
problems with the administration.
He supports a close examination of the present methods of financing residences.
He favors curriculum revision programs and the pub-
lication of undergraduate
anti-calendars.
For active leadership, I
urge you to vote Don Munton.
KEN HUTTON
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i^jpxzm?m>mimg^8^ Page 14
THE       UBYSSEY
Friday,   February   10,   1967
YALE'S  NEW PROGRAM ...
A  YEAR  OUTSIDE
They rough it abroad for credit
By CHARLOTTE HAIRE
NEW HAVEN, Conn. (UNS)—Yale university
students, sheltered by ivied walls and lost in the
anonymity of a multiversity, are finding a new
college program rewarding in terms of self-
knowledge.
The Junior Year Abroad Program, Yale's
pioneer five-year BA experiment is said by its
director to attempt to "interrupt the relentless
progression of courses and the increasingly inevitable thrust toward graduate school, with a
maturing experience that explores life beyond the
campus."
The first group of 11 Yale sophomores left
New Haven last summer to spend a year, not in
France or Italy studying for credit under auspices
of the college or overseas agency, but alone, in
Nigeria, Morocco, or India, working in jobs they
found themselves.
A report of their experiences midway through
their year abroad appeared in the current issue
of the Yale alumni magazine written by professor Prosser Gifford, director of the program.
The article said selection of candidates was
based on talent, resourcefulness, diversity in background and commitment.
They were made aware of the fact that they
woud have only themselves to depend on.
They seemed motivated, said Gifford "by a
desire to clarify their own goals away from the
competitive   environment of  a  highly  academic
college."
Although most of them expressed an interest
in public service for the future, "a clear desire to
serve others did not seem the primary objective.".
Gifford reports that none of the students regret
losing a year.
Announcing -the experiment, Yale president
Kingman Brewster Jr., said he hoped it would
attract "a considerable number of young people
who yearn to become involved in something more
meaningful than inherited patterns of success."
One student summed up the results of his
overseas experiences by saying:
"I'm now sensitive to the whole range of
human emotion from which I'm isolated at Yale."
CANADA:
Frosh exams pondered
WINNIPEG (CUP) — University of Manitoba freshmen
may have to write university entrance exams in 1968.
"The university, in cooperation with other Canadian universities, has been working out a nation-wide system of entrance exams," said Manitoba education minister George
Johnson.
Vice-president Dr. H. E. Duckworth suggested that if these
exams were introduced the importance of present matriculation
exams could well be reduced.
He added that he believed Ontario was reviewing the
necessity of grade 13 exams and might drop them in favor of
university entrance exams.
Walter Paschak, chairman of the Winnipeg school board,
thought the entrance exams might "weed out" potential first
year failures.
Expo fires youth PRO
MONTREAL, (CUP) — A student newspaperman who exposed discriminatory practices in hiring executive staff of the
Expo youth pavilion has been fired from Expo 67's youth advisory council.
Harvey Oberfield, a reporter at the Georgian, student
paper at Sir George Williams University, was approached last
year by the committee and offered the post of public information officer.
But when 13 of 14 executive staff members appointed
turned out to be French-Canadians, the reporter got off the
Expo bandwagon.
He then wrote a letter to a Montreal newspaper condemning this action as discriminatory, urging that action be taken
to rectify further paid appointments.
The matter was raised in the House of Commons, when
Robert Coates questioned trade minister Robert Winters as to
the validity of the letter.
Meanwhile, Oberfield received a letter from the youth
advisory committee informing him he had been sacked.
Technocrat demands down
TORONTO (CUP)—The demand for engineers, scientists and executives is down
almost 10 per cent from last year's record
high says the Technical Service Council,
a non-profit, industry-sponsored placement
service.
Independents crush old line
ST. JOHNS (CUP)—Established student
political parties have suffered an upset in
model parliament elections here.
At Memorial Universtiy, an independent
student party, the Pitcher Plant Party, won
23 of the 42 seats.
The Progressive Conservatives got eight
seats, the Liberals six and the NDP five.
McGill University's model parliament
convened Tuesday with a minority NDP
government holding 21 of the 61 seats.
The Liberals were next in the running
with 20 seats.
St. Mary's opts for CUS
HALIFAX (CUP)—The Canadian Union
of Students has received a vote of confidence as St. Mary's University voted to
remain within the national student organization.
Toronto president returns
TORONTO (CUP)—Tom Faulkner, council president at the University of Toronto,
has been elected by acclamation to an
unprecedented second term.
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Come in and see it — and the books!
Come   and   Discuss
"THE NEW
MORALITY"
in "Talk-Back"
at University Hill
United  Church
on  University Boulevard
SUNDAY NIGHTS AT 7:30 P.M.
Coffee and Discussion 8:30-9:30 p.m.
Feb. 12th—The New Morality ft WAR
Dr. John Conway,
Dept.   of   History   U.B.C.
Feb. 19th-The New Morality ft Sex
Rev.  Jim Taylor,
East Burnaby United
Church   Counsellor,
Pres.  of  B.C. Conference
Feb. 26rh-The   New   Morality   and
The Use of Drugs
Rev. Ted Kropp,
Chaplain, Matsqui Centre
for Drug Addiction
Mar. 5th—The New Morality and
Marriage and Divorce
Dr. Reg Wilson,
Union College of B.C.
Mar. 12th-The   New  Morality   and
Church ft Community life
Rev. Ted Nichols,
Exec. Sec  B.C. Conference
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lySiStrata
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ARISTOPHANES FARCICAL
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Matinee Feb. 23 at 12:30.   Student tickets 75c Everyone else $2.00
Book Early—Only 6 performances. Box office FW Theatre, Rm. 207. Ph. 228-2678 Friday,  February  10,  1967
THE      UBYSSEY
Page 15
— derrek webb photo
UNIDENTIFIED flying bodies, California stripes and UBC solids, grapple for the rugger
skin in a battle to. win the World Cup trophy. Berkeley boys broke through in the last
ten minutes of yesterday's game to whip UBC 11-6. It was the first of the two game
series which ends Saturday.
Cal closes opener
By Tony Hodge
The UBC rugby Thunderbirds lost a
heart breaker to University of California
yesterday.
With only ten minutes left to play, the
Birds were ahead 6-0. Dave Austin, on a
sequence which he began by beating his
man, scored a try and Doug Brazier kicked
a penalty kick.
Cal scorers were Jim Boyce, Don Guest,
all with tries, and ja convert, by Randy
Thaman. Boyce, an ex-Wallaby has scored
28 points in the last five games.
TJBC coach Brian Wightman, commenting on his team's play, said, "In the last ten
minutes we relaxed our tackling, allowed
them to get hold of the loose (balls, and we
did not follow anything up. We simply relaxed, and we lost."
But this is not the end for the Birds.
The series is a total point affair with the
second game going tomorrow in the stadium
at 2 p.m.
If the Birds were to play the calibre
of rugby that they used to win in Oregon,
they should win.
UBC skiers show stamina
in international circle
A series of warm-up races resulted in a
number of falls and disqualifications for
UBC skiers but also some promising results
and individual runs.
The runs were held at Kimberley, Crystal Mountain and the Du Maurier International against Canadian and U.S. national
teams as well as European competitors.
Best results were posted by Bob Calladine, placing 11th all-round and fourth
Canadian in the Du Maurier giant slalom,
and Elwood Peskett — 13th in the Silver
Skis slalom at Crystal;
Nine members of the team then left for
the 21st International Intercollegiate Ski
Meet at Banff. The team had problems with
poor wax, spills and injuries. UBC came a
disappointing fourth of the nine colleges.
Dave Turner had the best run, placing sixth
in the individual standings.
Despite being shorthanded, the team
skied to a second place finish in the slalom
with Peskett and Turner coming fifth and
seventh respectively. This left UBC in second place in the Alpine events with 185.6
points following the top-ranked Washington
squad who had earned 196.
The  first  Nordic  event  was the cross-
Mackie stars in
gymnast meet
The UBC gymnastics team made an
excellent showing against the University of Oregon in Eugene last weekend.
UBC pushed Oregon with 133.45
points to their opponent's 150.95.
Bill Mackie of UBC easily won the
all-round title, proving to be the best
gymnast at the meet, as well as among
the top ten in Canada.
UBC competes against Eastern
Washington in the War Memorial
Gymnasium at 2 p.m. Saturday.
country. Idaho won the team event with
UBC second due to the determination of Jan
Atting and Rolf Petterson. They ended third
and fourth individually, ahead of -the entire Washington team.
Going into the final jumping event, UBC
maintained second place. But the Norwegian
imports of both Idaho and Montana were
strong enough to edge UBC out of the tight
race.
Peskett and Turner placed fourth and
fifth in the Alpine combined, and Turner
was fourth in the four-event Skimeister.
The final results were: U. of Washington — 364.6 points; Montana State U. —
337.4; U. of Idaho — 337.2; UBC — 335.6.
Atting and Petterson then flew to the
North American Championships in Prince
George where they placed ninth and 12th
respectively against some of the top Scandinavians in the world.
Meanwhile Allan Vittery won the combined title in the B.C. Junior Championships at Kelowna.
Next races will be at the Enquist slalom
on Seymour in preparation for the PNW
Intercollegiate   Championships.
Intramurals
Zeta Psi fraternity racked up the fastest
total time in the intramural ski meet held
on Mt. Seymour, Feb. 5.
Its competitors finished in a sum of 167.5
seconds. The Engineers started their week
ahead of time placing second with a time
of 176.3.
In third place, chalking up 190.8, was
Forestry. Sciencemen followed with 195.3
to their credit.
The top four individual competitors in
the giant slalom race were Baker, 38.4
seconds; Peter Wood, 39.0; Al Verigin, 39.6;
and Eric Wood, 40.8.
VARSITY GRILL
CHINESE AND WESTERN CUISINE
ECONOMICAL STUDENT MEALS
FREE DELIVERY
Join the Crowd at
VARSITY   GRILL
Next to Varsity Theatre
CA 4-1822
CA 4-3944
4381  W. 10th Ave.
GETTING MARRIED? !
PLEASE  SEND   YOUR  LATEST   INVITATION !
SAMPLES AND PRICE LIST BY RETURN MAIL |
I
NAME      |
ADDRESS j
MR. ROY YACHT, Conwltont |
c      ™»CARD SHOP     i
Corner Robson and Burrard MU 4-4011    I
Ispinette placidly points
to for porteUin pig-
fapincrie, How wiles
from pabsvillG, teams
a sad lesson in Vie
reliability <f6o&
tnecfianical and
economic devices.
lapinette now fytows
tte security efnoney
in ttetontcandfer
own, personal ctieques.
U/diK hsaster strikes,
your fh'enUy 6anK is
a6 close as your ctejtte
focfr.ioAicAisa
proilemjbr Mis Hio...
-1/VNIV^
ike painless advertisement-
did we ever tell yew
the story of haw
lapiaefte came to
deal with, lie
camputfanf: in tlie
first place ?
well, once upon, a time,
lappy used fo -keep
.her cash, in a pig.iiow
tfiis pig vras, a
jorcelain-pig. you
fcnow tie type: kind
o£ acceptable in ait
aestHetic way, but not
overly active o-itkwse
one day, whilst- lappy
was -dS-agrsiclnrf a
chap -With, 3\er Honda,
She broke a sprocket'.
now, sprockets aa-ea't
kard to £and, J?ut lap
liad left hetr pig in
Iter pad.
ever try, to cash, a
one_rue dr awtv on, a
walkinxr to class,<3he
passed tlte c<mpu$£an(c.
Which was near the
campus, naturally.
why not ? she mused
3?efttttse4.1y.
whal service! fiow fondf
$hc was delighted.
:and lier very own
•pe&soxual chatting
account c-h-s^uefceok,?
bub even our bank,
can't Sunk/ of
everything-
Sfce .broke another.
sprocket- draj&racJiur
yesterday. °
hut her chequebook
was saf§ and sound
m the pig<
fanfc ofntonfreal
in tie. *AmZnieiratioti building Page 16
THE    UBYSSEY
Friday,   February   10,   1967
'TWEEN CLASSES
Indians plight probed
CUS
The Canadian Indian Youth
Symposium examines the Indian situation in Canada, today and Saturday, 9:30 to 5
p.m. in the Green Park Building (next to the school of social
work on N.W. Marine Drive.)
INTERNATIONALISTS
Open meeting on Student
Protest and Public opinion,
tonight, 8 p.m., Acadia residence women's lounge.
HAMSOC
Aquatic   instruction   with
Earl Rubin on field trip, today, noon, clubroom.
CONTEMPORARY
ARTS FESTIVAL
Daryl Hine reads his own
poetry, today, noon, Bu. 106.
Program of films by Michael
Snow and Joyce Wieland, today, 3:30, Bu. 106.
IH
Slide   show  and   dance,   tonight,   8   p.m.,  lower   lounge.
Bring slides and records.
ALLIANCE   FRANCIASE
Meeting with film Vancou-
ver-Ville de cent visages, today, noon, IH.
CONSERVATIVE  CLUB
Executive     meeting    today,
noon, Brock conference room.
NEWMAN  CENTRE
Schema 19 with the Tripp,
tonight, 9 p.m. to 1 a.m., Newman Lounge (St. Mark's), $1.00
per person, members 75 cents.
N.P.B. films, Sunday, Newman
lounge, 8 p.m., free
PSYCH CLUB
Dr. Signori speaks on UBC's
graduate    program,    today,
noon, Ang. 207.
EL CIRCULO
Film on Brazil, today, noon,
Bu. 204. Non-members ten
cents.
VCF
The film Books and Sloths,
today, noon, Bi. 2000.
DANCE CLUB
Free ski trip, members show
cards—others $2.00 Apply at
dance club office.
VOC
Sign lists for food and rides
for   mid-term   break  Whistler
trip in clubroom.
ALPHA OMEGA
Meeting    to    discuss    open
house   and    spring   activities,
Monday, noon, Bu. 223.
POLAND'S  MILLENIUM
Prof. B. Czaykowski speaks
on Postwar Polish Poets, Monday, noon, Bu. 100.
NISEI VARSITY CLUB
Valentine Dance with the
Bob Fraser Quartet, Saturday,
9 p.m. - 1 a.m., Hallmark Hall,
41 Ave. and Fraser, semi-formal, $3.75 per couple.
Law moot
goes to UBC
Two UBC law students won
the Western Canada moot
court competition at the University of Saskatchewan last
weekend.
Pete Berger, law 2, and
Amy Abramson, law 2, defeated University of Saskatchewan in the semi-finals and
University of Manitoba in the
finals.
The issue of contention was
the constitutional validity of
a provincial censorship statute.
The UBC victory was the
university's second win in
three years. Last year University  of Alberta won.
TIRED OF
INSTITUTIONAL
FOOD ? solution —
The  FRIAR Tuesday!
STALEMATED?
If you are, OPERATION CHECKMATE will arrange exciting
new dates for you. Literally thousands of students across
Canada have participated in CHECKMATE'S computer-
dating program. Long-range plans include computerized
dances, inter-municipal and inter-provincial dating for
people visiting other parts of Canada (e.g. Expo!), and
many more. Why not try it ?
For Brochures Distributed With
Today's   and   next   Tuesday's   UBYSSEY
BE SURE TO GET YOUR COPY
OPERATION CHECKMATE
If you can't find a brochure on campus, complete the coupon betow and
send  for one  todayl
OPERATION CHECKMATE
4601   W. 7th Ave.
Vancouver 8,  B.C.
Please send me your free brochure
NAME .
STREET
CITY
-. ZONE PROV.	
^oooooooooooooooooeooeooocoooooooooooooeoooooor1
PRE SOCIAL WORK
Norman Levi discusses Community and the Lawbreaker,
Monday, noon, Bu. 203.
EAST ASIA SOC
Correction — Clive Ainsley's
eye witness report on the Red
Guards will be Tuesday, noon,
Bu. 102. Admission 25 cents.
EUROPE $396?'
Unbelievable, but true!! This is return
fare and accommodation for 21 days.
Ideal if you have to work this summer,
but want a break for a few weeks.
Full details on request—limited space
only.
9-5 p.m., incl. Saturday       HH  £\ Km K IM     ^
Hagen's Travel Service Ltd.
736-5651
2996 W. Broadway
CLASSIFIED
Rates: 3 lines, 1 day, $.75—3 days, $2.00 Larger Ads on request,
Non-Commercial Classified Ads are payable in Advance
Classified Ads are not accepted by telephone
Publications Office: Brock Hall.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Lost & Found
11
WOULD PERSON WHO FOUND
H. Wood's wallet please drop It
in mail. I will pay postage.
Valentine Greetings
12
BE ORIGINAL—SAVE MAILING A
card. Send Valentine Greetings to
your friends with a Classified ad.
(Feb. 14). Make arrangements this
week in the Publications office,
Brock Hall. "Deadline Monday
11  a.m."
LOST GREEN RUBBER - LINED
book bag on path to Fort Camp
Beach. Reward. Lome, RE 3-
9544.
LOST: ENGLISH 200 NOTEBOOK
with whole year's notes in Buchanan, Wednesday afternon, Feb.
8. Name on it. Please call 435-
6294.
FOUND: IN EMA 101, SMALL
round locket watch. Claim at
Bu.   2260  or  phone  CA  4-0557.
FOUND: SUEDE JACKET IN
Woodward Library 2 weeks before Xmas. You have my new
one. Urgent. Phone Judy, 224-
9805,   Rm.   289.
LOST: SINCE CHRISTMAS Black
leather keycase, initialed F.C.L.
Phone Frank,  224-9020.
LOST: BROWN ATTACHE CASE,
Wed., 3.30, outside Brock Lounge
Contains important books, etc.
Reward,   phone   Dennis,   224-1438.
Coming Dances
12A
SLAVIC FROLIC FEB. 11, 8-1. I.H.
Dancing to the Bruce Fairburn
Quartet. Entertainment by the
"South Slavs". Single $1.50, Couple  ?2.50.
IT'S HAPPENING THIS WEEK-
end with the UEL, fantastic sensations, painted ship, and strobe
and light show), all at the afterthought.
Special Notices
13
JOX RECS & MICKEY MOUSERS.
P.E. Valentine's Dance—The Cardiac Thump, Fri. Feb. 10. $3.00 per
couple. Tickets at noon in the
gym.	
FINAL CLEARANCE AT THE
Campus Shoppe, 5732 University
Blvd. (in the village). Where
prices are always right. CA 8-8110.
SPANISH CLUB PRESENTS CUBA
Today. Bill James, CKLG News
Director, will give a talk on
Castro's Cuba Friday evening in
Bu. 204 8:30 slides.	
WHY PAY HIGH AUTO INSUR-
ance rates? If you are over 20 and
have a good driving history you
qualify for our good driving rates.
Phone Ted Elliott 224-6707.
GEOLOGY MUSEUM OPEN MON.-
Fri. 12:30-1:30 F.&G. 116 — come
and see our minerals and fossils.
SONG FEST 1967. FEB. 11 8:00
p.m. Q.E.T. "An Evening For
Everyone" Tickets — AMS, Common Blocks, Q.E.T., Eaton's —
downtown. Single $1.50. Couple
$2.75. _
500 GIRLS NEEDED MARCH 3 & 4.
BLEED   TODAY   AT   THE   ARMO-
ries.
JOSE GRECO—TWO EXCELLENT
seats at $3.25 each for tonight at
Q.E.     Phone   AL   266-2297.
Transportation
14
RIDE NEEDED FROM CAMBIE
12th area 9:30 Monday to Friday.
Call  874-9773.
RIDE WANTED FROM NORTH
Burnaby Monday to Friday. Convenient times. Phone Lloyd, 298-
1015.
RIDE FOR THREE WANTED TO
Frisco. Leaving Monday or Tues-
day.   Call   731-9334.	
GIRLS WANT RIDE TO KELOW-
na; midterm break. Share ex-
penses.  Ph.  224-9746 Rm. 469.
NEED RIDE TO WEST KOOTE-
nay on Feb. 15th or 16th. Please
phone   "Peter"  at  299-9859,
RIDERS WANTED FOR 8.30
Classes Monday to Friday, from
Richmond (Brighouse area) Call
277-9338.
Wanted
15
WANTED TO BUY SKI RACK
for sports car. Phone 274-9768
after seven.    Room 633.
Travel Opportunities
16
FOR SALE- A.M.S. CHARTER
Flight ticket one way Vancouver/
London, leaving May 11th. Phone
Cherry — 224-9731.
TAKE A DOUBLE TRIP AT THE
Afterthought this Friday and
Saturday! with U.E.D. painted
ship and fantastic sensations,
2114 West 4th Ave.
AUTOMOTIVE   &  MARINE
Automobiles For Sale 21
•53 CHEV — GOOD RELIABLE
transportation $75. Call Dick at
731-3881   or   224-9769.
1959 CHEV. SEDAN. NEW
brakes, clutch, battery, etc. Phone
AM 6-2527.
'59 RENAULT. GOOD CONDITION.
Extensive repairs, offers. Phone
DA   2-7469.
1962 TEMPEST. GOOD CONDI-
tion. Selling for my son who
needs money in Europe. Phone
261-8737.
1958 VOLKS, COMPLETELY NEW
Cost over $1200, selling for $595.
Call  John  Kennedy  at  224-9049.
Automobile Parts
21A
'61 FIAT SPYDER PARTS. NEW
top, clutch, tires trans., body
parts.  CY  9-4874.
Bodywork, Glass
23
Motorcycles
27
WANTED MO-PED OR SMALL
Motorcycle, cheap. Call Brian
MacKenzie at 733-6506 after 6:00
p.m.
BUSINESS SERVICES
Miscellaneous
34
GETTING ENGAGED: SAVE AT
least 501 percent on finest quality
diamond rings. Satisfaction guaranteed.  Call 261-6671 any time.
Scandals
39A
SONG FEST 1967. FEB. 11 8:00
p.m. Q.E.T. — "An Evening For
Everyone" Tickets — AMS, Common Blocks, Q.E.T.. Eaton's
downtown. Single $1.50. Couple
$2.75.	
COUNTRY JOE AND THE FISH
from San Francisco are coming!
to the Afterthought, Feb. 16, 17
and   18.
GOVERNOR GENERAL'S BALL
Directorate regrets announcing
the ahsense of Jimbo this year.
Tough   luck   King.
FOR A TOTAL ENVIRONMENT
Dance and the newest sounds,
book the Jabberwok. It loves
you? Phone John, CA 4-9073 or
Lindy,  CA 4-4555.
ATTENTION SKIERS—ARE other
Volkswagens passing yours? You
may need a tune-up ($4.50) now
at Auto Henneken Specialized
Volkswagen Service, Oak and
S.W.    Marine.      Phone   263-8121.
Sewing  &  Alterations 40
Typing
43
TYPING—FAST,    ACCURATE   EF-
ficient,   any   time.   224-5621.
Professional Typing
ARDALE   GRIFFITHS   LTD.
8584   Granville   St.
70th  &  Granville  St. 263-4530
FAST, ACCURATE THESES TYP-
ing. Electric typewriter. Fully
exp.   Inger  872-7380.
STUDENTS — TYPING DONE IN
my home. Essays, Thesis, etc.,
low rates. Phone 733-0734 any
time.
TYPING
ELECTRIC,    224-6129.
MANUSCRIPTS, ESSAYS, Thesis,
accurately typed, Electric machine. Phone 224-5'046 after 6
P.m.
EMPLOYMENT
Help Wanted
SI
WANTED: COUNSELLOR APFLI-
cations for Diabetic Summer
Camp, last two weeks, August.
(Especially Girls). Phone Mr. Russell,  325-3756.
MALE AND FEMALE SUMMER
Camp Counsellors. Committed
Christians with camping experience required for Salvation Army
Day and Resident Camps. July
and August, 1967. Apply to: Major
Bruce Halsey, M.S.W. Family Service Centre, 319 East Hastings
Street,  Vancouver 4, B.C.
LIFEGUARDS — HEAD GUARD
City of Kamloops refer to placement   office.
Music
63
FENDER DELUXE-REVERB AMP.
New $400. Sell $290. 3 mos. old.
TR 6-4200 after 6  p.m.
EXPERIENCED LEAD GUITAR
player wanted. Contact James,
224-6446   or   Mark,   224-3784.
Instruction-Tutoring
64
ALL FIRST AND SECOND YEAR
subjects by excellent tutors: Sciences and arts.  736-6923.
EXPERT TUTORING IN MATH,
Science, Engineering. $3/hr. Minimum 5 lessons. 876-1859.
Special Classes
65
Instruction Wanted
66
MISCELLANEOUS
FOR SALE
71
COMPLETE LINE OF UNPAINT-
ed furniture. Klassen's Used
Furniture Mart, 3207 W. Broadway.   RE  6-0712.
Beer   Bottle  Drive-in
at Rear of Store
FOR SALE: ADMIRAL 21" TV
Set. Good working condition, $45.
Phone   261-3808.
RENTALS  &  REAL ESTATE
Rooms
81
PRIVATE SLEEPING ROOM
wanted immediately. Must be
close to University. Phone John,
AL  3-6086.   Leave  a message.
TWO   MEN     SHARE     BEDROOM,
16   and   Burrard,   738-6283.
FURNISHED ROOM, LIGHT
cooking in a new quiet home
near  gates.     Phone   224-0477.
Room & Board
82
FOR CONVENIENCE, COMFORT,
and congeniality, stay at Zeta PSI
Fraternity, 2250 Wesbrook Cres.
Phone 224-9662 between 5:00 p.m.
and  7:00 p.m.	
TRAFFIC PROBLEMS? MOVE ON
campus and forget them! Room
and board. Feb. 1. 2280 Wesbrook.
224-9986.
DORM LIFE AT ITS BEST AT
the Zeta Beta Tau House; excellent   food,      lowest     rates     ($65)
Quiet   Frat   parties.     Phone   Jerry,
224-9660.
Furn. Houses and Apts.
83
GIRL WANTED TO SHARE
modern Kits, apartment. Call
Vicki,   731-1749.
Unfurn. Houses & Apts.
84
Real Estate
86
BUY - SELL - RENT
WITH
UBYSSEY
CLASSIFIED

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